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Nancy's Mysterious Letter

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Nancy receives a letter informing her that she is heir to a fortune. This story tells of her search for another Nancy Drew.


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Nancy receives a letter informing her that she is heir to a fortune. This story tells of her search for another Nancy Drew.

30 review for Nancy's Mysterious Letter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    One thing you can always count on when reading a Nancy Drew mystery is an original story line. I think that may be part of what made them so exciting when I was younger. Besides learning about the various crimes and scams, I got to learn about things that weren’t part of my world. Things like sailor lingo, or the fact that there are postal inspectors, and even a bit of Shakespeare. This particular mystery was a bit weak. It started out alright but sort of dissolved into a chase to track down the One thing you can always count on when reading a Nancy Drew mystery is an original story line. I think that may be part of what made them so exciting when I was younger. Besides learning about the various crimes and scams, I got to learn about things that weren’t part of my world. Things like sailor lingo, or the fact that there are postal inspectors, and even a bit of Shakespeare. This particular mystery was a bit weak. It started out alright but sort of dissolved into a chase to track down the culprit and the elusive other Nancy Drew. The culprit is known from the beginning, so there is no suspense there. Additionally, so much of the story is contrived; it really is just filler and adds nothing to the story. The author tried to work in suspenseful and seemingly related happenings but wasn’t quite successful in creating scenes that fit naturally within the story. There were a few scenes that weren’t realistic at all such as one where the girls are in the convertible and it is noted that Nancy had put the top up earlier as the day appeared cloudy and raw. It is November, it starts to snow in the same scene, yet Nancy had been riding around with the top down the day before? I live in Wisconsin, and no one is driving their convertible with the top down in November, ever. It’s much too cold, and usually windy, for that. River Heights is supposedly in Illinois and it’s not that much warmer there. We do learn more about Ned in this book, and we see how he is the embodiment of the all-American football star. There’s even a chapter or two detailing his winning kick in the big game. Also notable is that Ned and Nancy’s relationship has certainly taken off since Nancy only started dating him in the last book. We’re introduced to Burt and Dave, George and Bess’s respective dates, and we will see them again in future mysteries. This was an original idea that wasn’t quite enough for a full plot. It needed more elements to really flesh it out into a mystery; more suspects, less filler, more exciting clues. Overall, as part of the series it’s an okay read with a weak mystery.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Since so many of the ND books are written by committee, I'm betting this one was a man. . . .there's a male perspective I haven't sensed til this one, #8. And there was a lot of Ned, dances and "getting ready" for dances and dates. I kinda like it better when she is just doing that because it is part of Nancy being Nancy. And. . . still concerned at how absent Dad Drew is . . . .he's there but whenever they are together for a minute, he gets called away. Anyway! Off to #9, twisted candles are inv Since so many of the ND books are written by committee, I'm betting this one was a man. . . .there's a male perspective I haven't sensed til this one, #8. And there was a lot of Ned, dances and "getting ready" for dances and dates. I kinda like it better when she is just doing that because it is part of Nancy being Nancy. And. . . still concerned at how absent Dad Drew is . . . .he's there but whenever they are together for a minute, he gets called away. Anyway! Off to #9, twisted candles are involved, and it's October, so Halloween will be in the wings, maybe?

  3. 5 out of 5

    C.

