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FIND YOUR WILL, FIND YOUR DISCIPLINE – AND YOU WILL FIND YOUR FREEDOM Jocko Willink's methods for success were born in the SEAL Teams, where he spent most of his adult life, enlisting after high school and rising through the ranks to become the commander of the most highly decorated special operations unit of the war in Iraq. In Discipline Equals Freedom, the #1 New Yor FIND YOUR WILL, FIND YOUR DISCIPLINE – AND YOU WILL FIND YOUR FREEDOM Jocko Willink's methods for success were born in the SEAL Teams, where he spent most of his adult life, enlisting after high school and rising through the ranks to become the commander of the most highly decorated special operations unit of the war in Iraq. In Discipline Equals Freedom, the #1 New York Times bestselling coauthor of Extreme Ownership describes how he lives that mantra: the mental and physical disciplines he imposes on himself in order to achieve freedom in all aspects of life. Many books offer advice on how to overcome obstacles and reach your goals—but that advice often misses the most critical ingredient: discipline. Without discipline, there will be no real progress. Discipline Equals Freedom covers it all, including strategies and tactics for conquering weakness, procrastination, and fear, and specific physical training presented in workouts for beginner, intermediate, and advanced athletes, and even the best sleep habits and food intake recommended to optimize performance.Within these pages discover the keys to becoming stronger, smarter, faster, and healthier. There is only one way to achieve true freedom: The Way of Discipline. Read this book and find The Way.


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FIND YOUR WILL, FIND YOUR DISCIPLINE – AND YOU WILL FIND YOUR FREEDOM Jocko Willink's methods for success were born in the SEAL Teams, where he spent most of his adult life, enlisting after high school and rising through the ranks to become the commander of the most highly decorated special operations unit of the war in Iraq. In Discipline Equals Freedom, the #1 New Yor FIND YOUR WILL, FIND YOUR DISCIPLINE – AND YOU WILL FIND YOUR FREEDOM Jocko Willink's methods for success were born in the SEAL Teams, where he spent most of his adult life, enlisting after high school and rising through the ranks to become the commander of the most highly decorated special operations unit of the war in Iraq. In Discipline Equals Freedom, the #1 New York Times bestselling coauthor of Extreme Ownership describes how he lives that mantra: the mental and physical disciplines he imposes on himself in order to achieve freedom in all aspects of life. Many books offer advice on how to overcome obstacles and reach your goals—but that advice often misses the most critical ingredient: discipline. Without discipline, there will be no real progress. Discipline Equals Freedom covers it all, including strategies and tactics for conquering weakness, procrastination, and fear, and specific physical training presented in workouts for beginner, intermediate, and advanced athletes, and even the best sleep habits and food intake recommended to optimize performance.Within these pages discover the keys to becoming stronger, smarter, faster, and healthier. There is only one way to achieve true freedom: The Way of Discipline. Read this book and find The Way.

30 review for Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual

  1. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    This is harmful nonsense for one very simple reason: an amount is not an approach. Leave aside the many aesthetic failings (the black pages with white text, the self-parodically terse phrasing, the meathead vacuity) and look only at the ideas. What do we have? "Work hard" "Hard" is not what to do, it's how much you do. It is not a prescription, it's a dosage. He says again and again that the secret to success is early mornings and late nights, that the way to be tougher is "BE TOUGHER". That is no This is harmful nonsense for one very simple reason: an amount is not an approach. Leave aside the many aesthetic failings (the black pages with white text, the self-parodically terse phrasing, the meathead vacuity) and look only at the ideas. What do we have? "Work hard" "Hard" is not what to do, it's how much you do. It is not a prescription, it's a dosage. He says again and again that the secret to success is early mornings and late nights, that the way to be tougher is "BE TOUGHER". That is not useful information. Worse than that, it creates a false model of the world in which the only thing that matters is how many hours you threw at a problem, how white your knuckles got, how deep your brow furrowed. If you succeeded: great, you spent enough time. If you failed? Guess you were weak, loser. Update 2/2020: I've recently heard Jocko talk about a variety of topics in YouTube and podcast appearances, and while my opinion of the writing itself has not changed, I think that the book is a very poor representation of who he is and how he thinks. The book lacks any nuance, and tersely emphasizes the most commonly stated piece of advice in modern culture ("work hard"), but Jocko frequently answers questions in a different way, showing a sophisticated understanding of how to handle complex social challenges as well as an impressive natural grasp of positive reframing and the importance of self-regulation, but they sadly aren't displayed well in this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Heiner

