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Beyond Black and White: From Civil Rights to Barack Obama (Radical Thinkers)

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Highly acclaimed dissection of the “new racism,” from one of the greatest radical black intellectuals of our time Many in the United States, including Barack Obama, have called for a “post-racial” politics; yet race still divides the country politically, economically, and socially. In this highly acclaimed work, Manning Marable rejects both liberal inclusionist strategies a Highly acclaimed dissection of the “new racism,” from one of the greatest radical black intellectuals of our time Many in the United States, including Barack Obama, have called for a “post-racial” politics; yet race still divides the country politically, economically, and socially. In this highly acclaimed work, Manning Marable rejects both liberal inclusionist strategies and the separatist politics of the likes of Louis Farrakhan. Looking back at African-American politics and the fight against racism of the recent past, he argues powerfully for a “transformationist” strategy that retains a distinctive black cultural identity but draws together all the poor and exploited in a united struggle against oppression.


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Highly acclaimed dissection of the “new racism,” from one of the greatest radical black intellectuals of our time Many in the United States, including Barack Obama, have called for a “post-racial” politics; yet race still divides the country politically, economically, and socially. In this highly acclaimed work, Manning Marable rejects both liberal inclusionist strategies a Highly acclaimed dissection of the “new racism,” from one of the greatest radical black intellectuals of our time Many in the United States, including Barack Obama, have called for a “post-racial” politics; yet race still divides the country politically, economically, and socially. In this highly acclaimed work, Manning Marable rejects both liberal inclusionist strategies and the separatist politics of the likes of Louis Farrakhan. Looking back at African-American politics and the fight against racism of the recent past, he argues powerfully for a “transformationist” strategy that retains a distinctive black cultural identity but draws together all the poor and exploited in a united struggle against oppression.

41 review for Beyond Black and White: From Civil Rights to Barack Obama (Radical Thinkers)

  1. 5 out of 5

    John Ward

    I was born in 1993 so the essays discuss politics just as I was born and it’s good to get this insight. He’s a little optimistic. But does portray well where the conservative movement is / was headed in America.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    I feel inadequate to really review this work, but it struck me deeply all the same. Its encyclopedic coverage of the history and development of African American political activity, the growth of academic study of the African Diaspora, and analysis of blackness in American politics is fascinating, but I feel that this edition, which stops at the election of Barack Obama, is sadly outdated. The final essay ends with a look at how an Obama presidency could be a starting point for greater social chan I feel inadequate to really review this work, but it struck me deeply all the same. Its encyclopedic coverage of the history and development of African American political activity, the growth of academic study of the African Diaspora, and analysis of blackness in American politics is fascinating, but I feel that this edition, which stops at the election of Barack Obama, is sadly outdated. The final essay ends with a look at how an Obama presidency could be a starting point for greater social change, and multicultural unity to help counter the Neoliberal capitalistic word order, but we see now that the potential there was never realized. It's almost sad to end there, where some hope was seen, when we know now how much worse things were going to get. But perhaps the author's passing in 2011 was a kind of blessing, since he was spared the sight of the racist backlash that lead to our current administration. I see this as an invaluable resource in understanding the history of American politics and its impact on the lives of black Americans, especially as an examination from a Marxist understanding of class struggle.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Hollingsworth

    Manning Marable was a professor of history and African-American studies who tragically died at 60 years old in 2011. His scholarly career was spent trying to analyze race, class, and other issues in a way that was of use to building popular movements. He was a scholar-activist who cared deeply about creating a better world, while also looking at things in scholarly and realistic way. This book, primarily composed during the 90s, is a collection of essays about current events at the time of their Manning Marable was a professor of history and African-American studies who tragically died at 60 years old in 2011. His scholarly career was spent trying to analyze race, class, and other issues in a way that was of use to building popular movements. He was a scholar-activist who cared deeply about creating a better world, while also looking at things in scholarly and realistic way. This book, primarily composed during the 90s, is a collection of essays about current events at the time of their writing. It is a book worthy of the author. The essays deal with a variety of topics, but all of them are related in some way to blackness and most of them further related to some combination of class struggle, the struggle of other communities of color, building popular movements, and the role of academia. I'm heavily biased in evaluating this material because I share Marable's general worldview- what could be called multiracial/intersectional democratic socialism- but the scholarly merit and clear-eyed way of conceptualizing things really stood out to me here. There are other writers whom I agree with, but none have struck me the way Marable has. The essays in this collection clearly weren't made with the thought of being put into a collection. Not because they don't gel well together, they do, but because a few times things can get a bit repetitive. It's the closest thing I have to a complaint about this book, but the content is good enough that a little repetition isn't a bad thing. There's only one or two things I felt got a little overstated, and in the end it wasn't a big deal. If you care about issues of race, but want something that takes into account other factors (primarily class, though he also gets into gender and sexuality), or you want something that gives you a constructive path forward, check this book out. It's a shame he isn't still around, because I'd do anything to hear his take on current events. As a historian, Marable may be one of my favorite thinkers of all time, and I don't say that lightly.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Hassinger

  5. 4 out of 5

    Renee Leehim

  6. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl Proc

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  8. 4 out of 5

    HarryM

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Daniel

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joe N

  11. 4 out of 5

    Deana Ayers

  12. 4 out of 5

    Fanny Nordmark

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  14. 4 out of 5

    Grigori Rasputin

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Andrews

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erin W

  17. 4 out of 5

    Traci James

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lilas

  19. 4 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laurene

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elena

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mark Fitzpatrick

  23. 4 out of 5

    sonie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aris Merquoni

  25. 5 out of 5

    Solomon

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sare

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rohith Jyothish

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Jackson

  31. 4 out of 5

    Wesley

  32. 5 out of 5

    Quintillis K.

  33. 5 out of 5

    Book crocodile

  34. 5 out of 5

    Hezekiah

  35. 5 out of 5

    Rixla Hussain

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ryan McBride

  37. 4 out of 5

    Stacey Wrenn

  38. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  39. 4 out of 5

    chengliang dong

  40. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

  41. 5 out of 5

    Eric Boyer

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