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A Walmart greeter, a nurse, and an astronaut walk into a church. . . . They each bring with them their own exhaustions and exasperations, their own uncertainty about whether and how their work matters to God. Good news: All work matters to God, because all work reflects some aspect of the character of God. God created the world so that it runs best when it mirrors Him, and A Walmart greeter, a nurse, and an astronaut walk into a church. . . . They each bring with them their own exhaustions and exasperations, their own uncertainty about whether and how their work matters to God. Good news: All work matters to God, because all work reflects some aspect of the character of God. God created the world so that it runs best when it mirrors Him, and we ourselves find the most fulfillment when we recognize God behind our labor. John Van Sloten offers a fascinating and innovative reflection on vocation: Our work is a parable of God; as we work, we are icons of grace.


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A Walmart greeter, a nurse, and an astronaut walk into a church. . . . They each bring with them their own exhaustions and exasperations, their own uncertainty about whether and how their work matters to God. Good news: All work matters to God, because all work reflects some aspect of the character of God. God created the world so that it runs best when it mirrors Him, and A Walmart greeter, a nurse, and an astronaut walk into a church. . . . They each bring with them their own exhaustions and exasperations, their own uncertainty about whether and how their work matters to God. Good news: All work matters to God, because all work reflects some aspect of the character of God. God created the world so that it runs best when it mirrors Him, and we ourselves find the most fulfillment when we recognize God behind our labor. John Van Sloten offers a fascinating and innovative reflection on vocation: Our work is a parable of God; as we work, we are icons of grace.

30 review for Every Job a Parable: What Walmart Greeters, Nurses, and Astronauts Tell Us about God

  1. 5 out of 5

    James

    Each career has something to teach us. When people do the type of things, they were made to do, they image God for the rest of us. So says John Van Sloten, Calgary pastor and preacher teacher at Ambrose Seminary in Calgary, Alberta. Van Sloten previously wrote The Day Metallica Came to Church: Searching for the Everywhere God in Everything, a book that explored God's presence in pop-culture. In Every Job a Parable, Van Sloten trains his eye on careers around him, and how God is revealed in our vo Each career has something to teach us. When people do the type of things, they were made to do, they image God for the rest of us. So says John Van Sloten, Calgary pastor and preacher teacher at Ambrose Seminary in Calgary, Alberta. Van Sloten previously wrote The Day Metallica Came to Church: Searching for the Everywhere God in Everything, a book that explored God's presence in pop-culture. In Every Job a Parable, Van Sloten trains his eye on careers around him, and how God is revealed in our vocation. In Part I, describes how people in their job, image God. Van Sloten talks with a Walmart Greeter, a flyer delivery person in his neighbourhood, a forensic psychologist, tradespeople and auto mechanics, doctors and florists, and scientists, exploring how our work puts us in touch with the character of God, and his imprint on our world and work.  He continues to probe various vocations throughout the book. In Part II, Van Sloten explores what parables are and how our work is a parable. He explores the ways workers image God's presence and how someone's vocation(calling) is an icon of God. In Part III, he explores what our work reveals about God. Different jobs reveal God's ongoing creation (e.g., Geophysicists), crooked lawyers and immoral politicians show how sin distorts things, how first responders and medical professionals reveal ways God works to redeem all things, and how activists point us to God's work of new creation. Part IV forms an invitation for us to live more effectively and consistently the image of God we are called to through our work. Van Solten suggests learning discernment, gratitude, rhythms of rest, a mystical full-sense-engagement in our vocational life, and trust that God will use our work. Van Sloten's perspective on vocation helps us see the sacredness of work. Too often, our work feels small and mundane, and seems the chunk of our day that takes us away from our life. Van Sloten argues, instead that what we do at work is formational and iconic, allowing our work to call us to Christlikeness and imaging God. While the book assumes the sacredness of every vocation, Van Sloten does address where sin distorts our sense of call. Lawyers may lie, federal politicians may be immoral, accountants may be . . . creative. But Van Sloten's negative examples all assume that each of these are a peculiar vocation gone amiss. He does not treat, in this volume, jobs that are illegal (mob boss, pimp, prostitute), immoral (pornographer) or  ambiguous (a card dealer at a Casino, bar tender, etc). Presumably, these can fit the 'Every job a parable' motif, even if these jobs don't 'image God.' They still may have things to teach us. Van Sloten, is Reformed, and many of the theological voices he draws on are within the Christian Reformed Stream: Cornelius Plantinga, Richard Mouw, Abraham Kuyper, Herman Bavnick. Though CS Lewis, Eastern Orthodox theology through the lens of Rublev's Trinity and Gabriel Bunge are also significant. This was a pretty enjoyable read and I like the way Van Sloten valued the professions he highlighted here.  On a personal note, feeling somewhat vocationally muddled as of late, I appreciate Van Sloten's call to examine where God is revealed in my day job. I give this four stars - ★★★★ Notice of material connection: I received a copy of this book from the Tyndale Blog Network, in exchange for my honest review.  

