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Sleep is just a myth created by mattress salesmen. Isaac, a night auditor of a hotel somewhere in the surreal void of Texas, is sick and tired of his guests. When he clocks in at night, he’s hoping for a nice, quiet eight hours of Netflix-bingeing and occasional masturbation. What he doesn’t want to do is fetch anybody extra towels or dive face-first into somebody’s clogged Sleep is just a myth created by mattress salesmen. Isaac, a night auditor of a hotel somewhere in the surreal void of Texas, is sick and tired of his guests. When he clocks in at night, he’s hoping for a nice, quiet eight hours of Netflix-bingeing and occasional masturbation. What he doesn’t want to do is fetch anybody extra towels or dive face-first into somebody’s clogged toilet. And he sure as hell doesn’t want to get involved in some trippy owl conspiracy or dispose of any dead bodies. But hey…that’s life in the hotel business. Welcome to The Nightly Disease. Please enjoy your stay.


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Sleep is just a myth created by mattress salesmen. Isaac, a night auditor of a hotel somewhere in the surreal void of Texas, is sick and tired of his guests. When he clocks in at night, he’s hoping for a nice, quiet eight hours of Netflix-bingeing and occasional masturbation. What he doesn’t want to do is fetch anybody extra towels or dive face-first into somebody’s clogged Sleep is just a myth created by mattress salesmen. Isaac, a night auditor of a hotel somewhere in the surreal void of Texas, is sick and tired of his guests. When he clocks in at night, he’s hoping for a nice, quiet eight hours of Netflix-bingeing and occasional masturbation. What he doesn’t want to do is fetch anybody extra towels or dive face-first into somebody’s clogged toilet. And he sure as hell doesn’t want to get involved in some trippy owl conspiracy or dispose of any dead bodies. But hey…that’s life in the hotel business. Welcome to The Nightly Disease. Please enjoy your stay.

30 review for The Nightly Disease

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    Isaac is the night auditor at the God Damn Hotel in the middle of nowhere Texas. His nights are endless stretches of Netflix binges and masturbating on the roof of the hotel. Totally what I did when I worked as a night auditor. (You can tell this author really works in the hotel business-he cracked me up with these parts) Then a new employee catches Isaac's attention. Mandy 2. She might be the one to fall in love with him since the Bulimic homeless girl hasn't realized her love for him yet. He st Isaac is the night auditor at the God Damn Hotel in the middle of nowhere Texas. His nights are endless stretches of Netflix binges and masturbating on the roof of the hotel. Totally what I did when I worked as a night auditor. (You can tell this author really works in the hotel business-he cracked me up with these parts) Then a new employee catches Isaac's attention. Mandy 2. She might be the one to fall in love with him since the Bulimic homeless girl hasn't realized her love for him yet. He starts talking to Mandy 2 and realizes that she might just have a weird owl fetish. She keeps rambling on about wanting to pet one and that she has an owl stalker. Then he finds out that Mandy 2 has met her demise by owl. An owl ate her face off. I HATE birds. I knew those bastards were creepy and this just confirmed it. So I'm still with the story. Isaac seems to attract loonies. It happens to the best of us. He gets involved with a couple of shoe counterfeiters, drinks on the job with his bestie who works at the Other God Damn hotel and then the book takes a weird turn. I admit I totally suck at reading bizarro, so I'm probably at fault with not liking the second half of this one. Isaac starts to descend into crazy town. Bodies are piling up. Blood and gore are everywhere. (I didn't hate this part. I'm not that much of a willy)...and the owls. [image error] So I'm going with 3 stars for the first half of the book and 1 star for the second. I like this author though so I'm not done with him yet. Booksource: Netgalley in exchange for review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    As if Isaac's soul-crushing gig as night auditor at The God Damn Hotel wasn't bad enough, now he has to contend with two methed up shoe manufacturers, a bulimic girl, and numerous corpses. I got this from DarkFuse via Netgalley. Ever wonder what crazy shit goes on at a hotel during the night shift? Wonder no longer! The Nightly Disease is the tale of Isaac, the night auditor of a hotel, and how his life spiraled out of control after one ill advised decision. It's hilarious and suspenseful and very As if Isaac's soul-crushing gig as night auditor at The God Damn Hotel wasn't bad enough, now he has to contend with two methed up shoe manufacturers, a bulimic girl, and numerous corpses. I got this from DarkFuse via Netgalley. Ever wonder what crazy shit goes on at a hotel during the night shift? Wonder no longer! The Nightly Disease is the tale of Isaac, the night auditor of a hotel, and how his life spiraled out of control after one ill advised decision. It's hilarious and suspenseful and very hard to put down. MBIII has a great ear for dialogue. Isaac's friendship with George was masterfully done. While some of the scenarios were unlikely, they were all plausible and Max wove them into a tapestry of awesomeness. Max went from the frying pan to the fire, which was actually burning in another frying pan above another fire and so on and so forth. The feeling of desperation grew throughout the book, as did my sympathy for Isaac. By the end, I was just hoping he'd live though it. This is a little different than the books I normally get from DarkFuse, more noir than horror, but it was a damn fine read. Max Booth III drew on his own hotel experiences and delivered one hell of a tale. Four out of five stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Janie C.

