counter create hit The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine

Availability: Ready to download

The true structure and workings of the human body are, we casually assume, everywhere the same, a universal reality. But when we look into the past, our sense of reality wavers: accounts of the body in diverse medical traditions often seem to describe mutually alien, almost unrelated worlds. How can perceptions of something as basic and intimate as the body differ so? In t The true structure and workings of the human body are, we casually assume, everywhere the same, a universal reality. But when we look into the past, our sense of reality wavers: accounts of the body in diverse medical traditions often seem to describe mutually alien, almost unrelated worlds. How can perceptions of something as basic and intimate as the body differ so? In this book, Shigehisa Kuriyama explores this fundamental question, elucidating the fascinating contrasts between the human body described in classical Greek medicine and the body as envisaged by physicians in ancient China. Revealing how perceptions of the body and conceptions of personhood are intimately linked, his comparative inquiry invites us, indeed compels us, to reassess our own habits of feeling and perceiving. The Expressiveness of the Body was awarded the 2001 Welch Medal by the American Association for the History of Medicine.


Compare

The true structure and workings of the human body are, we casually assume, everywhere the same, a universal reality. But when we look into the past, our sense of reality wavers: accounts of the body in diverse medical traditions often seem to describe mutually alien, almost unrelated worlds. How can perceptions of something as basic and intimate as the body differ so? In t The true structure and workings of the human body are, we casually assume, everywhere the same, a universal reality. But when we look into the past, our sense of reality wavers: accounts of the body in diverse medical traditions often seem to describe mutually alien, almost unrelated worlds. How can perceptions of something as basic and intimate as the body differ so? In this book, Shigehisa Kuriyama explores this fundamental question, elucidating the fascinating contrasts between the human body described in classical Greek medicine and the body as envisaged by physicians in ancient China. Revealing how perceptions of the body and conceptions of personhood are intimately linked, his comparative inquiry invites us, indeed compels us, to reassess our own habits of feeling and perceiving. The Expressiveness of the Body was awarded the 2001 Welch Medal by the American Association for the History of Medicine.

30 review for The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dagezi

    If I could give this 4.5 stars I would. Exhibit 1 in the case that I really should read Birth of the Clinic already. Fascinating and unusual book this is. That expert on TCM whose name begins with a U (slips my mind) (4/12: Paul Unschuld) says Kuriyama plays a bit fast and loose with the Chinese side of things, but even if he is overstating the separation of the two traditions, the book is still a remarkably cool thought experiment. And a real pleasure to read, real poetry in places. For me the If I could give this 4.5 stars I would. Exhibit 1 in the case that I really should read Birth of the Clinic already. Fascinating and unusual book this is. That expert on TCM whose name begins with a U (slips my mind) (4/12: Paul Unschuld) says Kuriyama plays a bit fast and loose with the Chinese side of things, but even if he is overstating the separation of the two traditions, the book is still a remarkably cool thought experiment. And a real pleasure to read, real poetry in places. For me the most interesting issues raised are twofold--first the difference in the way the Greeks and the Chinese reconciled disagreements between anatomy and sensation. In the former case, the interior structure of the (dead) body is taken as the ultimate reality in the later, the sensations and connections of the surface of the living body trump internal structure. This difference derives in part from the differing status of dissection and anatomy in both traditions. Kuriyama makes a compelling case for putting the anatomizing gaze at the root of western knowledges about the body. Some truly fascinating discussions of the similarities between early dissectors and that set of priests who measured the future by way of animal entrails. Anybody, med anth types, etc., able to recommend a good history of science or med anth take on the history of dissection and anatomy in the west? (4/12: the Body Emblazoned by Sawday is now on the to read list) Revisited 4/12 -- this is a five star book. One that stays with you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    This is an interesting read that those in the medical field could benefit from. It discusses how ancient Chinese medicine differed from that of Greek and Western medicine, which provides important insights to how culture and approaches to medicine and health are different. As someone who studies communication, this book was also interesting. “My thesis is that the history of conceptions of the body must be understood in conjunction with a history of conceptions of communication” (Kuriyama, 2002, This is an interesting read that those in the medical field could benefit from. It discusses how ancient Chinese medicine differed from that of Greek and Western medicine, which provides important insights to how culture and approaches to medicine and health are different. As someone who studies communication, this book was also interesting. “My thesis is that the history of conceptions of the body must be understood in conjunction with a history of conceptions of communication” (Kuriyama, 2002, p. 107). Communication theories and concepts are echoed throughout the book though they are never explicitly spelled out. It almost felt like a book of examples of communication concepts through the perspective of medicine and different cultures. However, at some points the book seems repetitive with how many examples there are. For me, I felt like saying, "okay, I got the point. Move on." However, I know for non-communication studies people, the concepts being introduced were unusual in that they had never considered some of these concepts (like orientalism, fundamental attribution error, fields of experience, etc.) so the extra time and effort spent discussing it in the book was more worthwhile for these individuals.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    This is one of the best books on Chinese Medicine. It compares the development of the "felt body" in Ancient Greece and in Chinese Cosmology and then shows how we got where we are today by looking at both art and medicine through history. Very highly recommended for students of the martial arts. This is one of the best books on Chinese Medicine. It compares the development of the "felt body" in Ancient Greece and in Chinese Cosmology and then shows how we got where we are today by looking at both art and medicine through history. Very highly recommended for students of the martial arts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    VICENTE

