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You Can Retire Early!: Everything You Need to Achieve Financial Independence When You Want It

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The definitive guide to financial independence that offers proven skills and realistic strategies you can use to retire early—and still have time to enjoy your golden years! Retiring early is not limited to lottery winners or the super rich. In fact, with proper planning, we can all retire at a younger age than we ever dreamed—but only if we know how. Personal finance exper The definitive guide to financial independence that offers proven skills and realistic strategies you can use to retire early—and still have time to enjoy your golden years! Retiring early is not limited to lottery winners or the super rich. In fact, with proper planning, we can all retire at a younger age than we ever dreamed—but only if we know how. Personal finance expert Deacon Hayes explains the practical, concrete steps you can take to start your retirement when you’re young enough to thoroughly enjoy it, including: -Developing a personalized retirement plan -Maximizing income -Understanding opportunity cost -Assessing and reducing debt -Selecting the right investment vehicles -Sticking to the plan With Hayes’s guidance, you can achieve financial independence and enjoy an active, happy retirement.


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The definitive guide to financial independence that offers proven skills and realistic strategies you can use to retire early—and still have time to enjoy your golden years! Retiring early is not limited to lottery winners or the super rich. In fact, with proper planning, we can all retire at a younger age than we ever dreamed—but only if we know how. Personal finance exper The definitive guide to financial independence that offers proven skills and realistic strategies you can use to retire early—and still have time to enjoy your golden years! Retiring early is not limited to lottery winners or the super rich. In fact, with proper planning, we can all retire at a younger age than we ever dreamed—but only if we know how. Personal finance expert Deacon Hayes explains the practical, concrete steps you can take to start your retirement when you’re young enough to thoroughly enjoy it, including: -Developing a personalized retirement plan -Maximizing income -Understanding opportunity cost -Assessing and reducing debt -Selecting the right investment vehicles -Sticking to the plan With Hayes’s guidance, you can achieve financial independence and enjoy an active, happy retirement.

30 review for You Can Retire Early!: Everything You Need to Achieve Financial Independence When You Want It

  1. 4 out of 5

    da AL

    You can retire early -- but what if as a result of all one's planning & squeezing of each & every last penny to try & do so, all facets of life continue to be gambles & one loses their $$ or dies early?... You can retire early -- but what if as a result of all one's planning & squeezing of each & every last penny to try & do so, all facets of life continue to be gambles & one loses their $$ or dies early?...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Very thorough. Not very compelling. 2.5 stars. It reads like 2 day old boiled chicken. Dry baby dry.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris Mcgowan

    (Audiobook Jan 2018) - A fairly solid financial book laying out the basics of saving. Save early, save often, keep saving and put those funds to work for you. Some interesting examples of what people did to boost savings and then invest in vehicles that replaced their "real job" incomes. With the rise of the side hustle economy if you can implement some of these concepts early (20's and 30's), then you truly can retire early with some sacrifice and delayed gratification. (Audiobook Jan 2018) - A fairly solid financial book laying out the basics of saving. Save early, save often, keep saving and put those funds to work for you. Some interesting examples of what people did to boost savings and then invest in vehicles that replaced their "real job" incomes. With the rise of the side hustle economy if you can implement some of these concepts early (20's and 30's), then you truly can retire early with some sacrifice and delayed gratification.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Reshmi Pillai

    Liked it. Gives detailed description on the 3 ways (Real estate, stock market and business) to fast track formal retirement by creating a savings bank. Informative! Though I have mention here that the author talks from the context of american markets, if you are leverage it to your geographical markets, it is a good read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    More like what to do in your 20’s so you can retire early. Save every penny, spend little, start your own business. When you are ready to retire think about moving to another country with a low cost of living.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily Mozzone

    This book honestly answered every question I had about an early retirement, and solidified itself as one of my favorite books that I'll visit again and again. The best part is that the intended audience is people between the ages of 20-35, while most other retirement books are written for older folks. Perhaps the information in this book is a bit basic as other reviewers said, but there's no magic, secret trick to saving and accumulating money. Anyone who tells you there's some big secret or get This book honestly answered every question I had about an early retirement, and solidified itself as one of my favorite books that I'll visit again and again. The best part is that the intended audience is people between the ages of 20-35, while most other retirement books are written for older folks. Perhaps the information in this book is a bit basic as other reviewers said, but there's no magic, secret trick to saving and accumulating money. Anyone who tells you there's some big secret or get rich quick scheme is probably lying. The tone of this book is quite casual which I really appreciated, and doesn't have too many complicated equations or long drawn out case studies. Everything is simply written and easy to understand. I highly recommend this book to anyone just starting out in their early retirement planning.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tia

    Well laid out info, but way too basic for most people who are interested in retiring early and likely have the majority of this knowledge already. Mentioning budgeting and investing as an option to people who are already budgeting and investing isn't very helpful - would have loved to see more down and dirty details on opening a brokerage account, buying real estate, how to maximize these investments, etc. Well laid out info, but way too basic for most people who are interested in retiring early and likely have the majority of this knowledge already. Mentioning budgeting and investing as an option to people who are already budgeting and investing isn't very helpful - would have loved to see more down and dirty details on opening a brokerage account, buying real estate, how to maximize these investments, etc.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Cova

