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Lieutenant Ellen Ripley awoke from her long journey in space with a hole in her memory and an overwhelming drive to survive. When she meets Wilks and Billie, two battered veterans in the war against the aliens, she realizes she's found two comrades in arms - and she's ready to take up the fight. Only then does she discover the devastating secret that lurks behind her long s Lieutenant Ellen Ripley awoke from her long journey in space with a hole in her memory and an overwhelming drive to survive. When she meets Wilks and Billie, two battered veterans in the war against the aliens, she realizes she's found two comrades in arms - and she's ready to take up the fight. Only then does she discover the devastating secret that lurks behind her long sleep. When she, Wilks, and Billie prepare to meet the aliens head-on to turn a powerful alien queen against her spawn in a battle intended to save Earth, that secret becomes her greatest weapon - and her greatest liability. As the fate of Earth hangs in the balance, Ripley and Billie must come to terms with what it means to be alien... and what it means to be human.


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Lieutenant Ellen Ripley awoke from her long journey in space with a hole in her memory and an overwhelming drive to survive. When she meets Wilks and Billie, two battered veterans in the war against the aliens, she realizes she's found two comrades in arms - and she's ready to take up the fight. Only then does she discover the devastating secret that lurks behind her long s Lieutenant Ellen Ripley awoke from her long journey in space with a hole in her memory and an overwhelming drive to survive. When she meets Wilks and Billie, two battered veterans in the war against the aliens, she realizes she's found two comrades in arms - and she's ready to take up the fight. Only then does she discover the devastating secret that lurks behind her long sleep. When she, Wilks, and Billie prepare to meet the aliens head-on to turn a powerful alien queen against her spawn in a battle intended to save Earth, that secret becomes her greatest weapon - and her greatest liability. As the fate of Earth hangs in the balance, Ripley and Billie must come to terms with what it means to be alien... and what it means to be human.

30 review for Aliens: The Female War

  1. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I enjoyed this one because it featured Ripley in a main role (sort of) and also had a pretty major even in the ending. (view spoiler)[ Of course, Ripley is now some type of highly advanced synthetic and the big ending, where a bomb kills all of the Aliens infesting Earth, is never actually shown. The book even ends on a cliffhanger, at least in a way, and that dropped my rating somewhat. (hide spoiler)] We see Billie and Wilks team with Ripley and a rag tag bunch of warriors in a final attempt t I enjoyed this one because it featured Ripley in a main role (sort of) and also had a pretty major even in the ending. (view spoiler)[ Of course, Ripley is now some type of highly advanced synthetic and the big ending, where a bomb kills all of the Aliens infesting Earth, is never actually shown. The book even ends on a cliffhanger, at least in a way, and that dropped my rating somewhat. (hide spoiler)] We see Billie and Wilks team with Ripley and a rag tag bunch of warriors in a final attempt to destroy the Aliens on Earth once and for all. They travel to the Aliens home planet and gather the Queen of All Queens in an effort to lure the aliens to their doom. It's a pretty typical Aliens story with a big action ending that we've come to expect. I thought it was good as a logical next step in the story, but it felt like it was an ending that's not an ending, so it left me slightly confused. If you read the first two novels, you may was well read this one to at least complete the trilogy. I'm not sure how closely the next books in the series tie into this one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ana Mardoll

