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The stunning sequel to the awarding winning novel One Thousand White Women 9 March 1876 My name is Meggie Kelly and I take up this pencil with my twin sister, Susie. We have nothing left, less than nothing. The village of our People has been destroyed, all our possessions burned, our friends butchered by the soldiers, our baby daughters gone, frozen to death on an ungodly tr The stunning sequel to the awarding winning novel One Thousand White Women 9 March 1876 My name is Meggie Kelly and I take up this pencil with my twin sister, Susie. We have nothing left, less than nothing. The village of our People has been destroyed, all our possessions burned, our friends butchered by the soldiers, our baby daughters gone, frozen to death on an ungodly trek across these rocky mountains. Empty of human feeling, half-dead ourselves, all that remains of us intact are hearts turned to stone. We curse the U.S. government, we curse the Army, we curse the savagery of mankind, white and Indian alike. We curse God in his heaven. Do not underestimate the power of a mother’s vengeance... So begins the journal of Margaret Kelly, a woman who participated in the government's "Brides for Indians" program in 1873, a program whose conceit was that the way to peace between the United States and the Cheyenne Nation was for One Thousand White Women to be given as brides in exchange for three hundred horses. These "brides" were mostly fallen women; women in prison, prostitutes, the occasional adventurer, or those incarcerated in asylums. No one expected this program to work. The brides themselves thought it was simply a chance at freedom. But many of them fell in love with the Cheyennes spouses and had children with them...and became Cheyenne themselves. THE VENGEANCE OF MOTHERS is a novel that explores what happens to the bonds between wives and husbands, children and mothers, when society sees them as "unspeakable." What does it mean to be white, to be Cheyenne, and how far will these women go to avenge the ones they love? As he did in ONE THOUSAND WHITE WOMEN, Jim Fergus brings to light a time and place in American history, and fills it with unforgettable characters who live and breathe with a passion we can relate to even today.


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The stunning sequel to the awarding winning novel One Thousand White Women 9 March 1876 My name is Meggie Kelly and I take up this pencil with my twin sister, Susie. We have nothing left, less than nothing. The village of our People has been destroyed, all our possessions burned, our friends butchered by the soldiers, our baby daughters gone, frozen to death on an ungodly tr The stunning sequel to the awarding winning novel One Thousand White Women 9 March 1876 My name is Meggie Kelly and I take up this pencil with my twin sister, Susie. We have nothing left, less than nothing. The village of our People has been destroyed, all our possessions burned, our friends butchered by the soldiers, our baby daughters gone, frozen to death on an ungodly trek across these rocky mountains. Empty of human feeling, half-dead ourselves, all that remains of us intact are hearts turned to stone. We curse the U.S. government, we curse the Army, we curse the savagery of mankind, white and Indian alike. We curse God in his heaven. Do not underestimate the power of a mother’s vengeance... So begins the journal of Margaret Kelly, a woman who participated in the government's "Brides for Indians" program in 1873, a program whose conceit was that the way to peace between the United States and the Cheyenne Nation was for One Thousand White Women to be given as brides in exchange for three hundred horses. These "brides" were mostly fallen women; women in prison, prostitutes, the occasional adventurer, or those incarcerated in asylums. No one expected this program to work. The brides themselves thought it was simply a chance at freedom. But many of them fell in love with the Cheyennes spouses and had children with them...and became Cheyenne themselves. THE VENGEANCE OF MOTHERS is a novel that explores what happens to the bonds between wives and husbands, children and mothers, when society sees them as "unspeakable." What does it mean to be white, to be Cheyenne, and how far will these women go to avenge the ones they love? As he did in ONE THOUSAND WHITE WOMEN, Jim Fergus brings to light a time and place in American history, and fills it with unforgettable characters who live and breathe with a passion we can relate to even today.