    After having a few "Nancy Drew" novels as a youngster, it is fun to read all of them in order. I discovered a great essay about the Stratemeyer family and know writers were employed to expand story ideas. The original author, Mildred A. Wirt, had more leeway when Edward was alive than when his brave daughter, Harriet took over. In the 1950s, Harriet received enough complaints about impropriety to undertake rewriting the suite; sometimes in imbalanced chunks. My yellow hardcovers are the rewrites After having a few "Nancy Drew" novels as a youngster, it is fun to read all of them in order. I discovered a great essay about the Stratemeyer family and know writers were employed to expand story ideas. The original author, Mildred A. Wirt, had more leeway when Edward was alive than when his brave daughter, Harriet took over. In the 1950s, Harriet received enough complaints about impropriety to undertake rewriting the suite; sometimes in imbalanced chunks. My yellow hardcovers are the rewrites, whereas my Mom's generation would know Nancy's spunkier portrayals. Melanie Rehak's essay is worth reading to understand the marvel Mildred was. A remuneration conflict resulted in a Walter Karig penning this novel! I hope the subsequent two he did are better than this. No wonder "Nancy's Mysterious Letter" is one of the weakest. However one fault is a spoiler synopsis at the Goodreads website! It told how the novel would go! My careful summary is that this mystery derives from a stolen mailbag. The approach was silly right away. No one would take a mailbag from a house, instead of in public. Worse, Nancy knew there was an international letter for her but dillydallied to read it. Her Dad places European phone calls to learn the contents of the letter, from the sender that they were able to ascertain. The mystery would have been just fine, had Nancy read the letter and pursued its puzzle directly. Superfluous drama was a turnoff. This only needed to be a mission to locate someone. However I admired that Nancy, Bess, George, and Carson did do a lot of real legwork. I look forward to quests and outcomes that are far more atmospheric than this one was. Old houses and treasure chests make more exciting subjects than a greedy bloke.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Teen sleuth Nancy Drew confronts two mysteries, both related to the mail, in this eighth entry in the series devoted to her ongoing adventures. Her regular mailman, Mr. Ira Dixon, was due to retire from the Postal Service with a thirty-five year, unblemished record. Coming into a modest inheritance, the kindly old man who had been Nancy's friend since she was a little girl, planned to retire. Then, on one of his last days of work, his mailbag was stolen, bringing him into disgrace. Feeling respo Teen sleuth Nancy Drew confronts two mysteries, both related to the mail, in this eighth entry in the series devoted to her ongoing adventures. Her regular mailman, Mr. Ira Dixon, was due to retire from the Postal Service with a thirty-five year, unblemished record. Coming into a modest inheritance, the kindly old man who had been Nancy's friend since she was a little girl, planned to retire. Then, on one of his last days of work, his mailbag was stolen, bringing him into disgrace. Feeling responsible, as the bag was stolen when Nancy invited Mr. Dixon inside for a cup of cocoa, Nancy decided to investigate. Her suspicions were aroused when she learned that the mailman's younger half-brother, a "wild boy," had been demanding half of Mr. Dixon's inheritance, even though he was not entitled to it. As she got involved in this situation, Nancy also found herself searching for another Nancy Drew, an English Nancy Drew living in America, whose letter had been mistakenly delivered to her - Nancy Drew, the sleuth. While investigating the mystery of the stolen mail pouch and attempting to track down the other Nancy Drew, our heroine also traveled to nearby Emerson College, where her friend Ned Nickerson was to play in the big annual football game against the state college... Published in 1932, Nancy's Mysterious Letter was the first of the Nancy Drew books not ghost-written by Mildred Wirt Benson, who authored books 1-7, 11-25 and 30 in the series, and who is considered the true creator of the character. Books 8-10 of the series were written by a man named Walter Karig, and although it is not glaringly obvious that a new author is at the helm, there are some clues to that effect. Chief amongst them is the prominent role played by the football game, in the story. Karig's detailed description of the game reminded me of boys' sports-fiction authors of the 1920s and 30s, including such writers as Earl Reed Silvers (of whose books, I have read a number). While Nancy is described in previous entries in the series as an accomplished sportswoman, particularly in those episodes occurring at camp, or requiring physical nerve, here the details of football are a bit beyond her feminine mind, and the author depicts all of the women heading back to the comfortable hotel after the game, rather than staying for the rowdy post-game celebrations. This is perhaps true to the time, in terms of gendered social conventions, but it struck me as out of keeping with the tone of earlier volumes, in which Nancy is game for anything. Leaving that aside, traveling to Emerson itself is central to the plot, as Nancy solves both of her mysteries in that locale. I did enjoy this entry in the series, despite the consciousness of there being a new author, and a slightly different tone - Nancy is more reliant on Ned Nickerson and his father, in this volume, than she seems to have been on other figures, in previous books - and I appreciated the fact that we meet Helen Corning again, however briefly. I read the Applewood Books reprint of the original version - the Nancy Drew books were revised and condensed in the 1950s and 60s - and, as always, I appreciated the many period details. There were one or two unpleasant moments where black porters spoke in the broken dialect assigned to such characters in so many vintage children's books of the era, but these were thankfully very brief. In thinking about why I prefer these original versions to the updated, sanitized ones from a few decades later, despite the far more objectionable social content, I always come back to their more accomplished writing, and to the "period details." Of course, the 1950s are now quite removed from us today, historically speaking, but somehow they don't seem as historical as the 1920s and 30s. I was reminded of this feeling, reading Jane Smiley's introduction to this edition, in which she writes: "Reading Nancy Drew, as many grown women can attest, can lead in strange ways to adult careers. For me, I think it was those strange words like "roadster" and "sleuth" that made me want to make words and stories my life. These Nancy Drew reprints from the thirties aren't as familiar or easy for girls today as later rewrites and 'The Nancy Drew Files,' but their very strangeness gives girls something that I don't think they should miss." Exactly! What a lovely way of encapsulating the appeal and importance of these original Nancy Drew books, and of vintage children's books in general! Recommended to anyone who has read and enjoyed previous entries in the series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark Baker

