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John Stick, zoo keeper and giant, just wants to sit alone in a dark room with his pet tarantula. However, when ten thousand birds fall dead from the New Mexican sky, the woman he loves, an ornithologist with severe facial deformity, begs him to decipher the cause. He grudgingly agrees, a decision that plunges him into a tangle of weirdness as old as the American Southwest. John Stick, zoo keeper and giant, just wants to sit alone in a dark room with his pet tarantula. However, when ten thousand birds fall dead from the New Mexican sky, the woman he loves, an ornithologist with severe facial deformity, begs him to decipher the cause. He grudgingly agrees, a decision that plunges him into a tangle of weirdness as old as the American Southwest. Stick’s investigation reveals that the birds’ mass death is an offshoot of a much larger conflict. On one side, the Good Friends, an underground railroad for undocumented immigrants, wants Stick to oust the man they believe responsible for killing the birds and persecuting immigrants. This same man leads The Minutemen Militia, which covets Stick’s expertise in handling their genetically mutated immigrant-tracking monsters. Meanwhile, a beautiful animal theologian tries to seduce Stick into believing his existence is key to balancing an off-kilter universe. Shady characters whisper of chupacabras loose in the desert. The exsanguinated corpses of strange beasts begin to turn up, some of them Stick’s close pals. At the center of it all lurks an enigmatic antagonist who, so they say, has harnessed the power of God in an ancient hot springs and is using it to herald doomsday. Stick’s journey upends his stable life, shakes apart his fragile relationships, and sets him on a collision course with his family’s secret ancestry. Ultimately, as chupacabra-like monsters, Minutemen, and Good Friends head toward a final showdown, Stick must make a hard choice about his own identity and values.


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John Stick, zoo keeper and giant, just wants to sit alone in a dark room with his pet tarantula. However, when ten thousand birds fall dead from the New Mexican sky, the woman he loves, an ornithologist with severe facial deformity, begs him to decipher the cause. He grudgingly agrees, a decision that plunges him into a tangle of weirdness as old as the American Southwest. John Stick, zoo keeper and giant, just wants to sit alone in a dark room with his pet tarantula. However, when ten thousand birds fall dead from the New Mexican sky, the woman he loves, an ornithologist with severe facial deformity, begs him to decipher the cause. He grudgingly agrees, a decision that plunges him into a tangle of weirdness as old as the American Southwest. Stick’s investigation reveals that the birds’ mass death is an offshoot of a much larger conflict. On one side, the Good Friends, an underground railroad for undocumented immigrants, wants Stick to oust the man they believe responsible for killing the birds and persecuting immigrants. This same man leads The Minutemen Militia, which covets Stick’s expertise in handling their genetically mutated immigrant-tracking monsters. Meanwhile, a beautiful animal theologian tries to seduce Stick into believing his existence is key to balancing an off-kilter universe. Shady characters whisper of chupacabras loose in the desert. The exsanguinated corpses of strange beasts begin to turn up, some of them Stick’s close pals. At the center of it all lurks an enigmatic antagonist who, so they say, has harnessed the power of God in an ancient hot springs and is using it to herald doomsday. Stick’s journey upends his stable life, shakes apart his fragile relationships, and sets him on a collision course with his family’s secret ancestry. Ultimately, as chupacabra-like monsters, Minutemen, and Good Friends head toward a final showdown, Stick must make a hard choice about his own identity and values.