30 review for The Vengeance of Mothers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    3.5 stars This book is the sequel to One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd, a fictional story set in the 1870s in which the U.S. government agrees to send a total of 1000 white women to intermarry with the Cheyenne in exchange for 1000 horses. Supposedly, this will advance peaceful relations between white settlers and the Cheyenne people. Most of the women in the program are volunteers from prisons and insane asylums, though the dozen or so females in the story are 'nice girls' who g 3.5 stars This book is the sequel to One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd, a fictional story set in the 1870s in which the U.S. government agrees to send a total of 1000 white women to intermarry with the Cheyenne in exchange for 1000 horses. Supposedly, this will advance peaceful relations between white settlers and the Cheyenne people. Most of the women in the program are volunteers from prisons and insane asylums, though the dozen or so females in the story are 'nice girls' who got locked up due to unfortunate circumstances. The novel is composed of journal entries from one of the women, May Dodd, who was committed to an asylum by her wealthy father for choosing a man below her station. The novel illustrates the women's lives in Chief Little Wolf's Cheyenne tribe in the Montana Territory, and ends with an army raid on the tribe's encampment. ***** The second book, The Vengeance of Mothers, takes up right after the army's vicious attack - which kills almost everyone in the tribe.....both white and Cheyenne. Two of the white women who survive are Margaret (Meggie) and Susie Kelly, spirited Irish twins with flaming red hair who vow to get revenge by killing U.S. soldiers and taking their scalps and bollocks (testicles). By now the government has abandoned the 'brides for horses' program, and is trying to sweep the whole business under the rug for fear of public backlash. Just before the program was cancelled, however, the authorities sent out a second contingent of women, and - due to a confluence of circumstances - seven of these females end up with the remains of Chief Little Wolf's tribe, along with Meggie and Susie. One of the new arrivals is Molly McGill, a former schoolteacher who was sent to Sing Sing prison for murder. The story is told in alternating sets of journal entries: one set from Meggie and Susie - who write in colloquial Irish lingo that's very picturesque; the other set by Molly McGill - who writes in the refined diction of an educated woman. From Molly's diary pages we learn how the 'new' white women settle in among the Cherokee, including: the women's use of sign language to communicate with the Indian people; the tipi accommodations, which contain fires for cooking and buffalo blankets for sleeping; the deerskin dresses and shoes given to the women by Cherokee squaws; the women's 'jobs' in the tribe - collecting firewood and carrying water; Cherokee beliefs, etiquette and manners; and so on. Molly also talks about her infatuation with a handsome Indian brave called Hawk, who's reputed to be a shape-shifter. One interesting custom that Molly describes is the matrimonial dance ceremony, during which Indian lads are paired up with single girls by a Cherokee matchmaker. After the traditional Indian dance the white women do a toned down version of the raunchy French can-can, which turns out to be a fun addition to the festivities. After the revelry, each paired off couple embarks on a courtship, which - if all goes well - leads to marriage (the woman moves into her husband's tipi). The author doesn't say much about the Cherokee/white couples, which was a disappointment. I would have liked to know what the 'betrothed' pairs really thought about each other, a man and woman from vastly different cultures - essentially strangers - who presumably have different ideas about physical attractiveness and romance. Meggie and Susie's diaries address some of the same topics mentioned by Molly. However, they're mostly about the formation of a band of 'women warriors' - both white and Indian - who plan to get revenge on white soldiers. The women fighters learn to ride a horse while shooting guns, rifles, and bows and arrows.....and even master the art of hanging off the side of a galloping mount while shooting under the horse's neck. Moreover, the women become handy with tomahawks, which are useful for chopping off scalps and bollocks. Before long, Chief Little Wolf learns that American soldiers are amassing in huge numbers, to wipe out the Indians in the Montana Territory. Thus the Cheyenne embark on a trek to join up with other tribes in the region, so they can fight together. This will turn out to be the Battle of Little Bighorn. I rooted for the Indians while reading the book, and cheered for their successes. At the same time I was unutterably sad, because the ultimate fate of the Indians is well known. The story has a variety of interesting secondary characters, including: Gertie - a tough, wily, donkey-riding loner who's comfortable in both the white world and the Indian world; she's a good friend to the white women; Jules Seminole - a filthy, odorous French scout who works with the American army; he's a sadist who likes to degrade and abuse women; Pastor Christian Goodman - a deserter from the U.S. Army who ran off after observing their atrocities; Captain John Bourke - an American Cavalry officer who's sympathetic to the white women (and maybe even the Indians), but has to follow orders; Lady Ann Hall - an English noblewoman who volunteered for the brides program for personal reasons; she's a whiz with horses and guns; and more. One of my favorite parts of the book is the beginning, which takes place in the present. A Cheyenne woman, dressed in traditional deerskin garb - complete with scalp belt and knife - visits a Chicago publisher to give him the 1870s journals. Asked if her attire attracted attention in the city streets, she says "I blend in. I become whatever, whomever I need to be in the eyes of the beholder." And she does! (LOL) I enjoyed the book, which gave me a glimpse into the lives of the plains Indians.....and the shameful mistreatment they suffered. Though this book is a sequel to One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd it can be read as a standalone. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    *SPOILERS AHEAD and Major rant ahead* The long awaited sequel to "One Thousand White Women," Jim Fergus immediately picks up his latest book where the first one ended, so make sure you read it first. The premise of the novel is based on historical speculation rather than any concrete proof(just go on the internet to see the great debate that has emerged based on these books). Apparently, Fergus stumbled upon a story that the US government agreed to provide a program of one thousand white women *SPOILERS AHEAD and Major rant ahead* The long awaited sequel to "One Thousand White Women," Jim Fergus immediately picks up his latest book where the first one ended, so make sure you read it first. The premise of the novel is based on historical speculation rather than any concrete proof(just go on the internet to see the great debate that has emerged based on these books). Apparently, Fergus stumbled upon a story that the US government agreed to provide a program of one thousand white women to intermarry with the Native American Cheyenne and Lakota tribes in order to assimilate them. Fergus paints these women as prostitutes, mentally ill, dancers and actresses. A fact that boggled my mind in book one and that Fergus doesn't drop in book two. One of the most ridiculous scenes in this book is when the white women plan a can-can for the Native American warriors (Seriously, I cannot make that shit up). The journals are this time dictated by the Irish Kelly sisters and a new bride named Molly McGill. The women join with their prospective Native American mates and train to wage war on the U.S. Army. I would love to know from where Jim Fergus draws his "research" but there was no author's note. A nod to NETGALLEY for an uncorrected proof in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marialyce

    I truly liked this fictitious novel chronically done through jounel entries of the trials of white women who were pledged into the service of marrying Indians in order to pay their debt to society. The story was harrowing and a total page turner for this reader. As the journals are read, we are introduced to a cast of women who certainly are courageous, endearing to one another, and determined to protect the Indians who have been so grossly mistreated by our government. The time period of the lat I truly liked this fictitious novel chronically done through jounel entries of the trials of white women who were pledged into the service of marrying Indians in order to pay their debt to society. The story was harrowing and a total page turner for this reader. As the journals are read, we are introduced to a cast of women who certainly are courageous, endearing to one another, and determined to protect the Indians who have been so grossly mistreated by our government. The time period of the late eighteen hundreds and the situations that these women were previously in was heart breaking. I thought the author presented these women, some as hard as nails and what might be called savages, as totally believable and admirable. He did a fine job giving us characters with many faults but who desperately were looking for a better life and in most cases found it living among the Cheyenne tribe. Although depicting a fictitious program of the government, this reader could see how pitiful the positions the women presented found themselves in and I had to think that there were many women who also experienced a life filled with tragedy and pathos living during those times. This was a remarkable read and one that left me with extremely positive feelings about the spirit and the courage that women so very often display. Sincere thanks to NetGalley and St Martin's Press for an advanced copy of this novel for an unbiased review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    TL