    This book is for anyone who has felt that their job is a life sentence. For Isaac, it just might be.  He is the night auditor at a hotel, and the situations he gets into are not only unbelievable but humorous in the darkest of ways.  Isaac's best friend works at the neighboring hotel, part of the same chain.  They share whiskey and race luggage carts down the hotel halls for entertainment.  Isaac has other methods of coping with the stress and boredom of his job, especially on the roof of the ho This book is for anyone who has felt that their job is a life sentence. For Isaac, it just might be.  He is the night auditor at a hotel, and the situations he gets into are not only unbelievable but humorous in the darkest of ways.  Isaac's best friend works at the neighboring hotel, part of the same chain.  They share whiskey and race luggage carts down the hotel halls for entertainment.  Isaac has other methods of coping with the stress and boredom of his job, especially on the roof of the hotel.  Little does he know that he is being watched.  The hapless auditor is about to become involved with some downright evil characters, and the more he tries to extricate himself, the more calamitous and harrowing his situation becomes.  Isaac's life has been a comedy of errors, and you can't help but feel badly for him.  He is mugged for a wallet full of money he has just found.  Dead bodies are tainting the air in his apartment.  Owls talk to him in the passenger seat of his car.  Can't a guy just get away from it all?  Isaac tries, and the tragicomedy takes him to his destiny.  This is the definition of job hell.  Welcome to the Goddamn Hotel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Issac is a "night auditor" for a chain of motels in Texas. His time there (when he's lucky), consist of masterbating on the roof, hours of Netflix, talks with his fellow auditor from across the way, George, and making pancakes for a bulimic woman that he thinks he's in love with. Unfortunately, there are times when he actually has to unclog toilets, bring towels to the guests, evade domestic disputes, and hear tales of owls that like to eat the face off of people. Quite the life. Until he gets cau Issac is a "night auditor" for a chain of motels in Texas. His time there (when he's lucky), consist of masterbating on the roof, hours of Netflix, talks with his fellow auditor from across the way, George, and making pancakes for a bulimic woman that he thinks he's in love with. Unfortunately, there are times when he actually has to unclog toilets, bring towels to the guests, evade domestic disputes, and hear tales of owls that like to eat the face off of people. Quite the life. Until he gets caught up in a situation with two brothers that he can't extradite himself from. Then the owl stories keep pouring in..... And there's that business of trying to dispose of bodies before the authorities get involved--Issac can't help but feel he didn't exactly sign up for any of this. If you've never read anything from Max Booth III before, you're in for a treat with this one! The dark comedic situations make this a fast-paced novel where everything can--and does--change from moment to moment. Issac is a character that you can't help but understand--his life is fully fleshed out by what he does and thinks, much more so that anything he actually "states". Stuck in a dead end job, where his aspirations have pretty much dried up into day-to-day monotony, things can only get better, right? An entertaining novel filled with unexpected challenges of all sorts (and OWLS)!!! I read this book first as a serial novel in the DarkFuse magazine, and have come to the conclusion that it is nearly torturous to have to wait for the next chapter, at times. ;) Highly recommended!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Danger

    A hallucinatory and hilarious novel that functions somewhere between a crime caper and a suicide note. The story centers around Isaac, the night auditor at a crappy hotel. He hates his customers, he hates his job, and he’s suffering from (possible) delusions involving owls. But things go from bad to worse when a couple of shady counterfeiters blackmail him into helping with their criminal enterprise. What follows is a comedy of errors so violent and pitch-black it’s like a slapstick version of a A hallucinatory and hilarious novel that functions somewhere between a crime caper and a suicide note. The story centers around Isaac, the night auditor at a crappy hotel. He hates his customers, he hates his job, and he’s suffering from (possible) delusions involving owls. But things go from bad to worse when a couple of shady counterfeiters blackmail him into helping with their criminal enterprise. What follows is a comedy of errors so violent and pitch-black it’s like a slapstick version of a Coen Brothers movie. Not every plot twist clicked completely into place (there are like a dozen plot twists) because we’re experiencing the story through someone so acerbic and sleep-deprived, but the lines between reality and fantasy gleefully dissolve from the first chapter, and ramp up until a crazy and satisfying conclusion. This was a really fun book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Isaac may be the worst hotel night auditor ever. In between his sleep depraved hallucinations, owl obsessions and late night rooftop jerking, he is rude to his customers, in love with a mysterious homeless girl and is totally crappy at disposing of bodies. He makes pretty good pancakes though, so there’s that. Too bad they don’t seem to last very long in the stomach. Not really a spoiler, just a meaningless rant that has basically nothing to do with the story: (view spoiler)[I read this one as a Isaac may be the worst hotel night auditor ever. In between his sleep depraved hallucinations, owl obsessions and late night rooftop jerking, he is rude to his customers, in love with a mysterious homeless girl and is totally crappy at disposing of bodies. He makes pretty good pancakes though, so there’s that. Too bad they don’t seem to last very long in the stomach. Not really a spoiler, just a meaningless rant that has basically nothing to do with the story: (view spoiler)[I read this one as an online serial over at DarkFuse Magazine and really enjoyed it. Serials are tough for me (I have said this more than once) and they are hard to review as well, because the reading is broken up into sections and spread out over many days. I much prefer to read as much as I want, when I want, without the restrictions of having to wait for the next installment to be released. Yes, I could just wait for it to be released in full and read it that way, but I am not a good waiter. Well then you could just re-read it when it comes out, you say. Hahaha! You are funny. I am not re-reading anything. Have you seen my tbr? Fug. Rant done. Mic dropped. Me exiting. (hide spoiler)] A surreal and humorous trip into the world of the seedy hotel night auditor. A winner from Max Booth III. If the rest of his stuff is as good as this one, then I need to get to more of his work with a quickness. A solid 4 trippy owl stars.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Benoit Lelièvre