    Nancy Drew has received a letter from a law firm in London. They are trying to track down a Nancy Drew who has become an heiress in England. Obviously, she isn’t the intended recipient, but she sets out to find the woman with the same name. Meanwhile, she’s also trying to track down a mail thief who hit very close to home. Can she solve both cases? With some of the other Nancy Drew books I’ve reread as an adult, I’ve complained about too many coincidences in the plot. That’s not the case here. Na Nancy Drew has received a letter from a law firm in London. They are trying to track down a Nancy Drew who has become an heiress in England. Obviously, she isn’t the intended recipient, but she sets out to find the woman with the same name. Meanwhile, she’s also trying to track down a mail thief who hit very close to home. Can she solve both cases? With some of the other Nancy Drew books I’ve reread as an adult, I’ve complained about too many coincidences in the plot. That’s not the case here. Nancy may jump to a few wild but correct conclusions, but by the time we reach the end, everything has come together logically. Along the way, we get some great twists and turns that are tons of fun. The characters remain thin and there are a few dated references, but overall, this is a book that will keep the intended audience, middle graders, turning pages as quickly as they can to figure out exactly what is going on. Read my full review at Carstairs Considers.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessaka

    This could have been a fun read, even exciting except that the person doing the outline of the book didn’t give one that was adventurous enough, and hey, there were no haunted bridges, no haunted houses, and no scary places; in fact, there was no action. It started out being a good book with the mailman stopping by Nancy Drew’s house, and after telling her that he was retiring, she invited him in for hot chocolate. When he got up to leave, he found that the mailbag that he had left on the front p This could have been a fun read, even exciting except that the person doing the outline of the book didn’t give one that was adventurous enough, and hey, there were no haunted bridges, no haunted houses, and no scary places; in fact, there was no action. It started out being a good book with the mailman stopping by Nancy Drew’s house, and after telling her that he was retiring, she invited him in for hot chocolate. When he got up to leave, he found that the mailbag that he had left on the front porch had been stolen, letters and all. Now he is worried about losing his pension, but he does lose his job. But Nancy will find it and the letters, this we know because she is a great detective. In finding them, nothing happens. I remember her and Ned going to a football game, and I think he was playing. I know she had good money coming in from her dad to buy her either a fur coat for the year or clothing, and she chose clothing. My grandmother had a fur coat, and my mother said that they kept you cool in the summer. I doubt that seriously. I once had a rabbit fur jacket and wore it on Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley in the 70s, and a woman walked up to me, stopped and said, “Your coat offends me!!!!” She was a rabid person after my rabbit jacket. I had to ditch her by running into a store. And now fur offends me, but not because of her. And that was more adventureous than the story in this book. So in this do nothing book, I stopped short of finding out if the mailman gets his job back, but we know he does or at least gets his pension, and he did have an estate given to him, so he was going to spend his twilight years raising guinea pigs or hamsters, one of those. Notes: 1932 edition Who wrote this book? It wasn’t Mildred Wirt Benson, my favorite writer of this series because she refused to write it and the next two in the series, Twisted Candles and Larkspur Lane. I remember Larkspur Lane being good. But who wrote the outline? Walter Karig wrote the book, and Edna Squier wrote the outline for this book, after that the next two were outlined by Harriet S. Adams but Walter Karig wrote them. Did Edna get fired from doing such a bad job like the postman had, and did Nancy Drew help her out? No, because her sister Harriet was the supervisor over this series, and she wrote most of the outlines, but her sister helped outline many more. Harriet’s sister had no sense of adventure. I would have given her the job of janitor. Its just that without a good outline where else can you go but down the ladder. Reread: February 21, 2018