    I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in an exchange for an honest review. All my opinions are my own:). (A bunch of these I won decided to come in at the same time haha) ---- Cover of my ARC.. different from what pictured on GR. Still good cover, but like the other better. *Random musings* This was an easier read than the first book in some ways... the first book wasn't bad or anything (see my review for it) but there was a heaviness to it that wasn't as present in this one. Yes the subject matter I received this via Goodreads Giveaways in an exchange for an honest review. All my opinions are my own:). (A bunch of these I won decided to come in at the same time haha) ---- Cover of my ARC.. different from what pictured on GR. Still good cover, but like the other better. *Random musings* This was an easier read than the first book in some ways... the first book wasn't bad or anything (see my review for it) but there was a heaviness to it that wasn't as present in this one. Yes the subject matter and situations were the same in some parts, but the people telling it.. lightened it (for lack of a better word) in their own way. Not that the situations are made light of... Our "Irish Scamps" have plenty of reason (along with their tribe) to be angry and I don't blame them for it. Once again I repeatedly HulkSmashed and yelled at many people in this story on "our side" (our side... *snorts*) and especially one maggot in particular.. .refuse to call that filth a man.. especially after (view spoiler)[what he did to Martha... there are not enough words to throw at this piece of trash for what he did. I cheered so loud as Molly rescued her and as she slowly came back to herself. The army taking her son away so no proof would be had of the Brides program had me seeing Red. (hide spoiler)] A pleasant surprise was (view spoiler)[Phemie being alive... Bless that Warrior Woman :) And Gertie as well... my heart sang for them both. (hide spoiler)] I was under the impression when I got this that it would solely from the POVs of the Kelly girls and was excited to read what happened to them after (they were a favorite of mine from the first), specially considering what was hinted at about them after everything. Molly's journals was a surprise... she did remind me of May in some ways. They both were tough and hardened by their life experiences... and have more in common than at first glance. But while I warmed to May right away (view spoiler)[The only thing I held against her (not in the way you think) was her 'affair' with John Bourke... I thought both of them were selfish and still do.. despite what May was heading towards, being scared and uncertain yet determined. (hide spoiler)] , Molly wasn't as easy to sympathize with at times. After a certain thing is revealed, you understand her better and why she was drawn towards a certain person and why some of her actions were inspired by that and the events after. (Still took me awhile to believe "the love story" though) The only one I was attached to in this second group of women aside from Molly (eventually) was Lady Hall. I loved her personality and her stubbornness... your heart squeezes for her in a different than Molly and the others.. especially in one section, but no less sad. All the backstories of the others have you wanting to hug them but I never got attached to them like the first group. Not to compare and contrast, each lady is decidedly their own person. Perhaps it is because the focus of this book is different and not as much time is spent on the lives of this group, considering what is happening and being prepared for. Regarding Captain Bourke , I was chuckling when (view spoiler)[ Molly firing those shots at him about May Dodd... plus the fact she wasn't charmed by him was a hoot as well. (hide spoiler)] He still isn't a bad man, but I am less inclined to offer him sympathy even with (view spoiler)[his daughter being in the Indian camp... he gets points with being concerned for her well being but that's it. (hide spoiler)] The ending pages had me in turns: admiring the bravery of some, tense and waiting for something to happen, happy, and confused. No spoiler tags even because I am still thinking about it and imagine I will off and on while at work tonight... before writing this review, I read it twice and still not sure I figured it out. It ended it in a good spot, but still wish some more final scenes had been in there. I would recommend this, but make sure you read the first book as there are some spoilers in this one for certain things. I guess this could be read as a standalone of sorts but both ARE inter-connected. As I said before "Reading the history and knowing what has happened, you still hope for a good outcome for everyone." That is one of the powers of good writing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Men may be the warriors but there is nothing so powerful as the vengeance of a mother who has lost her child to violence. Having survived the bloody Mackenzie massacre that killed so many, Meggie and Susie Kelly, who's babies froze from the cold, are out to punish any and all in revenge for their babies. They were part of a contingent of women sent to marry into the Cheyenne tribe in hopes of civilizing the "Natives". What they found instead was a love for the people and their culture. A new gro Men may be the warriors but there is nothing so powerful as the vengeance of a mother who has lost her child to violence. Having survived the bloody Mackenzie massacre that killed so many, Meggie and Susie Kelly, who's babies froze from the cold, are out to punish any and all in revenge for their babies. They were part of a contingent of women sent to marry into the Cheyenne tribe in hopes of civilizing the "Natives". What they found instead was a love for the people and their culture. A new group of potential brides has arrived, though the program has been disbanded, for many the integration into the Cheyenne is better than the the circumstances they came from. Among them is Molly, a headstrong and passionate woman who believes she has little to lose. What she finds in her freedom is a re-awakening of hope and the possibility of love. But war is inevitable with the Army looking to wipe out the Indians to claim the land for themselves and the settlers to come. Told through journals, it's an intimate look at a bloody time in the history of our country. There seems to be an endless cycle of war and violence as shown in this quote: "the absurdity of war, the pointless circle of vengeance, like a dog chasing it's tail. If all Cheyenne men are warriors, taught from early youth that no pleasure on earth equals the joy of battle, that death in war is the noblest, most glorious end for which a man can hope, then all women are breeders, put on earth to keep the tribe well supplied with future warriors, who will grow up to kill their enemies, and be killed by them, generation after generation after generation. It is, in her short, simple telling, the entire history of the human race."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sally Lindsay-briggs

    Prisoners, people from insane asylums and people of questionable character chose to participate in the brides program started by the U.S. government in the mid 1800's to "civilize" the Indians. These women were to marry the braves. Problem was the government decided to end the program pretty suddenly. This book is based on several journals that really existed, written by several of the brides about their harrowing experiences. This free Goodreads Giveaway was extremely exciting, with lots of ver Prisoners, people from insane asylums and people of questionable character chose to participate in the brides program started by the U.S. government in the mid 1800's to "civilize" the Indians. These women were to marry the braves. Problem was the government decided to end the program pretty suddenly. This book is based on several journals that really existed, written by several of the brides about their harrowing experiences. This free Goodreads Giveaway was extremely exciting, with lots of very savy, strong, brave and gutsy women. There was slaughter, pathos, healing, love and a story that endured. It is a must for people who love historical novels as I do. You can sink your teeth into this book for hours and travel to the midwest where all is fair in love and war.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jolie

    I went into this book blind and knowing nothing about One Thousand White Women. Actually, I didn’t even know the book existed. There is a part of me that wished that I had read One Thousand White Women before reading The Vengeance of Mothers. I could have gotten a better understanding of the women who survived the massacre. Saying that I enjoyed the book. The format that it was written in, journal style, was different. I can count on one hand how many books were written in this format that I actu I went into this book blind and knowing nothing about One Thousand White Women. Actually, I didn’t even know the book existed. There is a part of me that wished that I had read One Thousand White Women before reading The Vengeance of Mothers. I could have gotten a better understanding of the women who survived the massacre. Saying that I enjoyed the book. The format that it was written in, journal style, was different. I can count on one hand how many books were written in this format that I actually liked. The Vengeance of Mothers has been added to that short list. Besides that, I also liked that the story was told by a whole different set of women. It was through them that we got to see how badly the Indians were treated by the American government. I could understand Meggie and Susie’s need for vengeance. Their friends and adopted families were murdered by the Army. They were slaughtered in their tipis while sleeping. Their 3-week old daughters froze to death and they were forced to carry them when fleeing. Their thirst for revenge was almost all-consuming. That battle scene where they castrated that young man is forever printed in my brain. I could also understand why Molly jumped at the chance to leave Sing Sing. It would be a fresh start for her. She also understood Meggie and Susie’s need for vengeance and she did try to counsel them against it. The author chose to reveal that part of her story after the dance, when she and Hawk were sharing a blanket. There were hints that lead up to it but I wasn’t ready for the brutal emotion that it evoked in me. The beginning and end of the story started with a descendant of Hawk and Molly meeting with a descendant of May Dodd. When I started the book, I couldn’t understand why she gave JD a copy of the journals. But after reading the story and the epilogue….I can understand. I just wish that maybe it was revealed a little earlier in the book and not in the epilogue. My Summary of The Vengeance Of Mothers: 4 stars The Vengeance of Mothers is a well written, fictional account of events that happened in the West. Notice I stressed fictional. The Brides for Indians incentive never existed but the author played on the “What if“. It is the “What If” that made the story for me. The only thing that I didn’t like was that I was left wondering about certain characters in the beginning of the book. Other than that, this book took me on a roller coaster of emotions. Will I reread: Yes Will I recommend to family and friends: Yes Age range: Older Teen Why: Sexual situations, language, and violence. There is a very graphic scene of a young man being castrated and scalped. I want to thank Jim Fergus, St. Martin’s Press and NetGalley for allowing me to review The Vengeance Of Mothers **I chose to leave this review after reading an advance reader copy**