30 review for Archaeopteryx

  1. 4 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    Archaeopteryx (The Albuquerque Trilogy Book 1) by Dan Darling is one of the top five books I have read this year! It is everything I love in one book! Science, fantasy, adventure, suspense, government or big business cover-up, danger, creatures, odd but likable characters, and Wow factors. This has all of it ten times over! John Stick, giant of a man helps a gal he likes that is beautiful on one side of her face and has tumors on the other. He collects samples from a strange occurrence that caus Archaeopteryx (The Albuquerque Trilogy Book 1) by Dan Darling is one of the top five books I have read this year! It is everything I love in one book! Science, fantasy, adventure, suspense, government or big business cover-up, danger, creatures, odd but likable characters, and Wow factors. This has all of it ten times over! John Stick, giant of a man helps a gal he likes that is beautiful on one side of her face and has tumors on the other. He collects samples from a strange occurrence that caused birds to drop out the sky and die. From that collection, his life has changed forever. He is hunted, harassed, kidnapped, threatened, and so much more. Then he finds it isn't just people that are following him...creatures are attracted to him...he has a scent like no other and they like it. This is one hell of a read! A must read for sci-fi and fantasy lovers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Dan Darling is a bard of the baroque and broken I wrote at one point in the margin of his lyrical debut, Archaeopteryx. The prose of his novel sang on every page. Consider how a father didn’t slip into his birth language when weary, but instead “Spanish staged a coup inside his mouth.” When a friend smiled, “she smiled one of those gentle, genuine smiles that occupy people’s faces when their guard is down, like a squatter taking over a vulnerable house.” And in another place, “emptiness sat on h Dan Darling is a bard of the baroque and broken I wrote at one point in the margin of his lyrical debut, Archaeopteryx. The prose of his novel sang on every page. Consider how a father didn’t slip into his birth language when weary, but instead “Spanish staged a coup inside his mouth.” When a friend smiled, “she smiled one of those gentle, genuine smiles that occupy people’s faces when their guard is down, like a squatter taking over a vulnerable house.” And in another place, “emptiness sat on her living room sofa in a jacket made of hat and shadows.” What I hope these examples get across is not just the poetic quality of the writing, but also how all of these personifications convey the beautiful vulnerability of each of these characters. John Stick inhabits the center of the novel, a misfit giant zoologist who finds himself entangled in a web of mystery after ten thousand birds fall stricken from the sky in the deserts of the Bosque. His friends are fellow misfits who struggle in the land of the “Normals” including an ornithologist named Melodia, half of her face ravaged by tumors, and Spartacus Rex, “an outcast before he even left the womb.” In a world that is about to experience an apocalyptic release of hybrid monsters, including chupacabras, you root for these characters as a reader and hope bad things don’t happen. But you know the monsters are about to be turned loose. It’s not just the language and characters that draw you in as a reader, but the story itself. At one point one of the characters defines the word “chimera” a mythical beast that is part lion and goat and serpent. Dan Darling’s novel itself is a chimera, and not just in the title, which refers to a carnivorous creature transitioning from dinosaur into bird. Like a chimera, the story effectively blends noir mystery, speculative fiction, and even elements of dystopia into a fascinating, literary menagerie. I teach with Dan Darling at Normandale, so I know he belonged to a small circus overseas at one point and that he’s skilled on a unicycle and once was a practicing magician. What I need to ask him is where in the world he learned so much about zoology. I loved moments like this as two of the characters discuss one of the fiercest insects I’ve ever heard of: “If it’s a tarantula hawk, the larva will burrow into Jones’ abdomen. It’ll eat around the major organs, saving them for last. It’ll grow. It’ll mature. It’ll pupate, which only lasts for a day or so, and then it’ll become an adult.” “And then?” “It’ll rip through Jones abdomen wall and emerge, wet and beautiful,” I said. “Then we’ll know what we’ve got.” “That sounds awful.” “It is quite awful.” Most of nature was awful. Melodia stood with her head cocked, watching the sleeping spider. “Isn’t there a kinder way to do this. Jones doesn’t seem like he deserves to die in such a gross way.” “Death comes with being a spider,” I said. “It won’t be pleasant for him, but he’s a predator. He’s poisoned dozens of little insects and sucked their liquified guts out of them. This experience is part of his life cycle.” Melodia fell down on one of her swivel stools. “You work with some terrible things, Stick. I believe they’re beginning to affect your worldview.” So yes, there are grim moments, and there’s a musing melancholy that settles over the pages as these misfits try to stave off an apocalypse while also searching for a way to fit into a world that has discarded them, but this doesn’t mean it’s a heavy read, because on every page the humor and wit lighten the load. The dialogue is often genuinely funny. Perhaps that sounds like an absurd combination: humor and melancholy? Or maybe this, too, is part of the book’s chimeric chemistry. It works. There are many other things I could write about here, from how vampire bats stalk their prey by running on their wingtips, the habits of Tasmanian devils, or how tarantulas hunt and kill. There’s an animal theologian who might be friend or femme fatale or foe, and my favorite, the chupacabra. Strange things creep and crawl and flit and flutter through this book. Deadly beasties that our zoologist has a mysterious affinity for. “I knew one thing about a web,” John Stick thinks as the book speeds toward an explosive climax . “If a creature caught in the middle thrashed around enough, the entire structure would collapse. I was a big creature. It was time to start thrashing.” I’ll leave it to you to discover what happens what he does.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Marjolein