    Max Booth III is improving with every release and THE NIGHTLY DISEASE is a major step up. What begins as the somewhat amusing chronicles of a lonely hotel night auditor take a strange turn about a third into the novel when the surreal nature of the night and his sleep deprived subconscious start to get the better of him. Think the Grand Budapest Hotel meets Lost Highway. It's funny, heartwarming, terrifying and yet it's nearly impossible to tell what is real and what is projected by protagonist' Max Booth III is improving with every release and THE NIGHTLY DISEASE is a major step up. What begins as the somewhat amusing chronicles of a lonely hotel night auditor take a strange turn about a third into the novel when the surreal nature of the night and his sleep deprived subconscious start to get the better of him. Think the Grand Budapest Hotel meets Lost Highway. It's funny, heartwarming, terrifying and yet it's nearly impossible to tell what is real and what is projected by protagonist' Isaac's subconscious. Is Isaac sleeping? Is he taking active part in the most bizarre nightmare he's ever had? Or has his most bizarre nightmare and reality simply fused? THE NIGHTLY DISEASE is a hypnagogic delight that everyone can enjoy, but ESPECIALLY people who don't sleep all that well.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    The book has just enough typos to frustrate me, and some continuity and logistical weirdness that twigged me every time I spotted it, but it's very tightly written, very well-paced, and it trout-slapped me with its plot twists, which hardly ever happens--less because I'm a precognitive reader (but I am) than because so many people are predictable writers. Those said: It's about a night auditor, which is part of what attracted me to it, okay, I held that position for a few years, in the carefree da The book has just enough typos to frustrate me, and some continuity and logistical weirdness that twigged me every time I spotted it, but it's very tightly written, very well-paced, and it trout-slapped me with its plot twists, which hardly ever happens--less because I'm a precognitive reader (but I am) than because so many people are predictable writers. Those said: It's about a night auditor, which is part of what attracted me to it, okay, I held that position for a few years, in the carefree days of my youth, though nowhere near Texas, where the book is set. I did it in the wintry wilds of northern Alberta. It beat digging ditches, as an old boss of mine was fond of saying, but make no mistake, if you do that job, you'll See Some Shit, and it will change you in ways you never would have imagined. I never did any of the things that Isaac does in the book (even before the cheddar falls off his Triscuit,) but I, uh. I did some things. (Don't you judge me. Things were done to me first!) Anyway! I don't want to get specific about it any way, because I don't want to ruin it for you, it's chockablock with surprises, so let me simply say the following: 1. From a storytelling perspective, one aspect of Isaac's dilemma reminded me strongly of Fargo (movie, come on, don't be disgusting) but in a clever, DL sort of way, not in a grody "It's an HOMAGE, Mom!" way. 2. By the time I was about 2/3 in, I was really frustrated with Isaac, okay, his life never was all that great, and it descends into the Pits of Despair through the course of the book, what with one thing and another. I sat there thinking "For Christ's sake, man, why don't you just fucking quit?" and I was so angry with the author for writing him that way, it's just common sense, okay, but then my brain served up a sepia-toned montage of the 836,297 times Bad Stuff has happened to me at work, and I've complained about it, and someone has said "For Christ's sake, man, why don't you just fucking quit?"... ...and I've gone ahead and like not done that, at all. Not even considered doing it. Fucking brilliant. 3. I just really really liked that Isaac is such a sleazy, foul-mouthed misanthrope, but he drinks Malibu at home. You're a girl-drink drunk, Isaac. Accept it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Rolfe

    THE NIGHTLY DISEASE is another slice of Max Booth III's unique mind. I've read two of his previous works (Toxicity and Black), both equally fucked up and interesting. I must admit, THE NIGHTLY DISEASE, hits far closer to home. Being a hotel auditor, I recognize a billion hideous acts and people within these pages. We follow night auditor, Issac, as he talks us through his depressing and miserable existence. The narrative, while dark, sad, and all too true for many, is spiced up by Booth's talent THE NIGHTLY DISEASE is another slice of Max Booth III's unique mind. I've read two of his previous works (Toxicity and Black), both equally fucked up and interesting. I must admit, THE NIGHTLY DISEASE, hits far closer to home. Being a hotel auditor, I recognize a billion hideous acts and people within these pages. We follow night auditor, Issac, as he talks us through his depressing and miserable existence. The narrative, while dark, sad, and all too true for many, is spiced up by Booth's talent and the raw but entertaining thoughts and observations of the protagonist. Issac's crazy few weeks include tales of thieves, thugs, owls, drinking with George from the Other Goddamn Hotel, falling in love with a bulimic girl with terrible breath, robbery, owls, murder, and owls...hoot, hoot! I've mentioned in a past review of the author's work that his love for work of Quentin Tarantino (one I share) oozes like pus from the blisters on the thumbs holding his pen. There's even references to KILL BILL and PULP FICTION. One scene, Issac wished he could call "Mr. Wolf" when he finds himself in a situation similar to that of poor Marvin. The story, much like movies like the above mention QT films, and movies like FARGO and THE BIG LEBOWSKI, is fun, crazy, but always entertaining. There is a bit of heart in here, but its so messed up, it just gets mixed up and lost with all the other madness surrounding our unfortunate, poor choice-making night auditor. All in all, fun, crazy, entertaining with boatloads of dark humor. I give THE NIGHTLY DISEASE 4 stars!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    I got to say that this novel is very enjoyable. It reminds me of the work published from the Dell Abyss line in the ‘90s. You know, a little horror here, a darkly humorous passage there. This original tale of a bored hotel night auditor who’s going rather cuckoo is filled with psychedelic images and unpredictable situations. Max Booth III is an author to watch. Told in the first person, his narrative is fun and as strong as that face-eating owl that keeps coming back in his story (a sort of a ho I got to say that this novel is very enjoyable. It reminds me of the work published from the Dell Abyss line in the ‘90s. You know, a little horror here, a darkly humorous passage there. This original tale of a bored hotel night auditor who’s going rather cuckoo is filled with psychedelic images and unpredictable situations. Max Booth III is an author to watch. Told in the first person, his narrative is fun and as strong as that face-eating owl that keeps coming back in his story (a sort of a homage to Charles Grant’s THE NESTLING, don’t you think?) Indeed, THE NIGHTLY DISEASE is a novel that’s clearly authentic, and one that should be highly enjoyed by those on the lookout for something different. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the chance to read this novel in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rodney

