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The Right Murder

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First, there's the corpse in Joe the Angel's Bar. Sequel to The Wrong Murder. First, there's the corpse in Joe the Angel's Bar. Sequel to The Wrong Murder.


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First, there's the corpse in Joe the Angel's Bar. Sequel to The Wrong Murder. First, there's the corpse in Joe the Angel's Bar. Sequel to The Wrong Murder.

30 review for The Right Murder

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael Reilly

    I did not read the edition pictured above. I read a 1941 Popular Library paperback pocket book copy. It was one of the small paperbacks from the 1940s and 50s that really would fit in your back pocket. I picked it up second hand. The glue in the binding was all dried out so the pages were loose. The edges of the pages were water stained. This book lead a tough life. It was an odd feeling to know that I was destroying the book by reading it. As I turned each page it separated from the binding. I f I did not read the edition pictured above. I read a 1941 Popular Library paperback pocket book copy. It was one of the small paperbacks from the 1940s and 50s that really would fit in your back pocket. I picked it up second hand. The glue in the binding was all dried out so the pages were loose. The edges of the pages were water stained. This book lead a tough life. It was an odd feeling to know that I was destroying the book by reading it. As I turned each page it separated from the binding. I finished with a collection of loose pages. It was not the kind of thing you get reading a book on a Kindle. I like to know that I am reading a particular copy of a book with a particular history. It is more than a formatted text file. This is a Malone and Justus story. Rice did a series of madcap crime capers set in 1940s Chicago. They featured John J. Malone, the best criminal lawyer in Chicago, Jake Justus, who worked variously as a reporter, a press agent and a bar owner, and his wife, the wealthy socialite Helene Justus. Everyone drinks like crazy. The cops are not that bright. Dead bodies keep popping up and everyone talks in a snappy patter. There are running gags in the series. Malone is always broke. Helene's driving terrifies everyone. Flanagan, the Homicide detective, is always planning where he is going to move to, away from Chicago, when he retires. This is a sequel to Rice's previous book, "The Wrong Murder". The set up for both stories is that a wild society dame, Mona McClane, bets Jake that she can commit a murder in Chicago in public in front of witnesses and get away with it. If Jake can prove she committed the murder, he wins her nightclub. ( These types of screwball stories aren't too worried about realism) Fun plot. Satisfying ending. Great 1940s style and talk. What's not to like?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Vintage Malone!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    For my full review click on the link below: https://crossexaminingcrime.wordpress... For my full review click on the link below: https://crossexaminingcrime.wordpress...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Whistlers Mom

    If you think Mondays are bad, wait 'til you meet the Tuesdays. Craig Rice wrote eleven novels and numerous short stories about Chicago Lawyer John J. Malone and his friends. I think it's best to read the books in order of publication, but most of the novels are stand-alone. Not so with this one, which is a continuation of the third book in the series - "The Wrong Murder." I've no idea why Rice decided to spread a story over two book-length mysteries, but I think the results are two of her weaker If you think Mondays are bad, wait 'til you meet the Tuesdays. Craig Rice wrote eleven novels and numerous short stories about Chicago Lawyer John J. Malone and his friends. I think it's best to read the books in order of publication, but most of the novels are stand-alone. Not so with this one, which is a continuation of the third book in the series - "The Wrong Murder." I've no idea why Rice decided to spread a story over two book-length mysteries, but I think the results are two of her weaker efforts. Still good reading, but PLEASE don't start with this one if you're new to this author. And I strongly advise that you read "The Wrong Murder" before you read this one. Frankly, they're hard enough to follow if you read them in order. In the first book, Malone's drinking-buddies-and-crime-solving-partners Jake Justus and Helene Brand are ready to leave on their honeymoon when eccentric socialite Mona McClane bets Jake she can kill someone in broad daylight in front of lots of witnesses and get away with it. And a murder like that occurs and Mona has a dandy motive, but so do several other characters. After the murderer is identified, Mona makes a strange remark. She says Jake's solved the WRONG murder! Uh-oh. This book finds Malone at Joe the Angel's Bar on New Year's Eve, drunk and morose because Jake and Helene have left for their honeymoon and he's ringing in the New Year alone. He figures they'll return and settle down to wedded bliss and respectability and he'll never see them again. Woe is him. Before he can drink enough to pass out, a stranger stumbles into the bar, calls his name, and collapses. Of course, the man dies and his last act was to press a numbered key (hotel? lock box? apartment?) into Malone's hand. And there's no ID on him and no one knows where he came from or who stabbed him, so the key is the only clue. And, naturally, Malone gets into a drunken brawl and loses the key. Before he and Chicago Police Captain von Flanagan have made any headway at all, Helene and Jake return from their honeymoon. Only they're not speaking to each other. So much for wedded bliss. Helene is staying with Mona McClane, who has a bunch of guests at her stately mansion. Most of them are as eccentric as she is. And then one of them is stabbed to death. His name is Gerald Tuesday and he was trying to contact Malone at the time he was killed. And he reminds Malone of someone he's seen recently. Could there be more than one Tuesday in this week? The plot is even stranger than most of Rice's books and certainly more complicated than some of them. Malone and Jake and Helene out in the snow in evening clothes searching an eerie old estate to find a grave that's empty, then full, then empty again. There's a body (stabbed, of course) that they have to get back to Chicago, but Helene knows a guy with a hearse who's willing to bend the law, so no problem. Well, you get the idea. So why did I like it? Because the writing is wonderful and the characters are delightfully daffy and the dialog is always witty and frequently hilarious. Rice wrote "surreal" or "madcap" mysteries, not traditional figure-out-where-the-suspects-were-when-the-crime-was-committed detective novels. There's some of that, but it's not why Craig Rice fans love her. If you can relax and enjoy the ride, these are great books.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brett Bydairk

