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HELP! My Kid Wants to Become a YouTuber: Your Child Can Learn Life Skills Such as Resilience, Consistency, Networking, Financial Literacy, and More While Having a TON OF FUN Creating Online Videos

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DOES YOUR KID WANT TO BECOME A YOUTUBER? Like many parents, you are successful and that is awesome! But you are busy, and your kid spends much of his time with his face buried in his computer or phone! It is time to turn this screen time into LEARN TIME! Your kid is already in love with YouTube and is begging you to help them become a YouTuber! Stop worrying about it! LET DOES YOUR KID WANT TO BECOME A YOUTUBER? Like many parents, you are successful and that is awesome! But you are busy, and your kid spends much of his time with his face buried in his computer or phone! It is time to turn this screen time into LEARN TIME! Your kid is already in love with YouTube and is begging you to help them become a YouTuber! Stop worrying about it! LET ME HELP YOU HELP THEM! This book is for you to help understand the phenomenon that is YouTube and to give you tips to empower your kids to have a safe and meaningful experience on their favorite website. You will learn how to help your kid: Create a channel making videos they love! Understand the importance of networking with other kid YouTubers! Stay safe online and how to handle trolls and harassment! Learn how real kids make real money doing this! And much, much more! Many kids are making six-figure incomes from posting videos and having the time of their lives! YouTube is a wonderful hobby you can help your kids make the most of – and even a legitimate career path. Whatever the case, THIS BOOK IS FOR YOU! This is your chance to help your kid create their first business doing something they are super passionate about! Creating their own YouTube channel helps kids learn Resilience, Consistency, Networking, Financial Literacy, and much more while having a TON OF FUN! You have your hands full being a parent; I got this one for you!


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DOES YOUR KID WANT TO BECOME A YOUTUBER? Like many parents, you are successful and that is awesome! But you are busy, and your kid spends much of his time with his face buried in his computer or phone! It is time to turn this screen time into LEARN TIME! Your kid is already in love with YouTube and is begging you to help them become a YouTuber! Stop worrying about it! LET DOES YOUR KID WANT TO BECOME A YOUTUBER? Like many parents, you are successful and that is awesome! But you are busy, and your kid spends much of his time with his face buried in his computer or phone! It is time to turn this screen time into LEARN TIME! Your kid is already in love with YouTube and is begging you to help them become a YouTuber! Stop worrying about it! LET ME HELP YOU HELP THEM! This book is for you to help understand the phenomenon that is YouTube and to give you tips to empower your kids to have a safe and meaningful experience on their favorite website. You will learn how to help your kid: Create a channel making videos they love! Understand the importance of networking with other kid YouTubers! Stay safe online and how to handle trolls and harassment! Learn how real kids make real money doing this! And much, much more! Many kids are making six-figure incomes from posting videos and having the time of their lives! YouTube is a wonderful hobby you can help your kids make the most of – and even a legitimate career path. Whatever the case, THIS BOOK IS FOR YOU! This is your chance to help your kid create their first business doing something they are super passionate about! Creating their own YouTube channel helps kids learn Resilience, Consistency, Networking, Financial Literacy, and much more while having a TON OF FUN! You have your hands full being a parent; I got this one for you!

30 review for HELP! My Kid Wants to Become a YouTuber: Your Child Can Learn Life Skills Such as Resilience, Consistency, Networking, Financial Literacy, and More While Having a TON OF FUN Creating Online Videos