    The story described in the book is top notch and believable.

  5. 4 out of 5

    RONNIE

    This is just the type of book I like to read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Reveiws by Daisie

    The story is very current.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rauth

    This was a great read, which I thoroughly enjoyed and will certainly read this author again.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shuhui Shen

    Reconsidering the comparative methodology...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Myrna

    The writing is inventive and imaginative.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ordonez

    Overall, I loved the book and I can't wait to read the next one. Well done! Overall, I loved the book and I can't wait to read the next one. Well done!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Really well done

  12. 4 out of 5

    Archer

    This book for me was remarkable, as it is always interesting to read the alternate reality of your own. (social imaginary) The body, of course, concerns our deepest understandings, and the ways in which these manifested later in Eastern and Western philosophy are fascinating; a simple example of which being the synergistic dominance of objective thought in the western sphere vis-a-vis anatomy vs. the more subjective but still constructed reality of the Eastern body. One is more about particles, This book for me was remarkable, as it is always interesting to read the alternate reality of your own. (social imaginary) The body, of course, concerns our deepest understandings, and the ways in which these manifested later in Eastern and Western philosophy are fascinating; a simple example of which being the synergistic dominance of objective thought in the western sphere vis-a-vis anatomy vs. the more subjective but still constructed reality of the Eastern body. One is more about particles, one is more about waves. They both had results. We now have to understand the two as one. The whole thing was fascinating to me. One of those books you pick up off a random shelf and open to a random spot just to test its worth. An answer is revealed, so you go on. Lots of pencil lines. Maybe I'll write a longer review later but I'd say if you're looking for the answer of how the world came to be as it is today, (as we understand it) this is a piece of the puzzle.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Poppy

    Very interesting approach to comparing, but mostly contrasting eastern and western medicine. Looks at what it means to examine the body in both cultures. What it means to be in the body. Why are greek visual representations of man so muscle bound and chinese ones so paunchy and chilled out?Very good if you are interested in the history of medicine, eastern medicine. The text is academic, full of citations, but it is not hard to read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Nordenson

    This book is an analysis of ancient Greek vs Chinese medicine in terms of their different perceptions of--and ways of perceiving--the body. Kuriyama's extensive discussion about pulse-taking in each of these traditions was fascinating, and I think I will always have it in mind when a clinician reaches for my wrist. This book is an analysis of ancient Greek vs Chinese medicine in terms of their different perceptions of--and ways of perceiving--the body. Kuriyama's extensive discussion about pulse-taking in each of these traditions was fascinating, and I think I will always have it in mind when a clinician reaches for my wrist.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Keisuke

    Why the expressiveness of the body was so different between the East and the West? The brain was nothing but just a gray chunk of meat to the Oriental medicine. People didn't pay much attention to muscles that were not depicted in medical pictures in the East. Almost no anatomy. However, the oriental medicine is really effective. Why? The answer can be found in your body? Maybe.... Why the expressiveness of the body was so different between the East and the West? The brain was nothing but just a gray chunk of meat to the Oriental medicine. People didn't pay much attention to muscles that were not depicted in medical pictures in the East. Almost no anatomy. However, the oriental medicine is really effective. Why? The answer can be found in your body? Maybe....

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    Very cool concept of comparing the view of the body from the different systems, but it's one of those hard-to-digest books with language of a beef-jerky style. It's probably one I won't ever fully read. Very cool concept of comparing the view of the body from the different systems, but it's one of those hard-to-digest books with language of a beef-jerky style. It's probably one I won't ever fully read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andee Nero

    I had no interest in Chinese history and Chinese medicine until I read this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Hong

    Interesting.

  19. 4 out of 5

    M

    Amazing work that opened my eyes to an entirely new perspective.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saba Hoda

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Mahoney

  24. 4 out of 5

    John

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mariko

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gary Danchak

  28. 5 out of 5

    Raiyan Ahsan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peiting

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.