    Most​ ​of​ ​us​ ​have​ ​had​ ​a​ ​job​ ​we​ ​hated​ ​at​ ​some​ ​point​ ​in​ ​our​ ​lives,​ ​perhaps​ ​still​ ​do.​ ​I​ ​was​ ​so impressed​ ​with​ ​the​ ​way​ ​the​ ​author​ ​turned​ ​these​ ​experiences​ ​into​ ​a​ ​well​ ​developed​ ​and cynically​ ​comical​ ​story, placing those ​thoughts we often keep to ourselves​​ remarkably​​ ​​well​​ ​​into ​​words.​ ​I was​ ​hooked​ ​from​ ​the​ ​start,​ ​with​ ​the​ ​“list​ ​of​ ​responsibilities”​ ​you​ ​must​ ​fulfill​ ​to​ ​be​ ​a​ ​successful hote Most​ ​of​ ​us​ ​have​ ​had​ ​a​ ​job​ ​we​ ​hated​ ​at​ ​some​ ​point​ ​in​ ​our​ ​lives,​ ​perhaps​ ​still​ ​do.​ ​I​ ​was​ ​so impressed​ ​with​ ​the​ ​way​ ​the​ ​author​ ​turned​ ​these​ ​experiences​ ​into​ ​a​ ​well​ ​developed​ ​and cynically​ ​comical​ ​story, placing those ​thoughts we often keep to ourselves​​ remarkably​​ ​​well​​ ​​into ​​words.​ ​I was​ ​hooked​ ​from​ ​the​ ​start,​ ​with​ ​the​ ​“list​ ​of​ ​responsibilities”​ ​you​ ​must​ ​fulfill​ ​to​ ​be​ ​a​ ​successful hotel​ ​night​ ​auditor.​ ​The​​ ​Nightly​​ ​​Disease​ ​is​​ ​​a​​ ​​black​​ ​​comedy​​ ​​of​​ ​​errors.​ ​A​​ ​​disenchanted​​ ​​protagonis​t at​​ ​​the​​ ​​end​​ ​​of​​ ​​his​​ ​​rope​​ ​​is​​ ​​pulled​​ ​​into​​ ​​things​​ ​​he​​ ​​is​ ​not​​ ​​capable​​ ​​of​​ ​​handling.​ ​You’ll​ ​laugh​ ​with,​ ​cheer for,​ ​empathize​ ​and​ ​ultimately​ ​connect​ ​with​ ​Isaac.​ ​​Max​ ​Booth​ ​III​ ​has​ ​solidified​ ​himself​ ​as​ ​one​ ​of my​ ​favorite​ ​authors.​ ​I​ ​never​ ​know​ ​what​ ​I​ ​will​ ​get​ ​when​ ​I​ ​pick​ ​up​ ​one of his​ ​books​,​ ​but​ ​I always​ ​enjoy​ ​it.​ ​This​ ​is​ ​a​ ​fantastic​ ​place​ ​to​ ​start​ ​if​ ​you​ ​have​ ​yet​ ​to​ ​read​ ​any​ ​of​ ​his​ ​work.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    Isaac is a night auditor for the Goddamn Hotel, who, when not reading, watching porn or Netflix, or masturbating off the roof and onto the cars parked in the lot below, is dealing with surly, ignorant guests, deadbeat travelers, grifters, and the occasional corpse. After stealing a guest's lost wallet, and shocked by the disturbing owl-related attack of a co-worker, Isaac is caught up in some dark situations well and truly over his head. He also has a crush on a homeless bulimic girl. By turns fu Isaac is a night auditor for the Goddamn Hotel, who, when not reading, watching porn or Netflix, or masturbating off the roof and onto the cars parked in the lot below, is dealing with surly, ignorant guests, deadbeat travelers, grifters, and the occasional corpse. After stealing a guest's lost wallet, and shocked by the disturbing owl-related attack of a co-worker, Isaac is caught up in some dark situations well and truly over his head. He also has a crush on a homeless bulimic girl. By turns funny and macabre, dark and sentimental, The Nightly Disease is a crime story with shades of horror, wrapped in the sensibility of retail hell. Originally published by DarkFuse Magazine as an online serial, the story has now been collected in a limited edition hardcover with a forthcoming ebook due out in 2017. As somebody who spent too many years working in retail, and even longer working with the public (with no end in sight...), Isaac is a guy I could relate to a little too well. He gets inundated with idiotic requests, selfish demands, and entitled assholes who think the concept of the customer is always right actually means something. I definitely got where Isaac was coming from, even as he goes off the deep end, and Max Booth III's writing is clearly drawn from a deep pool of real-life experiences. Booth, himself a hotel night auditor, no doubt has many more such stories saved for other books. Isaac's relationships with Kia, the bulimic homeless girl, hits a particularly strong chord and their relationship is explored rather tenderly. This unlikely romance is a terrific mirror for Isaac as he weighs who he is versus who he wants to be. The Nightly Disease is a successful fusion of multiple genres told right from the ground-level of the eternal war between the public and the workers that serve them while struggling to maintain not only their integrity and individual identity, but their sanity, as well. Note that this last item is especially important and a more difficult struggle than most civilians realize. Booth captures that particular essence here especially well. There's also a good deal of owls, which is clearly always a bonus. If Booth intended to drive his readers into seeing owls everywhere, it worked. This book got a little too into my head, but that's OK because at least now Owlbert and Chowls can keep me company. [Note: I received an advanced copy of this title via NetGalley as part of the DarkFuse Readers Group.]

  13. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    Wow. THE NIGHTLY DISEASE by Max Booth III is an amazing story. Who knew you could take your crummy night shift job, add in some owls and sprinkle it over a gripping crime story and get a masterpiece? Max Booth! That's who! From the opening line of the book and straight through to the final period, THE NIGHTLY DISEASE drags you into its talons and refuses to let go. So many great, quotable sentences pepper the pages of the book. The prose is wonderful. The plot is nerveracking. Isaac, the protagon Wow. THE NIGHTLY DISEASE by Max Booth III is an amazing story. Who knew you could take your crummy night shift job, add in some owls and sprinkle it over a gripping crime story and get a masterpiece? Max Booth! That's who! From the opening line of the book and straight through to the final period, THE NIGHTLY DISEASE drags you into its talons and refuses to let go. So many great, quotable sentences pepper the pages of the book. The prose is wonderful. The plot is nerveracking. Isaac, the protagonist, is a consumate fuck-up who makes choices that should make you hate him and yet you find him endearing and can't help but route for him. This book is nominated for the 2017 Wonderland Book Award as of the writing of this review. I thought my pick for the award was a long standing lock. This confuses things. It is a great book that deserves to be elevated above the confines of genre and be appreciated on a mass scale. Bravo, Max, Bravo.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marvin