  1. 4 out of 5

    irem

    edit on 15.11.2018: I decided to just go ahead and lower my rating from a 3 to a 2 because I wouldn't want to mislead anyone into thinking the advice in this book is good. --- original review: I think that objectively this book is more of a 2 stars but I'm giving it 3 because I had a lot of fun reading it. Even though I didn't agree with a lot of the advice in this I thought the subject matter itself was very interesting, I enjoyed exploring Buck's perspective and it made me think a lot about my own edit on 15.11.2018: I decided to just go ahead and lower my rating from a 3 to a 2 because I wouldn't want to mislead anyone into thinking the advice in this book is good. --- original review: I think that objectively this book is more of a 2 stars but I'm giving it 3 because I had a lot of fun reading it. Even though I didn't agree with a lot of the advice in this I thought the subject matter itself was very interesting, I enjoyed exploring Buck's perspective and it made me think a lot about my own experiences and opinions. So, when I read the title I thought the book was gonna be more about a kid who watches YouTube and *dreams* about being a YouTuber. I didn't think it was about them actually starting to make videos and how it all works. I guess I just assumed that because in my experience being a fan was the part where I didn't have my parents' support. When I was the one making the videos they were kinda proud. Also, independent from whether they're supporting it or not, why would your parents need to know so much about making videos on YouTube? The kid's the one that's making a channel, right? Not the parent? Here is the thing though, turns out I kinda misunderstood what the word "kid" meant. I was 15 when I became a YouTube fan and 17 when I uploaded my first video. The kid here, Jesse, is only 10 years old. That's one of the things where my disagreements come from, but more on that later. In this review I want to talk separately about the way the book deals with being a fan of YouTube and being a creator. About the being a fan side, Buck says that parents shouldn't be dismissive and say they don't get it. They should explore it and try to understand it. They should talk to their children about it. He also says that there is no reason for any screen time restrictions because screen time is learn time. I don't have any problems with that until the last sentence, which by the way I don't completely disagree with, but I want to share a personal experience before going further into it. I discovered YouTube at a very low point in my life. My relationship with my parents was terrible too at the time because they didn't understand what was going on, they didn't know how to help me, they were in denial... it was a whole mess. So as a bonus to me already having a really shitty time, not only did I lose the support I had always had from my parents, but they were actively pushing me to be even worse. YouTube became the family I lost at that time. The YouTubers I followed were, unlike my parents, well informed about the stuff I was going through. They encouraged me to be myself and be confident and stand up for what I believed in. I was introduced to whole new perspectives and ideas and so much positivity. I made a YouTube themed Tumblr blog, built a following, made lots of friends from all around the world and had a community of people who not only had a common interest as me, but also reflected all the positive qualities I listed of the YouTubers. They cared about me and asked me how I was and told me I could talk to them about anything and were so so nice. YouTubers and the community I had built around them were my biggest source of happiness and honestly what kept me from killing myself. Naturally I clung on to it. I clung on to life. That wasn't what my parents saw though. They saw that I was depressed and that I was watching YouTube. Then I must be depressed because I'm watching YouTube, right? Because that's all I'm doing and I don't have a life and I don't spend as much time with them anymore? So they started shaming me for having the one thing I had left, making me feel guilty over it. This also prevented them from seeing the real causes of my problems because they had already found something to blame, completely destroying any chance of them being able to help me. Them doing this had the opposite effect of what they wanted, I clung onto YouTube even harder. They were only further destroying our relationship, making me feel even shittier, pushing me to the people online who were understanding and who were helping me. Honestly, if you tell me you hate YouTube or the Internet or "my laptop" as it was always referred to, you're telling me you wish I were dead. Now, in that scenario I wanna scream my lungs out that YOU SHOULD NOT BE TRYING TO RESTRICT YOUR KID'S INTERNET TIME. But, obviously, this was not a healthy situation. I shouldn't have had to spend that much time on the Internet in the first place. There are actual serious cases of addiction and you shouldn't be spending all your time in front of a screen under normal circumstances. Especially if you're as young as 10 years old when your mind hasn't completely developed and you can't really be responsible for the decisions you make. I however definitely agree with Buck that screen time is learn time. I did list all those positive aspects of YouTube and YouTubers earlier, didn't I? There is honestly a lot missing in education systems and in traditional media and naturally also our parents since that was what they were brought up with. The fact of the matter is, if my parents had been educated about mental health they would've been able to help me from the get go and the situation wouldn't have escalated and spiralled the way it did. That's what YouTube can do for you. After all these years I am still so in love with YouTube and the Internet. It's just so fucking awesome. With all that said though, it shouldn't be your whole life (under normal circumstances), that's all I'm saying. It's totally okay to go over your normal amount when you are excited about something or when you just discovered something new though. Like, I would say it's not healthy to stay up all night every night to watch something live, but go ahead and do it once every couple of months, even if it coincides with something really important. Or to go off the example in the book, if you are subscribed to 20 YouTubers, there should be one of them that you would forego dinner for, you know? About the being a creator part, it was so business like. I wouldn't have had a problem with this if it wasn't telling moms to teach this stuff to 8 to 14 year olds (which it was). Even if you're older, once you start looking at things that way, it gets so stressful. Even if you aren't all focused on the numbers, being a YouTuber is fucking hard. I can't imagine it with that bonus. It was business like to the point of being weird. It would talk about all these goals of numbers all the time and then squeeze a sentence in there about how you should be doing it because you love it, but since it's the other stuff the book is constantly talking about of course that's what people are gonna focus on. It tried to make up for itself by saying the goals set should be small as well as high, that small achievements should be celebrated too but I think that's still focusing too much on numbers. It even had examples of setting goals of getting a certain amount of likes on a video, not even views or subscribers. It did, again very rarely, say that if the kid doesn't care about this stuff and just wants to do it for fun that's fine too but I think that should have been focused on a lot more. In fact I think the other option really isn't healthy. We are talking about 8 to 14 year olds here. Literal 8 year olds. There's no need to try to make them into businessmen. Not only is it gonna make the experience suck for them and set them up for disappointment, that's usually not even how it works. And I assure you there is no need to hire a YouTube coach for your kid. It was annoying that Buck kept saying "wanting to be a YouTube Star" all the time instead of just wanting to be a YouTuber or a successful YouTuber. It has to be SENSATIONALIZED. YouTubers don't usually do this to themselves. It's the traditional media people who call them that in their articles but I guess since this is for uninformed moms it makes sense. Anyway, back to the forcing kids to be businessmen bit, there is a part about how the parent should make sure the kid is vlogging at a YouTube convention and I was all "THE KID WILL VLOG IF HE DAMN WELL PLEASES LET HIM ENJOY THE MOMENT IF HE WANTS TO FOR FUCK'S SAKE". It also said when the kid meets another kid who has a YouTube channel at a convention they should film a collab video right at that moment and that the kid should be determined like someone trying to sell something and excuse me??? So many things wrong with that. First of all, I would NOT wanna film a collab video with someone I know nothing about. I would wanna collab with someone whose content I know that I like or I know is good enough in it's own category even if it doesn't interest me . I don't wanna be advertising something that might be trash. Besides just not being good, what if they are offensive? You don't know! Second, if someone else did that to me and I said no and they wouldn't let it go because they think they are being determined, that is creepy. Leave me alone please. And third, we're just assuming people don't have higher standards for their channel than just whipping out a camera, forcing themselves to be entertaining with a stranger for 5 minutes with nothing prepared and with no purpose and then posting it? Okay. There are other things I could still mention but I think you get the idea. I don't believe in the law of attraction nor am I a fan of The Secret like Michael so those parts and that outlook in general made me cringe. I think positive thinking is a great thing but beyond that... no. I don't even think being a life coach is a legit thing. Another point I can make is that Michael isn't really well versed in YouTube. All the examples he gave were about the kind of YouTube videos he watches and makes + gaming because that's what he learned from Jesse. There are so many types of YouTube channels where you can make stuff without even filming anything. You can make film reviews. You can do stuff like game theory. You can make animation. You can make list videos. You can make fan edits. You can share your music. You can make videos where you do film stuff that are very different from vlogging too. You can make short films. You can make ASMR. You can make a BookTube channel. You can even make slime videos. Do whatever you want. There are so many sub-genres on YouTube that Michael either isn't aware of or doesn't consider being a YouTuber. His vision is very limited. One last quick thing I'll mention, I found it kind of annoying how he kept repeating that YouTube would make you gain life skills, because it felt a bit too dumbed down for me but I realize what's obvious for me isn't obvious for the parents reading the book so I understand. Weirdly though, I still couldn't help but be annoyed even though I know that's not very rational. Overall conclusion: I feel pretty bad for this Jesse kid.