    If I was 20 or 30 years younger, this would be a great read, but the subtitle of this book should probably be "if you are young and start now...". So to my younger friends and family - get this book (or borrow it from me). For me, not much relevant info... If I was 20 or 30 years younger, this would be a great read, but the subtitle of this book should probably be "if you are young and start now...". So to my younger friends and family - get this book (or borrow it from me). For me, not much relevant info...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Arriola

    Too late

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chuy Ruiz

    Solid introduction into the FIRE (Financial Independence, Retire Early) movement. If you're already familiar with it, it might sound a bit repetitive. Solid introduction into the FIRE (Financial Independence, Retire Early) movement. If you're already familiar with it, it might sound a bit repetitive.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    On my way! I wish he had spoken about purpose more.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karla Huebner

    As most of my working life prior to going into academia was spent at and near minimum wage, it has generally been my assumption that I'll have to keep teaching until about the time Social Security deems my Full Retirement Age. Still, one can dream... and with my current decent-paying job I sock away as much money as possible. So, of late I've been pondering whether it might be possible to retire before I hit that governmental benchmark date. This is a decent, clearly presented book on its topic, As most of my working life prior to going into academia was spent at and near minimum wage, it has generally been my assumption that I'll have to keep teaching until about the time Social Security deems my Full Retirement Age. Still, one can dream... and with my current decent-paying job I sock away as much money as possible. So, of late I've been pondering whether it might be possible to retire before I hit that governmental benchmark date. This is a decent, clearly presented book on its topic, directed mainly at people who are much younger than I am. It's not a particularly exciting book, but it's informative, especially for people who don't know much about money--which seems to be a large segment of the American public. I wouldn't say that I got any bright new ideas from it, but it did confirm that I'm doing overall the right things to ensure a properly funded retirement. Some things it suggested, none of which I plan to do, include taking a second job for awhile, giving up buying coffee at cafes, and starting a side business. These aren't bad options, they're just not things I choose to do (although if I make any money on my books, that will be self-employment income, so sort of like starting a side business, just not one that generates reliable income). Investing in real estate was another suggestion; I probably won't do that either, but wouldn't rule it out. The advice I am already taking involves putting both pre- and post-tax income into retirement accounts and investments. I have a 15-year mortgage rather than 30-year, and I pay off my credit card each month. Also, of course, I don't buy new cars, have cable, go to lots of expensive restaurants, make any attempt to keep up with the Joneses (whoever they might be), etc. The thing books like this one leave out is that people who are genuinely struggling financially (do not have a job with benefits, or a spouse with one, versus just not handling their money wisely) are mostly not in a position to follow advice that will benefit those of us who are in a better position to start with. Sure, it's possible for a very thrifty low-income single person living in a low-cost-of-living area to save money, but such people are not the norm; usually someone in that position experiences setbacks that devour the savings, such as job loss, car trouble, or illness.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    nonfiction; personal finance / early retirement I skimmed through this--it has lots of examples to inspire more people to spend less and save more, and a little information about how to invest their savings and a little about how much you'll need to save before you can retire. I might suggest reading Your Money or Your Life instead because in addition, it provides more info about supplemental income you might tap into in your senior years, and other ways you might plan for that (besides "end of l nonfiction; personal finance / early retirement I skimmed through this--it has lots of examples to inspire more people to spend less and save more, and a little information about how to invest their savings and a little about how much you'll need to save before you can retire. I might suggest reading Your Money or Your Life instead because in addition, it provides more info about supplemental income you might tap into in your senior years, and other ways you might plan for that (besides "end of life care" insurance). According to the model used by this author (and others in the "FIRE" movement), you'll want to save 25x of your annual expenses, making sure that a significant portion provides dividends that you'll use for income, and also that you should plan for a 3.5% withdrawal rate per year (more conservative than the usual 4%). This model still seems rather simplistic to me (shouldn't we also consider how many years you'll live and be depending on this retirement nest egg?) so I suspect all the FIRE proponents don't want to scare average folks with lots of math. So read all of these with a grain of salt, and balance it with insight from more traditional, conservative sources too.

  14. 4 out of 5

    P

    Planning and Courage!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eric Reidsma

    Vague at best

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tara Choate

    Basic investment information. Not worth it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jackson

    Imagine the most boring guy you've ever met paraphrasing 6 months of Dave Ramsey podcasts. Congratulations. You've just read this book and saved $15. Imagine the most boring guy you've ever met paraphrasing 6 months of Dave Ramsey podcasts. Congratulations. You've just read this book and saved $15.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    Too little too late. I am at retirement age and I think there are better books out there to learn about saving.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

  20. 4 out of 5

    Eternaldissident

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matt Gooding

  22. 4 out of 5

    Phillip

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Gore

  25. 4 out of 5

    T'Rell

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh Davis

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura Shelton

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bridgette

  29. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Heitner

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

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