    The direct sequel to The Wrong Murder, this starts about a month after that one ends. John J. Malone is busy getting drunk in a Chicago bar on New Year's Eve, when a man walks in the door shouting his name; Malone has never seen this man before, and before he can meet him, the man falls to the floor, dead. Who this guy is and why he wanted Malone is the start of another screwball mystery featuring Malone and Jake and Helene Justus. Much confusion (not to mention booze consumption) happens before The direct sequel to The Wrong Murder, this starts about a month after that one ends. John J. Malone is busy getting drunk in a Chicago bar on New Year's Eve, when a man walks in the door shouting his name; Malone has never seen this man before, and before he can meet him, the man falls to the floor, dead. Who this guy is and why he wanted Malone is the start of another screwball mystery featuring Malone and Jake and Helene Justus. Much confusion (not to mention booze consumption) happens before the killer is revealed, and Jake wins the bet made in the book before this.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cullen Gallagher

    Another great satire on American idealism and morality where everyone is either honestly corrupt or dishonestly corrupt, and everyone is always wildly drunk. The thing about "escapist" fare is that one is always escaping from something, and alcohol becomes a primary the primary vehicle for fleeing. Also, the political context that was quietly implicit in Rice's earlier works finally emerges in the plot, as several of the characters are European exiles fleeing from the war. Rice's caricatures are Another great satire on American idealism and morality where everyone is either honestly corrupt or dishonestly corrupt, and everyone is always wildly drunk. The thing about "escapist" fare is that one is always escaping from something, and alcohol becomes a primary the primary vehicle for fleeing. Also, the political context that was quietly implicit in Rice's earlier works finally emerges in the plot, as several of the characters are European exiles fleeing from the war. Rice's caricatures are still spot-on, but there is a new level of sympathy in her work.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    "The sun rose that morning of January first at 7:24. No one of importance noticed it." I love living in the 1940s of these books. The plots seem to be getting thinner, while the writing seems to be getting better. And the drinking is starting to get out of control. (*starting*?) "The sun rose that morning of January first at 7:24. No one of importance noticed it." I love living in the 1940s of these books. The plots seem to be getting thinner, while the writing seems to be getting better. And the drinking is starting to get out of control. (*starting*?)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

    read SOMETIME in 1998

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vierblij

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela Holtzman

  15. 5 out of 5

    Monica DiSabato

  16. 4 out of 5

    M

  17. 5 out of 5

    Koji Mukai

  18. 5 out of 5

    MK Lee

  19. 4 out of 5

    Clovis

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bill Shackleford

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jill Kettilstein

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lindajean

  23. 4 out of 5

    Richardson smith

  24. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cheer

  27. 5 out of 5

    Keely

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anne Libera

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ethel

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