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    I was absolutely thrilled to get a chance to read this book as I loved the concept of finding ways to serve God no matter what your vocation is. Too often we only think as certain vocations as ones that you can serve God in, like the medical field, teaching, being a missionary,etc but this book shows that any job can be used to glorify God and provides an opportunity to serve Him! This book tells stories of those who have served in such capacities like Judges who are able to serve God and those I was absolutely thrilled to get a chance to read this book as I loved the concept of finding ways to serve God no matter what your vocation is. Too often we only think as certain vocations as ones that you can serve God in, like the medical field, teaching, being a missionary,etc but this book shows that any job can be used to glorify God and provides an opportunity to serve Him! This book tells stories of those who have served in such capacities like Judges who are able to serve God and those who work as Wal-Mart greeters who are able to glorify God with their position. I love how this book helps show that it is not so much the job that holds us back from sharing with others but it is really our attitude because if we are ready and willing servants God will provide to opportunities! Filled with biblical wisdom and practical insight this book is an excellent read! I received a copy in exchange for my honest opinion.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: A theology of work proposing that our different jobs are "parables" that reveal various aspects of the character and ways of God, and therefore that all work matters and that God speaks to the world through our callings. John Van Sloten has approached the theology of work in a way I've not seen before. He notes how so many of the parables of Jesus focus on the various kinds of work his hearers would readily have recognized and observes: "When Jesus wrapped a parable around a particular vo Summary: A theology of work proposing that our different jobs are "parables" that reveal various aspects of the character and ways of God, and therefore that all work matters and that God speaks to the world through our callings. John Van Sloten has approached the theology of work in a way I've not seen before. He notes how so many of the parables of Jesus focus on the various kinds of work his hearers would readily have recognized and observes: "When Jesus wrapped a parable around a particular vocation, he was affirming the creational goodness of that job. I think Jesus is still doing the same today--through the parable that is your job." For him, this sheds new light both on how we image God in all of our endeavors, how God is revealed in our work, and how we might more effectively image God in our work. He traces the significance of our work from creation where God speaks through our work and our world; the fall and the ways we are hindered from experiencing God in our work; redemption and the transforming power of naming God's saving presence in the world, and the New Earth that reminds us that our work is a foretaste of our eternal destiny. He did something else I've not seen before. He interviewed and studied scores of workers from different occupations: astronauts and Walmart greeters, forensic psychologists and restaurant servers, emergency response personnel and asphalt contractors and explored how God meets them in their work and reveals himself through it. One of the powerful experiences for both Van Sloten and the various workers was to see their work in new light as they revealed that it all matters to God. Perhaps one of the chapters that most resonated with me was his discussion of our lives as part of God's great story, that he speaks through us--where we have the sense that we are participating in something greater than ourselves, where Someone greater than ourselves is speaking or singing or composing or caring or building or crafting through us. He calls this entering into the spokenness of our work. Through short chapters that weave stories of workers with theological reflection, Van Sloten offers one of the richest and most accessible treatments of the theology of work I've read. He invites individuals and groups to join him in this reflection on the significance of our work with reflection questions titled Lectio Vocatio at the end of each chapter. Van Sloten has also created a series of YouTube videos around different vocations. One example is a sermon on restaurant servers. He includes a list of links to all the videos in an index. There are many people who sit in our churches who wonder what connection their work has with the things we speak of Sunday by Sunday. They spend the major portion of their waking hours at work in many cases. John Van Sloten offers the tremendous news that God not only speaks on Sundays but through us in our work, which matters greatly. God "calls" to the world through our callings. Rather than a necessary evil, our work images the good and beautiful and true God. The book may serve as a great resource for an adult education class, or a preaching series, giving people hope that it is not simply through their involvement in the church, but also through their work in the world that they may know the pleasure of God upon their lives.