    Aliens Novels: Book 3, The Female War / 0-553-56159-6 Having thoroughly enjoyed the first two books in the Aliens series ("Earth Hive" and "Nightmare Asylum"), I have mixed feelings about this book. We join the series almost precisely where we left off in "Nightmare Asylum" - with Wilks, Bille, and Ripley mooning about on the lunar rescue station and plotting how they can help in the grand scheme of human against alien. Ripley has come up with a daring plan that involves gathering together the Dre Aliens Novels: Book 3, The Female War / 0-553-56159-6 Having thoroughly enjoyed the first two books in the Aliens series ("Earth Hive" and "Nightmare Asylum"), I have mixed feelings about this book. We join the series almost precisely where we left off in "Nightmare Asylum" - with Wilks, Bille, and Ripley mooning about on the lunar rescue station and plotting how they can help in the grand scheme of human against alien. Ripley has come up with a daring plan that involves gathering together the Dreamers on the lunar station - those empaths who pick up the telepathic communications of the aliens in their dreams - for a mission that will ultimately doom the aliens on Earth to extinction. A great deal of attention is lavished on the supporting characters, making this motley crew of Dreamers the most fleshed-out supporting characters in the series so far, and providing me with actual concern that they might die on the mission, rather than mentally consigning them off as anonymous cannon fodder like so many before them. The plot expositions is nicely done as well, with the authors considering carefully the logistics of their plan, and how to pull off the technical details of Ripley's daring and drastic scheme. These details are a case of 'too little, too late', though, because the actual plot of "Female War" is very thin, verging on the ridiculous. You see, empaths sense the presence of aliens, which is why Dreamers have been used in the past to pinpoint nearby alien nests. However, it turns out that the empaths have not been sensing the nearby alien nests *directly*, but have rather been picking up the ambient telepathy waves directed *at* the nearby aliens *from* the Queen of Queens (QoQ) back on their home planet (not the 'home' planet from "Earth Hive", incidentally). The QoQ knows where each of her children are in the universe and send them constant telepathic commands to come back to her. The Dreamers are able to pick up these commands and pinpoint the location of the home world, by remembering star layouts from their dreams. Ripley realizes that if the QoQ can be kidnapped from the home world and dropped on Earth, then all the aliens will flock to her in a single localized spot and it'll just be the work of a few nukes to take care of the alien infestation forever. This plot has more than a few problems associated with it, not the least of which is WHY the QoQ sends this constant signal - what's the point of having all your drones gathered to you rather than spreading out, hunting, and perpetuating the species? Some half-hearted attempts are made to suggest that the aliens might be bio-weapons, with the suggestion that the QoQ might be some kind of return beacon or something, but this never really pans out and frankly seems somewhat silly. Anyway, Ripley decides to gather up all the Dreamers, or as many as are game, hijack a ship from the lunar station, travel to the alien home world, kidnap the QoQ, drop her off on Earth, and then set off a long-dismantled nuclear bomb to wipe out the aliens when they gather at critical mass. Easy peasy. To heighten the tension and provide motivation, the authors include a pretty implausible scenario: the military is still sending regular sorties down to Earth to engage the aliens (despite the ridiculous odds of a dozen marines against a planet-wide infestation) and to look for survivors (despite the fact that there really shouldn't be any more at this point, and despite the serious risk of contamination of the lunar station if one is infected). These sorties, however, give a useful excuse to take the stolen transport ship out on 'maneuvers', so we let it pass. The ship of Dreamers travels to the home world in relative peace and quiet and here is where I get a little annoyed. The theme of the victim hunting the hunter via a telepathic link is a time honored tradition, used at least as far back as "Dracula". However, it is reasonable to pose, as Stoker does, several serious questions: Is the link merely one-way, or does the hunter have full knowledge of the victim's plans and is laying in wait for them? Are the actions of the victim truly their own if they are under telepathic influence? Will the telepathic victims be able to maintain their own minds in the overwhelming presence of the hunter? These are questions that can and should be posed, and the authors hint at a possible twist: Did the QoQ call them to her intentionally? Are their plans really hers? Is the QoQ aware of their plans and prepared for their arrival? All these hinted questions are then completely discarded, which really bugs me. At the very least, a few non-dreamers should have been brought along as backup, in case the dreamers lost control of themselves on the planet, but no. Then the silly become ludicrous: the QoQ is not buried deep within a mountain, surrounded by thousands of drones, but rather is resting placidly on the planet's surface, readily available for Ripley to hover a ship over her, goad her into a rage, and trick her into scrambling up into the ship. Despite the fact that even the drones on this planet are giant-sized, the group escapes with implausibly minor casualties. Several point-blank shots to the aliens fail to slosh gallons of acid over the main characters, a serendipitous fact that they chalk up to extraordinarily good luck. The QoQ thus secure, they race back to Earth on the double. There, the plan is to drop the QoQ off near the main cluster of nukes, hope to god that she nests in that general area, and wire the nukes to go off after a six month delay allowing most all of the aliens to travel to this new nest. In the meantime, Ripley and Billie decide to rescue the last little girl on planet Earth and will do their best Rambo impersonations, fighting off waves and waves of hundreds of stampeding aliens without sustaining a single major injury. If this weren't enough, I have to register a complaint with regard to Ripley in this book. A twist has been introduced in order to explain the one question I didn't care about (How can Ripley be here when she's 'supposed' to be dying on the prison planet in "Alien 3"?) whilst ignoring the massive amount of new questions this ridiculous twist brings up, not the least of which being Who, What, Where, When, How, and Why? This is, in my opinion, an inexcusably sloppy way to resolve a continuity problem and I would have preferred they just stick with the time-honored tradition that books don't have to match movies. Anyway, they are still stuck with a problem if they want to match the movies, because there's really no way to reconcile the problem that the cast of "Alien Resurrection" have never seen or heard of the aliens, despite the fact that (according to the books), they destroyed Earth and nearly wiped out humanity. Really, I didn't regret reading this book. The writing was okay, even if the plot was ridiculous and sometimes rushed. It's worth a look if you just want to finish out the tale of Wilks and Billie from the first two novels. However, if you're not already a big fan, there's nothing really here for you. And even if you *are* a fan, most of the 'alien details' included here are just nonsensical and stupid, which may well leave you frustrated. ~ Ana Mardoll