  7. 4 out of 5

    vic (indefinite hiatus)

    i'm extremely extremely busy these days which is why i haven't been on goodreads as much for the past few days but RTC i promise i'm extremely extremely busy these days which is why i haven't been on goodreads as much for the past few days but RTC i promise

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Tobiya

    I have most of the Nancy Drew books, and all the edition types too (from 1930's onward), and I have to say my original unrevised editions are the best. They are more detailed, and fit more to the time period Nancy is originally from. It also gets annoying how the stories can get completely different for the editions (for example The Secret at Shadow Ranch was changed to The Secret of Shadow Ranch, and the mysteries are completely different). I know this might sound messed up of me, but one of th I have most of the Nancy Drew books, and all the edition types too (from 1930's onward), and I have to say my original unrevised editions are the best. They are more detailed, and fit more to the time period Nancy is originally from. It also gets annoying how the stories can get completely different for the editions (for example The Secret at Shadow Ranch was changed to The Secret of Shadow Ranch, and the mysteries are completely different). I know this might sound messed up of me, but one of the things I liked in this mystery, is how much Nancy got scolded for being spoiled, lazy and "modern" which showed a lot of how sexist the times were back then. Also it's good the original books mentioned the "colored" maid and janitor and stuff, not that I like that it was racist, but again, it shows true to the times...and their dialogue of the maid and janitor sounded exactly like how the characters of Their Eyes Were Watching God..it gave me weird de ja vu about that book lol :p Also, I think in the modern edition Nancy gets chloroformed or something? Nothing that exciting happened here, but it was still good anyways :]

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    May 2017 Reread I loved this book this time around. I listened to it in audio and found the story interesting and fun. I loved how Nancy was on the hunt for the other Nancy Drew and man was it hard to track her down! Lol! Great read. ** This was a good mystery. I enjoyed the hunt for another Nancy Drew and found that part very interesting. A nice read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Mail fraud and mistaken identities! Meek elderly mail carrier has a mean, no-good brother who convinces single ladies to mail money to him. Meanwhile, Nancy and her gal pals visit Ned's college to watch him play footballs. The girls cheer "lustily" and yell things that make no sense like "Eeeeh! Yeeeeh!" Meanwhile, Ned faints on the field and is taken to the bench. Weekend plans for the girls and their football guys include a play on Friday night, the game and a dance on Saturday, and a chapel serv Mail fraud and mistaken identities! Meek elderly mail carrier has a mean, no-good brother who convinces single ladies to mail money to him. Meanwhile, Nancy and her gal pals visit Ned's college to watch him play footballs. The girls cheer "lustily" and yell things that make no sense like "Eeeeh! Yeeeeh!" Meanwhile, Ned faints on the field and is taken to the bench. Weekend plans for the girls and their football guys include a play on Friday night, the game and a dance on Saturday, and a chapel service on Sunday morning. If anything gets more wholesome, I'm gonna throw up. And yet again, Nancy Drew meets another lady named Nancy Drew and some inheritance confusion occurs. This was a messy one.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ami