    I had originally thought to go with 3.5, but that's not possible on Goodreads, and so I rounded down. This can also be entitled "Intro to Jocko's philosophy." The problem is, if you have even listened to a handful of his podcasts, you've got the whole book, so for those who "get" and "like" Jocko, as I do, this book is not valuable. It's valuable to give as a gift to others who have never heard of Jocko, especially if those people are struggling with execution, as Jocko relentlessly strips away e I had originally thought to go with 3.5, but that's not possible on Goodreads, and so I rounded down. This can also be entitled "Intro to Jocko's philosophy." The problem is, if you have even listened to a handful of his podcasts, you've got the whole book, so for those who "get" and "like" Jocko, as I do, this book is not valuable. It's valuable to give as a gift to others who have never heard of Jocko, especially if those people are struggling with execution, as Jocko relentlessly strips away excuses through his short 2-3 page "essays." To get a good sense of whether the book is for you, my favorite chapter is also my favorite content from Jocko ever, and it is entitled "Good." (pages 58-60) You can watch him read it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdTMD... The book itself is printed in an innovative way - black pages and white ink. There's also an appendix to get you started with working out without complicated machines. Stuff you can do in hotel rooms. "Go through the motions. Lift the weights. Sprint the hill. Work on the project. GET OUT OF BED. I don't like procrastination. But if you feel like you need a break - that is one thing you should procrastinate." (p. 49) "Every day is a Monday." (p. 64) "Most of us aren't defeated in one decisive battle. We are defeated one tiny, seemingly insignificant surrender at a time that chips away at who we should really be." (p. 72) "Fasting will recalibrate what hunger is to you. You will realize that you aren't actually hungry most of the time. You are just bored. And at the end of a fast your food will taste better too.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jewelianne

    Okay, hear me out. On the one hand, I read this book after midnight while eating licorice. The next day (which I had off of work), I slept until 11. So that's kind of EXACTLY the opposite of what the author is advocating for people to do in their lives. But maybe that is why I need this book. I feel like I'm pretty good at not being in denial about all my many shortcomings and bad habits. The thing I like about this book is that there is no room for the denial. At times it is a bit repetitive, b Okay, hear me out. On the one hand, I read this book after midnight while eating licorice. The next day (which I had off of work), I slept until 11. So that's kind of EXACTLY the opposite of what the author is advocating for people to do in their lives. But maybe that is why I need this book. I feel like I'm pretty good at not being in denial about all my many shortcomings and bad habits. The thing I like about this book is that there is no room for the denial. At times it is a bit repetitive, but the author's main point is if you want to do something, then you should do it. The end. Don't waste time on all the planning, fear, perfection, etc. And don't make compromises and excuses with yourself. In general, I feel like this is my philosophy too. Any time I have accomplished something difficult (impossible!) it finally happened when I got out of my own way and quit making excuses. Weight loss (or in this case, more like health and exercise in general) are probably no different. I also really like what the author says about self-discipline having to come from within. That is entirely true also. As much as you SAY you want to do something, you would do it already if you really wanted to. None of the pills, or medications, or programs or anything else are going to help you to achieve your goals if you aren't really committed to it internally. But even if you aren't at that point yet, I think it's good to read books like this. The more you expose yourself to people and ideas that you wish to emulate, the more you will realize it is possible. And hopefully that will cause the internal motivation to click on a little sooner (like you know, before your genetically likely diabetes sets in...) The only thing I kind of don't like about this book is how the author applies this theory to pretty much all aspects of life. He does say to learn from mistakes and failures, and use that as a learning opportunity, which I agree with completely. But I do think there are SOME things that are impossible. For example, there are always going to be poor people, and poverty is not a moral failure or a character flaw. Some poor people can rise above their station, but not all of them. Of course he doesn't say anything about poverty, so maybe I am being unfair on this point. But I think that while his philosophy can absolutely apply to many people and situations (specifically of course health and exercise for otherwise healthy people), it is too simplistic for others.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    About as useful as a drill sergeant yelling at you for 30 minutes. Black pages, large gimmicky font with weird offset that looks like Instagram meme material, not much content other than a hefty dose of tough love. The gist of the entire book:” shut up, don’t complain, just do it!” There, I just saved you from reading the thing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Chabot