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Francois Boivin

    The third in the "first" trilogy of ALIENS novels, based on a trilogy of graphic novels from Dark Horse Comics written by Mark Verheiden. In the previous two books, Perry re-worked the characters Newt and Hicks from the comics as Billie and Wilks following the release of ALIEN3. The third comic co-starred Ellen Ripley herself, so how to include her as a major part of the story? Android Ripley! The whole part when she discovers she is an Artificial Person implanted with the knowledge and memories The third in the "first" trilogy of ALIENS novels, based on a trilogy of graphic novels from Dark Horse Comics written by Mark Verheiden. In the previous two books, Perry re-worked the characters Newt and Hicks from the comics as Billie and Wilks following the release of ALIEN3. The third comic co-starred Ellen Ripley herself, so how to include her as a major part of the story? Android Ripley! The whole part when she discovers she is an Artificial Person implanted with the knowledge and memories of Ripley (along with convenient knowledge of how to set up bombs) is a nice dramatic addition as she tries to deal with what she is. Of course, she still kicks ass. The story is basically a whole saga of Ripley, Wilks and Newt gathering a few ex-marines and support personnel to steal a freighter ship from Gateway Station in the goal of going to the Mother Queen Alien's planet, capture her/it and bring it back to Earth. the Mother Queen has been communicating telepathically across the galaxy with her "children", and some humans received the connection in their dreams. Hence, they are able to triangulate the location of the planet. Once on Earth, the Queen of Queen would attract her brood from all across the planet so they can be wiped out with one fell massive explosion. What happens next is an epic story of triumphs and fuck-ups, with a few hundreds of thousands of aliens caught in-between. For this third book, Perry enlisted the help of his daughter Stephani Danelle Perry who, he later revealed, wrote the majority of the book. They do a great job, given that they are re-telling someone else's story. This is also the one that is most modified from the original comic. Their writing style is top-notch and perfect for this style of sci-fi/horror/action story. Personally, my favorite is the middle novel/comic Aliens: Nightmare Asylum, but "Female War" is nothing to sneeze at. NOTE: I assume the title was changed from the comic, which was titled "Earth War", because it would be too similar to the first novelization "Earth Hive". "Female War" fits the bill, since it's about Ripley still dealin with the loss of her daughter, Billie wanting to rescue a little girl who survived on Earth for a couple of years, and of course the Mother Alien and all her drones.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lee Carter

    Having read all three Aliens books by Steve Perry, this final novel was definately the best in the trilogy. Earth Hive was good, but it was the second book, Nightmare Asylum, which really picked up the pace and delivered a truly spectacular action packed storyline. It blew me away I don't mind confessing. I didn't think Perry could deliver anything as good as the second book, but I was wrong. The third installment was even better. Great military gung ho action, good characters (though a bit one di Having read all three Aliens books by Steve Perry, this final novel was definately the best in the trilogy. Earth Hive was good, but it was the second book, Nightmare Asylum, which really picked up the pace and delivered a truly spectacular action packed storyline. It blew me away I don't mind confessing. I didn't think Perry could deliver anything as good as the second book, but I was wrong. The third installment was even better. Great military gung ho action, good characters (though a bit one dimensional at times) and a big twist in the tale which I honestly did not see coming. Well written and well paced. Of course, as with the other two novels, the plotline is slightly implauasable and the book moves from one event to another without time for contemplation, but then this is based on a comic book and therefore hardly surprising. Nonetheless, fans of the alien expanded universe will not be disapointed with this instalment in the Aliens series. Definately recomended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joe Pranaitis

    This is a great adaptation of the comic series Aliens: Earth War and I liked how both Steve and Stephaine wove the last chapter of the trilogy togeather as well as explained how Ripley could've survived her death on Fury 161, it is apparent that this trilogy takes place during the 200 hundred years between Alien 3 and Alien Resurrection and as far as I am conserned it should've been Alien 4 instead of Resurrection which still could've come later but that's not saying that this trilogy still coul This is a great adaptation of the comic series Aliens: Earth War and I liked how both Steve and Stephaine wove the last chapter of the trilogy togeather as well as explained how Ripley could've survived her death on Fury 161, it is apparent that this trilogy takes place during the 200 hundred years between Alien 3 and Alien Resurrection and as far as I am conserned it should've been Alien 4 instead of Resurrection which still could've come later but that's not saying that this trilogy still couldn't be made into motion pictures and like Prometheus it would bring the Alien saga back in a big way.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bauke

