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A Very French Christmas: The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time

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A continuation of the popular Very Christmas Series, this collection brings together the best French Christmas stories of all time in an elegant and vibrant collection, featuring classics by Guy de Maupassant and Alphonse Daudet, plus stories by the esteemed 20th-century author Irène Némirovsky and contemporary writers Dominique Fabre and Jean-Philippe Blondel. With a holid A continuation of the popular Very Christmas Series, this collection brings together the best French Christmas stories of all time in an elegant and vibrant collection, featuring classics by Guy de Maupassant and Alphonse Daudet, plus stories by the esteemed 20th-century author Irène Némirovsky and contemporary writers Dominique Fabre and Jean-Philippe Blondel. With a holiday spirit conveyed through sparkling Paris streets, opulent feasts, wandering orphans, kindly monks, homesick soldiers, oysters, crayfish, ham, bonbons, flickering desire, and more than a little wine, this collection encapsulates the holiday spirit. This is Christmas à la française - delicious, intense, and unexpected, proving that nobody does Christmas like the French.


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A continuation of the popular Very Christmas Series, this collection brings together the best French Christmas stories of all time in an elegant and vibrant collection, featuring classics by Guy de Maupassant and Alphonse Daudet, plus stories by the esteemed 20th-century author Irène Némirovsky and contemporary writers Dominique Fabre and Jean-Philippe Blondel. With a holid A continuation of the popular Very Christmas Series, this collection brings together the best French Christmas stories of all time in an elegant and vibrant collection, featuring classics by Guy de Maupassant and Alphonse Daudet, plus stories by the esteemed 20th-century author Irène Némirovsky and contemporary writers Dominique Fabre and Jean-Philippe Blondel. With a holiday spirit conveyed through sparkling Paris streets, opulent feasts, wandering orphans, kindly monks, homesick soldiers, oysters, crayfish, ham, bonbons, flickering desire, and more than a little wine, this collection encapsulates the holiday spirit. This is Christmas à la française - delicious, intense, and unexpected, proving that nobody does Christmas like the French.

30 review for A Very French Christmas: The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time

  1. 4 out of 5

    Classic reverie

    I came across this collection of short stories when looking to see if any more English translation of Irene Nemirvosky's books. I was sold when I saw her included but several other authors would have had me bite anyhow! A brief description below of each short story-- *The Gift by Jean Philippe Blondel (2017) A man in his seventies looking at his life and his thoughts on his family on Christmas. (I thought this one was interesting and like it) *St. Anthony and his Pig by Paul Arene (1880) A hermit I came across this collection of short stories when looking to see if any more English translation of Irene Nemirvosky's books. I was sold when I saw her included but several other authors would have had me bite anyhow! A brief description below of each short story-- *The Gift by Jean Philippe Blondel (2017) A man in his seventies looking at his life and his thoughts on his family on Christmas. (I thought this one was interesting and like it) *St. Anthony and his Pig by Paul Arene (1880) A hermit tells of tempation, his Pig and the devil. (Good) * The Louis D'or by Francois Coppee (1893). A gambler penniless takes money from a cold homeless young girl. (I loved this one!) *Christmas in Algiers by Anatole Le Braz (1897) A soldier's vision on Christmas Eve. *The Wooden Shoes of Little Wolfe by Francois Coppee (1889) A little poor boy's kindness rewarded. (Great story) *Christmas Eve by Guy de Maupassant (1882) A writer with writer's block looks to find a well filled out female and what it brings! (A great story) *Christmas at the Boarding School by Dominique Fabre (2017) A boy who rather go back home to his own country but must stay in France. (My least favorite, it seemed a little too choppy, but I did read it) *Salvette and Bernadou by Alphonse Daucet (1873) Two soldiers in the hospital and thinking of home during the Christmas. (Heart breaking) *A Christmas Supper in the Marais by Alphonse Daudet (1872) A manufacturer sees spirits in his seltzer plant. *A Miracle by Guy de Maupassant (1882) A doctor witnesses a miracle. *I Take Supper with My Wife by Antoine Gustave Droz (1870) A married couple and their life. *The Lost Child by Francois Coppee (1892) A banker learns about life when his son is missing on Christmas Eve. (Loved this one) *The Juggler of Notre Dame by Anatole France (1892) A juggler lives a life with monks. This story sounded familiar from OTR (Old Time Radio - Family Theater- The Juggler of Our Lady-December 24, 1947). https://www.oldtimeradiodownloads.com... *Noel by Irene Nemirovsky (unknown) A story written like a movie being shown to the reader. I don't think I have ever read a book written this way. It is not a play, you just have to read to understand completely. I was wondering how Irene would write a Christmas story and after reading, this is it exactly! Irene is able to capture reality of human nature that is not so often flattering but certainly engaging and one hopes life is better but often times it is not and Irene captures this. A family on Christmas Eve and Day with the drama of life. (My favorite)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kristyn - Reading to Unwind