    Okay, so I've read Extreme ownership and loved every word in it. Willink is obviously some kind of superhuman and I respect the guy a lot. BUT. This book couldn't be more boring. It felt like reading the transcript from a motivational youtube video. I expected so much more from the author, such as real life example, thorough explanation of his thought process, even philosophy. In the end, it's just a mind numbing repetition of a few keywords mixed with ''You can do it if you set your mind onto i Okay, so I've read Extreme ownership and loved every word in it. Willink is obviously some kind of superhuman and I respect the guy a lot. BUT. This book couldn't be more boring. It felt like reading the transcript from a motivational youtube video. I expected so much more from the author, such as real life example, thorough explanation of his thought process, even philosophy. In the end, it's just a mind numbing repetition of a few keywords mixed with ''You can do it if you set your mind onto it'' type of chapters. It's actually sad, because Jocko Willink has a LOT to teach and I was first in line to listen.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris De

    If you follow Jocko, you have heard it all before. I was intrigued by his workouts that range from beginner to advanced, I am excited to start those. I could hear his voice as I read the book. Read it in an hour. Consider it Jockos version of Ray Dalios Principles.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    Boot camp in a book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Abbie

    A motivational kick in the pants if ever there was one. Loved it. (Also the whole thing is on Spotify – bonus!)

  9. 5 out of 5

    David

    I agree with a lot of Jocko's advice. It might even bear repeating. And repeating. AND REPEATING IN ALL CAPS. In my own words, the core principles found in Discipline Equals Freedom that I agree with are: * Doing things is the cure for procrastination * Master yourself, don't worry about people or situations outside your control * Have long-term goals and move towards them in a meaningful way * If you can't do what you planned (illness, injury), do what you can, even if it's just a little bit; keep t I agree with a lot of Jocko's advice. It might even bear repeating. And repeating. AND REPEATING IN ALL CAPS. In my own words, the core principles found in Discipline Equals Freedom that I agree with are: * Doing things is the cure for procrastination * Master yourself, don't worry about people or situations outside your control * Have long-term goals and move towards them in a meaningful way * If you can't do what you planned (illness, injury), do what you can, even if it's just a little bit; keep the momentum going * Don't wait for motivation * Sugar is the devil (and a person weakness of mine) * Humans don't have to eat constantly (fasting is natural) In my own personal improvement journey I've experienced each of these things. I agree with them. I believe in them. So why the low star rating? First, as other reviewers have noted, there is very little content in this book. Second, I don't think Jocko makes a very convincing case for his principles. If you're not already convinced, I don't see how this text will convince you. If you are already convinced, this is little more than a pep talk. And third, the section titled "Psychological Edge" demonstrates several serious misunderstandings of the science of willpower. "Now, some scientists have claimed that discipline dissipates the more it is used -- that willpower is a finite resource that is reduced every time it is used during the day." Right, that's what I've read and it certainly reflects my experience. "This is wrong. That does not happen." Take that, science! Okay, Jocko. So how does it work? "To the contrary, I believe, and studies have shown, that discipline and willpower do not go down as they are called into action -- they actually get stronger." Funny, I've read that too...by the same scientists! How could this be!? Because in the second case, they're talking about the strengthening of willpower (by exercising it) over the course of many days. It's just like a muscle, Jocko. You can wear out a muscle in the course of a day, but strengthen it over the course of many days. Same thing. The scientists are saying that willpower is like a muscle. "This is obvious if you actually try the experiment yourself: Before you go to bed...Stage your workout clothes so you don't even have to think when you get up." Oh, for Pete's sake! That works because you're not depleting your willpower in the morning - you've already made the decision the night before. The fact that the "experiment" works literally demonstrates the point about depleting willpower: you get the stuff ready at night because you know it would be harder to make the decision to get on your gear and go workout in the morning. Furthermore, I don't think Jocko demonstrates that he understands the role in which habit plays in his morning workout ritual. At this point, I doubt it requires much if any willpower for Jocko to wake up early and workout. It's a deeply ingrained habit. Of course he has to maintain the habit, and that does require discipline, but it's not a decision he has to make each morning any more - it's as automatic for him as brushing our teeth is for the rest of us. The willpower thing rubbed me the wrong way. I'll end with this: I think this book would have been far stronger if it had included some anecdotes and examples to reinforce the principles. Surely Jocko has some stories from his own life or inspiring people he's known whose lives illustrate his message? I would have liked to have read that sort of material -- and as an added bonus, they would have helped with the word count!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Uke