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    Having absolutely devoured “One Thousand White Women,” I was really anticipating a stellar sequel. Unfortunately this book was just “meh” for me. Mr. Fergus still gave me lots of strong female characters (thank you!) to root for but I found the plot to be a bit rushed and sloppy (and very depressing). I believe there is a third book planned to complete the trilogy and I am interested in the overall conclusion. The imagery is beautiful and the writing charismatic; the ending is abrupt but beautif Having absolutely devoured “One Thousand White Women,” I was really anticipating a stellar sequel. Unfortunately this book was just “meh” for me. Mr. Fergus still gave me lots of strong female characters (thank you!) to root for but I found the plot to be a bit rushed and sloppy (and very depressing). I believe there is a third book planned to complete the trilogy and I am interested in the overall conclusion. The imagery is beautiful and the writing charismatic; the ending is abrupt but beautiful. Overall, this book will not be one of my favorite reads this year, but certainly wasn’t a waste of time either.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aura

    I really enjoyed this sequel to One Thousand White Women. It picks up as the first one leaves off. This author obviously has taken liberties with history and supposes that the US government trades one thousand white women for Indians. Women, mostly from dregs of society, volunteer to go in hopes of improving their plight. Most of our women volunteers find a better life with the Cheyenne except for the efforts of the US army to kill them. In this sequel, a few of our characters from book 1 seek v I really enjoyed this sequel to One Thousand White Women. It picks up as the first one leaves off. This author obviously has taken liberties with history and supposes that the US government trades one thousand white women for Indians. Women, mostly from dregs of society, volunteer to go in hopes of improving their plight. Most of our women volunteers find a better life with the Cheyenne except for the efforts of the US army to kill them. In this sequel, a few of our characters from book 1 seek vengeance against unspeakable violence as the last batch of women join in as the "brides for Indian" program. I really like this sequel and recommend it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

    When I heard that Jim Fergus had written a sequel to One Thousand White Women, a book that I read twice, I rushed to get it. THE VENGEANCE OF MOTHERS follows some of the same women from OTWW, volunteers in the U.S. Government's Brides for Indians program, as well as a new group who arrive after the program has been terminated and are left in limbo. Reacting to the horrendous massacre which ended OTWW, the survivors mourning friends, husbands, and especially children, vow vengeance on the Army an When I heard that Jim Fergus had written a sequel to One Thousand White Women, a book that I read twice, I rushed to get it. THE VENGEANCE OF MOTHERS follows some of the same women from OTWW, volunteers in the U.S. Government's Brides for Indians program, as well as a new group who arrive after the program has been terminated and are left in limbo. Reacting to the horrendous massacre which ended OTWW, the survivors mourning friends, husbands, and especially children, vow vengeance on the Army and enlist the new Brides to the cause. The first battle of the Women's Warrior Society at Rosebud, the week before the Battle of Little BIghorn, ends in mixed results. The journals of the Brides end here and Will Dobbs, the last descendent of May Dobbs from OTWW returns the ledgers to a descendant of Molly McGill from TVOM and the meeting hints at another story to come. (I received pre-publication access thanks to NetGalley.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    The Vengeance of Mothers was a disappointing read. The author’s previous novel, One Thousand White Women, is one of my favorite books and his current work is merely a poor and unoriginal duplication replete with stereotypes, moral lessons and verbal anachronisms. In addition, the story abruptly and unexpectedly ends. I promptly turned the pages looking for the next chapter, but there was none to be had. Granted, the pretext was the brides had “exhausted their paper supply” and could not continue The Vengeance of Mothers was a disappointing read. The author’s previous novel, One Thousand White Women, is one of my favorite books and his current work is merely a poor and unoriginal duplication replete with stereotypes, moral lessons and verbal anachronisms. In addition, the story abruptly and unexpectedly ends. I promptly turned the pages looking for the next chapter, but there was none to be had. Granted, the pretext was the brides had “exhausted their paper supply” and could not continue writing in their diaries, but that response was unsatisfactory. I also chide the author for not tying the modern day plot line in the beginning of the book with the diarists living in the late 19th century. I anticipated a connection, but alas, it was not revealed. The book felt wholly incomplete and I would not recommend this novel.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Huether

    I won this Free book from Goodreads First-Reads. Thank you Goodreads for sending me such an interesting book. In 1873 the US Government gathered up 1000 white women from jails, asylums, and brothels and escorted them to the Cheyennes in Southeastern Montana in exchange for 300 horses. In the story the author brings to life from the journals of May Dodd; the everyday happenings with the Indians and the white women. He had a sensitive way of describing the emotions of the women. An excellent book. I I won this Free book from Goodreads First-Reads. Thank you Goodreads for sending me such an interesting book. In 1873 the US Government gathered up 1000 white women from jails, asylums, and brothels and escorted them to the Cheyennes in Southeastern Montana in exchange for 300 horses. In the story the author brings to life from the journals of May Dodd; the everyday happenings with the Indians and the white women. He had a sensitive way of describing the emotions of the women. An excellent book. I recommend it to all lovers of history.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vikki Patis

    I quite enjoyed One Thousand White Women, but, sadly, I didn't get on with the sequel quite as well. I'm not a fan of the journal style of fiction writing, but I found May Dodd to be a much stronger, relatable voice than the Kelly sisters in The Vengeance of Mothers. That being said, both of these books feature strong women, struggling to survive within society, and then taking on the role of wives to Cheyenne men. The best historical fiction, in my view, is that which takes a historical event, I quite enjoyed One Thousand White Women, but, sadly, I didn't get on with the sequel quite as well. I'm not a fan of the journal style of fiction writing, but I found May Dodd to be a much stronger, relatable voice than the Kelly sisters in The Vengeance of Mothers. That being said, both of these books feature strong women, struggling to survive within society, and then taking on the role of wives to Cheyenne men. The best historical fiction, in my view, is that which takes a historical event, and builds a story around it. In the late 1800s, the Cheyenne tribe apparently asked for 1000 white women to be given as brides, so that their subsequent children might grow up "half in" white society. Although it's believed that this request was made, it was never honoured. Fergus decided to write the story as if it had been honoured. These are books worth reading, if only for the feminist perspective, of women just doing their best with the life they're given, and for the strength and power of mothers in particular. Fergus doesn't pull any punches, and it's darker than you might think, but this series is a good one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Miller