    This is a short story collection like none I have ever read before. A few of the stories are uplifting towards the end of them and some gave me a lot to think about. I also want it to be Christmas time after reading the book. My favorite story was in the beginning of the book with the old man who is out with his family. He goes into portions of his life and how it went wrong with him and his deceased wife. I loved getting his reflection back on life and how he came to be sitting with his family. This is a short story collection like none I have ever read before. A few of the stories are uplifting towards the end of them and some gave me a lot to think about. I also want it to be Christmas time after reading the book. My favorite story was in the beginning of the book with the old man who is out with his family. He goes into portions of his life and how it went wrong with him and his deceased wife. I loved getting his reflection back on life and how he came to be sitting with his family. The author did a great job even going into the dynamic of the family it was only a short story, but it felt very memorable and a lot longer. The ending of the story is adorable and really makes me believe in fate. This was an excellent addition to the Christmas story collection. Each story has a different meaning and is written in a different style. I found some of the stories harder to follow along with than others, but overall the stories where great with very profound lessons. Each story is unique in it's own right and they don't really have to be read in any particular order. I enjoyed the bits and pieces of the older French culture that came through the book. A large amount of the stories are set in the past and it was great to read about life in that time period in France. I liked how the stories where also dated so you could tell the time period of when the story was taking place. I would suggest this as a great nighttime read around Christmas time right when you are getting in the spirit of the holidays. I would also suggest this could be a book for a middle school reader, although some of the topics where tougher I think it has a lot of valuable Christmas lessons to learn. I received a copy of this book from France Book Tours in exchange for an honest review. This does not effect my opinion of this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jammin Jenny

    I enjoyed this set of short Christmas stories from France. They all had something to offer. I really liked the one with the grandfather and the kid...that was a sweet one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    A Very French Christmas is a collection of fourteen short stories from various authors. These stories include: The Gift by Jean-Philippe Blondel St. Anthony and His Pig by Paul Arène The Louis D'Or by François Coppée Christmas in Algiers by Anatole Le Braz The Wooden Shoes of Little Wolff by François Coppée Christmas Eve by Guy de Maupassant Christmas at the Boarding School by Dominique Fabre Salivate and Bernadou by Alphonse Daudet A Christmas Supper in the Marais by Alphonse Daudet A Miracle by Gu A Very French Christmas is a collection of fourteen short stories from various authors. These stories include: The Gift by Jean-Philippe Blondel St. Anthony and His Pig by Paul Arène The Louis D'Or by François Coppée Christmas in Algiers by Anatole Le Braz The Wooden Shoes of Little Wolff by François Coppée Christmas Eve by Guy de Maupassant Christmas at the Boarding School by Dominique Fabre Salivate and Bernadou by Alphonse Daudet A Christmas Supper in the Marais by Alphonse Daudet A Miracle by Guy de Maupassant I Take Supper With My Wife by Antoine Gustave Droz The Lost Child by François Coppée The Juggler of Notre Dame by Anatole France NOËL by Irène Némirovsky  A Very French Christmas is quite different from other Christmas books I have read. Each story is only about to 5-15 pages long, making it easy to continue on to the next story, and hard to put the book down. There were a couple of the stories I did not care for but enjoyed most of them. They are fun, interesting, heartwarming, inspiring, delightful, magical, compelling, and even sometimes funny. I loved learning more about French culture during Christmas time. My favorite story of the collection is I Take Supper With My Wife by Antoine Gustave Droz. I thought it was a cute and charming little story. I found myself chuckling a couple of times reading it. If a reader is looking for a quick and different Christmas read, I think A Very French Christmas would be a perfect addition to their to read or wish list. I give this book 4 stars. I received this book from the publisher. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Experience Christmas as you have never before, with this unique, very French short story collection. As you would know if you are familiar with French literature in general, the French cannot be described as the most optimistic people in the world. If there’s a yes, there’s always a BUT shortly after. This reflects as well in this collection of Christmas short stories, which makes it quite unique! If you want something different for your next Christmas, ask Santa to bring you A Very French Christ Experience Christmas as you have never before, with this unique, very French short story collection. As you would know if you are familiar with French literature in general, the French cannot be described as the most optimistic people in the world. If there’s a yes, there’s always a BUT shortly after. This reflects as well in this collection of Christmas short stories, which makes it quite unique! If you want something different for your next Christmas, ask Santa to bring you A Very French Christmas: The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time. my full review is here: https://wordsandpeace.com/2017/08/11/...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Dagg

