counter create hit One Scandalous Story: Clinton, Lewinsky, and Thirteen Days That Tarnished American Journalism - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

One Scandalous Story: Clinton, Lewinsky, and Thirteen Days That Tarnished American Journalism

Availability: Ready to download

In 1963 Marvin Kalb observed the Secret Service escorting an attractive woman into a hotel for what was most likely a rendezvous with President Kennedy. Kalb, then a news correspondent for CBS, didn't consider the incident newsworthy. Thirty-five years later, Kalb watched in dismay as the press dove headfirst into the scandal of President Clinton's affair with White House In 1963 Marvin Kalb observed the Secret Service escorting an attractive woman into a hotel for what was most likely a rendezvous with President Kennedy. Kalb, then a news correspondent for CBS, didn't consider the incident newsworthy. Thirty-five years later, Kalb watched in dismay as the press dove headfirst into the scandal of President Clinton's affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky, disclosing every prurient detail. How and why had the journalistic landscape shifted so dramatically? "One Scandalous Story" seeks to answer this critical question through the inside story of thirteen days -- January 13-25, 1998 -- that make up a vital chapter in the history of American journalism. In riveting detail, Kalb examines just how the media covered the Lewinsky scandal, offering what he calls an "X-ray of the Washington press corps." Drawing on hundreds of original interviews, Kalb allows us to eavesdrop on the incestuous deals between reporters and sources, the bitter disagreements among editors, the machination of moguls for whom news is Big Business, and above all, the frantic maneuvering to break the story. With fresh insight, he retraces decisions made by Michael Isikoff of "Newsweek," Internet renegade Matt Drudge, Jackie Judd of ABC, Clinton-basher Lucianne Goldberg, Susan Schmidt of "The Washington Post," Jackie Bennett of the Office of the Independent Counsel, and other key players in this scandal that veered from low comedy to high drama. Through the lens of those thirteen turbulent days, Kalb offers us a portrait of the "new news" in all its contradictions. He reveals how intense economic pressures in the news business, the ascendancy of the Internet, theblurring of roles between reporters and commentators, and a surge of dubious sourcing and "copy-cat journalism" have combined to make tabloid-style journalism increasingly mainstream. But are we condemned to a resurgence of "yellow journalism"? Painstakingly documented and sobering in its conclusions, "One Scandalous Story" issues a clarion call to newsmakers and the American public alike: "Journalism can change for the better -- and must."


Compare

In 1963 Marvin Kalb observed the Secret Service escorting an attractive woman into a hotel for what was most likely a rendezvous with President Kennedy. Kalb, then a news correspondent for CBS, didn't consider the incident newsworthy. Thirty-five years later, Kalb watched in dismay as the press dove headfirst into the scandal of President Clinton's affair with White House In 1963 Marvin Kalb observed the Secret Service escorting an attractive woman into a hotel for what was most likely a rendezvous with President Kennedy. Kalb, then a news correspondent for CBS, didn't consider the incident newsworthy. Thirty-five years later, Kalb watched in dismay as the press dove headfirst into the scandal of President Clinton's affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky, disclosing every prurient detail. How and why had the journalistic landscape shifted so dramatically? "One Scandalous Story" seeks to answer this critical question through the inside story of thirteen days -- January 13-25, 1998 -- that make up a vital chapter in the history of American journalism. In riveting detail, Kalb examines just how the media covered the Lewinsky scandal, offering what he calls an "X-ray of the Washington press corps." Drawing on hundreds of original interviews, Kalb allows us to eavesdrop on the incestuous deals between reporters and sources, the bitter disagreements among editors, the machination of moguls for whom news is Big Business, and above all, the frantic maneuvering to break the story. With fresh insight, he retraces decisions made by Michael Isikoff of "Newsweek," Internet renegade Matt Drudge, Jackie Judd of ABC, Clinton-basher Lucianne Goldberg, Susan Schmidt of "The Washington Post," Jackie Bennett of the Office of the Independent Counsel, and other key players in this scandal that veered from low comedy to high drama. Through the lens of those thirteen turbulent days, Kalb offers us a portrait of the "new news" in all its contradictions. He reveals how intense economic pressures in the news business, the ascendancy of the Internet, theblurring of roles between reporters and commentators, and a surge of dubious sourcing and "copy-cat journalism" have combined to make tabloid-style journalism increasingly mainstream. But are we condemned to a resurgence of "yellow journalism"? Painstakingly documented and sobering in its conclusions, "One Scandalous Story" issues a clarion call to newsmakers and the American public alike: "Journalism can change for the better -- and must."

36 review for One Scandalous Story: Clinton, Lewinsky, and Thirteen Days That Tarnished American Journalism

  1. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Kelley

    Back to the Clinton story. I am not sure why I am reading up on his presidency, but it provides a distraction from COVID-19! This book should be read along side Michael Isikoff’s book “ Uncovering Clinton”, which told his story of “ breaking” the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Kalb takes a highly critical view of the media coverage over 13 days in January, 1998, when in the hyper-competitive climate between print and electronic media, journalists rushed to tell their stories, often relying on scant in Back to the Clinton story. I am not sure why I am reading up on his presidency, but it provides a distraction from COVID-19! This book should be read along side Michael Isikoff’s book “ Uncovering Clinton”, which told his story of “ breaking” the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Kalb takes a highly critical view of the media coverage over 13 days in January, 1998, when in the hyper-competitive climate between print and electronic media, journalists rushed to tell their stories, often relying on scant information and an anonymous source or two. He is critical of Isikoff’s role at times, as he becomes part of the story, and involved in negotiations with the office of the independent counsel, Kenneth Starr, over the timing of his article and access to the tapes recorded secretly by Linda Tripp. He also notes the arrival of social media in the coverage, as the Drudge Report would print, with little verification, rumours that placed even more pressure on more traditional journalists and media outlets. More than twenty years later, the weaknesses and failures identified by Kalb, a veteran journalist, are more evident than ever. The need to “ feed the beast” on 24-hour news channels, the cutbacks at traditional media in the face of online competition, and the blurring of the lines between delivering the news and expressing opinions have created an unholy mess, and an unhealthy world of “fake news” and “ alternate facts”. Heaven help us all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I thought it was interesting, and worrisome, that over recent decades, the public assumes political figures are lying and assumes that the press is bias. Sad to see journalism move from providing facts for the public to responding to drama tactics that appeal to the public despite what is true and factual. Whom are we to learn the actual news from?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Monte Lamb

    Marvin Kalb uses the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal to show how journalism has changed with the advent of the 24 hour news cycle. Sources are no longer "hard" as in the days of Watergate and gossip, innuendo, and controlled news leaks are the order of the day. This is well-written and informative. Marvin Kalb uses the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal to show how journalism has changed with the advent of the 24 hour news cycle. Sources are no longer "hard" as in the days of Watergate and gossip, innuendo, and controlled news leaks are the order of the day. This is well-written and informative.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Roger

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne Chan

  6. 4 out of 5

    naomi

  7. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Robinson

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jon Fletcher

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    As a journalist, I liked the behind-the-scenes of how Newsweek broke the affair.

  10. 5 out of 5

    France

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brigid McDonough

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katie B.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kate Gould

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mark Welkie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jason Law

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lillian

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

  20. 5 out of 5

    Richard Stevens

  21. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wikimedia Italia

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pulitzer Center

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Schuman

  29. 4 out of 5

    Allison Yarrow

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  31. 5 out of 5

    Akaash Shao Pin

  32. 4 out of 5

    Roni

  33. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Cintron

  34. 4 out of 5

    Monica Roche

  35. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  36. 5 out of 5

    Amy

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.