    Jim Fergus’s One Thousand White Women began the story of the “Brides for Indians” program, where women who were the outcasts of white society—“fallen” women, the insane, criminals, women considered unmarriageable in normal white society at the time—volunteered to marry into the Cheyenne. They were expected to bear children of mixed Cheyenne and white blood, children who could tread both worlds and who could ease the Cheyenne’s way into white American culture. Many of these women fell in love wit Jim Fergus’s One Thousand White Women began the story of the “Brides for Indians” program, where women who were the outcasts of white society—“fallen” women, the insane, criminals, women considered unmarriageable in normal white society at the time—volunteered to marry into the Cheyenne. They were expected to bear children of mixed Cheyenne and white blood, children who could tread both worlds and who could ease the Cheyenne’s way into white American culture. Many of these women fell in love with their Cheyenne husbands, and became Cheyenne themselves, only to see their lives and their world torn apart, their friends slaughtered, their children dead, and their village destroyed. The Vengeance of Mothers, the sequel to One Thousand White Women, is a heartbreaking, vividly written novel that continues the story of the women of the “Brides for Indians” program. I highly recommend both these books. (Advance Reading Copy obtained by request from NetGalley.)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Missy

    Nothing makes you cry like a mother’s sorrow, hurt, anger, and ultimate vengeance. In this sequel to "One Thousand White Women" you feel and see all these. Just like "One Thousand White Women" was from the diaries of May Dodd, this story is from the journals of Meggie Kelly and Molly McGill. The story takes place in the months before the Battle of Little Big Horn and how the tribes come together for this ultimate fight, a fight to keep their ways, and their homes. "The Vengeance of Mothers" start Nothing makes you cry like a mother’s sorrow, hurt, anger, and ultimate vengeance. In this sequel to "One Thousand White Women" you feel and see all these. Just like "One Thousand White Women" was from the diaries of May Dodd, this story is from the journals of Meggie Kelly and Molly McGill. The story takes place in the months before the Battle of Little Big Horn and how the tribes come together for this ultimate fight, a fight to keep their ways, and their homes. "The Vengeance of Mothers" starts at the raid of the winter settlement by the US Army, with the killing of the Indians, and ultimately Meggie and Susie Kelly’s (the Irish twins from the streets of Chicago) and their twin daughters freezing to death on the move over the mountains to safety. That Phemie, Martha, and May’s daughter survive. Meggie and Susie want nothing more than vengeance for their children. But the train carrying the second “secret” Brides for Indians is ambushed and seven survivors come to the village. For Meggie and Susie this means training to become Cheyenne. But in the midst of learning the ways of the Cheyenne, rumors of a big battle are looming, and not only do they learn to become Cheyenne, but they learn to become warriors to fight in battle. They are quite a batch of characters, the newcomers are, Molly McGill comes from Sing Sing prison for murder, and a loss so painful she cannot talk about it. Lady Hall an Englishwoman and her maid, Hannah, have come all the way to find Lady Hall’s “friend” Helen Flight, an artist in the first Brides for Indians program, who was killed in the raid. Lulu a French dancer, who teaches them French lullabies and to dance the Can-Can. Astrid, a Norwegian girl from Minnesota who has lost her husband in a fishing accident. Maria, a Mexican-Indian who escaped the tortures of a brutal man since she was very young. Carolyn the wife of a Baptist minister is sent to an asylum because in those days husbands could do that for no reason. Their hurt is just as big, their reasons probably the same for coming to a new way of life, though different. The story tells of unbelievable, and unbearable, heartache one cannot imagine, but yet empathizes with as a woman, and even more so as a mother. It is a story of vengeance of the selfless loss of children, of youth and innocence, of mentality, of brutality, and eventually the learning that through all these, there is love for each other, for man, for a different way of life, and for one’s self. I would highly recommend this book, especially if you read and enjoyed "One Thousand White Women". It was funny and heartbreaking, but a great read of how no matter how good vengeance sounds, it is not always the vengeance in the end that heals. *Disclaimer – there is cussing and using the Lord’s name – however, it did not deter my reading and rating of this book as I read it for the message within the story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Martie Nees Record

    Genre: Historical Fiction Pub. Date: September, 12, 2017 Publisher: St. Martin’s Press When I read this historical novel I wasn’t aware that it is a sequel. I did have the feeling that I was missing the first part, but I wasn’t at all confused, meaning one can read it alone. Set in the 1800’s the book begins with the journals of two sisters, the Kelly twins, who were part of the Wives for Indians Program that sent “undesirable” women from prisons and asylums to marry Native Americans of the Cheye Genre: Historical Fiction Pub. Date: September, 12, 2017 Publisher: St. Martin’s Press When I read this historical novel I wasn’t aware that it is a sequel. I did have the feeling that I was missing the first part, but I wasn’t at all confused, meaning one can read it alone. Set in the 1800’s the book begins with the journals of two sisters, the Kelly twins, who were part of the Wives for Indians Program that sent “undesirable” women from prisons and asylums to marry Native Americans of the Cheyenne Nation as a means to encourage assimilation. The Kelly sisters were part of the original story, “One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd.” In “Vengeance” the reader learns that their village is destroyed by U.S. soldiers while they were waving a white flag, in a raid that leaves their children and husbands dead. The title of the novel comes from the sisters’ desire for revenge on the US Calvary. The second journal we read in this story belongs to Molly McGill, another woman sent to marry into the Cheyenne tribe. But when Molly arrives in the West, the program is virtually defunct, and the group of Cheyenne she was sent to meet is now on the run. Originally, this batch of women was held as hostages by the Native Americans. When given their freedom they decide to stay. Living with the Cheyenne would be as equally dangerous and as hard a lifestyle yet still desirable than to returning to prisons or asylums. I have learned that the first novel “The Journals of May Dodd” has been made into a movie. I have also learned via Wikipedia that “the spark for this novel was an actual historical event that occurred in 1854. A Cheyenne chief did request the gift of 1000 white women as brides but the offer was rejected by the U.S. Army.” This is an okay read though obviously written by a man for the author’s generalizations on women falling in love are stereotypical. When Molly realizes she is falling for her Cheyenne captor, I felt it could have been a scene from the 1920s silent movie, “The Sheik” starring Rudolph Valentino. However, I did enjoy learning about the Native Americans’ ways of life. Because of this novel, I intend to read more hoping it all will not be too similar to another movie named, “Dances with Wolves,” where Kevin Costner plays a disillusioned Civil War lieutenant who comes to realize that it was he and his government and not the Native Americans who are the real savages. I say this because (although I agree with the statement), I would like to learn something new about the tribes other than that they seemed to be a more decent set of human beings than the whites who destroyed them. This is an Advanced Review Copy (ARC) book. I received this novel from the publisher at no cost in exchange for an honest review. Find all my reviews at https://books6259.wordpress.com/