    What’s French about it Short story collections by assorted authors can be hit and miss. Harnessing together authors from different periods with very different writing styles is quite risky. The logic behind such an enterprise is, I imagine, to seek to introduce the reader to a variety of writing united by some common theme or themes – as here where we have two in Frenchness and Christmas – at the same time bearing in mind that not everyone is going to like everything, but should at least like som What’s French about it Short story collections by assorted authors can be hit and miss. Harnessing together authors from different periods with very different writing styles is quite risky. The logic behind such an enterprise is, I imagine, to seek to introduce the reader to a variety of writing united by some common theme or themes – as here where we have two in Frenchness and Christmas – at the same time bearing in mind that not everyone is going to like everything, but should at least like something! This book presents us with an excellent selection of festive French literature that I think will please and interest the vast majority of readers. The Frenchness emerges in various ways in the anthology. France has long been thought of as a bastion of male chauvinism, something reflected in the language itself. Get one guy and a thousand girls together and you have to refer to them as ‘ils’ because of that one man! Times are changing, however, if slowly, but it was rather disappointing to see just one female author included in this anthology. Yes, it’s a long story/screenplay but it’s still just one as opposed to nine male authors. The lone female is Irène Némirovsky, of Ukranian Jewish origin, lived half her lifetime in France and wrote in French, but was refused French citizenship. Had she been awarded it, this prolific author might have avoided being arrested as a stateless Jew on 13 July 1942, despite having converted to Roman Catholicism, and sent to Auschwitz where she died just over a month later. It is thus very poignant and powerful to find her work included in this French anthology, since her adopted country let her down. Other Frenchness emerges in how Christmas isn’t overly romanticised in any of the stories. In many, it’s mainly a background. This is how Noël is in this country. There isn’t the crazy hype starting in October that you get in other countries. There’s an air of restraint about it, but nonetheless, a good time is had by all. There is also a clear focus on eating during the festive season, and this emerges in many of the stories. The importance of food is one French stereotype that holds firm! But there are some small helpings of magic and wishful thinking, a crucial part of Christmas. Straight talking is another Frenchness. No beating around the bush. Thus it’s a little startling and uncomfortable, for Western European readers at least, to come across an African character called Black Jo in one of the stories. It’s not offensively motivated, it’s who he is to the other boys at the school, and as the narrator of the story comes to know the boy better, he begins to call him Jo or Joseph. But all these Frenchisms, together with the variety of writing we are offered, give a good impression of the country’s historical and present culture. These are the stories and authors: The Gift – Jean-Philippe Blondel (b.1964) Relationships and loneliness at Christmas. St Anthony and his Pig – Paul Arène (1843-96) Great fun this one! St Anthony struggles with terrible temptation. The Louis d’Or – François Coppée (1842-1908) A gambler seeks redemption. Christmas in Algiers – Anatole La Braz (1859-1926) A soldier far from home attends a midnight mass with a difference. The Wooden Shoes of Little Wolff – François Coppée (1842-1908) A touching tale, the most Christmassy of them all. Christmas Eve – Guy de Maupassant (1850-93) The moral of this story is don’t pick up a pregnant prostitute on Christmas Eve… Christmas at the Boarding School – Dominique Fabre (b.1960) A young African boy in France, because of ‘events’ faces Christmas far from home. Salvette and Bernadou – Alphonse Daudet (1840-97) Two imprisoned French soldiers remember the Breton Christmases of their youth. A Christmas Supper in the Marais – Alphonse Daudet (1840-97) A Christmas ghost story – or just too much wine for Christmas supper? A Miracle by Guy de Maupassant (1850-93) Evil spirits at Christmastime. I Take Supper with my Wife – Antoine Gustave Droz (1832-95) Husband and wife share a playful Christmas Eve supper. The Lost Child – François Coppée (1842-1908) A sweet Christmas miracle. The Juggler of Notre Dame – Anatole France (the pseudonym of Jacques Anatole Thibault 1844-1924) Another religious miracle based on a medieval legend. Noël – Irène Némirovsky (1903-42) Bittersweet undercurrents during a Christmas party held by affluent Parisians. The book makes for an interesting and quite challenging read, will make Christmas more multi-cultural and will, I hope, tempt readers to discover more French writers after sampling the writing in this anthology. My only gripe is with the subtitle – in my opinion it’s a little rash to claim things are the ‘greatest’ but it gets attention I suppose, and it’s acceptable ‘puff’. However, I think the anthology would have worked just as well without it. Clearly the stories are selected because the editing team considers them to be exceptionally good and worthy of inclusion, and thus it’s implicit that there is merit in reading them. I suspect an anthology of awful stories not worth reading has yet to be published… I also take slight issue with the ‘of all time’ label as three of our ten authors were born in the twentieth century, and all the other seven in the nineteenth from 1832 onwards. But since some of the stories refer to earlier times and we come right up to the present, then we do get a taste of many ages.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This book is a collection of Christmas stories written by ten French authors including Guy de Maupassant, Victor Hugo, Anatole France, Irene Nemirovsky and others. Some were poignant but several were depressing rather than uplifting and celebratory as I had expected.

