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The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight, and Resilience in the Middle East

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A Westerner's travels among the persecuted and displaced Christian remnant in Iraq and Syria teach him much about faith under fire. Gold Medal Winner, 2018 IPPY Book of the Year Award Silver Medal Winner, 2018 Benjamin Franklin Award Finalist, 2018 ECPA Christian Book Award Inside Syria and Iraq, and even along the refugee trail, they're a religious minority persecuted for t A Westerner's travels among the persecuted and displaced Christian remnant in Iraq and Syria teach him much about faith under fire. Gold Medal Winner, 2018 IPPY Book of the Year Award Silver Medal Winner, 2018 Benjamin Franklin Award Finalist, 2018 ECPA Christian Book Award Inside Syria and Iraq, and even along the refugee trail, they're a religious minority persecuted for their Christian faith. Outside the Middle East, they're suspect because of their nationality. A small remnant of Christians is on the run from the Islamic State. If they are wiped out, or scattered to the corners of the earth, the language that Jesus spoke may be lost forever - along with the witness of a church that has modeled Jesus' way of nonviolence and enemy-love for two millennia. The kidnapping, enslavement, torture, and murder of Christians by the Islamic State, or ISIS, have been detailed by journalists, as have the jihadists' deliberate efforts to destroy the cultural heritage of a region that is the cradle of Christianity. But some stories run deep, and without a better understanding of the religious and historical roots of the present conflict, history will keep repeating itself century after century. Andreas Knapp, a priest who works with refugees in Germany, travelled to camps for displaced people in the Kurdish region of northern Iraq to collect stories of survivors - and to seek answers to troubling questions about the link between religion and violence. He found Christians who today still speak Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic, the language of Jesus. The uprooted remnant of ancient churches, they doggedly continue to practice their faith despite the odds. Their devastating eyewitness reports make it clear why millions are fleeing the Middle East. Yet, remarkably, though these last Christians hold little hope of ever returning to their homes, they also harbor no thirst for revenge. Could it be that they - along with the Christians of the West, whose interest will determine their fate - hold the key to breaking the cycle of violence in the region? Includes sixteen pages of color photographs.


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A Westerner's travels among the persecuted and displaced Christian remnant in Iraq and Syria teach him much about faith under fire. Gold Medal Winner, 2018 IPPY Book of the Year Award Silver Medal Winner, 2018 Benjamin Franklin Award Finalist, 2018 ECPA Christian Book Award Inside Syria and Iraq, and even along the refugee trail, they're a religious minority persecuted for t A Westerner's travels among the persecuted and displaced Christian remnant in Iraq and Syria teach him much about faith under fire. Gold Medal Winner, 2018 IPPY Book of the Year Award Silver Medal Winner, 2018 Benjamin Franklin Award Finalist, 2018 ECPA Christian Book Award Inside Syria and Iraq, and even along the refugee trail, they're a religious minority persecuted for their Christian faith. Outside the Middle East, they're suspect because of their nationality. A small remnant of Christians is on the run from the Islamic State. If they are wiped out, or scattered to the corners of the earth, the language that Jesus spoke may be lost forever - along with the witness of a church that has modeled Jesus' way of nonviolence and enemy-love for two millennia. The kidnapping, enslavement, torture, and murder of Christians by the Islamic State, or ISIS, have been detailed by journalists, as have the jihadists' deliberate efforts to destroy the cultural heritage of a region that is the cradle of Christianity. But some stories run deep, and without a better understanding of the religious and historical roots of the present conflict, history will keep repeating itself century after century. Andreas Knapp, a priest who works with refugees in Germany, travelled to camps for displaced people in the Kurdish region of northern Iraq to collect stories of survivors - and to seek answers to troubling questions about the link between religion and violence. He found Christians who today still speak Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic, the language of Jesus. The uprooted remnant of ancient churches, they doggedly continue to practice their faith despite the odds. Their devastating eyewitness reports make it clear why millions are fleeing the Middle East. Yet, remarkably, though these last Christians hold little hope of ever returning to their homes, they also harbor no thirst for revenge. Could it be that they - along with the Christians of the West, whose interest will determine their fate - hold the key to breaking the cycle of violence in the region? Includes sixteen pages of color photographs.