  2. 5 out of 5

    EsquiredToRead

    I first started watching WhatTheBuck/BuckHollywood on Youtube when he was doing his show on celebrities. I have stuck by his youtube channel since and am really excited to get a chance to read his book. ** Note: This book is available for FREE on amazon for a limited time, so you should all download it! ** I liked this book. It was sweet and felt like a having a conversation with Michael, just like his videos did. The writing style helped a fast book go even faster and I fully enjoyed the content I first started watching WhatTheBuck/BuckHollywood on Youtube when he was doing his show on celebrities. I have stuck by his youtube channel since and am really excited to get a chance to read his book. ** Note: This book is available for FREE on amazon for a limited time, so you should all download it! ** I liked this book. It was sweet and felt like a having a conversation with Michael, just like his videos did. The writing style helped a fast book go even faster and I fully enjoyed the content of the book. I have no kids myself and I watch YouTube but I still learned a lot about the younger generation watching/making videos on YouTube. His arguments for the pros of YouTube were respectfully stated and well thought out. Definitely recommend.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    Teacher and Supporter Many of my students have dreams of being a famous YouTuber and I wanted a resource to me understand so I could make sure I'm providing skills they need for their future/present careers. This was a great resource which I have also, of course recommended to their parents.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Really approachable, usable information on helping adults understand the YouTube phenomenon from a kid's point of view. Has some good starter information, including setting a schedule and guidelines, but is mostly a sales tool for Buckley's video coaching series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Crysta Chesbro

    Love it Love it, I know him from YouTube for years now and he's an amazing person and I know this book will help parents

  6. 4 out of 5

    Princess

    My son gave me this book for Christmas because he wants to make YouTube videos. I liked that the two authors addressed and allayed some of the concerns I have. The biggest annoyance about the book was the plug for the online course at the end of every single chapter.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Georgina Falzon

  8. 4 out of 5

    greg rowe

  9. 5 out of 5

    James

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Poole

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ariana

  12. 4 out of 5

    Wenona Gardner

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  14. 4 out of 5

    N.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Fabiane Hallage

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  17. 5 out of 5

    Layla Blunn

  18. 5 out of 5

    June Dsouza

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Atkinson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cristina Boggs

  21. 5 out of 5

    Haley

  22. 5 out of 5

    Temshi

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nif

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stickmations Of Doom

  25. 5 out of 5

    Estela Pajarillo

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brandy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Juan Nutt

  28. 4 out of 5

    Karen Kavett

  29. 5 out of 5

    Daelyn

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kat Murakami

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