    It is said one should write about what they know. Max Booth definitely knows something about night auditing in a hotel. Much of what is in The Nightly Disease comes from his experiences working that very job; hopefully not the actual events but from the strange and cynical atmosphere that night duty brings. Having worked a series of night shifts in a series of strange jobs in my much younger years, I can vouch that the midnight hours brings out a different and not always complimentary side of hu It is said one should write about what they know. Max Booth definitely knows something about night auditing in a hotel. Much of what is in The Nightly Disease comes from his experiences working that very job; hopefully not the actual events but from the strange and cynical atmosphere that night duty brings. Having worked a series of night shifts in a series of strange jobs in my much younger years, I can vouch that the midnight hours brings out a different and not always complimentary side of human nature. But so far none of my nighttime jobs ever involved, at least directly, owls. Only my daytime ones. The Nightly Disease centers around a hotel night auditor by the name of Isaac. In first person narrative, he gets right down to telling us about what a lousy job he has. His only real only friend is George the night auditor at the hotel next door. Asides from George, the only other thing he looks forward to each night is the bulimic homeless girl who comes into the hotel to purge. There is one other interesting girl he meets, a new night auditor who biggest dream is to pet an owl. So it is a bad sign when she ends up dead, killed by an owl that attacks her. Owls figure heavily in Booth's noirish yet weird novel. What their role actually is may be argued even after you finished the last page. They give the book a fantastic feel but are more of a omen (appropriately if you know your Native American folklore) than the main event. Isaac's nightly encounters are both mundane and surreal at the same time. It is a bit like Bukowski's nihilism meets Tom Robbins' mirth. Booth could have made the questionable decision to write a wandering narrative steeped in the negativity of lost hotel characters but instead he wisely chooses to add a main event that gives the plot a focus and Isaac a challenge. Isaac doesn't see it that way but views it as an exclamation point to his drudge of a life and it's inescapable dead end. But in a typical noir move there is a girl that may be his ticket to a meaningful life. Yes, it is the bulimic one. Even hotel night auditors have dreams and sometimes you have to take them where they drop. While Booth is usually associated with writings of the surreal and bizarre, this particular book reads fairly straight. That does not mean it isn't strange, just the type of strange that makes sense in an alienating world. In fact, of the things I've read by the author, this is probably the most mainstream . (Gasp!) It is, as expected, beautifully written with dialogue and descriptions that grabs your jugular. It is a darkly comedic story which smacks head first into existential angst and comes out the other side with a least a little hope for the human race, not to mention one hotel night auditor. Max Booth III is one of those authors to look out for and The Nightly Disease is the first substantial and thoughtful fiction of the new year.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    I don't know where to start. Part of me says what the hell did I just read? Yet I have to admit I flew through this book (like an owl?) and couldn't put it down. Isaac is a young man who has led a very strange life. We are given a small glimpse into his past when as a young teen he was uprooted from his home.. though we are not given the why of it all. Do we need to know? I can't say the not knowing took away from my enjoyment of this humorous and horrifying story but I am certainly curious. Cur I don't know where to start. Part of me says what the hell did I just read? Yet I have to admit I flew through this book (like an owl?) and couldn't put it down. Isaac is a young man who has led a very strange life. We are given a small glimpse into his past when as a young teen he was uprooted from his home.. though we are not given the why of it all. Do we need to know? I can't say the not knowing took away from my enjoyment of this humorous and horrifying story but I am certainly curious. Currently sleeping days and working nights at the "Goddamn Hotel" Isaac is subjected to a strange cast of inhabitants on a nightly basis, including a homeless bulimic girl that he thinks he's in love with and whom he tries to win over with waffles, and a criminal element selling knock offs of name brand shoes. Then there are the owls, do not pet the owls! If you like dark twisted humor with your horror this is most definitely for you. I received an advance copy for review

  16. 5 out of 5

    The Grim Reader

    ‘The Nightly Disease’ is a book Mr Booth has been working on for some time. If you follow his amusing ramblings on social media then you will be well aware that Max is a night auditor at a hotel. Servicing his guests with a smile and always being sure that they are spending the night in comfort, overwhelmed with the scent of freshly washed towels, Max decided to write a surreal book about some the exploits of Isaac – a young chap also working the graveyard shift. What follows is a tale of death, ‘The Nightly Disease’ is a book Mr Booth has been working on for some time. If you follow his amusing ramblings on social media then you will be well aware that Max is a night auditor at a hotel. Servicing his guests with a smile and always being sure that they are spending the night in comfort, overwhelmed with the scent of freshly washed towels, Max decided to write a surreal book about some the exploits of Isaac – a young chap also working the graveyard shift. What follows is a tale of death, loneliness, love (sort of) and owls! ‘The Nightly Disease’ blurs lines between what is real and what is not, it is left to the reader to decide as Isaac’s sleep deprivation and constant annoyance at his guests drives him insane. An impossible love interest with a bulimic girl is a nice touch and further details Isaac’s desire for a little companionship. Isaac is a bit of a sad sack, sarcastic, but you can’t help but like the guy. ‘The Nightly Disease’ is a unique book and I doubt you will read anything quite like it in this year or the next. It certainly is a dark book, but filled with enough humour to keep it from becoming depressing. The writing is sharp and the novel moves at a more than brisk pace as Isaac spirals into madness. Isaac is a fully realised and realistic character. He has problems, like we all do, he makes mistakes, but at his core he is human. I’m not sure if he is the most likeable of people but if you have ever worked nights in any trade, especially in hospitality then there are certain aspects of his personality you will connect with. On the surface ‘The Nightly Disease’ is a darkly humorous tale of one mans struggle with life, but if you dig deeper then there is much more than meets the eye. I suppose that ‘The Nightly Disease’ is a tricky one to pigeonhole, if you really wanted to then I guess you could say that it’s a Bizarro book. Whatever it is, it’s a great read from a writer you are never quite sure what you are going to get next, and here is where one of Booth’s strengths lie. One of the most original and thoughtful books of 2016.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Berg