52 review for The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight, and Resilience in the Middle East

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rama

    Living in a state of terror Jews, Christians, Yezidis and other religious minorities have been ill-treated in the Muslim nations of Iraq and Syria for many centuries. Their plight became more visible and excruciating when the Islamic terror group, ISIS captured many towns and cities and systematically tortured and brutalized non-Muslim communities. In the mountain village of Maaloula that lies 34 miles from Syria's capital, Damascus, important religious buildings such as the looming Greek Cathol Living in a state of terror Jews, Christians, Yezidis and other religious minorities have been ill-treated in the Muslim nations of Iraq and Syria for many centuries. Their plight became more visible and excruciating when the Islamic terror group, ISIS captured many towns and cities and systematically tortured and brutalized non-Muslim communities. In the mountain village of Maaloula that lies 34 miles from Syria's capital, Damascus, important religious buildings such as the looming Greek Catholic monastery of St. Sergius was damaged by heavy shelling. ISIS also destroyed the ancient city of Palmyra that included the 1,800-year-old Arch of Triumph and the nearly 2,000-year-old Temple of Baalshamin. The Syrian archeologist who was an expert of the history of the city was beheaded. In the ancient Armenian town of Kessab stood the Holy Trinity Armenian Evangelical church. Its library, pews and altar had all been burned, and statues were riddled with bullets and Islamist slogans were scrawled across the walls of homes and shops. In this book, Andreas Knapp, a German priest who works with refugees from Middle East narrates his experiences with displaced people from northern Iraq and Syria. These are disturbing stories of individual survivors and their families. In the chapter 16 entitled “Through a child’s eyes” describe in simple words how a young Muslim boy displaced from Iraq tells the story of being exposed to constant shelling and bomb explosions. The book does not give graphic details of the horrors. In Chapter 11, entitled “The decline of the Christian Middle East,” the author gives a brief account how Syria was a cradle for Christianism when the church was still at its infancy. In Syria, Christians still speak Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic, the language of Jesus. It is the home of the first Gentile Christians. In fact Assyrians were the first to accept Christianity and set up the ministry of Jesus. Some New Testament scholars attribute to the experience of Paul when he was on his way from Jerusalem to Syrian Damascus with a mandate issued by the High Priest to seek out and arrest followers of Jesus, with the intention of returning them to Jerusalem as prisoners for questioning and possible execution. The journey is interrupted when Paul sees a blinding light, and communicates directly with a divine voice. There are many well written books about the recent events in war-torn Iraq and Syria. This work comes from the personal experiences of the author after working with refuges coming to Germany from Iraq and Syria.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    We read the headlines of Islamist terrorists taking over a city in Iraq. What that means for Christians in Iraq became a reality for Knapp when he began to get to know Iraqi refugees who had moved into his Leipzig neighborhood beginning in 2014. He shares here the stories of many as well as his own visit to Ankawa and the refugee camp. I was shocked,as was Knapp, when he heard the stories of those having to flee Mosul. Terrorists overran the city in June of 2014. Christians were given an ultimatu We read the headlines of Islamist terrorists taking over a city in Iraq. What that means for Christians in Iraq became a reality for Knapp when he began to get to know Iraqi refugees who had moved into his Leipzig neighborhood