  8. 5 out of 5

    James

    A cozy and warm collection of short stories from French authors primarily from the late 19th century and the last few years. Some were more memorable than others but all evoked the Christmas spirit. I think my favorite was the last tale, Noel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Pollard-Gott

    A Very French Christmas: The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time is a joy to hold and page through, as it is beautifully produced–not surprising since it comes from New Vessel Press. This collection of fourteen stories derives primarily from the late nineteenth century, the heyday of Christmas stories, one might say, given the popularity of annual Christmas tales from Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, and others. But A Very French Christmas feels very French, and also very fresh, owing to A Very French Christmas: The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time is a joy to hold and page through, as it is beautifully produced–not surprising since it comes from New Vessel Press. This collection of fourteen stories derives primarily from the late nineteenth century, the heyday of Christmas stories, one might say, given the popularity of annual Christmas tales from Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, and others. But A Very French Christmas feels very French, and also very fresh, owing to the inclusion of a long story by twentieth-century writer Irène Némirovsky and new stories by contemporary writers Jean-Philippe Blondel and Dominique Fabre, commissioned expressly for this book. Although these stories can be sentimental and heartwarming at times, many of them have a bracing quality, taking an ironic view of holiday celebrations, and exploring the way people’s desires and expectations for the season can be confounded.  This is equally true of the older stories. The collection opens with a new story, “The Gift,” by Jean-Philippe Blondel, who is known for his recent, well-received novel, The 6:41 to Paris.  Like that novel, this story presents another unexpected meeting between a man and woman, this time at a Christmas luncheon.  In this very strong collection, I found all the stories to be fascinating, just as the book’s subtitle promises.  The Christmas themes are treated with a refreshing originality and variety, and I can imagine returning to reread this collection for many Christmases to come. For my full review, including discussion of stories by Guy de Maupassant, Anatole France, and others, visit The Fictional 100. *Note:* I received a copy of this book free of charge from the publisher.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Ridiculous. I'm sure it seems ridiculous. I've just read A Very French Christmas: The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time. I'm not in France. And it most certainly isn't December. What's going on? There are some people who always send you to the good books. Emma, of the blog, Words and Peace, and the organizer of France Book Tours, always sends me to the good books. I just couldn't resist a book of French Christmas stories. Even in August. So why should you hear about A Very French Christma Ridiculous. I'm sure it seems ridiculous. I've just read A Very French Christmas: The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time. I'm not in France. And it most certainly isn't December. What's going on? There are some people who always send you to the good books. Emma, of the blog, Words and Peace, and the organizer of France Book Tours, always sends me to the good books. I just couldn't resist a book of French Christmas stories. Even in August. So why should you hear about A Very French Christmas? You, especially you, who are not a fan of stories about France or (even) Christmas? That's easy to answer. A Very French Christmas is really about France or Christmas. Yes, there's a definite French-ish feel to the stories, and all of them have a little dash of Christmas in them. But these aren't baked-potato-loaded-with-French-Christmas-fixings stories. No one really likes those sorts of stories, do they? These are not French stories. These are not Christmas stories. They are just good stories. (Spoiler alert) The first story in the book, for example, is a story of a man who really doesn't like Christmas. It's his wife who likes it, his wife who makes him get together with the family every year, to celebrate with food he doesn't care for and gifts he doesn't want. And he does so every year, even after his wife is long passed away. Until the Christmas comes where his wife gives him one last Christmas gift, a gift he is very happy about. Yes, these are good stories. More than that, they are remarkably good stories. So good that I think I'll go back and read them again.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    I am ashamed to admit I don’t have enough experience of reading the great French authors, so with contributions from names like Guy de Maupassant, François Coppée and Anatole France I thought this collection of short stories would be a perfect introduction and I wasn’t disappointed. This selection of Christmas tales was full of beautifully written pieces, where the descriptions of winter helped to cool me down on a hot summer day, although I wasn’t really filled with the Christmas cheer I was exp I am ashamed to admit I don’t have enough experience of reading the great French authors, so with contributions from names like Guy de Maupassant, François Coppée and Anatole France I thought this collection of short stories would be a perfect introduction and I wasn’t disappointed. This selection of Christmas tales was full of beautifully written pieces, where the descriptions of winter helped to cool me down on a hot summer day, although I wasn’t really filled with the Christmas cheer I was expecting. These traditional tales set in years gone by often reminded me of Dickens. Many of the stories seemed to show how lonely Christmas can be for some; the old man struggling to fit in with his family, the hermit and his pig, the young gambler bankrupt on Christmas Eve, the dying soldier far from home and the wealthy but lonely merchant are just a few examples to be found, along with a good smattering of ghostly apparitions and orphans. They were certainly stories that made me think and I enjoyed this different perspective. Culturally I learned a lot and was certainly glad to make my acquaintance of some of France’s great writers. I am looking forward to re-reading this book nearer the festive season and now that I’ve dipped my toes into the literature of some of France’s greats, I’m keen to read more.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    I think I signed on to read and review the book as more of a curiosity because I wanted to know how French christmas was different than the stereotypical portrayal of American and Dickensian christmas. I also think I was curious how I would feel about the stories considering that I don't celebrate christmas (closest is New Years in Russian style which is similar to christmas style as I learned when I came to America.) What I found out is interesting: modern stories like the first one as well as I think I signed on to read and review the book as more of a curiosity because I wanted to know how French christmas was different than the stereotypical portrayal of American and Dickensian christmas. I also think I was curious how I would feel about the stories considering that I don't celebrate christmas (closest is New Years in Russian style which is similar to christmas style as I learned when I came to America.) What I found out is interesting: modern stories like the first one as well as one by Dominique Fabre and last one by Irene Nemirovsky for me they are far more enjoyable than the old stories by Alphonse Daudet and Francoise Coppee who apparently were hypocrites in their beliefs towards those who are not christians. Most of the 14 stories are dominated by Daudet and Coppee. I liked learning about the way French celebrate christmas and seeing something other than British or American, but I do wish that the stories would have been in more of a modern vein rather than the 1800s vein. I was given this book for a honest review