  17. 5 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    The Vengeance of Mothers is the second book in the One Thousand White Women series. Reading the first book years ago it was great to see an update on the characters I met in the first book. These are the The Journals of Margaret Kelly & Molly McGill. Everyone has a story to tell and this is the voice of the women who participated in the government's "Brides for Indians" program in 1873. Some are running from the law or fallen women,some coming from broken abusive homes these women thought it was The Vengeance of Mothers is the second book in the One Thousand White Women series. Reading the first book years ago it was great to see an update on the characters I met in the first book. These are the The Journals of Margaret Kelly & Molly McGill. Everyone has a story to tell and this is the voice of the women who participated in the government's "Brides for Indians" program in 1873. Some are running from the law or fallen women,some coming from broken abusive homes these women thought it was a chance at freedom. The US government was given 300 horses from the Cheyenne Nation for One Thousand White Women to be given as brides. Many of these women fell in love with their Cheyenne husbands and had children with them. I love historical books and this one was a fascinating book, it kept me reading late into the night. Their reality is not something I would ever want to experience. Their reality was harshness and constantly looking over their shoulder . They went into war with their husbands and participated in the raids. It was interesting to catch up with the characters from the first book . Pub Date 12 Sep 2017 Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for a review copy in exchange for my honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dorine

    The Vengeance of Mothers by Jim Fergus continues the adventure that left us hanging in One Thousand White Women. Historical fiction meets mystic lore in this engrossing continuation about the women we loved in book one. If you haven’t read One Thousand White Women, I highly suggest it because you get May’s point of view and it’s a really good book. It’s possible to read The Vengeance of Mothers as a standalone because plot points and situations are rehashed from book one. This is helpful for thos The Vengeance of Mothers by Jim Fergus continues the adventure that left us hanging in One Thousand White Women. Historical fiction meets mystic lore in this engrossing continuation about the women we loved in book one. If you haven’t read One Thousand White Women, I highly suggest it because you get May’s point of view and it’s a really good book. It’s possible to read The Vengeance of Mothers as a standalone because plot points and situations are rehashed from book one. This is helpful for those who read One Thousand White Women so long ago that your memory needs a reminder. Personally, I can’t imagine one book without the other because they fit together. They’re also different in that book two includes some mysticism that was only hinted at in book one. I will reread both in the future to relive the adventure, and that’s not normally something I do which is the highest compliment. This time we get several point of views (POVs), starting out with the Irish scamps otherwise known as the Kelly twins, which can be repetitive and confusing. Even with that bump, I zoomed through this story because it’s so good. That’s probably why POV switching confused me – I was often zooming along, not paying attention to the nitty-gritty details. I was so anxious to find out what happens next. Molly McGill was my favorite, so her story often gutted me. What a heart-wrenched saga that finally gave me some peace. The story begins by repeating some of May’s journal, then a snippet from the monk who knew the white women. Next, we’re in modern day Chicago with JW Dodd, May Dodd’s great great-grandson and Will Dodd’s son. He is visited by a Native American woman who has two well-worn saddle bags with her. She is dressed as a Cheyenne of another time and claims to be a shape-shifter. She leaves him with the journals of the white women who tell the rest of the story. Let me remind you, that just like One Thousand White Women, The Vengeance of Mothers is gruesome at times. It’s written during a time of war between the Cheyenne, other native nations, and the white man. The beginning of this book is written by twins who feel all the hate imaginable for those who killed their adoptive family. Their vengeance doesn’t come along quietly. We’re given some brutal detail on what happened since the first book, as well as some of those gory details of the last chapters of book one. A fictional tale, The Vengeance of Mothers utilizes real people like Crazy Horse to make the story seem realistic. Because it’s told in journal format, you can’t help but get wrapped up in these characters’ lives. Some of the story made me very sad. It’s not easy to read, especially when you want it to be a HEA for all, while fully knowing it cannot be. There are many villains, one of them beyond creepy while others sneak up and surprise you. The only part of this book I’m not sure I liked is the end. It’s creative. I can appreciate that. I guess I get frustrated when historical fiction takes a mystical turn, then ends outside its historical roots. I can understand the mysticism based on Native American lore. I’m just not sure I like the combination. I read an advanced copy of this book months ago, prior to publication. My apologies to the publisher and author for not getting to the review until now. I needed to digest it, then read parts of it again to really sort my feelings to write my review. I was frustrated as well as enamored. Surprised and contemplative, I just couldn’t put words to paper on how I felt. With time away from it, then back to it again, I hope I’ve done the book justice. With that in mind, One Thousand White Women is my favorite of the two novels. But, I must admit the creativity of The Vengeance of Mothers is just as good in some ways. My only question is, will there be a third book to the series? I have a yearning for more. Highly recommend the two books to those who love historical fiction that bends the rules. Review by Dorine, courtesy of The Zest Quest. Advanced digital copy provided by the publisher for an honest review. Read my review of One Thousand White Women here.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Edee

    One Thousand White Women stands out as one of the most memorable titles from our book club selections over the past several years so I was very excited to learn that the story would be continued in The Vengeance of Mothers. Both novels involve the "Brides for Indians" program where 1000 white women were sent to become brides to the Cheyenne nation. The Vengeance of Mothers is not so much a sequel, as I believe it could be read independently, but more of a continuation of the story. It introduces One Thousand White Women stands out as one of the most memorable titles from our book club selections over the past several years so I was very excited to learn that the story would be continued in The Vengeance of Mothers. Both novels involve the "Brides for Indians" program where 1000 white women were sent to become brides to the Cheyenne nation. The Vengeance of Mothers is not so much a sequel, as I believe it could be read independently, but more of a continuation of the story. It introduces new memorable characters but also furthers the stories of some of the characters from One Thousand White Women. The Vengeance of Mothers provides a glimpse into a very interesting yet brutal time in American history. I felt that the author handled the subject well and does an excellent job creating characters that are unique and compelling. The emotions that the women feel, while being as varied as the characters themselves, are well translated in writing and you experience their feelings as if they are your own. I definitely enjoyed the book, but I did feel the ending left me slightly underwhelmed. That being said, the novel is still one I would recommend and that was well worth the read. I received this book courtesy of St. Martin's Press through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Marlene♥