    Full review to come!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    4.5 stars. A great sci-fi novel set in New Mexico. Animals and their place in the world, as well as current politics, figure prominently. I look forward to the next book in the trilogy. Also it would be neat to run into the author, he lives in my same town :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Westgate

    I won a copy of Archaeopteryx in a Goodreads giveaway. Below is my honest review. For me, this book falls somewhere between 2 and 3 stars, but 2 is definitely too low so I've rounded up to three. I didn't dislike it, but I'm not really sure I liked it either - it was just "better than ok". I'll start with a good point - and the one thing that actually kept me reading - Dan Darling has a really good writing style! His descriptions are poetic but not overly so, and I enjoyed his use of language thro I won a copy of Archaeopteryx in a Goodreads giveaway. Below is my honest review. For me, this book falls somewhere between 2 and 3 stars, but 2 is definitely too low so I've rounded up to three. I didn't dislike it, but I'm not really sure I liked it either - it was just "better than ok". I'll start with a good point - and the one thing that actually kept me reading - Dan Darling has a really good writing style! His descriptions are poetic but not overly so, and I enjoyed his use of language throughout. So much so, whenever I had to put the book down it was his writing style which drew me back to it. The plot, unfortunately, not so much. It was ok, but just incredibly....slow, and not much happened for a lot of the book. You have a big intriguing event at the start, then the next 100-ish pages is just Stick driving back and forth between a few places not really caring that anything happened. In fact, the majority of the book was Stick driving back and forth, not caring about anyone or anything. I can say I've learned a lot about being a zookeeper! But that wasn't really what I was hoping to get from the book (which sounded exciting, fantasy/sci-fi from the blurb). Stick starts off as an interesting character, but the more I learned about him the more frustrating he became. He talks about having only two friends, yet when one could be in real danger he gives a moment to think "Should I warn them?" and promptly decides it's not worth his time. When the same friend has something potentially bad happen later, he doesn't care until he can use it as a bargaining chip for his own gain. I reached a point just before midway where Stick's lack of caring made me not care what happens either, and if it wasn't for Darling's great writing style I probably would have DNF'd at that point. But, because his style did hook me, I kept going. There were a few interesting characters throughout (Melodia, Tanis, and Abbey in particular) and I really wish we could have learned more about them, or seen more of them, but because Stick didn't care about anyone or what they did or didn't do, then we as the reader didn't get to see those things either. Which I feel was a missed opportunity, but maybe the second book will go more in depth? The end does answer the questions of "What happened?" and "Why?" but it was all shoved into the last 10 pages of the story which made it feel even more inconsequential. You get a few tidbits throughout the book, but again because Stick doesn't really care to know anything you don't really get to know much until the very end (and I felt myself caring less and less about any of it). Overall it's an OK book, and 3 stars, but I don't think I'd pick up the next in the series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gabe Mianulli