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    John Calvin stressed that the everyday activity of Christians has religious significance. The first and third verse of George Herbert’s poem ‘The Elixir’ expresses this insight: Teach me, my God and King, In all things thee to see; And what I do in anything To do it as for thee. A servant with this clause Makes drudgery divine; Who sweeps a room, as for thy laws, Makes that and the action fine. We spend ten times more hours at work than we do at church. And yet most of the sermons in church are abo John Calvin stressed that the everyday activity of Christians has religious significance. The first and third verse of George Herbert’s poem ‘The Elixir’ expresses this insight: Teach me, my God and King, In all things thee to see; And what I do in anything To do it as for thee. A servant with this clause Makes drudgery divine; Who sweeps a room, as for thy laws, Makes that and the action fine. We spend ten times more hours at work than we do at church. And yet most of the sermons in church are about church and church activities. However, not at John Van Sloten’s church. This book arose out of a sermon series he did looking at different vocations and what they can tell us about God. Van Sloten is a church pastor, before that he has worked as a real estate developer. In this book, he draws upon his own experience in the workplace as well as conducting extensive research into other people’s jobs, by visiting them in their workplace. Van Sloten provides a succinct summary of this book: it is about ‘understanding how Jesus is speaking directly to you (via your personal experience of work) and how he is speaking through you (to the broader world)’. What he wants to do is to ‘kindle a new kind of vocational imagination’. To this end, he develops a lectio vocatio - a seeing of God in and through our work. And the end of each chapter is a short series of exercise that will help to shape this. He sees jobs as parables and draws biblical insights from a wide range of careers. What is God saying to you and others through your job? This is an important question and one that this book sets about to answer. He also explores how we can be icons of grace in our work. Here he applies some insights of Rublev's work 'Holy Trinity' and applies them to the workplace. Obviously not all jobs or careers are covered, for example no mention of undertakers or the unemployed, but there is an extremely wide range covered - almost fifty of them ranging from accountant to Walmart worker. For many a job is a way of earning money and not much more; ministry is something done in church at the weekend. And for others church is where there is ‘a tacit obligation to turn up, sit up, pay up and shut up’. This book will help with a paradigm shift, it shows that God is concerned with our daily job and, not only that, is able to speak in an through it. As someone commented to Van Sloten: ‘I think I see what you are doing. I’ve spent my entire life connecting the Jesus of the New Testament to the Jesus of the Old Testament. You are connecting the Jesus of the New Testament to the resurrected Jesus today.’ This is exactly what this book does. It endorses jobs as ministry. Van Sloten shows that God speaks through our careers. It is an important book. It provides a model for pastors in relating church to work, and for labourers in whatever field to show that God is working in and through our labours. Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., has provided me with a complimentary copy of this book. The book will be released in June.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As a book reviewer, I have the privilege of learning about a large number of books, usually before they are published. In light of this stream of books, it is oftentimes easy to think that we do not need any more books on a particular subject. We have been blessed and inundated with a quantity of faith & work books over the last few years. I think there is a case for at least more, with this thoughtful contribution by John Van Sloten: Every Job a Parable: What Walmart Greeters, Nurses and Astron As a book reviewer, I have the privilege of learning about a large number of books, usually before they are published. In light of this stream of books, it is oftentimes easy to think that we do not need any more books on a particular subject. We have been blessed and inundated with a quantity of faith & work books over the last few years. I think there is a case for at least more, with this thoughtful contribution by John Van Sloten: Every Job a Parable: What Walmart Greeters, Nurses and Astronauts Tell Us About God. Van Sloten is on staff at The Road Church in Calgary, Canada. The premise behind this book is the idea that each of our vocations is a kind of parable. “…a lived-out story within which and through which God speaks in multiple ways.” For years my view of how Jesus’ parables worked was limited. I understood them to be narrative tools for the conveyance of moral and ethical truth, stories with a built-in spiritual lesson. I still believe this. But lately I’ve come to realize that the created elements of his stories – the down-to earthness, the real-life content, ordinary people doing ordinary things – also carries revelatory weight…When Jesus wrapped a parable around a particular vocation, he was affirming the creational goodness of that job. Van Sloten argues that what Jesus was doing in the Gospels through parables, He continues today through our vocations. “God is more present at your work than you know. And I think he wants you to know that. God wants you to see that he is there and that His Spirit is moving in you, through you, and all around you. God wants you to know him in all you do – including the third of your life that you spend working.” Throughout the Bible, in fact, God accomplished his will and made himself known through real