beginning in 2014. He shares here the stories of many as well as his own visit to Ankawa and the refugee camp. I was shocked,as was Knapp, when he heard the stories of those having to flee Mosul. Terrorists overran the city in June of 2014. Christians were given an ultimatum, convert, pay a tax or leave. He writes, “...there is no place for Christians under IS's black banner.” (Loc 120/2695) Christians had flourished there for 1600 years but were now forced to flee to Syria. There may be no Christians in the city now as it has been declared a “Christian-free” zone by the Islamic State. I was appalled at the suffering Christians had to experience as a result of the U.S. and British invasion of 2003. “In response to the American invasion of Iraq, Muslim clerics called for a holy war.” (Loc 189/2695) Western countries were associated with Christianity and Christians in Iraq were the ones who suffered the attacks. The personal stories Knapp has included are heart breaking. Yet the global community has not risen to protect Christians in Islamic states. He shows that this has often been the case historically. The brutal treatment of Christians in the Middle East over the centuries has been generally ignored. Knapp spends quite some time on the Armenian Genocide of 1915, a topic Turkey would like to see erased. I highly recommend this book. It will be shocking to those who have not paid attention to the persecution of Iraqi Christians, particularly those in Mosul. It will be enlightening to those who have opposed Syrian Christians entering the U.S. as refugees. It will bring to light the human tragedy that has caused those Christians to seek asylum. You will receive insight into the history of Christian persecution as well. It is not a pretty story. Body mutilations and repeated rapes do not make for easy reading. The first hand accounts of such atrocities still happening today are difficult and shocking but they cannot be ignored. They are clear evidence of a Christian faith worth dying for. I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    "The Last Christians" is about Syriac Orthodox Christians and other Christian groups that have existed in the Middle East long before Islam. The author is a German priest who came in contact with Christian refugees from Iraq and Syria. In 2015, he traveled to the Kurdish region of northern Iraq and collected the stories of those he met (most of whom fled Mosul when Islamic State fighters took over). He also helps Christian refugees in Germany. He relates their stories, plus stories about similar "The Last Christians" is about Syriac Orthodox Christians and other Christian groups that have existed in the Middle East long before Islam. The author is a German priest who came in contact with Christian refugees from Iraq and Syria. In 2015, he traveled to the Kurdish region of northern Iraq and collected the stories of those he met (most of whom fled Mosul when Islamic State fighters took over). He also helps Christian refugees in Germany. He relates their stories, plus stories about similar events in 1915 when the Ottoman Empire (specifically, Turkey and Kurds) carried out a holocaust against the Christians living there. The author wants to inform people about the history and persecution of these Christians and to ask people to help them even though they're not Protestant or Roman Catholic. His suggestions on how to help included ways to reach out to Christian refugees (which seemed more aimed at European countries) and trying to get Muslims to condemn violence in the name of religion. Syriac Orthodox Christians are dedicated to nonviolence and forgiving their enemies, and the author feels that the rest of the world has a lot to learn from their example. While it's rather depressing reading, overall, I'd recommend this book--especially to those who are in a position to help these refugees. I received a review copy of this book from the publisher through Amazon Vine.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy Leigh