    Final part of the trilogy. I enjoyed the entire trilogy. As we can read on the back of the book, Ripley comes back in this book which is nice. The character of Ripley is somewhat different than I imagined, but that maybe just me. But then again, she is different... In this part, (view spoiler)[a team is gathered of people that have the same dreams, or heard a calling from the queen. Apparently there is a queen of queens, bit strange, but why not. I did like the way they travelled to planet where Final part of the trilogy. I enjoyed the entire trilogy. As we can read on the back of the book, Ripley comes back in this book which is nice. The character of Ripley is somewhat different than I imagined, but that maybe just me. But then again, she is different... In this part, (view spoiler)[a team is gathered of people that have the same dreams, or heard a calling from the queen. Apparently there is a queen of queens, bit strange, but why not. I did like the way they travelled to planet where that queen lives. Yes, trapping a huge queen in a ship by luring it sounds a bit far fetched, but hey, I'm a succes for alien stories, so what the hell. (hide spoiler)] The new characters in this part are described good. I could get a good overview of what the people were like. Marines amongst each other. Also the relationship between Billie and Wilks was good to read as the story went on. Of course, at the end, it is all not (view spoiler)[ certain what happens, but we all know it's not over. I wonder, did they "nuke the entire planet from orbit"? How else could a few nukes destroy the aliens. Anyways, it can't be over, because I have volume 2 of the Alien Omnibus here on my stack of Alien books :) (hide spoiler)] I did like the trilogy a lot. Overall, it somehow resembles the Aliens movie a bit, here and there, but that was quite okay.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aidan Budd

    As I expect I've written in every review of an Aliens-related book - I love the xenomorphs for how deeply scary they are as monsters. Even in the least-scary Aliens-related media (AVP: Requiem, for example), I can enjoy it a bit just 'cause the xenomorphs are in it. . So I did enjoy this book. . At the same time, I found the cast too large to get to grips with, found it hard to care much about any of the characters, even the ones I knew from previous books - just didn't feel the emotional engagement As I expect I've written in every review of an Aliens-related book - I love the xenomorphs for how deeply scary they are as monsters. Even in the least-scary Aliens-related media (AVP: Requiem, for example), I can enjoy it a bit just 'cause the xenomorphs are in it. . So I did enjoy this book. . At the same time, I found the cast too large to get to grips with, found it hard to care much about any of the characters, even the ones I knew from previous books - just didn't feel the emotional engagement I need to enjoy them. . Basically, this story is one of the "go to an alien nest for some reason, try and get something from it" plots - of which there are many in the various Aliens novels. The variations on that theme we see here don't work, for me, to make it interestingly different from others of this kind. . SPOILERS. . . . I was, however, happy to see the end and resolution of the Hicks/Wilks Newt/Billie story lines, and hope they went on to have a long happy life :) . And I guess the books that come after this one imply that they were successful in getting rid of the aliens at the end of this book? Would have liked something about that in the book, that explains how in later books they still have a few aliens around on earth, but that the "plague" is over and they are under control...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    Man, do I have regrets. I was under the impression that the Steve Perry Aliens books were good, and bought several of the books in the series beyond theirs to see how they ranked. I like the franchise, and I was curious to see how authors could work beyond the stories in the movies. So far, the consensus seems to be "Not so well." Like the first two books in this trilogy, The Female War is an adaptation of a comic, written by different people, so some of the ridiculous plot points should be blame Man, do I have regrets. I was under the impression that the Steve Perry Aliens books were good, and bought several of the books in the series beyond theirs to see how they ranked. I like the franchise, and I was curious to see how authors could work beyond the stories in the movies. So far, the consensus seems to be "Not so well." Like the first two books in this trilogy, The Female War is an adaptation of a comic, written by different people, so some of the ridiculous plot points should be blamed on them, not the Perrys. But the whole idea of capturing the Boss alien queen, transporting her to Earth and putting her in one place so all the other aliens would flock to her and they could bomb that one location instead of the entire planet to exterminate the aliens seems like it's pushing credibility too much. Especially since Ripley is involved. Oh yeah, Ripley is one of the main characters of the book. You may be asking yourself why she would make an appearance, since the deaths of Hicks and Newt at the start of Alien³ forced the publisher to retcon their characters to Billie and Wilks. She's alive and well here, many years after the end of that movie, and they didn't retcon anything to get her there. What could possibly have happened to bring her back? (If you think about it long enough -- ten seconds, maybe? -- with Alien³ in mind, you'll figure it out.) To the Perrys' credit, they circle back to a theme raised in the first book and give the book a nice point. Still, the number of run-on sentences throughout the book make me want to take that credit back. Also, Billie and Wilks have a weird attraction going on for each other here, which is skeevy as hell, when you consider that they started out as Newt and Hicks, and have the same backgrounds and ages as those characters. It's Heinleinesque, and it creeps me out. Oh, oh, and I almost forgot to mention how they and the crew avoid being damaged by an EMP -- they turn off all electronics before it bursts. THAT'S NOT HOW IT WORKS. To top it off, I read an e-book edition of this book, and the number of typos and OCR errors was plentiful. That's beyond acceptable to me. Hire a dang copy-reader and fix them. I have the rest of these books to read, and I'm hoping the quality will change with some new authors. Most of them are still based on comics, but I have high hopes at least for the Yvonne Navarro title. I just have to make it that far without giving up.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian

    This entire series was a bit schlocky, and I knew what I was getting into when I started, I knew I would have to intentionally hang most of my disbelief out to dry, but man, the whole “plan” for solving the alien infestation problem on Earth, and especially the way it ultimately unfolded, crushed every last shred of credibility the authors managed to retain through the previous two books. Furthermore, the aliens are no longer a menacing horror presence, no longer fanatical opponents in war, they This entire series was a bit schlocky, and I knew what I was getting into when I started, I knew I would have to intentionally hang most of my disbelief out to dry, but man, the whole “plan” for solving the alien infestation problem on Earth, and especially the way it ultimately unfolded, crushed every last shred of credibility the authors managed to retain through the previous two books. Furthermore, the aliens are no longer a menacing horror presence, no longer fanatical opponents in war, they have been turned into a simple force of nature, like a flood or fire, that the right McGuffin can switch off more or less instantly. And don’t even get me started on the way (view spoiler)[the mega-queen just “hellos” straight out of her shallow bubbly nest as soon as Ripley comes near (hide spoiler)] , contrary to everything we know about how the xenos function as a species. I mean, there’s crappy fun, there’s funny crap, and then there is just… this.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    One of the inherent problems in any narrative with installments is writers feeling like they need to up the ante every time, in order to not become boring or repetitive or have their readers/viewers be like "yawn, but this is exactly like what they solved last time". This is how you end up with ridiculous, over-the-top premises -- or just more action in general, e.g. look at the jump in action from Alien to Aliens, or First Blood to Rambo II. Look at any season of Supernatural, and how they've h One of the inherent problems in any narrative with installments is writers feeling like they need to up the ante every time, in order to not become boring or repetitive or have their readers/viewers be like "yawn, but this is exactly like what they solved last time". This is how you end up with ridiculous, over-the-top premises -- or just more action in general, e.g. look at the jump in action from Alien to Aliens, or First Blood to Rambo II. Look at any season of Supernatural, and how they've had to leap into the stratosphere post-S5 in order to find a Big Bad who's even more Big Bad than Lucifer himself. (I could have sworn there's a particular psychological term for this that can be used for fiction -- needing more and more stimulation to reach the same emotional heights? -- but my hazy Psych 101 memories are too faded.) Anyway, case in point: The Female War. One xenomorph isn't enough, but now they're dealing with THOOOOUSAAAAAANDSSSS. One queen wasn't enough, but now they have an even bigger QUEEN OF QUEENS. (Tangent because everything in my life is Animorphs: I'm amazed that a series with 54 books in its main chronology didn't suffer from this. Despite being episodic, Animorphs' focus was on character development and long-term attrition and war; some of the most "HOLY COW!!!" books happened relatively early in the series, and I never felt like they jumped the shark, nor that books that came later were underwhelming or over-the-top.) But! The Aliens novels, being novelisations of comic book series of a science fiction franchise, are understandably campy and actiony. I actually kinda liked the crazy-ridiculous balls-to-the-walls premise here: Ripley & co. assembling a ragtag group of dreamers to mutiny, steal a ship, and go take on the queen o' queens to try to liberate Earth from the alien war. There's another fantastic twist: (view spoiler)[the Ripley they met as of the end book 2 is actually an android, based on the original. Which neatly explains how she's still alive despite the events of Alien 3. You'd think I'd get tired of "X IS ACTUALLY AN ANDROID!!" reveals by now, but it's still a deeply beloved pet theme of mine -- especially when the android themselves don't know, a la Terminator 4. (hide spoiler)] Falk is another lil' favourite of mine, because of course I love the big scary broken mercenary. I'm undecided about the Amy subplot: (view spoiler)[It ties into the mother/daughter feelings that are so crucial to the entire Alien series, and was set up in the previous book... but Billie is sooooo obnoxious about her monomaniacal quest to save this little girl. And it's so completely nutso that Amy would be, miraculously, the ONLY PERSON STILL ALIVE in a heap of death, a literal pile of corpses. But then again, there's the parallels to Aliens and Newt, plus Ripley's real daughter (remind me I need to play Alien: Isolation). But again, it also feels like just taking the events of Aliens and blowing it up to be EVEN BIGGER? I don't know. Even though it would have been a way bummer ending, I kind of wish Billie had found Amy already dead, and then maybe even died in the process too. The fact that they all survived without much damage was just so convenient. That's a lot of my problem with the novel as a whole, really: despite this being THE game-breaking, over-the-top, be-all end-all mission to finish Perry's trilogy, nothing really bad happens? Everyone gets off scot-free and I didn't have the sense of urgency/panic that I had in the first two books, which is also why I'm not shelving this under horror/terror. (hide spoiler)] Mostly, though, as much as I did like the main plot, there is a subplot that DROVE ME CRAZY and that I HATED and every time they talked about it, I pretty much mentally docked another star: (view spoiler)[It's the same thing that bothered me in the previous book: Wilks/Billie. :| They were attracted to each other in the previous book, which I hated -- and then consciously decided to set it aside, which forgave it for me... but now it's back? And not only that, but they're ~falling in loooove~ in this book. I hate it!!!! The fact that his romantic/sexual feelings for her are juxtaposed with flashbacks/dreams about him carrying her as a child are just so gross to me. Found family themes are so important to this series, so having a father/daughter-type relationship to balance out all the mother/daughter themes of Alien was great. Plus it feels like he barely spends any time with Ripley, when I wanted to see more of what their dynamic would have been like. I'm shameless: I want Ripley/Hicks back, but I also just think it's more interesting as a relationship. Two people driven by their obsessive hatred of the aliens, to the exclusion of all else! Realising that there is something else! Learning to move on and grow together! Sassiness!!! I am straight-up going to rewrite book 3 as if it's Hicks and Newt reuniting with Ripley (android or not) and picking up where they left off, having survived the events of the second movie together. :"| (hide spoiler)] /ranting over. It's an okay-written conclusion to the trilogy, and maybe you won't be personally bothered by the things that personally bothered me... but I ended up preferring the fun batshit lunacy of the first two books much more. The first one was the best book, IMO. And from all the reviews I'm seeing on GR, apparently I shouldn't even bother with the next two non-Perry books in the series. Welp. That's such a shame. On the bright side, I do trust Steve Perry as a tie-in author now, so I'm going to check out his Star Wars writing...

