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NEW JERSEY REGIMENTS IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC FROM l86l"TO JUNE 30, 1863, THEIR ASSIGNMENTS TO DUTY AND THE COMMANDS WITH WHICH THEY SERVED — TABLES SHOWING LOSSES FOR TWO YEARS. THE patriotism of the citizens of New Jersey during the stormy period of 1861-65, was attested on many occasions, not alone by the valor of her soldiery on scores of battle-fields, but by the pro NEW JERSEY REGIMENTS IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC FROM l86l"TO JUNE 30, 1863, THEIR ASSIGNMENTS TO DUTY AND THE COMMANDS WITH WHICH THEY SERVED — TABLES SHOWING LOSSES FOR TWO YEARS. THE patriotism of the citizens of New Jersey during the stormy period of 1861-65, was attested on many occasions, not alone by the valor of her soldiery on scores of battle-fields, but by the promptness with which the people responded to the call of the National Government for troops, and the thorough manner in which the several organizations were armed and equipped before leaving the State. No appeal by the general government was ever made to the State authorities for assistance in vain. Governor Olden cooperated heartilv and cordially with the President and Secretary of War in all their efforts to suppress the rebellion in its infancy, and at the very outbreak of hostilities forwarded to Washington a brigade of four regiments, aggregating three thousand men, for three months' service under command of General Theodore Runyon. This brigade was fully armed and equipped at the expense of the State and was the first completely equipped body of troops to make its appearance at the National Capital, where it was greeted with the utmost gratification by the President. The Secretary of War feelingly appreciated the promptness of the State authorities in so generously and effectively aiding the National Government in its efforts to preserve its own integrity, and in a letter to Governor Olden cordially acknowledged the great service thus rendered, and in the name of the government tendered its sincere thanks to the people of the commonwealth. The theory entertained by the National authorities that the rebellion would be crushed out in three months' time soon proved erroneous. The rebellious states waxed bolder and bolder in their defiance of the National Government and resisted every offer of peace so determinedly, that a call was issued for thirty-nine regiments of infantry and one of cavalry to serve for three years or during the war, the quota for New Jersey being three regiments of infantry. Before another month had expired a second demand was made upon the State, this time for five additional regiments, all to serve for the same period of time. Under these calls there were promptly raised two brigades of infantry and two batteries of artillery, as follows: First Regiment—Colonel, William R. Montgomery. Second Regiment—Colonel, George W. McLean. Third Regiment—Colonel, George W. Taylor. Fourth Regiment—Colonel, James H. Simpson. Battery "A" First New Jersey Artillery—Captain William Hexamer, Commanding. These regiments formed the First New Jersey Brigade, and were assigned to duty with Franklin's Division. General Philip Kearny was commissioned by Governor Olden and placed in command of the brigade. The Second Brigade was composed of the following: Fifth Regiment—Colonel, Samuel H. Starr. Sixth Regiment—Colonel, James T. Hatfield. Seventh Regiment—Colonel, Joseph W. Revere. Eighth Regiment—Colonel, Adolphus J. Johnson. Battery "B" First New Jersey Artillery—Captain John E. Beam, Commanding. This brigade was assigned to Hooker's Division where it became a great favorite and was eventually known as "Hooker's Old Guard." It formed the Third Brigade of the Second Division, Third Army Corps, and was commanded by Colonel Starr of the Fifth Regiment, the senior officer. Rapidly as these organizations were formed the opportunities presented for enlistment were not sufficient to satisfy the desires of a great many who were anxious to go to the war. Thousands of Jerseymen enlisted in the regiments of other States, and whole companies left Newark, Elizabeth, Rah way, Orange and other places and were incorporated with New York and Pennsylvania regiments and credited to those States.


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NEW JERSEY REGIMENTS IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC FROM l86l"TO JUNE 30, 1863, THEIR ASSIGNMENTS TO DUTY AND THE COMMANDS WITH WHICH THEY SERVED — TABLES SHOWING LOSSES FOR TWO YEARS. THE patriotism of the citizens of New Jersey during the stormy period of 1861-65, was attested on many occasions, not alone by the valor of her soldiery on scores of battle-fields, but by the pro NEW JERSEY REGIMENTS IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC FROM l86l"TO JUNE 30, 1863, THEIR ASSIGNMENTS TO DUTY AND THE COMMANDS WITH WHICH THEY SERVED — TABLES SHOWING LOSSES FOR TWO YEARS. THE patriotism of the citizens of New Jersey during the stormy period of 1861-65, was attested on many occasions, not alone by the valor of her soldiery on scores of battle-fields, but by the promptness with which the people responded to the call of the National Government for troops, and the thorough manner in which the several organizations were armed and equipped before leaving the State. No appeal by the general government was ever made to the State authorities for assistance in vain. Governor Olden cooperated heartilv and cordially with the President and Secretary of War in all their efforts to suppress the rebellion in its infancy, and at the very outbreak of hostilities forwarded to Washington a brigade of four regiments, aggregating three thousand men, for three months' service under command of General Theodore Runyon. This brigade was fully armed and equipped at the expense of the State and was the first completely equipped body of troops to make its appearance at the National Capital, where it was greeted with the utmost gratification by the President. The Secretary of War feelingly appreciated the promptness of the State authorities in so generously and effectively aiding the National Government in its efforts to preserve its own integrity, and in a letter to Governor Olden cordially acknowledged the great service thus rendered, and in the name of the government tendered its sincere thanks to the people of the commonwealth. The theory entertained by the National authorities that the rebellion would be crushed out in three months' time soon proved erroneous. The rebellious states waxed bolder and bolder in their defiance of the National Government and resisted every offer of peace so determinedly, that a call was issued for thirty-nine regiments of infantry and one of cavalry to serve for three years or during the war, the quota for New Jersey being three regiments of infantry. Before another month had expired a second demand was made upon the State, this time for five additional regiments, all to serve for the same period of time. Under these calls there were promptly raised two brigades of infantry and two batteries of artillery, as follows: First Regiment—Colonel, William R. Montgomery. Second Regiment—Colonel, George W. McLean. Third Regiment—Colonel, George W. Taylor. Fourth Regiment—Colonel, James H. Simpson. Battery "A" First New Jersey Artillery—Captain William Hexamer, Commanding. These regiments formed the First New Jersey Brigade, and were assigned to duty with Franklin's Division. General Philip Kearny was commissioned by Governor Olden and placed in command of the brigade. The Second Brigade was composed of the following: Fifth Regiment—Colonel, Samuel H. Starr. Sixth Regiment—Colonel, James T. Hatfield. Seventh Regiment—Colonel, Joseph W. Revere. Eighth Regiment—Colonel, Adolphus J. Johnson. Battery "B" First New Jersey Artillery—Captain John E. Beam, Commanding. This brigade was assigned to Hooker's Division where it became a great favorite and was eventually known as "Hooker's Old Guard." It formed the Third Brigade of the Second Division, Third Army Corps, and was commanded by Colonel Starr of the Fifth Regiment, the senior officer. Rapidly as these organizations were formed the opportunities presented for enlistment were not sufficient to satisfy the desires of a great many who were anxious to go to the war. Thousands of Jerseymen enlisted in the regiments of other States, and whole companies left Newark, Elizabeth, Rah way, Orange and other places and were incorporated with New York and Pennsylvania regiments and credited to those States.

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