    This is about Syriac Orthodox Christians. What the believe, how they live and the unique language they speak. They are being persecuted and hunted in the Middle East by ISIS. This is a tough read but I highly recommend anyone who is able to read this. We are losing human lives, history and an entire language.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Liebes Buch

    Dieses Buch gibt denen eine Stimme, die keine haben. Als ich vor Jahren in der Kirche hörte, dass Christen verfolgt werden, und das weitererzählte, wurde mir vorgeworfen, ich sei ein Rassist, der gegen Muslime hetzt. Und obwohl die Verfolgung der Christen dieses Jahr auch offiziell als Genozid anerkannt wurde, ist es in Deutschland einfach nicht opportun, dieses Verbrechen zu thematisieren. Um nicht als Nazis dazustehen, schauen wir weg und schweigen- irgendwie eine absurde Situation. Vor dem Hi Dieses Buch gibt denen eine Stimme, die keine haben. Als ich vor Jahren in der Kirche hörte, dass Christen verfolgt werden, und das weitererzählte, wurde mir vorgeworfen, ich sei ein Rassist, der gegen Muslime hetzt. Und obwohl die Verfolgung der Christen dieses Jahr auch offiziell als Genozid anerkannt wurde, ist es in Deutschland einfach nicht opportun, dieses Verbrechen zu thematisieren. Um nicht als Nazis dazustehen, schauen wir weg und schweigen- irgendwie eine absurde Situation. Vor dem Hintergrund deutscher Geschichte schwer zu ertragen. Andreas Knapp ist ein Pastor aus Leipzig, der die Situation der Christen im Irak selber erlebt hat. Seine Eindrücke und die Erlebnisse der Christen beschreibt er in diesem Bericht. Er macht das mit viel Liebe gegenüber allen Seiten, sehr differenziert und sehr abgeklärt. Zum Verständnis erfährt der Leser die Geschichte der Christen in diesen Gebieten. Ich persönlich habe in der Schule nichts über die verhängnisvollen Verbindungen Deutschlands mit dem Islam gelernt. Nicht nur Hitler, sondern auch schon der Kaiser versuchten, mit Hilfe des Islams Macht zu erlangen. Besonders betroffen machen mich die Schilderungen der Flüchtlinge, die es nach Deutschland schaffen und dann hier weiter in Gefahr bleiben, weil die Mehrzahl der Flüchtlinge Muslime sind, die durch eine lange Geschichte- leider auch mit deutscher Hilfe- zum Hass gegen Christen (und Juden) erzogen wurden. Eine Tüte Gummibärchen reicht aus, um Gewalt auszulösen. Bitten um Hilfe der Christen in den Krisengebieten werden von der Bundesregierung genauso ignoriert wie von den Kirchen. Wenn Angela Merkel sagt, sie kenne die Angst der Christen vor dem Islam und sie sollen eben Liedzettel verteilen und Blockflöte spielen, dann weiss sie natürlich, dass christliche Liederzettel von Versen bereinigt sind, die im Widerspruch zum Islam stehen und dass Flöte zu spielen weder gegen Massenvergewaltigung noch Köpfung hilft. Ich bin enttäuscht, dass auch die Medien schweigen. So bleibt dieses wichtige und informative Buch tatsächlich ein einsames und kleines Zeugnis der Beachtung der Christenverfolgung, der Anteilnahme und eines Dialogversuches. Ich danke dem Autor, dem Verlag und wünsche dem Buch möglichst viele Leser.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Adamson Stars in Her Eye

    In The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight and Resilience in the Middle East, Andreas Knapp delves into the lives of those Christians whose home is control by the radical Islamic State and the struggles that they must endue to be true to their faith. Every American Christian should read this book. We cry persecution and throw a fit about the color of a Christmas cup while there are people still being excommunicated from their homes and even killed! This is what Christian persecution r In The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight and Resilience in the Middle East, Andreas Knapp delves into the lives of those Christians whose home is control by the radical Islamic State and the struggles that they must endue to be true to their faith. Every American Christian should read this book. We cry persecution and throw a fit about the color of a Christmas cup while there are people still being excommunicated from their homes and even killed! This is what Christian persecution really looks like. Knapp intermingles stories of people he knows and has seen struggle with tid bits of history that shows how life in the Middle East has changed for everyone living there. The personal stories really hit home as you feel the pain of families separated by either distance or death when they will not recant. Some families loose everything but their lives while others have to watch their children executed because they believe in Jesus Christ. Photos of the refuge camps truly drive home what these people are going through. The only down side is that Knapp almost manages to be objective but falls just short of this. He does well clearly stating Islam and it's reformations, but fails to draw any truthful parallels to their religion and Christianity in regards to violence and intolerance. Sadly, these things have happened on both sides. On a side note, I read this in conjunction with Daring to Drive, about a women's life in Saudi Arabia. The two books truly opened my eyes how radical Islam abuses both Christians and those of the Islamic faith. I received an ARC for review from NetGalley. All opinions are my own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Diane Perry

    I received this from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This is an eye opening account of what the persecuted Christians go through in Iraq and Syria. Knapp brought out things I had no idea about. His account is raw, heart breaking and an absolute must read. We need this better understanding of what is happening.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    This book was very eye-opening to the atrocities that are committed against Christians in the Middle East. It was inspiring to hear stories of how people's faith endured even under the hardest conditions. Worthwhile book to read, but not for the faint of heart.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Allen Patterson