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carole

    It is very interesting to read the style of Christmas stories written in the late 19th century. These 14 short stories are so finely written, that a only a few pages convey the real feeling. Already then, many people believed less in religion and yet they wittnessed Miracles. I was so amazed to read these stories were from 1892. One story said, the snow was 5 foot deep, a most unusual amount. But, the story "Christmas in Algiers" by Anatole Le Braz (1859-1926), written by a soldier could have be It is very interesting to read the style of Christmas stories written in the late 19th century. These 14 short stories are so finely written, that a only a few pages convey the real feeling. Already then, many people believed less in religion and yet they wittnessed Miracles. I was so amazed to read these stories were from 1892. One story said, the snow was 5 foot deep, a most unusual amount. But, the story "Christmas in Algiers" by Anatole Le Braz (1859-1926), written by a soldier could have been written today. "...one feels his way across the muddy roads, for the tradition of snow-white Christmases is dead; the seasons have changed their habits, like us men." It is 2020 now and we have no snow this year for Christmas, so we think a new problem, climate change is the reason.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Interesting collection of stories were interesting and cute. I read this on Christmas eve with my teenage daughters and they loved it. I left it on display in my living room for Christmas and my mother in law read and liked it too. Very entertaining.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I may be naive, but I believe that Christmas stories should be uplifting. Most of these were very much not.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Athena Thomas

    so sad!!! didn't really fill me with the "joy" of Christmas so sad!!! didn't really fill me with the "joy" of Christmas