    Archaeopteryx is an adventurous novel full of magic, mystery, and deep, dynamic characters. John Stick is a loveable and inspiring protagonist, a true companion and confidant to the reader. Contained in this novel is an imaginative journey into personal, physical, and esoteric identity, the complex functionalities of an ethically degraded society, and philosophical inquiries into cosmic chaos, the depths or shallows of morality, and the beauty of the biological entanglement of the natural world Archaeopteryx is an adventurous novel full of magic, mystery, and deep, dynamic characters. John Stick is a loveable and inspiring protagonist, a true companion and confidant to the reader. Contained in this novel is an imaginative journey into personal, physical, and esoteric identity, the complex functionalities of an ethically degraded society, and philosophical inquiries into cosmic chaos, the depths or shallows of morality, and the beauty of the biological entanglement of the natural world that is seldom appreciated more than in this story. Just as John Stick retreats from the ‘normals’ into his subterranean lair at the end of his demanding days, so was I, able to find a similar solitary comfort in this well-crafted and beautifully written story of individuality, ability, and dutiful resistance to the chaotic evils that ceaselessly invade our wishfully-organized lives. Introverts and other folks who enjoy their solitude will find solace in Stick, but this book also explores deeply the necessity of friendship and interpersonal relationships to the human psyche. Stick’s symbiotic reluctance and indulgence in the company he encounters mirrors an effect modern readers might be familiar with—of being human in a secluded, yet mediatic-dependent world where privacy is rare and genuine kindness is becoming even rarer. Archaeopteryx acknowledges some sad truths of society but also invokes a hope that with action, diverse alliances, and a basic intention of goodness, these ills can be cured, or at least, progressively challenged. In genre, Archaeopteryx seamlessly blends the forms of detective fiction with the more exploratory and imaginative realms of sci/fi and fantasy to create a vivid depiction of oddities found in the deserts of the southwest. Readers are gently placed into the head of John Stick as he grapples with abnormalities that only get more perplexing as the first leg of his adventure unfolds. They are with him every step as the true depth of the mystery that comes to dominate his life unfolds in the smooth, amusing prose of a masterful professor of English. Playful allusions to Holmesian deductions are gently sprinkled throughout the story, alongside classic greek mythology and precise zoological researches to create a magical and enthralling literary accomplishment. A wonderful read! A truly imaginative and creative work supplied with memorable characters and a rollercoaster plotline of mystery and discovery. I’ll be eagerly awaiting the next section of John Stick’s journey.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cassi

    This was not bad, but it got way too wordy at times. Also, it was strange to read a book where you don't really like any of the characters. I wouldn't bother reading a second book in the trilogy, but I was willing to finish this one out.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Metra

    Not only was this book was so beautifully and eloquently written, but the the journey the author's imagination takes you on is unpredictable and wonderful. The characters are authentic and complex -- one page I'd be rooting for a character and the next page, I'd be pulling my hair out in frustration. Dan Darling also keeps you guessing as far as plot lines and action -- I felt in the dark in a good way, as though I was reading something so unique that I hadn't anything to compare it to. It's bee Not only was this book was so beautifully and eloquently written, but the the journey the author's imagination takes you on is unpredictable and wonderful. The characters are authentic and complex -- one page I'd be rooting for a character and the next page, I'd be pulling my hair out in frustration. Dan Darling also keeps you guessing as far as plot lines and action -- I felt in the dark in a good way, as though I was reading something so unique that I hadn't anything to compare it to. It's been a few weeks since I've finished it and I still go back to it, visualizing this New Mexican imaginative journey. I cannot WAIT for the second novel in the series. Dan Darling is a natural born writer, and it was a gift to read his debut novel.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Buckley

    I'm not even going to try to describe this novel. First, because it defies description--and second, because describing it would spoil the discovery for you. It's partly a thriller about a scientific mystery, partly a loving portrait of Albuquerque, NM (where I happen to live, making it particularly evocative for me), partly about being human and coping as best one can. It brings to mind Rudolfo Anaya's novels, like Bless Me, Ultima ... only with a sting. I never saw any of the many plot twists c I'm not even going to try to describe this novel. First, because it defies description--and second, because describing it would spoil the discovery for you. It's partly a thriller about a scientific mystery, partly a loving portrait of Albuquerque, NM (where I happen to live, making it particularly evocative for me), partly about being human and coping as best one can. It brings to mind Rudolfo Anaya's novels, like Bless Me, Ultima ... only with a sting. I never saw any of the many plot twists coming. I can't imagine where he'll go with it next. I guess I should mention the protagonist has a pet tarantula. By the end of Archaeopteryx, I was becoming quite fond of it. This is apparently Mr. Darling's first novel, which I find incredible. I'm already looking forward to the second book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Berry