people doing real work: creating, building, tending, leading, managing, restoring, and filling the world with good things. According to Van Sloten, the purpose of this book is to help Christians “experience God at work more, and to help you read the parable that is your job. It is for people who trust that God is at work everywhere.” I believe God intended work to be a means through which we know Him, experience Him, and relate to Him – all in the context of his providential unfolding of history. After all, we are made in the image of a God who works. I see at least two distinctives in this book when compared to some other faith and work literature. First, Van Sloten does not shy away from the questions of sin and brokenness in this world. Is God really that involved with everything that fills creation? Are all things really playing out on purpose and for the greater good? What about corrupt governments, businesses, and cultural practices, and all of the other twisting, polluting, exploiting, and perverting impacts of sin? What about those who endure terrible working conditions? What connection could all of these broken things possibly have with God’s revelation? Isn’t there a line between what God does and what human beings do? Second, I have never seen a book where the author is so intentional in describing so many different vocations: Years ago, with the help of nephrologist Dr. Garth Mortis, I preached a message on the human kidney, an organ that maintains homeostasis in the body. It keeps the good going and the bad in check and allows your body to stay in balance, to be at equilibrium. Even as the kidney does this balancing work for the human body, so too does Dr. Mortis bring homeostasis to the whole of a patient’s life, via his deep knowledge of how the human body works and his great bedside manner. I recently had the opportunity to interview Van Sloten. TGR: Why did you write this book? JVS: Because of the beautiful reactions I’ve seen on people’s faces as I’ve exegeted the parable that is their job. It’s happened every time. Workers undergo what can only be described as a vocational epiphany; seeing their work from a whole new angle: the epigenetics researcher connecting his field of study to the back half of the second commandment, about the sins of the parents being passed on, and realizing that what he does is all about the genetic inheritance parents pass on to their children. The server realizing that she images the Jesus who humbly served as he brought good things to us from God’s kitchen. The largest residential landlord in Canada telling me he cried as he watched my sermon on God’s home-providing heart, unpacking his vocation. TGR: What makes it difficult for Christians to connect their faith and work? JVS: I think most Christians have an insufficiently robust theology of work – especially in relation to the revelatory nature of their jobs. Few are told they can experience God at work. Because of sin we all fall short as well. I think the church’s pre-occupation with naming what’s wrong in the world has blinded the church to what is right. Especially so when it comes to our work. I’m not sure how many people pray for a deeper connection between their faith and work. Even if they do, many think that God has nothing to do with what they do. But that’s not true. There is no job too small for God. This really hit home for me when I preached on the vocation of a sanitation worker one Easter – not a traditional Easter topic! At first I thought I was nuts… and then I realized that sanitation workers are made in the image of a God who takes out the trash to make room for the new! TGR: How can the church promote a strong theology of vocation? JVS: Preach it—the pulpit is the place where most churches talk about what they value most. Create vocationally based small groups. Go to people’s places of work as part of the sermon research process. I cannot emphasize how crucial it was to sit in that mechanic’s garage, scientist’s lab, stylist’s salon, and judge’s chambers. Naming God’s vocational presence in those places made them feel a bit more holy. I am pleased to see this book has received warm endorsements from leaders through the faith and work movement: Deeply thoughtful about the most important things while also drawing on the best of the Christian tradition, Every Job a Parable is for every man and every woman who cares about the work of work. (Steven Garber, author of Visions of Vocation) A greatly needed resource that pastorally weaves together biblical teaching and rich theology in the context of a wide diversity of occupations. (David H. Kim, executive director, Center for Faith and Work) John Van Sloten gives us eyes to see that our work is not only designed to serve others but is also essentially formative on our journey to greater Christlikeness. I highly recommend this book. (Tom Nelson, author of Work Matters and president of Made to Flourish) All work is meant to be God honoring. I have long believed that and taught it. But in this marvelous book John Van Sloten brings it all alive for me in new ways. I will be ready to read a parable from the Lord every time I see a sanitation worker or a Walmart greeter! (Richard Mouw, president emeritus, Fuller Theological Seminary) I heartily endorse this book, too, but as LeVar Burton has said in Reading Rainbow, “You don’t have to take my word for it.” Check out my friend Byron Borger’s excellent review here, then check out the book for yourself. I think this book is an important read and will be referenced for many years to come.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paula Vince