  17. 5 out of 5

    Silver

    I do not care for the conventional modern Christmas stories. They are frankly to warm and fuzzy, sentimental, and often romance oriented for my tastes. Thus I like to go on a quest to find holiday themed books that break the convention and offer something different and unexpected. This one caught my eye for a few reasons. For one because it is French and in addition to enjoying French literature as a whole I was curious as to how they would portray the holiday. Second I was intrigued by the fact I do not care for the conventional modern Christmas stories. They are frankly to warm and fuzzy, sentimental, and often romance oriented for my tastes. Thus I like to go on a quest to find holiday themed books that break the convention and offer something different and unexpected. This one caught my eye for a few reasons. For one because it is French and in addition to enjoying French literature as a whole I was curious as to how they would portray the holiday. Second I was intrigued by the fact that it was a mix of both contemporary and classical authors. Finally I was sold upon seeing that Guy de Maupassant was one of the contributors. I have to say the collection did not disappoint. It was all that I would have hoped for. Some of the stories were sentimental and did espouse traditional messages as to the meaning of Christmas. But on the whole the tone of many of the stories was more ironical and satirical. These were not gushy feel good stories ( which for me was a big positive) and some of them were rather bleak and stark ( again coming from me that is a compliment). While some stories I certainly found more outstanding than others across the board the writing was strong and usually rather clever.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Stevens

    Did not finish, mainly because I can't stand stories glorifying infidelity. I am reviewing the first A Very French Christmas, not this one, though Goodreads won't let me add another book with the first edition. I would probably finish it if this edition had a story by Victor Hugo in it. I only read the first story. I appreciate the old man's way of speaking and addressing the issue that he's been moved to only "Grandpa" and is almost just an ornament at the holidays, as unfortunately so many of Did not finish, mainly because I can't stand stories glorifying infidelity. I am reviewing the first A Very French Christmas, not this one, though Goodreads won't let me add another book with the first edition. I would probably finish it if this edition had a story by Victor Hugo in it. I only read the first story. I appreciate the old man's way of speaking and addressing the issue that he's been moved to only "Grandpa" and is almost just an ornament at the holidays, as unfortunately so many of our elders are. The young them are still there. One only has to take the time to find them. However, the story was a major turn off because he obviously had an affair on his wife with some feminista he worked with, whom he meets at the end of his life one more time. Lol she talks about how she hates how men only keep her as an obligatory ornament, and is only truly good for sexual appeasement. BUT THEN SHE GOES AND HAS SEX WITH A DUDE SHE WORKS WITH! Lol. Ugh. And of course, she's the one he's passionate about because wow, he's unfaithful. Duh. Anyway, some people like these kinds of stories. I do not. So, I will read no further. Grade: F.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shan

    « He recalls the celebration of Christmas, which in our beautiful land of Provence is like a bonfire lighted in the heart of winter. He thinks of the walk home after midnight Mass, of the bedecked and luminous churches, the dark and crowded village streets, then the long evening around the table, the three traditional torches, the aïoli, the dish of snails, the pretty ceremony of the cacho fio, the Yule log, which the grandfather parades through the house and sprinkles with mulled wine » Not bad « He recalls the celebration of Christmas, which in our beautiful land of Provence is like a bonfire lighted in the heart of winter. He thinks of the walk home after midnight Mass, of the bedecked and luminous churches, the dark and crowded village streets, then the long evening around the table, the three traditional torches, the aïoli, the dish of snails, the pretty ceremony of the cacho fio, the Yule log, which the grandfather parades through the house and sprinkles with mulled wine » Not bad for a collection of Christmas stories - but also not great...the usual - hearts softened, poor rewarded, miracles and kindnesses shared...but despite some illustrious French authors nothing particularly novel and memorable...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    I love reading holiday-themed stories in December to help get me in the Christmas mood. While this book started off strong with some great short stories, they got progressively worse. What a bummer! You keep hoping the next one will be better....then, no.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Terzah

    This is a fun collection of sometimes sad, sometimes uplifting stories for the Christmas season.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bambi

    This is just charming. What a wonderful Christmas gift from my mom. My favorite story in this volume is The Lost Child.

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Beckham

    Holiday Cheerr All the stories are wonderful relaxing reads. As tastee as Fine French wine. Don't miss Maupassant 's A MIRACLE, but I TAKE SUPPER WITH MY WIFE is the best. Holiday Cheerr All the stories are wonderful relaxing reads. As tastee as Fine French wine. Don't miss Maupassant 's A MIRACLE, but I TAKE SUPPER WITH MY WIFE is the best.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa of Hopewell

    I learned of this book here: https://wordsandpeace.com/2017/08/11/... I learned of this book here: https://wordsandpeace.com/2017/08/11/...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vlada

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zizi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julia Carpenter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Diana

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mitz

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anne

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