    Fock Wurk. This was a fun read about owls and death, some vomit and masturbation, stuffed with some really great references to movies in the everyday life of a night auditor. I liked reading that everyone finds the shortcuts to avoid actual work and develops creative ways to entertain themselves while the clock drags on the job, and that the narrator knows customers despise him just as much as he does them. I laughed at many parts, cringed at a few, but really enjoyed this thing. The plot took m Fock Wurk. This was a fun read about owls and death, some vomit and masturbation, stuffed with some really great references to movies in the everyday life of a night auditor. I liked reading that everyone finds the shortcuts to avoid actual work and develops creative ways to entertain themselves while the clock drags on the job, and that the narrator knows customers despise him just as much as he does them. I laughed at many parts, cringed at a few, but really enjoyed this thing. The plot took me by surprise often, very creative and well-written story that made for a satisfying read. Everyone hates work, but maybe Eye Sick had a worse day than you. See for yourself.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vincenzo Bilof

    Working with the public in an entry-level job can be demoralizing; whether you work in retail or fast food, the dregs of humanity and the individual’s desire to lord their power over the laborer send shivers down the spines of those who know. Some people make a career out of it and go into management, while others find a way to move into another career or end up suffering through it for a very long time. The Nightly Disease is Max Booth III’s novel of an existential crises suffered by a young ma Working with the public in an entry-level job can be demoralizing; whether you work in retail or fast food, the dregs of humanity and the individual’s desire to lord their power over the laborer send shivers down the spines of those who know. Some people make a career out of it and go into management, while others find a way to move into another career or end up suffering through it for a very long time. The Nightly Disease is Max Booth III’s novel of an existential crises suffered by a young man who works in a hotel—Isaac—and we find reason to laugh at the horror of the character’s all-too-familiar struggles, and we are thankful it’s him rather than us. If you work in any customer service industry, Isaac is the anarchic, lovable character who is never heroic but is every bit of hardass we want to be on the job. If you’ve thought about doing it, Isaac has, too, and he is probably acting on it… Storytellers usually craft characters we can empathize with, and in the case of Isaac, we are going to ask a lot of the same questions that people ask of anyone who hates their job: why don’t you get another job? Why don’t you get an education, pursue a career? Booth gives us the snapshot of a character who inherits the damning position, and we’re able to experience the debilitating conditions that imprison people in menial jobs that they hate. We ask these questions of people all the time, but more importantly, why are they here, and how did they get to this point? This is where the narrative shines brightest; Isaac is “committed” in the way that a mental patient is committed to a clinic, and the emotional/mental cost allows for Booth’s touch of surrealism to creep into the narrative in believable fashion. If we can believe how awful people are willing to act toward another human being in public, it’s not a stretch for talking owls to appear. I realize how unbelievable that seems, but in the context of the narrative, Booth’s ability to add surrealism underscores the plot’s chain of events. Present is Booth’s flair for dialogue and situational tragic-comedy in the vein of Cohen Brothers slapstick. This book did manage to get a few guffaws out of me, and Isaac’s cognizance of his plight ensured that I never pitied the character or found him pathetic, despite moments of wallowing and despair; if I found the character helpless and pitiful without any qualities that would engender further exploration of Booth’s world, I would have put this one down quickly. As with the majority of Booth’s work, his ability to weave self-loathing into a fantastical situation elevates the comedic elements and allows the dialogue to shine. Booth, and by extension, Isaac, is a juggler of chaos, and even more objects are tossed into the air near the novel’s conclusion, as Isaac’s gradual unraveling teaches our protagonist a bleak and realistic life lesson. A dark comedy that hits all the right emotional notes at the right time. Whenever I attempt to review a novel, I always review in the context of its genre with consideration to overall personal entertainment; Booth’s approach is unique, which is why I pick up each new novel with one big question: how is he going to do it this time? By IT, I mean get me to laugh, wince, and connect. Another engaging Boothian read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I will not do this book justice with this review, but I'll try. This was the kind of read I want to say is heart-breaking, fun, weird, impenetrable, bizarre as can be, un-put-down-able, and a dozen other adjectives that won't describe it adequately. Full disclosure: Booth published one of my stories in his Lost Signals anthology, but I don't know him personally and as far as I know don't owe him my allegiance, soul, or first-born. This is as honest review as I can write of an author who shares a I will not do this book justice with this review, but I'll try. This was the kind of read I want to say is heart-breaking, fun, weird, impenetrable, bizarre as can be, un-put-down-able, and a dozen other adjectives that won't describe it adequately. Full disclosure: Booth published one of my stories in his Lost Signals anthology, but I don't know him personally and as far as I know don't owe him my allegiance, soul, or first-born. This is as honest review as I can write of an author who shares a Venn diagram overlapping connection with me in the horror community, but nothing else. To begin with: I heard about this book when it became the subject of a really unfortunate drama. Booth mentions this in the intro so I won't go over it but basically about a month after this novel was originally released, the publisher went under. He re-released it a year or so later under his own imprint (and with a really cool cover) and provided a new introduction. Folks, the introduction itself is a work of art. In a book that is unashamedly an autobiographical fantasy, the honestly of the intro was heart-breaking. I'd never thought of the culture of people who live in hotels. Actually live in them. As in, have no other home. Buy this book IF ONLY for the introduction. It reads like some of the finest New Yorker creative non-fiction and is so incredibly moving that I had to take a moment to rethink my own petty family complaints. The book is so much weird fun and in such an unusual genre for me that I don't know how to describe it. Is it bizarro? It's definitely bizarre but it makes sense, has a logical consistency to the story, and is just incredibly enjoyable to read. There's a great plot here, albeit a weird one, and I was left thinking the story sort of plays out like a Kevin Smith movie, but with more maturity and a sense of deeper, lingering meaning. When I finished the book, I wanted more. It was a strange trip, but I didn't want it to end. Booth's writing is succinct while at the same time eloquent and his imagery is evocative and unique. I sincerely hope he's not a jerk in real life because I'd hate to gush this much over somebody who I wouldn't share an elevator with, but even so, this is a fine work of unusual horror, a great thriller, and a trip into a world of murderous owls, witless murderers, bulimics, and counterfeiters that I hope Booth might re-visit with a sequel.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mommacat