    I am thankful that I won this book from Goodreads. As soon as I got it in the mail I dropped everything else I was reading and read this book. The author is a RC Priest. I am a Baptist. To say I have disagreements with Catholic teachings would be an understatement. The author definitely weaves his Catholic beliefs into this book. If you're Catholic you probably won't have a problem with it. But even if you are not, I would still recommend this book. Why? Because he does do a great job of describ I am thankful that I won this book from Goodreads. As soon as I got it in the mail I dropped everything else I was reading and read this book. The author is a RC Priest. I am a Baptist. To say I have disagreements with Catholic teachings would be an understatement. The author definitely weaves his Catholic beliefs into this book. If you're Catholic you probably won't have a problem with it. But even if you are not, I would still recommend this book. Why? Because he does do a great job of describing and detailing the horrible persecution Christians are going though right now in the middle east. If you have hopes of getting a book that bashes all Muslims as persecutors of Christians this is not a book for you (many Muslims are facing the same persecution because of their loyalty to their friendship with Christians) . If you are so naive that you believe that no Muslim could ever persecute Christians and you don't want to be corrected then this book is not is not for you. However, if you really care about people and believe people ought to be free to believe and worship as they want you need to read this book. The author put his life in danger to get the stories of intense persecutions Christians are facing in the middle east. We're not talking about harassment. We're talking about robbery, rape, murder and this is nothing new. These crimes against humanity desperately need to be exposed. Silence implies consent. May God help all civilized people to be silent no more.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Julius

    Christian Knapp's The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight, Resilience in the Middle East gives voice to some of the West's most neglected stories about Christian persecution in the land of Christian origins: Northern Iraq and Syria. A German priest who works with Christian refugees, Knapp captures the exasperation and desperation that these brothers and sisters in Christ share as a result of religious persecution. The rise of ISIS and the heightened violence between Islamic sects has Christian Knapp's The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight, Resilience in the Middle East gives voice to some of the West's most neglected stories about Christian persecution in the land of Christian origins: Northern Iraq and Syria. A German priest who works with Christian refugees, Knapp captures the exasperation and desperation that these brothers and sisters in Christ share as a result of religious persecution. The rise of ISIS and the heightened violence between Islamic sects has made the survival of these Christian sects, some of whom still speak Aramaic dialects that date back to the time of Jesus, a tenuous proposition. Perhaps the most important contribution of The Last Christians is the historical context that Knapp explores -- a context that most of us in the West remain oblivious toward. His background material on the Armenian and Assyrian genocides by the Ottoman Empire, aided and abetted by the Germans for tactical reasons during World War I, is most fascinating. What Knapp does best, though, is present the early Christian "just war" practice. And contrasts that heavily with the Islamic State's practice of violence. This is a book full of anecdote, but these stories are important voices for hearing what Christian persecution in the modern world really looks like. ______________________ I received a free copy of this book from Plough Publishing in exchange for my honest review here.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Bennett

    This book is such an important read for everyone - regardless of religious or spiritual practices and beliefs. Andreas Knapp brings to light the struggles of Christians in the Middle East, a concept that gets little to no media coverage in the West. Knapp shares the heartbreaking stories of Iraqi and Syrian refugees in Germany, and we get a glimpse into the loss, the fear, and the hopefulness for their dying Christian heritage. This was a hard read for me, and I had to take it in small doses. Kn This book is such an important read for everyone - regardless of religious or spiritual practices and beliefs. Andreas Knapp brings to light the struggles of Christians in the Middle East, a concept that gets little to no media coverage in the West. Knapp shares the heartbreaking stories of Iraqi and Syrian refugees in Germany, and we get a glimpse into the loss, the fear, and the hopefulness for their dying Christian heritage. This was a hard read for me, and I had to take it in small doses. Knapp doesn't pull any punches when retelling the experiences of the refugees, so be prepared for graphic details of the violence they witnessed and endured. Knapp goes into the history of the Christian church in the East and how the Christians in the Middle East practice a nonviolent faith and uphold the separation of church and state, which has lead to growing numbers of Christian martyrs due to the Islamic State's attacks on "non-believers". Knapp also proposes solutions for how the global community can help promote understanding, tolerance, and support for refugees. This book is one step in the effort to bring awareness and a peaceful call to action for the persecuted Christians in the Middle East.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Tsipouras