    This was a very fascinating book

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Samuelson (BookAddict30)

    Read in 2008

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jaret

    What a fun walk down memory lane! I loved the Nancy Drew mystery series when I was younger and I find I still do. The characters are as fun as I remember them. Plus Carolyn Keene does not hold back on the mystery and suspense just because Nancy is a teenager. There were quite a few attempts on Nancy's life to prevent her from solving the mystery. All of this with the backdrop of visiting her boyfriend Ned's college campus, going to a football game, and a formal dance. Classic Nancy Drew fun... What a fun walk down memory lane! I loved the Nancy Drew mystery series when I was younger and I find I still do. The characters are as fun as I remember them. Plus Carolyn Keene does not hold back on the mystery and suspense just because Nancy is a teenager. There were quite a few attempts on Nancy's life to prevent her from solving the mystery. All of this with the backdrop of visiting her boyfriend Ned's college campus, going to a football game, and a formal dance. Classic Nancy Drew fun...

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Not the typical Nancy Drew story, but it was great fun as she tries to find the heiress with the identical name.

  15. 5 out of 5

    ruth stewart

    I love this book! Can't wait to read the next one! I love this book! Can't wait to read the next one!

  16. 4 out of 5

    PS

    A trip down memory lane.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Debalina

    Revisiting my favourite childhood sleuth over the past weekends has been going really well. This Saturday it was Nancy's Mysterious Letter, and I instinctively knew that the writer wasn't Mildred Benson, my favourite Carolyn Keene(! :D). It was Walter Karig, and although he is good I would give him 0.5 star less(Sorry!). I felt sometimes he overdid the simplicity, especially while describing sailor Joe. That was too stereotypical, maybe even for 1930s(Or so I think, but maybe I am wrong!). I don Revisiting my favourite childhood sleuth over the past weekends has been going really well. This Saturday it was Nancy's Mysterious Letter, and I instinctively knew that the writer wasn't Mildred Benson, my favourite Carolyn Keene(! :D). It was Walter Karig, and although he is good I would give him 0.5 star less(Sorry!). I felt sometimes he overdid the simplicity, especially while describing sailor Joe. That was too stereotypical, maybe even for 1930s(Or so I think, but maybe I am wrong!). I don't know if this criticism makes sense here. In Nancy Drew's world the people, even the traitors are nice especially if written by Benson, and pleasantly, and ironically so, Karig makes them a little bit more evil which is more realistic and fun for the rush. Although the plots have loopholes and even more than Benson's world of River Heights, there are more fortunate series of event which almost always help Nancy, but I love that world, and have been in love with it since I was way younger. So, it was really a pleasant walk down the memory lane, and hopefully I will finish revisiting the first, and as per my opinion, original, set of books this year. Happy reading! :)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katherine "Kj" Joslin

    Book 8 :)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    4.5 stars & 5/10 hearts. I enjoyed this story! It was fun to see Nancy interacting with a little boy. The plot was interesting and quite unusual. It was fun to meet George's & Bess's "guys" too. :D 4.5 stars & 5/10 hearts. I enjoyed this story! It was fun to see Nancy interacting with a little boy. The plot was interesting and quite unusual. It was fun to meet George's & Bess's "guys" too. :D