    Isaac works the graveyard shift at a hotel. As anyone who has ever worked a customer service job can tell you, it will drive you insane. Poor Isaac is no exception. Broke, sleep deprived and hating the guests who come to the hotel Isaac finds himself in one bad situation after another. Having worked the graveyard yard for a mother effing airline myself, I can only wonder how Max Booth III managed to get his hands on my journal. Every rant he rants is true. And it's true for everyone who must talk Isaac works the graveyard shift at a hotel. As anyone who has ever worked a customer service job can tell you, it will drive you insane. Poor Isaac is no exception. Broke, sleep deprived and hating the guests who come to the hotel Isaac finds himself in one bad situation after another. Having worked the graveyard yard for a mother effing airline myself, I can only wonder how Max Booth III managed to get his hands on my journal. Every rant he rants is true. And it's true for everyone who must talk to the public, be it at a restaurant, hotel or airline. It's sad, funny, and true. It's highly recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Proença

    i just finished reading this book in a hotel, and this certainly enhancend the experience. my actual review will be short: Max Booth III is one of my favorite writers in the business today. No one writes dialogue like him in the indie press world. Everyone should read him. Like, now.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Acanthea Grimscythe | The Ghastly Grimoire

    I really don’t know how I feel about Max Booth III’s The Nightly Disease. Published initially as a serial in DarkFuse’s magazine, The Nightly Disease follows a hotel night auditor’s descent into madness as everything that can go wrong, does go wrong. In a series of darkly comedic and horrific events, the reader joins Isaac on a crazy ride, rife with some of the most outrageous occurrences a person could encounter. Single, living alone, and working a job where he knows he’ll go nowhere, Isaac spe I really don’t know how I feel about Max Booth III’s The Nightly Disease. Published initially as a serial in DarkFuse’s magazine, The Nightly Disease follows a hotel night auditor’s descent into madness as everything that can go wrong, does go wrong. In a series of darkly comedic and horrific events, the reader joins Isaac on a crazy ride, rife with some of the most outrageous occurrences a person could encounter. Single, living alone, and working a job where he knows he’ll go nowhere, Isaac spends most of his nights between running the audit and preparing breakfast with his nose in a book, watching Netflix, or rubbing one out on the roof of the hotel he works at. He has a clear disdain for his job and spares no love for the guests that stay at his hotel, which all appear to be exceptionally rude (not that he’s any better). After he finds a wallet and decides to keep it, things escalate quickly and soon he is hiding bodies while trying to appease his invisible companions, Chowls and Owlbert. I think what throws me off the most about this book is that it can be a bit difficult to follow at times. As Isaac loses his mind, the writing takes on a more frantic, senseless air that seriously messed with me reading it – to the point I almost put it down. It wasn’t a bad book, by any means. In fact, I think there’s a lot to be said about the fact that I felt like I was losing my mind reading it; Isaac’s perspective is extremely well-written. Overall, I did not care that much for The Nightly Disease. It was nice to be able to identify with the main character to some degree – if only because I work the night audit shift at a hotel myself, and most hotels seem to work pretty much the same way. Other than that, I prefer books with a lot more depth and a bit more of a serious tone. While The Nightly Disease wasn’t really something I’m into, I definitely plan to look into Max Booth III’s other books. His writing style is great. I would like to thank NetGalley and DarkFuse for providing me with an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    FabulousRaye

    Review is percolating like coffee.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rob Twinem

    The story of Issac, a night auditor, at the Goddam Hotel somewhere in Texas, the people he meets, the troubles he endures, and the somewhat full on life he leads. The way of the author, the somewhat in your face prose, and the rather bizarre storyline is either something you will love or hate. In the beginning I enjoyed but by the midway point I felt the whole thing somewhat bizarre and wished for the party to be over. Not an author I would choose to read in the future......

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shadow Girl

    I saw this on Netgalley first, and since I'm Social Media buddies with the author, the book's description had me searching for a GIMMIE! link before I was even finished reading it! (see the GR comment I left on the 27th, before I even got the book >.< ) Excellent read, and full review will be posted soon. I saw this on Netgalley first, and since I'm Social Media buddies with the author, the book's description had me searching for a GIMMIE! link before I was even finished reading it! (see the GR comment I left on the 27th, before I even got the book >.< ) Excellent read, and full review will be posted soon.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hatchet Mouth

    This book is the real deal. Well written, goes at a manic pace, layered characters, Lebowski-like hijinks.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paul Anderson

    The Nightly Disease is about Isaac, a night auditor at a mid-tier hotel in the guts of Texas. Living a life best encapsulated by Trent Reznor’s “Every Day Is Exactly the Same” in 2004, a moment of selfishness, mingled with a moment of intense loneliness, soon spirals out of control in the most ridiculous, but oddly logical way. The novel takes huge chunks of Max’s actual life–motel life, his job, the chronic masturbation–and fictionalizes them, passing it all through a filter in Max’s mind that n The Nightly Disease is about Isaac, a night auditor at a mid-tier hotel in the guts of Texas. Living a life best encapsulated by Trent Reznor’s “Every Day Is Exactly the Same” in 2004, a moment of selfishness, mingled with a moment of intense loneliness, soon spirals out of control in the most ridiculous, but oddly logical way. The novel takes huge chunks of Max’s actual life–motel life, his job, the chronic masturbation–and fictionalizes them, passing it all through a filter in Max’s mind that no man should behold. Throughout all of it, fatalism permeates–you know that, even if Isaac survives, he won’t change and, ultimately, he’ll wind up in exactly the same situation as at the start of the novel. The story SHOULDN’T work, but does; Max’s prose line always read, to me, like he’s sprinting along a high wire, with only one false turn of phrase or sequence to send him and the story plummeting to mutual, glorious death; as he gets more confident and skilled, it becomes more like sprinting across a balance beam and the likelihood of him (and the story) failing becoming slighter. The absurd elements (they all involve owls) are handled deftly; you could make convincing arguments that either they really happened or Isaac is really cracked. Either one works. Usually a writer tips their hand pretty definitively, or at least leans to one side, but the lunatic portions of our program are left completely to the reader to decide on. I find that neat. What struck me most about the novel is that Isaac is probably the worst hero–but also probably the most realistic because the dude, in his decision-making, is as shortsighted a person can be…which is fairly representative of the world at large. The reader keeps hoping Isaac will make sense and the right decision but, no, he left-turns into utter disaster and you can only shrug and go, “You know, that actually makes sense. The big, dumb idiot.” In the end, The Nightly Disease follows what can now be typified as a “Max Booth III novel”: violent, absurd, fun to read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher Triana