    Finished last night. Did not think this book as engaging as was the first book. To be fair it was quite alike but I was not a fan of the sisters and thought the other narrator although a bit better very annoying. I would love another fictional book by Jim Fergus but a totally different story would be nice. I like his writing style.He is very good in making the characters, even the secondhand characters, come to life. That is his strength. I see I said the same when reviewing his other book which Finished last night. Did not think this book as engaging as was the first book. To be fair it was quite alike but I was not a fan of the sisters and thought the other narrator although a bit better very annoying. I would love another fictional book by Jim Fergus but a totally different story would be nice. I like his writing style.He is very good in making the characters, even the secondhand characters, come to life. That is his strength. I see I said the same when reviewing his other book which was another enjoying read. 3.5 stars

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emily at Reaching While Rooted

    It's the 1870s and the United States Government has made an agreement with the Cheyenne: 1000 white women as brides in exchange for 300 horses. A secret program, this exchange takes place right before the end of the American Indian War... One of the biggest shames of our nation's past. The Vengeance of Mothers by Jim Fergus is the journals of Margaret Kelly and Molly McGill, two "participants" in the program. These women come from the ranks of prisoners, prostitutes, lunatics and actresses that m It's the 1870s and the United States Government has made an agreement with the Cheyenne: 1000 white women as brides in exchange for 300 horses. A secret program, this exchange takes place right before the end of the American Indian War... One of the biggest shames of our nation's past. The Vengeance of Mothers by Jim Fergus is the journals of Margaret Kelly and Molly McGill, two "participants" in the program. These women come from the ranks of prisoners, prostitutes, lunatics and actresses that make up the bulk of the exchange. The story follows the women's experience as they try to integrate into Cheyenne society, and the love and friendships that they forge along the way. "Perhaps this country has opened us up to a new way of being, while at the same time binding us ever more tightly together. We have little left to hide from another, and no pretenses... Life in the wilds allows certain freedoms not available to the so-called civilized world." The second in the series, this book is a fantastic read for those interested in Native American culture and the warrior tribes of the time. Through the eyes of the women we learn about Cheyenne culture and beliefs, getting a rare (and what unfortunately seems like often silent) perspective from the tribal women and children of the atrocities surrounding the wars. I was surprised at how accepting the Cherokee were to others: they were not racist and were very accepting toward women, children and the elderly, something unheard of in white American society during the same time. Families were their priority and the men took their duties to their wives and children very seriously. "'Aye, funny ain't it, how they asked for white women in the trade,' says Susie, 'and our government sent 'em Phemine [a black woman] in our group, and a Mexican Indian, as dark-skinned as them, in this one?' 'That's somethin' I've always admired about these folks,' says Gertie. 'They don't judge people by the color of their skin. Remember, Phemie, how the first name they gave you when you come here was Black White Woman? But that was just a way to call you, to identify you, they didn't judge you by it or think any less a'you.'" Amen sisters! Told through two different journals the story is told in alternating point of views. Margaret Kelly is Irish and the journal is written in her brogue and colloquialisms, making it seem like she was right there having a conversation. Molly is a farmer's daughter who lost her daughter and murdered a man. Once a school teacher in Upstate New York her language is crisp and precise, leaving nothing out. This story was a little slow to start for me, probably because I didn't read the first book. But around a third of the way through the plot quickly picked up and I was right there with the women. As a mother their tales were relatable to me and I gained a new appreciation for that period in history. Jim Fergus was great about keeping true to the period, though he did take some literary license with the Bride Program (it is under debate whether or not this was a real exchange). Overall 4 out of 5 stars from this reader! *Thank you to Net Galley and the author for providing me with a free copy in exchange for a honest review. All opinions stated here are my own.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jo Ann

    I loved "One Thousand White Women" by this author, so was eager to read more. This book follows OTWW, and it's quite enjoyable...perhaps a 3.5 more than a solid 4 for me. The story is told through the journals of 2 of these white women who were brought to the plains to intermarry with the Cherokee and Lakota, via the U.S. Government. The program has been kept fairly secret from U.S. citizens, and has now been ceased. Most of the women, being from asylums, brothels, prisons, etc., have found comm I loved "One Thousand White Women" by this author, so was eager to read more. This book follows OTWW, and it's quite enjoyable...perhaps a 3.5 more than a solid 4 for me. The story is told through the journals of 2 of these white women who were brought to the plains to intermarry with the Cherokee and Lakota, via the U.S. Government. The program has been kept fairly secret from U.S. citizens, and has now been ceased. Most of the women, being from asylums, brothels, prisons, etc., have found community, marriage, motherhood, contentment, among the Indians, when the U.S. Army maliciously attempts to raid and kill both Indians and whites, including children and babies....it's ruthless. Jim Fergus depicts these women as strong, able, independent, sometimes downright funny. The vengeance of these white women who have lost their children, husbands, sisters, is strong...they've been dealt injustices and the horrendous losses of their babies, and they are out for vengeance...watch out, whoever's in the way! While Fergus paints some characters as pure evil, there are also kind, tender, and brave characters, both female and male, as I imagine there were during this very interesting part of our U.S. history.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I loved this book maybe not quite as much as One Thousand White Women. which I read twice. It certainly makes one think about the manner in which the United States treated Native Americans. A blight on our history much like slavery.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Scheppmann