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    Oh Nancy. I do not know how you survived to have as many Nancy Drew stories as you had! Seriously girl, you put yourself in such ridiculously dangerous situations with no thought to the fact that something bad could happen to you. For some incredibly lucky reason, you always survive without much more than a scratch, and you always catch the bad guy in the end, but you don't seem to realize how dangerous the world really is to young women. In this book Nancy allows herself to gullibly and blindly Oh Nancy. I do not know how you survived to have as many Nancy Drew stories as you had! Seriously girl, you put yourself in such ridiculously dangerous situations with no thought to the fact that something bad could happen to you. For some incredibly lucky reason, you always survive without much more than a scratch, and you always catch the bad guy in the end, but you don't seem to realize how dangerous the world really is to young women. In this book Nancy allows herself to gullibly and blindly be led into a "powder room", and then be led around to a back corner, where this happens: "The next instant the strange woman opened her purse and whipped out a handkerchief from a plastic bag. She grabbed Nancy around the neck and held the handkerchief tight over the girl's nose and mouth. It had a peculiar sickish odor. Nancy struggled to free herself, but within seconds she blacked out." Yes, this how the second to the last chapter of the book ends! Come on Nancy! Seriously. Are you trying to get yourself raped, mugged, or killed. Because this is an old kids story, of course your friends find you in chapter 20 in the powder room nursery "lying under a crib, covered with a blanket". COVERED WITH A BLANKET! The bad guy (actually one of the bad guy's woman accomplices) had gently placed you under a crib and covered you with a blanket! Must have had a moment of guilt over what she had just done. If this had been the bad guy that you so gullibly let do this to you, your friends would have found you in a corner, stripped naked, raped, and possibly strangled! Wake up Nancy! Take some self defense classes or something! This woman had to take her drug covered rag out of a plastic bag. You didn't notice her doing this?! Pay attention to your surrounding! Fight back! Hold you breath when she grabs you and fight. Fight with all your might! Kick her, knee her, throw an elbow,, throw your head back and break her nose. Anything! Okay. I will stop now. Yes, I realize this is an old fictional kids story in a series. I just really would like to see Nancy get a little more smart and aware of her surroundings. I am not sure her innocent gullibility is a good message for young girls. Maybe this series needs an upgrade. Nancy takes self defense. Nancy assumes the worst from strangers, not just the best. Nancy pays attention to her surroundings instead of just living in her head thinking about her latest "mystery".

  21. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    So I actually really like Walter Karig’s additions to the series (Minus Twisted Candles, that is definitely the worst Nancy Drew book!). This book was a page turner, and hard to put down. Probably because of the cliffhangers at the end of every chapter! I think while I was in it, I really enjoyed this book, but now looking back after ending it, it has a lot of flaws. We know right away who the villain is, so that is no mystery in the whole book. Pretty much the book is Nancy trying to find the o So I actually really like Walter Karig’s additions to the series (Minus Twisted Candles, that is definitely the worst Nancy Drew book!). This book was a page turner, and hard to put down. Probably because of the cliffhangers at the end of every chapter! I think while I was in it, I really enjoyed this book, but now looking back after ending it, it has a lot of flaws. We know right away who the villain is, so that is no mystery in the whole book. Pretty much the book is Nancy trying to find the other Nancy. There are some mild danger scenes but honestly not really serious. The villain is stupid to book a fight under his name, leave an emergency address with his brother, and drive a recognizable car. I like how Nancy is helping people (the other Nancy and Ira the mailman). I think this is a good “action-ish” book but there really isn’t any mystery past 1/4 through the book. Karig’s additions to the series are some of my favorites because they’re different. This is an ok book, Twisted Candles was horrid, but Larkspur Lane was really really good. I think if he would be the one writing the rest of the books, they definitely wouldn’t be as good as Mildred Wirt’s, but honestly he’s probably my second favorite author. I think he probably improved through his 3 books and I do wish he wrote more. I’ll be missing him as we continue the series!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Betsey Manzoni