  11. 5 out of 5

    J.

    It is funny because I remember reading this book during my "obsessed with anything and everything related to 'Aliens'" phase and yet none of it was familiar when I did another read through. I guess it completely passed through my brain at some point in time. I remember distinct parts of the first two entries in the series but almost nothing from book three. That is odd, considering that it has a fairly compelling storyline and caps off the trilogy rather nicely. I honestly prefer to think of the It is funny because I remember reading this book during my "obsessed with anything and everything related to 'Aliens'" phase and yet none of it was familiar when I did another read through. I guess it completely passed through my brain at some point in time. I remember distinct parts of the first two entries in the series but almost nothing from book three. That is odd, considering that it has a fairly compelling storyline and caps off the trilogy rather nicely. I honestly prefer to think of these books as the official continuation of the story and just forget that Alien: Resurrection even exists.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jared Stanley

    3.5 stars. A fun, quick read. But you DEFINITELY need to turn off the analytical part of your brain. It's also one of those books that essentially treat planets like cities. For example, they go to a planet to retreive something, they land on the planet, they just happen to be within driving distance of said thing. Prometheus and Alien: Covenant arebguilty of this, as well. That being said, I'm a big Warhammer 40k fan and that's literally every planet in that universe lol. So, like I said, just 3.5 stars. A fun, quick read. But you DEFINITELY need to turn off the analytical part of your brain. It's also one of those books that essentially treat planets like cities. For example, they go to a planet to retreive something, they land on the planet, they just happen to be within driving distance of said thing. Prometheus and Alien: Covenant arebguilty of this, as well. That being said, I'm a big Warhammer 40k fan and that's literally every planet in that universe lol. So, like I said, just turn your brain off, kick back, and enjoy the ride.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Synkro