    This is a great read for anyone who finds their daily grind a bit of a drag, or can't help thinking of their spiritual self as separate from their daily, nine-to-five self. John Van Sloten believes we can stretch our minds to think of any job or occupation as a parable for the way God works. After all, he's always made himself known through real people doing real work. First, Van Sloten knocks down the vocational hierarchy we might have all bought into at different times. It simply doesn't exist This is a great read for anyone who finds their daily grind a bit of a drag, or can't help thinking of their spiritual self as separate from their daily, nine-to-five self. John Van Sloten believes we can stretch our minds to think of any job or occupation as a parable for the way God works. After all, he's always made himself known through real people doing real work. First, Van Sloten knocks down the vocational hierarchy we might have all bought into at different times. It simply doesn't exist from a heavenly perspective, where every humble job has its own dignity and significance. Throughout the book, he interviews and observes people in many different professions, and then has fun revealing their essential goodness to them. To mention just a few, there are astronauts, flyer-deliverers, psychologists, residential landlords, cleaners, electricians, automative repairmen, florists, language translators, geophysicists and hairdressers. It's great to think we're all on an equal plane. We are urged to study God's signature moves, so we can more easily notice the way our jobs reflect them. Then we can pull our attitudes about them back into sync, in case they've been a bit off. There are three roles I've held; cleaner, writer and parent, which many people can probably relate to, and I enjoyed reading the thoughts about them. Cleaners (including anyone who cleans or regularly tidies up messes) reflect God's heart for people to have clean and healthy lives. We remove unnecessary, used trash to make room for pristine new surroundings, which is what God does on a larger scale. Cleaners everywhere bear witness to his world-restoring power, whenever we leave anything better than how we found it. As writers, we share God's heart for creativity, and attempt to figure out the way his world works through story telling, and clarity of expression. Pondering how we're going to form our sentences allows us to catch glimpses of God's own thoughts, and spread them, for the things we're passionate enough to write about are often the things he's passionate about too. And needless to say, as parents we enter into God's heart to care, nurture and love each others with a giving, sacrificial love. It's a mood-lifting book to read, with plenty of cheerful ways to regard the things we might not feel all that cheerful about naturally. John Van Sloten is aware that in our darker moods, this may all come across a bit platitudinal. He advises us to keep stretching our broader perspective muscles to go with it anyway. I think it really does work, and if you look for your own job, you'll be quite likely to find it in this enthusiastic and comprehensive book. Thanks to NetGalley and Tyndale House for my review copy. For more book chat and reviews, visit my blog, https://vincereview.blogspot.com.au/