    Loved the prequel to this book...One Thousand White Women. This book was almost as good. Felt by the way this ended there will be another book to come. Loved the characters, the names, and quick moving story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    (I received this book as an ARC in a goodreads giveaway. My opinion is my own.) To start, I might have liked this better if I'd re-read One Thousand White Women before I read this novel. There are constant callbacks to that novel, and while some of it is explained, a lot of it isn't, so if you're picking up this book either before you've read the first, or it's been awhile, prepare to be confused. The story has two/three narrators: The Kelly Sister, Meggie and Susie, who were in the first novel (I received this book as an ARC in a goodreads giveaway. My opinion is my own.) To start, I might have liked this better if I'd re-read One Thousand White Women before I read this novel. There are constant callbacks to that novel, and while some of it is explained, a lot of it isn't, so if you're picking up this book either before you've read the first, or it's been awhile, prepare to be confused. The story has two/three narrators: The Kelly Sister, Meggie and Susie, who were in the first novel, and a new character, Molly McGill. The Kelly sisters have become warrior women whose sole goal is to kill as many soldiers as possible in revenge for what happened to them at the end of One Thousand White Women . Molly is one of several new "brides" the government has sent to marry Native American men in the West. The narration of the story goes back and forth between the twins and Molly, in their respective journals. I really didn't like the Kelly sisters. Their journal entries are written with lots of slang: the 'g' is almost constantly dropped from words that end in -ing, and they use a lot of Irish slang, which makes sense, since they're Irish twins, but it seems stereotypical, and it's hard to read. It's like reading the Yorkshire transcriptions in Wuthering Heights, except not quite that bad. Molly's sections are much easier to read, and I found Molly a much more sympathetic character than the Kellys. If the story had just been her story, I think it would've been much better. The most interesting sections of the story pertain to the women's lives with the Cheyenne. When battles or travel are described, the author lost me, especially at the end, where it reads like an action sequence from a movie script. The secondary characters--the other brides and the Native Americans--are well-written, but are given somewhat short shrift except for Lady Anne Hall, who has come from England to find out the fate of her "friend" (aka, lover) Helen, who died in the first novel. But the strengths of the novel don't really outweigh the weaknesses, to me, and the fact that this is truly a sequel--in that, if you haven't read the first one, you're going to be pretty lost as you read this one. The book has a good premise, but it doesn't live up to its promises.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    This is a very interesting book. It is about the U.S. government program to send white women to be brides for Indians in the late 1870's. It was considered a failed program. This group of women was made up with a woman convicted of murder, a woman from a mental institution and a lady from society, along with a few others. The book is written as a diary belonging to two of the ladies. They go through many hardships and heartaches. But they form beautiful friendships too. Parts of the book are har This is a very interesting book. It is about the U.S. government program to send white women to be brides for Indians in the late 1870's. It was considered a failed program. This group of women was made up with a woman convicted of murder, a woman from a mental institution and a lady from society, along with a few others. The book is written as a diary belonging to two of the ladies. They go through many hardships and heartaches. But they form beautiful friendships too. Parts of the book are hard to follow and go into a lot more detail than I liked. This book is a good illustration of how "Mothers" set the path for everyone else. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for allowing me to read an advance copy for my honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mainlinebooker

    It was in 1998 when I first came across One Thousand White Women, the first in a planned trilogy.I inhaled that novel and have spent years pining for the next installment. One does not have to read the first in order to appreciate the second in the series, but it provides so much background that I feel it would do an injustice to appreciating the whole context. The first novel described the mail order bride barter system where the government exchanged 1000 white woman to interbreed with the Chey It was in 1998 when I first came across One Thousand White Women, the first in a planned trilogy.I inhaled that novel and have spent years pining for the next installment. One does not have to read the first in order to appreciate the second in the series, but it provides so much background that I feel it would do an injustice to appreciating the whole context. The first novel described the mail order bride barter system where the government exchanged 1000 white woman to interbreed with the Cheyenne in exchange for horses. Whether there is an element of truth to this was disputed in the years to come. However, both novels portray the selflessness, courage of the Cheyenne while visit the barbaric treatment of them by our country. The journals in volume II are written by red haired Irish twins who have become Cheyenne natives and a spirited 22 year old woman,Molly, who volunteered to come out with the next group of brides before finding that the program was disbanded. One follows the stories of the 7 women who are taken to the Cheyennes ,and follows their journeys as they band together as a group, becoming stronger and more embolden as time marches on. Vengeance is sought against an Army which meant to subjugate them, kill their children and take away their freedoms. I found myself really attached to the women and not able to let go of their stories.The only caveat was the epilogue which was clearly set up to pave the way for Book #3 but I felt it took away from the strength of the rest of the book and made the ending weaker. That said, I hope I don't have to wait another 9 years for Book #3. Curiousity will be my undoing!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I’m disappointed. This book had so much potential. I wanted to know how their stories ended, but all I got was some crap about “tribal secrets”. I am tried of authors fishing for sequels. I didn’t expect a sequel to One Thousand White Women, so I was pleasantly surprised when I stumbled across this advance readers’ edition. It picked up the stories of some of the survivors from the first book, but this book was, for the most part, anticlimactic and a little on the dry side. Perhaps Jim Ferguson I’m disappointed. This book had so much potential. I wanted to know how their stories ended, but all I got was some crap about “tribal secrets”. I am tried of authors fishing for sequels. I didn’t expect a sequel to One Thousand White Women, so I was pleasantly surprised when I stumbled across this advance readers’ edition. It picked up the stories of some of the survivors from the first book, but this book was, for the most part, anticlimactic and a little on the dry side. Perhaps Jim Ferguson should stick to nonfiction. Jules and his constant references to himself in 3rd person were super irritating...and WHY couldn’t we have seen him killed off? I mean PLEASE it was time, but alas this sick individual will continue on wreaking havoc for others long into the next novel (because you know there will be a next novel). Even though at the end of the first book we know he’s killed by Little Wolf. I just wanted to see it...maybe I was hoping that Martha would get her revenge and wear his scalp and bollocks, as Meggie and Susie put it, on her scalp belt. I was also annoyed by Molly Standing Bear at the end. Her preaching about the terror the whites inflicted on the People was true, but I read the book, and I played witness to the atrocities; I don’t need you summing it up for me in a long winded paragraph. Oh, and then she says to the white guy...”have a baby with me!” Really? Because everyone knows that worked out for May Dodd and the other women. Btw...it didn’t! So yea...I’m a bit disappointed. Three stars for a good story, but the ending...or should I say lack of one, really left me wishing I’d never found this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Drury

    I really liked 1,000 White Women. I thought it was fantastic, but I read it about 11 years ago. While reading the sequel though, I'm picking up on a lot of the problematic things I missed in the first book, the least of which includes centering a story about the Indian people around white women. The more chapters I read the less I like either book. I'm also beginning to get the feeling that Fergus doesn't know the first thing about women. I don't think it's very insightful that way. I don't sugge I really liked 1,000 White Women. I thought it was fantastic, but I read it about 11 years ago. While reading the sequel though, I'm picking up on a lot of the problematic things I missed in the first book, the least of which includes centering a story about the Indian people around white women. The more chapters I read the less I like either book. I'm also beginning to get the feeling that Fergus doesn't know the first thing about women. I don't think it's very insightful that way. I don't suggest either book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    I was generous giving this book 3 stars. I loved 1000 White Women, loved it. I couldn’t wait for the sequel and up until the very last page was hoping to see a glimmer of what I loved about the first book. I left more confused and disappointed than ever. Sadly, Fergus either needs to move onto a new tribe or perhaps a new story line!! Very disappointed.

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