    Overall , I enjoyed this trilogy ( as much as billies obsessions annoyed me ). Read them all back to back. The fact that it ended without the result of the final plan being told left me feeling a bit flat but still a good ride!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Taylor II

    I love the Aliens movies, and the whole world created by them. I think I was looking for more of a payoff in this book than we got.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joe West

    Good conclusion to the trilogy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ienjoyhorror

    A good end to an alright series, it does make me wish for much more post-apoclyptic stuff the first two teased and this one actually shows, in part, at least before our heroes save the earth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    My Realm of Books

    this book is amazing. The story isn't very much but well is alien. Five stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    D.L. Denham

    Steve Perry recruits his daughter, writer Stephani Perry, to conclude a separate storyline to one of the best SciFi franchises of all time. Filled with plenty of Xenomorph-action and a conclusion that no one would guess, Aliens: The Female War rocks hard and entertains like a champ! Now joined by Ellen Ripley, Wilks and Billie’s story picks up immediately after meeting Ripley at the end of book two. With Earth’s future still hanging in the balance and much of humanity destroyed by the black-chiti Steve Perry recruits his daughter, writer Stephani Perry, to conclude a separate storyline to one of the best SciFi franchises of all time. Filled with plenty of Xenomorph-action and a conclusion that no one would guess, Aliens: The Female War rocks hard and entertains like a champ! Now joined by Ellen Ripley, Wilks and Billie’s story picks up immediately after meeting Ripley at the end of book two. With Earth’s future still hanging in the balance and much of humanity destroyed by the black-chitin armored alien soldiers, our protagonists must capture the ultimate weapon if humanity is to ever recover and rebuild from the alien apocalypse: the Queen. But not just any queen, for there are now thousands of queens on our home planet and else where in the galaxy. The Queen of queens is calling out to Ripley and Billie and some of the residents on a remote refugee planet in one of the core systems. Assembling a team, Ripley and Wilks leads a crew of unprepared soldiers, scientists, and a hacker to capture the Queen on her home planet and bring her to Earth as bait. With the hopes of luring all of the Xenomorph’s to one place, maybe then they can initiate one of the dozens of nukes that were suppose to go off at the end of book one. Apparently, a nuclear ridden planet is preferred to a Xeno-infested one. Surprising and satisfying, Aliens: The Female War is a good conclusion to a great series. My main complaint is that the plot advances very quickly and the ending felt rushed. Closures on the lives of the characters are nonexistent at the end of the novel. I suppose this is purposeful since there were plans to continue the novels. Although the series continues without Steve Perry. Stephani Perry joins the list of other writers. The three part series with Steve Perry stand on their own and are very enjoyable. They are a great novelization to the Dark Horse comics and are all around good science fiction. The series as a whole gets five stars. Aliens: The Female War receives four stars. Originally Reviewed for SFBook.com

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephan

    A fairly well written end to a trilogy. Ripley & co has stolen a spacecraft to go and catch the biggest mama-alien in the known universe to lure all the aliens currently infesting earth to one single location and then just nuke the entire site (though not from orbit). The authors sure know how to write an exciting action and horror filled novel. My main gripes are just that so few characters actually die. After a few run ins with the oh so dangerous monsters you'd expect at least someone to bite i A fairly well written end to a trilogy. Ripley & co has stolen a spacecraft to go and catch the biggest mama-alien in the known universe to lure all the aliens currently infesting earth to one single location and then just nuke the entire site (though not from orbit). The authors sure know how to write an exciting action and horror filled novel. My main gripes are just that so few characters actually die. After a few run ins with the oh so dangerous monsters you'd expect at least someone to bite it... Also, in the first and second part of the trilogy we encountered quite a few human antagonists who, quite often, were a lot more horrifying than the aliens, but this time it's all monster mash. I've always liked the way the monsters, even though they are a big scary threat, mostly are treated as secondary villains to the human ones. We have the Company and their representatives in the films, the companies trying to get their hand on the aliens in Aliens: Earth Hive and then general Spears in Aliens: Nightmare Asylum. In this one there's just about only the monsters... and that's not really enough oposition forr the characters to really make it interesting. also... (view spoiler)[Ripley's an android? (hide spoiler)]