  7. 5 out of 5

    Prairie Sky Book Reviews

    Have you ever considered that your work, no matter what it is, matters very much to God? That in fact, your work is a method God wants to use to speak to you, as well as through you? “Every Job a Parable: What Walmart Greeters, Nurses & Astronauts Tell Us About God” is an insightful new book written by Calgary, Alberta pastor John Van Sloten and published by NavPress that unpacks these questions with great insight and thought-provoking depth. So what exactly is “Every Job a Parable” about? Well, Have you ever considered that your work, no matter what it is, matters very much to God? That in fact, your work is a method God wants to use to speak to you, as well as through you? “Every Job a Parable: What Walmart Greeters, Nurses & Astronauts Tell Us About God” is an insightful new book written by Calgary, Alberta pastor John Van Sloten and published by NavPress that unpacks these questions with great insight and thought-provoking depth. So what exactly is “Every Job a Parable” about? Well, as John explains, through the pages of this book “you’ll encounter God’s revelation through various vocational parables, as shared with me by the people I interviewed. You’ll learn how a firefighter’s passion is like God’s, how the nature of automotive restoration uniquely reflects the renewing mind of God, how the cultural product of the culinary arts reveals something of the hospitable heart of God, and how a geophysicist’s search for subterranean truth informs humanity’s collective search for God’s truth.” I love how this book breaks the broad subject of “work” into much more specific areas of “vocation”, and then illuminates the various ways of how it all points back to the God who created us, our world, and our work. My eyes were opened time and time again to the different ways that God is moving in and through and all around us, including in our daily work. I didn’t agree completely with a few areas of theology, and at times the mini-sermons seemed to carry on a little longer than necessary, but overall I found the message and insights of this book to be tremendously beneficial and presented in a way that is easy to comprehend, yet provides food for thought long after you finish the book. In closing, let John’s words about the beautiful gift of discovering the parables within our work inspire you, and open your eyes to the truths that God reveals to us in so many ways... “I love seeing the look in people’s eyes when they realize that God really is moving through the work they do. At first they’re surprised, and then there is this beautiful sense of goodness and gratitude that washes over them. It’s as though they are becoming more of their vocational selves right before my eyes. In that moment I experience God’s delight.” If this sounds like a message you would like to dive into, don’t miss “Every Job a Parable”! "Book has been provided courtesy of NavPress and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kenson Gonzalez

    There are books that lead us to reconsider our thoughts about an issue. And this is one of those. After reading this book it has been inevitable for me to see the work in another way and not only mine, but also that of my friends or neighbors. Like the author I have looked for in them some thought or an idea about the form of being or acting of God. Pastor Van Sloten has written a challenging book that consists of 12 chapters. He begins by establishing an idea in the reader: All works matter to There are books that lead us to reconsider our thoughts about an issue. And this is one of those. After reading this book it has been inevitable for me to see the work in another way and not only mine, but also that of my friends or neighbors. Like the author I have looked for in them some thought or an idea about the form of being or acting of God. Pastor Van Sloten has written a challenging book that consists of 12 chapters. He begins by establishing an idea in the reader: All works matter to God. Then he show us how our work is a parable of the work of God. Part three (one of my favorites) shows us how God reveals himself through our work and finally the author shows us how we can reflect the image of God in an effective and consistent way in our work. This last part contains five challenging chapters. In each chapter we will know different characters with different works but all of them show us that each work is a parable. One detail I enjoyed very much about this book was that at the end of each chapter I found a section titled "Lectio Divina", a series of questions for reflection (ideal for small groups). I also like the direct, pleasant and fluid style of the author. Some of my favorite quotes from this book: - We need to be doing both at the same time - loving God and loving our neighbour-to be fully alive -God is whispering truth and meaning in the most ordinary and small places. - In fact, those are often the places where God specially shows up. If you can't love an ordinary job, how can you ever find God there? Thanks to Tyndale House Publisher for the electronic copy to review

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daphne Self

    When I read about this book, read the blurb on the back, and the description I thought it would be how jobs, whether blue collar or white collar, can be a parable in Christian living. How awesome to see how a person's everyday living can be a testimony and how awesome that the author took the time to talk to these people....I was mistaken. This wasn't a book that I expected it to be. The author expounds upon these jobs by relating what he had observed and then creating a sermon from it. Some of th When I read about this book, read the blurb on the back, and the description I thought it would be how jobs, whether blue collar or white collar, can be a parable in Christian living. How awesome to see how a person's everyday living can be a testimony and how awesome that the author took the time to talk to these people....I was mistaken. This wasn't a book that I expected it to be. The author expounds upon these jobs by relating what he had observed and then creating a sermon from it. Some of the vocations mentioned were not what I would call a vocation and some of the "parables" seemed as though he really had to strive and stretch to make a point. Also, when he started writing about the seven deadly sins, I stopped reading. All sins are deadly; and no sin is worse than another. Sin is sin. And although he does point this out, in a way of speaking, I realized that this isn't a book for me. I don't know if I would recommend it. The writing seemed disjointed and the book seemed as though I was reading a very long, expansive sermon. I do appreciate Tyndale Publishers for providing me a chance to read this book. I do hope that it will benefit other readers.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pam Ecrement

