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Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800

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First published in 1980 and recently out of print, Liberty's Daughters is widely considered a landmark book on the history of American women and on the Revolution itself.


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First published in 1980 and recently out of print, Liberty's Daughters is widely considered a landmark book on the history of American women and on the Revolution itself.

30 review for Liberty's Daughters: The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    Best Little Free Library acquisition in a while. This was a really satisfying deep-dive into what life was like for American women in the late 1700's. Norton obviously did a whole hell of a lot of research - I'm impressed with how organized and eloquent she is with her presentation of her findings. We get to read snippets of several letters and diaries written by white women, and there's a respectable amount of informed consideration about the experiences of enslaved black women. (That's awkward Best Little Free Library acquisition in a while. This was a really satisfying deep-dive into what life was like for American women in the late 1700's. Norton obviously did a whole hell of a lot of research - I'm impressed with how organized and eloquent she is with her presentation of her findings. We get to read snippets of several letters and diaries written by white women, and there's a respectable amount of informed consideration about the experiences of enslaved black women. (That's awkwardly put on my part, because according to the author, there are no surviving letters or diaries from these women.) This was engaging and entertaining reading, all the more so for me, because I didn't think I particularly cared about this time period. Turns out, this is when American feminism first started to wake up. Little seeds of thought starting to germinate.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This is a fantastically researched book on the experiences of women during the Revolutionary War. I was enthralled with the book from start to finish and found it wildly interesting. Norton sets the book up nicely in her introduction, and continues to tie her chapters in throughout the book. Wonderful read, should be required reading for every women's historian.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mathew Powers

    As I mentioned on my review for Linda Kerber's Women of the Republic, this book should be read with Kerber's together. They are both brilliant books. Any book can be seen to have a flaw or two, but they are both, overall, brilliant pieces of scholarship and excellent reads.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Owens

    I loved the numerous women that Norton brought into the book. Liberty's Daughters was informative and easy to read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Russell

    Mary Beth Norton is the Xamot to Linda Kerber’s Tomax

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike Emett

    Required for Colonial America Reading Seminar Ph.D. course.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kaufmak

    Excellent book. When your work is still considered one of the standards for women's history in the Early Republic, you've done something special. I took one star away because it was a bit slow at the beginning. I know that the early chapters were to establish a starting point to define the cultural shift that occurred during and after the war, they were just a bit more of a slog than the rest of the book. If you feel Ill-informed about the place of women in early US History, this is the place to Excellent book. When your work is still considered one of the standards for women's history in the Early Republic, you've done something special. I took one star away because it was a bit slow at the beginning. I know that the early chapters were to establish a starting point to define the cultural shift that occurred during and after the war, they were just a bit more of a slog than the rest of the book. If you feel Ill-informed about the place of women in early US History, this is the place to start.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Literally, a good read. It can be a bit dry in places, but the information being conveyed is so different from what you see elsewhere that you keep going. Colonial women are among the hardest to find information on, so it's amazing how much detail is given about daily activities and their life experiences in general. It's also organized pretty much perfectly; if you're looking for a specific piece of information, you'll know exactly where to go with out much searching.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Mary Beth Norton is one of America's finest historians. Her work in women's history has been simply outstanding, and doubtlessly has influenced our collective consciousness pertaining to women's contributions to our republic's rich history. Liberty's Daughters represents Norton's first major foray into the experience of American women during the Revolutionary era.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

    This is a very informative and well written book about the lives and growth of American women during the revolutionary war. It shows the search for independence of women taking seed. How can a country take its independence without it's occupants doing the same?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Doris Raines

    A. Good. Title. There. Is. Know. Reading. Know. Reading. Know. Book. Missing. Words. Where. Is. The. Details.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Scheller Williams

    Very dry reading but extremely informative to an 1812 distaff reenactor.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katie Wilson

    For claiming to describe the Revolutionary experience for America's women, I expected more from Mary Beth Norton.

  14. 4 out of 5

    George Milad

  15. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

  16. 4 out of 5

    Doris Herrmann

  17. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tracey Uhrich

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lindy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Cox

  23. 4 out of 5

    Georgie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sian

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  27. 4 out of 5

    Holly Genovese

  28. 5 out of 5

    Belinda

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eileen yeoh

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

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