  20. 4 out of 5

    David

    The third book in Dark Horse's spin-off series of novels and comics to include Billie and Wilks, this also throws Ripley into the mix, and finishes the story first began in Aliens: Earth Hive and continued in Aliens: Nightmare Asylum. Wheres the 1979 film 'Alien' had a single Alien stalking the crew of the Nostromo after they picked up the transmission, with the 1986 film 'Aliens' then introducing the concept of the Alien Queen, this extrapolates even further than that with the introduction of a The third book in Dark Horse's spin-off series of novels and comics to include Billie and Wilks, this also throws Ripley into the mix, and finishes the story first began in Aliens: Earth Hive and continued in Aliens: Nightmare Asylum. Wheres the 1979 film 'Alien' had a single Alien stalking the crew of the Nostromo after they picked up the transmission, with the 1986 film 'Aliens' then introducing the concept of the Alien Queen, this extrapolates even further than that with the introduction of an Alien Queen Mother providing the deus ex machina for the plot. Talking of the plot: this is maybe a bit slower than those previous two novels, with more emphasis on character development (I know, I know: is such a thing even possible in these types of books?). As before, not going to set the literary world alight nor win any awards, but an enjoyable enough quick diversion for a day or two.

  21. 5 out of 5

    B. Reese

    Overall a decent conclusion to the trilogy, BUT there were some really bizarre and almost campy elements. The way they deal with the Earth infestation is a little too much deus ex machina, and their quest to obtain the deus ex machina has some "huh" moments. Namely xenomorphs that are giants on the xenomorph homeworld. Something probably contradicted by Prometheus. Same with the portrayals of the Engineers. In short, not sure how much, if any, of this story could be "canon" but it was enjoyable. Overall a decent conclusion to the trilogy, BUT there were some really bizarre and almost campy elements. The way they deal with the Earth infestation is a little too much deus ex machina, and their quest to obtain the deus ex machina has some "huh" moments. Namely xenomorphs that are giants on the xenomorph homeworld. Something probably contradicted by Prometheus. Same with the portrayals of the Engineers. In short, not sure how much, if any, of this story could be "canon" but it was enjoyable. I read this in 8th grade. Got it for Christmas and the next day I pretty much spent the whole day reading it. So, it is a page turner. must read if you read the others, and it kept my interest.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Isobelle Fox

    I've read altogether too many of these pulpy Aliens comics novelizations. Some of them are legitimately awful. I did enjoy this one, though. The writing is ok, and the story, particularly when regarded along with the other two novels in the trilogy, has sufficient scope to remain interesting. One thing that I particularly liked in these books is the theory that any alien drone can eventually become a queen if not suppressed by the presence of an existing queen. I wish that this idea had been con I've read altogether too many of these pulpy Aliens comics novelizations. Some of them are legitimately awful. I did enjoy this one, though. The writing is ok, and the story, particularly when regarded along with the other two novels in the trilogy, has sufficient scope to remain interesting. One thing that I particularly liked in these books is the theory that any alien drone can eventually become a queen if not suppressed by the presence of an existing queen. I wish that this idea had been considered canon in some of the movies and games as it makes the aliens considerably more formidable as a species.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Well that ended fast. The first two series were fantastic, but this third one? Garbage. Ok, perhaps it was more confusing because I mistakenly STARTED here, but it's still pretty lame. Ripley shows up, lacking even more character depth than usual (but more cleavage!). The layout is headache worthy, the story is rushed (and pointless). It lacks all the psycological depth that the previous series had. This was what I expected an Alien expanded universe to be like.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I was obsessed with the Alien movies when I was in middle school. I read all these fan fiction novels I could get my hands on. This was written before Alien 3, and I think it conflicts with the plot of that movie. The inconsistency that this brought the fictional universe turned me off to such spin off novels.

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Latham

    Not as good as earth hive and nightmare asylum, I thought everything came too easy for the main charcters, too many things helped them out simply for plot convenience. And I didn't get the same level of fear or passion as in the first two- the aliens were rarely seen and easily dealt with. Still not a bad story, it didn't give or take anything to the ethos of the alien universe.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Trinity Lizalde

    A good ending to the spinoff of the Aliens Trilogy. Thankfully a number of holes in the plot are filled in this book. Perry does a good job of putting many fanboys at ease, because if you watched the Alien films this story now makes perfect sense and is plausible in the Alien universe.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Vosper

    Again, pretty cookie cutter and similar to the first three books....but a fun read if you are a fan of Alien movie franchise (which I am). Some really good new characters were established through these three books, particularly Wilks and Billie.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I love how the Perrys integrated Ripley into this book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    The queen is angry and Ripley is the object of her wrath. Not bad but not great. The only thing that keeps this series going is the enmity between the aliens and humans.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    so far fetched it was frustrating. I can put aside reality for a lot of books but this just pushed too far.

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