    Pieces to the craziest puzzle you've ever read, a must read. 0 minutes ago Details John Stick lives a relatively solitary life. As a zoo keeper in the reptile department, he keeps to himself and his best friends are his animals. He does have a few friends outside of work, each of them a misfit just like him. It's a simple favor for one of these friends that turns Stick's world upside down. All he was trying to do was help Melodia out, and instead got himself stuck neck deep in a crazy game of secre Pieces to the craziest puzzle you've ever read, a must read. 0 minutes ago Details John Stick lives a relatively solitary life. As a zoo keeper in the reptile department, he keeps to himself and his best friends are his animals. He does have a few friends outside of work, each of them a misfit just like him. It's a simple favor for one of these friends that turns Stick's world upside down. All he was trying to do was help Melodia out, and instead got himself stuck neck deep in a crazy game of secrets. As Stick tries to put all the puzzle pieces together and make some sense of what is going on, he finds that he is only digging himself into a deeper hole.  As secrets begin to be revealed, Stick realizes that his life has been a sequence of manipulated events. All of it orchestrated by a crazy scientist trying to play God. John Stick is that puzzle piece that makes all the others pieces fit together. I really enjoyed Archaeopteryx and all the twists, turns, and surprises. Even if I was able to guess what might happen ahead in the story, the author was still able to throw a surprise in there that I never saw coming. It is a true page turner and I highly recommend this book. It's like reading through the Truman Show, as John Stick learns that his life, which he thought was so private, is really the main stage for everything that is happening. It's a puzzle with so many pieces that don't seem to fit together, only to realize that the key piece is already in your hand. I think this book could be great for young adult readers as well as more mature readers. I even think my 10yo would enjoy this story, although it may be a little mature, although there is no sexual content and very little language if any. This is definitely a must read. Happy Reading. 

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Bronder

    John Stick is a zoologist and suffers from gigantism. His close friend, Melodia is an ornithologist that suffers from half her face being covered in tumors. Both lead a very private life but Melodia asks John to get samples from a strange even in New Mexico. Ten thousand birds mysteriously fall from the sky. But after getting the samples, John finds himself in some serious trouble. The Minutemen Militia would love his help patrolling the Mexican border. The Good Friends, anti-Minutemen, want him John Stick is a zoologist and suffers from gigantism. His close friend, Melodia is an ornithologist that suffers from half her face being covered in tumors. Both lead a very private life but Melodia asks John to get samples from a strange even in New Mexico. Ten thousand birds mysteriously fall from the sky. But after getting the samples, John finds himself in some serious trouble. The Minutemen Militia would love his help patrolling the Mexican border. The Good Friends, anti-Minutemen, want him on their side. Creatures, normal and genetically engineered love the smell of him. An apocalypse is coming and John is in the middle of it. This book is filled with a little bit of everything wrapped up in beautiful description and some snarky humor. Ironically the misfits of our world are going to be the ones to keep it going. I really loved all the zoology facts that you learn along the way. I love how you find solace in the individual yet they have to learn to work together to save the world. This books is beautifully written and quickly draws you in. It’s one that I recommend checking out. I can’t wait to see where this series goes from here. For a first book I absolutely loved it!! I received a complimentary copy of this book. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    A grad school friend is the wife of Dan, the author, and recommended the book to me. I received it quickly off my holds list at the public library and waiting a couple weeks before digging in. Seems like reviews are mixed, but I really enjoyed the book. I miss reading science fiction and this was a fun re-entry with a more modern spin than what I used to read when I was younger. The writing is very good -- evocative without being flowery, down-to-earth but with a special unexpected quality to th A grad school friend is the wife of Dan, the author, and recommended the book to me. I received it quickly off my holds list at the public library and waiting a couple weeks before digging in. Seems like reviews are mixed, but I really enjoyed the book. I miss reading science fiction and this was a fun re-entry with a more modern spin than what I used to read when I was younger. The writing is very good -- evocative without being flowery, down-to-earth but with a special unexpected quality to the descriptions. The style is a great match for the setting in and around Albuquerque, a place that's simultaneously harsh and magical, and an amalgam of so many cultures. Some folks didn't like the main character but I guess I have a soft-spot for curmudgeons. I enjoyed him and thought he was well-developed, consistent, and believable. I did find a couple of the other characters a little confusing and not super realistic as representations of real people. I know it's meant to be a trilogy, and maybe this is unfair, but I still give it 4 stars instead of 5 because of some of the strangeness of the character development and the ending... it felt too open-ended, a little bit like cheating.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Poujade-scott