    Mystery #8 in which we learn that Nancy is a very skilled parallel parker! This was one of my least favorite Nancy Drew mysteries. Seems they may have been short on ideas and must have had a looming deadline. This is a lackluster story that hardly puts our pal Nancy in danger at all. She gets a rock thrown at her head and she is almost run over by a car. That's nothing compared to the dangerous scenarios she has landed herself in in the past. At any rate, the very polite Nancy invites the mailma Mystery #8 in which we learn that Nancy is a very skilled parallel parker! This was one of my least favorite Nancy Drew mysteries. Seems they may have been short on ideas and must have had a looming deadline. This is a lackluster story that hardly puts our pal Nancy in danger at all. She gets a rock thrown at her head and she is almost run over by a car. That's nothing compared to the dangerous scenarios she has landed herself in in the past. At any rate, the very polite Nancy invites the mailman in on a wintery day for some hot chocolate and he leaves his mailbag in her foyer. Much to their dismay, they discover it has been stolen along with all of it's contents. We discover that one of the letters inside was a letter for Nancy Drew, informing her of a large inheritance from a British relative. Alas, it's not for our Nancy, but for ANOTHER Nancy Drew, who just happens be in the River Heights area directing a Shakespearean play. Nancy promptly puts on her sleuthing hat and solves the mystery. She doesn't do this though, until the last 3 pages of the book and it's a very ho-hum, anti-climatic ending. Rather odd, since I felt the stories were steadily improving. I suppose you can't win them all.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Connie N.

    #8 in the Nancy Drew series, so this was a very early one, written in 1932. It's always fun to read through one of these books. At the time I first read it (at around age 10 maybe?), I remember enjoying this series very much. It was simple and straightforward, with a clear and understandable mystery, and just enough excitement to be interesting but nothing scary. As an adult, it's amusing to read about Nancy calling up the police chief and giving him clues to solve his cases--and he was very rec #8 in the Nancy Drew series, so this was a very early one, written in 1932. It's always fun to read through one of these books. At the time I first read it (at around age 10 maybe?), I remember enjoying this series very much. It was simple and straightforward, with a clear and understandable mystery, and just enough excitement to be interesting but nothing scary. As an adult, it's amusing to read about Nancy calling up the police chief and giving him clues to solve his cases--and he was very receptive! And she calls the postal inspector about mail that was stolen, worrying about whether or not she'd be arrested for having the mailbag at her house when it went missing. Keeping in mind that this was written for children in the 1930's, it's innocent and pleasant and entertaining, and a quick read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    When Nancy's mail carrier's mail is stolen the sleuth sets out to track down the culprit. It's a straightforward case of stolen mail, right? Wrong! A letter addressed to Nancy Drew was stolen alongside the others. But Nancy soon learns the letter was meant for someone else. Could there possibly be TWO Nancy Drews?! A mysterious letter, a swindling crook, and danger await. The regular crew of Nancy's family & friends watch in awe as, yet again, Nancy puzzles through another mystery to save the day When Nancy's mail carrier's mail is stolen the sleuth sets out to track down the culprit. It's a straightforward case of stolen mail, right? Wrong! A letter addressed to Nancy Drew was stolen alongside the others. But Nancy soon learns the letter was meant for someone else. Could there possibly be TWO Nancy Drews?! A mysterious letter, a swindling crook, and danger await. The regular crew of Nancy's family & friends watch in awe as, yet again, Nancy puzzles through another mystery to save the day. I loved these books as a kid and re-reading this one was an absolute treat! Nancy Drew Mysteries will forever be one of the best mystery series for all. Special thanks to Elysia for choosing this series for Book Club!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vishakha Motwani