    It is a shame that the Western churches constantly forget about their Eastern brothers and Sisters. Christianity in Syria and Iraq is just as old as it it is in Greece and much older than in Northern Europe. But it are these Christians who over the last 2000 years suffer persecution again and again and are forced to seek refuge somewhere else. Some of them still speak Aramaen, just as Jesus did. This book tells us about the situation in 2015, when Mosul and Aleppo were under the rule of ISIS, som It is a shame that the Western churches constantly forget about their Eastern brothers and Sisters. Christianity in Syria and Iraq is just as old as it it is in Greece and much older than in Northern Europe. But it are these Christians who over the last 2000 years suffer persecution again and again and are forced to seek refuge somewhere else. Some of them still speak Aramaen, just as Jesus did. This book tells us about the situation in 2015, when Mosul and Aleppo were under the rule of ISIS, some personal stories of refugees who managed to get to Germany, and the history of these churches that, if things continue as they are, will be scattered all over the world and erased in their homelands.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jody

    I received a free copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This is a book I intend to pass around church. American Christians know so little about real persecution that we tend to think it's the end of times when gas prices go up or the line at the store is too long. This book will open your eyes to what people go through only because of their faith in Christ. It will make you question the strength of your own faith and cause you to wonder if you could hold up under the same cond I received a free copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This is a book I intend to pass around church. American Christians know so little about real persecution that we tend to think it's the end of times when gas prices go up or the line at the store is too long. This book will open your eyes to what people go through only because of their faith in Christ. It will make you question the strength of your own faith and cause you to wonder if you could hold up under the same conditions. Very good book and a must read for today's Christian.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Darrin Niday

    A very eye opening book, for us here in the US. we don't realize what is happening in other parts of the world. If you are a Christian, to see what is happening to Christians in the Mid east is a real shocker. Plus the History we don't know is facinating and scary. A must read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Judibea

    I am currently reading this book by a priest who offers support to a Aramean Christian who has had to flee from Syria under persecution as a result of the IS take-over. The priest provides a personal eyewitness testimony of the suffering of these Christians who still speak the language of Jesus time and who are faithful to Christ despite losing everything. The devastation of their loses is heartbreaking but until I read this book I only new what I heard here and there or on the news which was li I am currently reading this book by a priest who offers support to a Aramean Christian who has had to flee from Syria under persecution as a result of the IS take-over. The priest provides a personal eyewitness testimony of the suffering of these Christians who still speak the language of Jesus time and who are faithful to Christ despite losing everything. The devastation of their loses is heartbreaking but until I read this book I only new what I heard here and there or on the news which was limited. I am learning so much from reading this book and recommend it highly! He brings you right into the refugee camps and describes the heart breaking reality of the lives of these dear people trying to survive and being rejected again and again at the risk of their lives. So many have lost their lives and the lives of family and friends. So many have lost the once close connection to neighbors who now under IS or due to their Muslim faith no longer are neighbors. Yet, among the stories Knapp finds a friendship bond that survives among those coming to a funeral. Coming and holding one another in love --- love that bridges the gap. I am humbled by this book. I can't put it down. My faith is challenged by my Christian brothers and sisters and their children and elders who know a persecution that has tested their faith as in the book of James. I am humbled that I owe them so much as they date back to the time of the 1st Century of faith. I wish to thank them for holding hope in Christ. Again, I am humbled by their testimony and troubled about the refugee crisis and the children. Thank you Adnreas Knapp for being a witness to their plight - we must know, we must care, we must pray and give help.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dan Davis

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Gold

  19. 5 out of 5

    terry l. hand

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jao

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dorothy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  23. 4 out of 5

    Justin DaMetz

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Brown

  25. 5 out of 5

    Damjan Šeruga

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ali

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lilamea

  28. 5 out of 5

    Macabre977

  29. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  30. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  31. 5 out of 5

    Ed

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Corey

  33. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

  34. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  35. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  36. 4 out of 5

    Wanda C

  37. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  38. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Taylor-Cruz

  39. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  40. 4 out of 5

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  41. 4 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  42. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

  43. 4 out of 5

    Frances Shelton

  44. 5 out of 5

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  45. 4 out of 5

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  46. 5 out of 5

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  47. 4 out of 5

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  48. 5 out of 5

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  49. 5 out of 5

    Mary Nee

  50. 5 out of 5

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  51. 5 out of 5

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  52. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Morris

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