    Interesting read I chose to give this a four star rating because at times I felt the dialogue was a bit too surreal but that might have been just the plot content. I did enjoy this book. Especially the sort of biological manipulations and the ending. I've met people like the characters, so it was easy for me to believe that the characters would act the way that they did. Please read if you are a fan of Michael Crichton.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura McClintock

    First of all I have never been to New Mexico but after reading this I feel like I have been and can describe it perfectly and want to go back. This book is greatly written with complex characters and suspenseful situations. As reading I would have to stop but find myself rushing to get back to it. Author Dan Darling did a fantastic job with this book and now I am ready to move on to the next.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lesley Ellis

    This is a book that keeps you on your toes, I loved it! From page one I was gripped, I didn’t want to put this book down. I loved the characters and the storyline. If you like fantasy, horror/thriller and originality then I recommend this book. Never a dull moment in John’s life. Awesome twists that you don’t see coming. I’m looking forward to reading book two in this series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Supernatural sci fi. Some interesting characters and interesting plot points, but a slow story dragged down by a myopic lead character.

  17. 4 out of 5

    LeonardaLeyva

    A circus of but people and no real plan, but I have read worse.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

    This is one of the best books I’ve read in years. John Stick is the main character and is a giant. The book is through his lens as an outsider, he refers to others as ‘normals.’ But there’s something incredibly relatable and homely about him. He’s tragic and cynical- but also familiar-feeling. He has a really sweet connection to his pet tarantula. One of my favorite parts of the book is seeing how he organizes his life (his home, his car, his clothes) to fit his body. I’ve been to New Mexico a fe This is one of the best books I’ve read in years. John Stick is the main character and is a giant. The book is through his lens as an outsider, he refers to others as ‘normals.’ But there’s something incredibly relatable and homely about him. He’s tragic and cynical- but also familiar-feeling. He has a really sweet connection to his pet tarantula. One of my favorite parts of the book is seeing how he organizes his life (his home, his car, his clothes) to fit his body. I’ve been to New Mexico a few times and feel the descriptions of the place are spot on- they make me miss it and want to go back right away. You read the book and know Darling has a deep connection to the state. The book is a page-turner, but it also has a lot of important things to say about issues that are really pressing: immigration (border politics in general), discrimination, and genetic engineering. Honestly, I think the world would be a better place if everyone read this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Bessette

    One of the best books I’ve read in years. Seriously couldn’t put it down. Highly recommend!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carolina Imhof

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy Waggener

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lucie Hankey

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brad A Davidson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cait

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Schrandt

  26. 5 out of 5

    carroll paterson struthers

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Nechrebecki

  28. 5 out of 5

    Holly Watson-Wetzel

    While Archaeopteryx is not typically a book I pick up straight away off the shelf, I LOVED it! Science fiction, for me, can be too fiction-ee, however, Dan Darling brought not only his characters to life, but also his creatures! I felt as if I could see, feel, and smell each one. The protagonist, John Stick, was completely relatable, despite his obvious differences to most readers. His dry humor and thought processes are incredibly pertinent to today's political climate and therefore reached out While Archaeopteryx is not typically a book I pick up straight away off the shelf, I LOVED it! Science fiction, for me, can be too fiction-ee, however, Dan Darling brought not only his characters to life, but also his creatures! I felt as if I could see, feel, and smell each one. The protagonist, John Stick, was completely relatable, despite his obvious differences to most readers. His dry humor and thought processes are incredibly pertinent to today's political climate and therefore reached out to me personally through the pages. For example, Darling writes, "Nothing humans did was ever bigger than a turtle. That we thought so was what made us so goddamned evil." John's reflection from his beloved turtle Esposita is what makes him so relatable- what is more important than the life of one small animal? If you haven't read this book yet- start now! It's easy to start and stop (easy to pick up the story line after busy work days) and easy to love. I'm waiting with bated turtle breath for the second book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mieke

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Lee

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