    So often we read and talk about looking for a break, rest, or a vacation. We long for those as a result of our day-in/day-out work schedules and duties. No one seems to feel there is enough “free time” in the average week or month. Few of those outside jobs within Christian ministry look at their positions as spiritual or representative of God despite the growing emphasis on “marketplace ministry”. Into that context, John Van Sloten’s new book, Every Job A Parable, challenges the reader to recons So often we read and talk about looking for a break, rest, or a vacation. We long for those as a result of our day-in/day-out work schedules and duties. No one seems to feel there is enough “free time” in the average week or month. Few of those outside jobs within Christian ministry look at their positions as spiritual or representative of God despite the growing emphasis on “marketplace ministry”. Into that context, John Van Sloten’s new book, Every Job A Parable, challenges the reader to reconsider work and its value and attributes of God. At the outset he tells the reader the purpose of the book: “to help kindle a new kind of vocational imagination, to help you experience God at work more, and to help you read the parable that is your job.” From Van Sloten’s opening chapters to the end of the book his theme looks at what it means to “image God” through work. To illustrate his theme, he identifies attributes of God and then looks at how those line up with various jobs or occupations. As he does so, he shows the value and nature of God in our work from the lowliest positions to the highest and many that fall somewhere in the middle.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

    Cassandra's review Q&A- - What did you like about the book and why? I like the open ideas that this author has for each person's work choice ans well as abilities and how he ties them into God's plan. - What did you not like about the book and why? It does not cover every job and what about people who can not work but volunteer? - What did you learn? The author has a very unique and expressive way of writing that will make the reader believe his words to be true. - To whom would you recommend this Cassandra's review Q&A- - What did you like about the book and why? I like the open ideas that this author has for each person's work choice ans well as abilities and how he ties them into God's plan. - What did you not like about the book and why? It does not cover every job and what about people who can not work but volunteer? - What did you learn? The author has a very unique and expressive way of writing that will make the reader believe his words to be true. - To whom would you recommend this book and why? Someone who wants to find God through working. I received a complimentary copy.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    A reasonable little book that reads like a series of sermons on the topic of jobs. This is not a book on vocation (single, married, priest, religious) but rather on how careers can image God, and how we can image God in our careers. A bit repetitive as it is written in a very conversational style as though he is preaching to the reader. A few truly lovely insights. I had to give this book back to its owner before reading the last 25 pages or so so this review does not include the final chapters.

  13. 5 out of 5

    J. Trent

    We all want to find meaning in our work. John Van Sloten has given us that gift--a glimpse into how God sees and uses our vocations to both shape us and the world. This book is a must-read for anyone beginning, shifting, or retiring from a career--which is all of us at some point or another. Whether we are a sanitation worker, geophysicist, or hairstylist, this book teaches us how to view our work as valid and ourselves as beloved instruments in God's creation. We all want to find meaning in our work. John Van Sloten has given us that gift--a glimpse into how God sees and uses our vocations to both shape us and the world. This book is a must-read for anyone beginning, shifting, or retiring from a career--which is all of us at some point or another. Whether we are a sanitation worker, geophysicist, or hairstylist, this book teaches us how to view our work as valid and ourselves as beloved instruments in God's creation.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dcbk

    A book with career advice ~ check I really liked the ideas and theology in this book. As a person who is looking for work and not sure if what job i take is meaningful - this book was helpful. The book was read by the author and that worked really well.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Though it contained kernels of wisdom it was like reading a book of sermons. would have enjoyed more of the personal stories of the people to come through.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    Read this one 2x by accident. Excellent theology and practical application. Explains the importance of work, then highlights real jobs we can relate to as key pieces of the Kingdom

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Author made a few good points but for the most part, this just didn't grab me and offer any insights to speak of. If you want a great book on this subject, I very highly recommend Every Good Endeavor: Connecting Your Work to God's Plan for the World. Author made a few good points but for the most part, this just didn't grab me and offer any insights to speak of. If you want a great book on this subject, I very highly recommend Every Good Endeavor: Connecting Your Work to God's Plan for the World.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Villines

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Anderson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Keenon

  21. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shavaughn

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Brumfield

  25. 4 out of 5

    Art Thiessen

  26. 5 out of 5

    Derek

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  28. 5 out of 5

    Danita Cummins

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zach Probst

  30. 4 out of 5

    David A.

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