    The story/plot was again wonderful but the narrator.... Well all I can say is at times it felt like she was just saying "blah blah blah" I miss Laura Linney, also the background mysterious music. The story/plot was again wonderful but the narrator.... Well all I can say is at times it felt like she was just saying "blah blah blah" I miss Laura Linney, also the background mysterious music.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Wonderful book! I think my favorite Nancy Drew book that I have read so far is The Bungalow Mystery. One of my favorite things about these books, is that you don't have to wait a long time for the mystery to come up. It usually happens in the first chapter. I love Nancy's friends, and they are in this one a lot. Solving this mystery proved to be very dangerous, but she never gave up. Wonderful book! I think my favorite Nancy Drew book that I have read so far is The Bungalow Mystery. One of my favorite things about these books, is that you don't have to wait a long time for the mystery to come up. It usually happens in the first chapter. I love Nancy's friends, and they are in this one a lot. Solving this mystery proved to be very dangerous, but she never gave up.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Nancy seems to have a mysterious twin. There's some nice double idenity shenanigans going on in this one. Nancy seems to have a mysterious twin. There's some nice double idenity shenanigans going on in this one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    AUTHOR Keene, Carolyn TITLE Nancy's Mysterious Letter DATE READ 01/20/20 RATING 4/B FIRST SENTENCE "Home again!" Nancy Drew spoke as she stopped her sporty maroon roadster before the walk of her own house. GENRE/ PUB DATE/PUBLISHER / # OF YA Mystery/1932/Grosset & Dunlap/209 pgs SERIES/STAND-ALONE #8 CHALLENGE Good Reads 2020 Reading Goal 15/120; GROUP READ ND TIME/PLACE 1932/IL CHARACTERS Nancy Drew/ girl detective COMMENTS I do like these original ND books. Nostalgia. Love the old fashioned langua AUTHOR Keene, Carolyn TITLE Nancy's Mysterious Letter DATE READ 01/20/20 RATING 4/B FIRST SENTENCE "Home again!" Nancy Drew spoke as she stopped her sporty maroon roadster before the walk of her own house. GENRE/ PUB DATE/PUBLISHER / # OF YA Mystery/1932/Grosset & Dunlap/209 pgs SERIES/STAND-ALONE #8 CHALLENGE Good Reads 2020 Reading Goal 15/120; GROUP READ ND TIME/PLACE 1932/IL CHARACTERS Nancy Drew/ girl detective COMMENTS I do like these original ND books. Nostalgia. Love the old fashioned language -- a "bumptious fellow". The mystery was weak characterized by too many unreal coincidences but still an enjoyable visit with the original Nancy Drew.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Below average. There is basically only one suspect and it's pretty clear that it's them the entire time. Most of Nancy's time is spent attending football games and costume parties rather than any real mystery-solving. The mystery itself isn't very compelling or interesting. The denouement is solved with a conversation rather than Nancy being kidnapped or any sort of real excitement. There is even a Scooby Doo-like "I'd have gotten away with it too if it wasn't for you meddling Nancy"-type uttera Below average. There is basically only one suspect and it's pretty clear that it's them the entire time. Most of Nancy's time is spent attending football games and costume parties rather than any real mystery-solving. The mystery itself isn't very compelling or interesting. The denouement is solved with a conversation rather than Nancy being kidnapped or any sort of real excitement. There is even a Scooby Doo-like "I'd have gotten away with it too if it wasn't for you meddling Nancy"-type utterance. I did like how they chose to ultimately handle the culprit's fate though, as that usually doesn't happen in any Nancy Drew mystery I've read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily Attaway

    My kids and I listened to this on audio on a car trip. My 9 year old daughter loved it. I would give it 3 stars for story and an extra star because we all know Nancy Drew is white, attractive and dripping with privilege but she's just so much smarter than everyone else, especially the (male) police and detectives. I love how her intelligence and deductive skills shine above everything else and she never needs a man to explain things to her. I do wish they would edit so, instead of being called " My kids and I listened to this on audio on a car trip. My 9 year old daughter loved it. I would give it 3 stars for story and an extra star because we all know Nancy Drew is white, attractive and dripping with privilege but she's just so much smarter than everyone else, especially the (male) police and detectives. I love how her intelligence and deductive skills shine above everything else and she never needs a man to explain things to her. I do wish they would edit so, instead of being called "the greatest girl detective" she would be refered to as "the greatest teenage detective" or likewise.

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