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Soviet Paratrooper vs Mujahideen Fighter: Afghanistan 1979-89

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In 1979 the Soviet Union moved from military 'help' to active intervention in Afghanistan. Four-fifths of the Afghan National Army deserted in the first year of the war, which, compounded with the spread and intensification of the rebellion led by the formidable guerrilla fighters of the Mujahideen, forced the Soviets to intensify their involvement. The Soviet army was in g In 1979 the Soviet Union moved from military 'help' to active intervention in Afghanistan. Four-fifths of the Afghan National Army deserted in the first year of the war, which, compounded with the spread and intensification of the rebellion led by the formidable guerrilla fighters of the Mujahideen, forced the Soviets to intensify their involvement. The Soviet army was in generally poor condition when the war started, but the troops of the airborne and air assault units were better trained and equipped. As a result they developed aggressive, sometimes effective tactics against an enemy that refused to behave the way most Soviet commanders wished him to. Featuring specially commissioned artwork, this absorbing study examines the origins, combat role and battlefield performance of the Soviet Union's paratroopers and their Mujahideen adversaries during the long and bloody Soviet involvement in Afghanistan during the 1980s.


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In 1979 the Soviet Union moved from military 'help' to active intervention in Afghanistan. Four-fifths of the Afghan National Army deserted in the first year of the war, which, compounded with the spread and intensification of the rebellion led by the formidable guerrilla fighters of the Mujahideen, forced the Soviets to intensify their involvement. The Soviet army was in g In 1979 the Soviet Union moved from military 'help' to active intervention in Afghanistan. Four-fifths of the Afghan National Army deserted in the first year of the war, which, compounded with the spread and intensification of the rebellion led by the formidable guerrilla fighters of the Mujahideen, forced the Soviets to intensify their involvement. The Soviet army was in generally poor condition when the war started, but the troops of the airborne and air assault units were better trained and equipped. As a result they developed aggressive, sometimes effective tactics against an enemy that refused to behave the way most Soviet commanders wished him to. Featuring specially commissioned artwork, this absorbing study examines the origins, combat role and battlefield performance of the Soviet Union's paratroopers and their Mujahideen adversaries during the long and bloody Soviet involvement in Afghanistan during the 1980s.

28 review for Soviet Paratrooper vs Mujahideen Fighter: Afghanistan 1979-89

  1. 4 out of 5

    James Crabtree

    David Campbell's book looks at the Soviet invasion and occupation of Afghanistan and the subsequent fighting between elite Soviet airborne units and the Mujideen fighters. Campbell provides an objective look at the strengths and weaknesses of both types of soldiers, which was a bit of an eye-opener for me. I assumed that only first-class officers were assigned to airborne units but it seemed leadership was an element lacking in the Desantiya units deployed to Afghanistan, especially since NCOs w David Campbell's book looks at the Soviet invasion and occupation of Afghanistan and the subsequent fighting between elite Soviet airborne units and the Mujideen fighters. Campbell provides an objective look at the strengths and weaknesses of both types of soldiers, which was a bit of an eye-opener for me. I assumed that only first-class officers were assigned to airborne units but it seemed leadership was an element lacking in the Desantiya units deployed to Afghanistan, especially since NCOs were poorly picked and poorly trained. The Mujideen, for their part, were poorly organized but did have a kind of "mobile force" to supplement the local fighters who would take the initial brunt of fighting. Campbell uses excellent sources to tell the story of both sides in this book. Illustrated with original artwork and photos.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wilde Sky

    A brief overview of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Some of the details of the fighting were gruesome, but there were enough facts in this book to make it interesting. The format (many side bars / data boxes) made it a bit confusing in places. Overall rating 3.5. Reading time around ninety minutes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tan Kheng Lai

  4. 5 out of 5

    SIM PUAY NGEE

  5. 4 out of 5

    Norgri

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dmitry N. Gamolin

  7. 5 out of 5

    Janel

  8. 4 out of 5

    Carey W Mavor jr

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  11. 4 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Intrepid86

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dеnnis

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pedro

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Somers

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Bober

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad AlHamad

  18. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matías Guastoni

  20. 4 out of 5

    EBRAHIM

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joe Dang

  22. 4 out of 5

    David Titleman

  23. 5 out of 5

    Meron Manelis

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tristan

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Burchill

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steven A. Raspet

  27. 5 out of 5

    lisa m walton

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jon

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