    Have you ever worked in the service industry? Were you a waitress, a cashier, a customer service rep, a department manager, or a general punching bag for anyone holding a dollar in the face of your greedy corporate masters? Well, Isaac can empathize. He's a young night manager at a hotel. He works the late, late, late shift, auditing and dealing with the kind of people who wander in and out of hotels in Texas at four in the morning. He spends his downtime reading horror novels, watching porn, an Have you ever worked in the service industry? Were you a waitress, a cashier, a customer service rep, a department manager, or a general punching bag for anyone holding a dollar in the face of your greedy corporate masters? Well, Isaac can empathize. He's a young night manager at a hotel. He works the late, late, late shift, auditing and dealing with the kind of people who wander in and out of hotels in Texas at four in the morning. He spends his downtime reading horror novels, watching porn, and masturbating on the roof of said hotel. But Isaac gets a breath of fresh air when a homeless bulimic girl enters his life. He falls deeply in love with her, despite his general misanthropy. His nihilism recedes in her presence, even if his self-hatred never wanes. But things start to unravel when Isaac runs afoul of a shoe selling redneck and his criminal brother, a co-worker gets her face eaten by owls, and dead bodies start to pile up when Isaac has nowhere to put them. Will our overweight hero ever get his new girl to love him as much as he loves her, or will the owls tear his face off with the help of a couple of dirty cowboys? In Booth's latest mind-twister, he brings his signature black comedy to a tale of miserable servitude and dark hallucination. There are touches of David Lynch and Thomas Ligotti style strangeness, with some of that Coen Brothers humor, and a hefty dose of Chuck Palahniuk's angry-young-man rants. The book is laugh out loud funny, gory, vivid and filled with a seething hatred for one's fellow man. These are all the things I enjoy in a book. I was once an angry young man. Now I'm a just-don't-give-a-damn-near-middle-age man. But I remember those dark days of anguish where I worked in a high-end grocery store and dealt with entitled soccer moms, and the brain melting 3am to 11am shift I once worked on a loading dock. I could really identify with Isaac, even if I've never had a conversation with an owl over where to hide the bodies. At least not that I can remember. The Nightly Disease is a good-sized book, but it is a fast, easy read. Great stuff.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eddie Generous

    Unnerving Magazine Review The Nightly Disease is nothing short of a hoot, a hoot I say… Wait. Note to self: it is wise to restrain enthusiasm in order to reserve a modicum of professionality. Isaac is a night auditor at a hotel, he’s luckless and bumbles into something too big for him to handle, well until the owls aid his growth. Full-bodied characters parade the lobby armed, sickly and demanding, the poor night auditor does what those in service for minimal wages do best, grabbing towels, plungi Unnerving Magazine Review The Nightly Disease is nothing short of a hoot, a hoot I say… Wait. Note to self: it is wise to restrain enthusiasm in order to reserve a modicum of professionality. Isaac is a night auditor at a hotel, he’s luckless and bumbles into something too big for him to handle, well until the owls aid his growth. Full-bodied characters parade the lobby armed, sickly and demanding, the poor night auditor does what those in service for minimal wages do best, grabbing towels, plunging cans, jerking off in semi-private all the while the world is coming down around him. The mounting absurdity snowballs into a winged cavalcade of carnage and action. To put things simply, this is a perfect example of what a comedic dark speculative fiction ought to strive towards when eyes seek a masterpiece of dark oddity for comparison. It’s loud and quick, it’s mysterious and grim. There’s a heroic crack in this nihilist’s skull where light and hope shines through bringing with it the weight of the universe. Just enough hapless hope to drive a man insane. I cackled idiotically numerous times. Uproarious is probably the suitable descriptor, and unabashedly so. The Nightly Disease is a barn dance in a leper colony, everybody’s cursed and nobody wants to admit their futility, so they keep on do-si-do-ing until the birdies come to pick at the mess. Engaging and mysterious, with tones not so different from Palahniuk's Fight Club and equally entertaining. The Nightly Disease is a paragon of this sub-genre and a bare glimpse into the service industry caste standing before the self-righteous credit card bearers of the world. A must read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    I'm a night auditor. I gravitated to The Nightly Disease because I wanted to read the bleary-eyed musings of another night auditor regarding this profession we equally esteem. But this book gave me no such thing. It became quickly apparent that the puzzling quirks of the other hotel employees was merely setting the stage for this story to ride right off the rails, much like the metaphors in this sentence just did. In fact, The Nightly Disease is not the memoirs of a night auditor but a work of biz I'm a night auditor. I gravitated to The Nightly Disease because I wanted to read the bleary-eyed musings of another night auditor regarding this profession we equally esteem. But this book gave me no such thing. It became quickly apparent that the puzzling quirks of the other hotel employees was merely setting the stage for this story to ride right off the rails, much like the metaphors in this sentence just did. In fact, The Nightly Disease is not the memoirs of a night auditor but a work of bizarro fiction, with no seeming rhyme or reason behind the cascading events our heroic auditor endures. And then I got to the last page. After reading chapter after chapter of random misadventures, I had reached the end. I read all the way to the final period, put the book down, and tried hard to swallow. He had done it. He had perfectly summed up the whole of a night auditor's existence, and he blindsided me with it out of nowhere. I had no choice but to applaud. Out loud. With guests downstairs to grab a cup of joe stared at me, trying to figure out if they were really awake or still upstairs dreaming.

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