    Written by an alleged navy seal wrote out a simple formula for self improvement in a series of white typewriter lettering vomited upon black paper. Full of proclaimed techniques of mastery with no scientific backing or ideas but that of artistic bold block-text that belongs on spray painted on the wall of a gym. I get that exercise and well being are a mindset, I get that. However there is a lack of underlying scientific knowledge that makes it insincere and full of empty bravado. It's not a 1/5 Written by an alleged navy seal wrote out a simple formula for self improvement in a series of white typewriter lettering vomited upon black paper. Full of proclaimed techniques of mastery with no scientific backing or ideas but that of artistic bold block-text that belongs on spray painted on the wall of a gym. I get that exercise and well being are a mindset, I get that. However there is a lack of underlying scientific knowledge that makes it insincere and full of empty bravado. It's not a 1/5 on account of having one or two useful standard operating procedures (SOPs) that would in fact build some form of discipline. But expecting over thirty dollars for a book, that has around five-pages of writing fully compressed? That's just pretentious.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jason Crawford

    I am a person who gets enjoyment from reading, studying, and working my mind. The danger in this is that many times I don't "do". I don't take action on what I learn. "Discipline Equals Freedom" is a shot of motivation right into the veins. Nothing in this short book is anything ground breaking or new, but it is said in a way to make you want to attack your day with purpose and self discipline. If you enjoyed "The War of Art" then you will love "Discipline Equals Freedom". If you haven't read ei I am a person who gets enjoyment from reading, studying, and working my mind. The danger in this is that many times I don't "do". I don't take action on what I learn. "Discipline Equals Freedom" is a shot of motivation right into the veins. Nothing in this short book is anything ground breaking or new, but it is said in a way to make you want to attack your day with purpose and self discipline. If you enjoyed "The War of Art" then you will love "Discipline Equals Freedom". If you haven't read either then stop what you are doing and read them now. You will look for the challenges in your life so you will have something to attack and slay. Do the work! Do!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    I got this from the library for the home-based fitness routine, but I actually really liked the whole thing. I wish there had been a section on pull exercises for absolute beginners. The "easy" option of doing a negative repetition is beyond me. I cannot hold my weight up with my chin over the bar if I stand on a box. I cannot even suspend my own weight hanging. I have nil pull strength. I cannot be the only human who is starting from absolute zero. Also, I weigh only half a pound less than the I got this from the library for the home-based fitness routine, but I actually really liked the whole thing. I wish there had been a section on pull exercises for absolute beginners. The "easy" option of doing a negative repetition is beyond me. I cannot hold my weight up with my chin over the bar if I stand on a box. I cannot even suspend my own weight hanging. I have nil pull strength. I cannot be the only human who is starting from absolute zero. Also, I weigh only half a pound less than the max weight for any pull-up bar I could find: I seriously don't trust them to hold me. It would have been great if Willink just had, like, one paragraph on some alternative exercises. At least I found options online. Still an awesome book, enough I'm considering buying a copy when this has to go back.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Trisha White

    you can read this book or watch the shia labeouf video i did both https://tenor.com/view/just-do-it-shi... you can read this book or watch the shia labeouf video i did both https://tenor.com/view/just-do-it-shi...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cold Medina

    this book fully set me on a better path in life. it's free on spotify, so there's no excuse. this book fully set me on a better path in life. it's free on spotify, so there's no excuse.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lakhan

    Good motivational book from JOCKO. Gave a decent background on his beliefs; how to stay healthy, and becoming relentless with training. Make the choice and get disciplined with no excuses! 'DO IT' Good motivational book from JOCKO. Gave a decent background on his beliefs; how to stay healthy, and becoming relentless with training. Make the choice and get disciplined with no excuses! 'DO IT'

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Calling Discipline Equals Freedom a field manual is an apt title for a book that is direct, to the point, and leaves you feeling like you've just had a drill sergeant screaming in your face. I love Jocko's undeviating view on finding discipline from within, and providing practical no-nonsense advice that you can apply instantly in your life. Are you struggling with your nutrition? He tells you exactly how to eat. You don't know what exercise to do? He provides example routines. Are you strugglin Calling Discipline Equals Freedom a field manual is an apt title for a book that is direct, to the point, and leaves you feeling like you've just had a drill sergeant screaming in your face. I love Jocko's undeviating view on finding discipline from within, and providing practical no-nonsense advice that you can apply instantly in your life. Are you struggling with your nutrition? He tells you exactly how to eat. You don't know what exercise to do? He provides example routines. Are you struggling with motivation to get up early and begin the day? No excuses, do it anyway. My key takeaway from the book? No more excuses. No more listening to the weak lies your mind is telling you. Just get out there and do it. I picked up Discipline Equals Freedom because I wanted a motivational book to help me begin to tackle some new challenges in my life, and this book has been worth it's weight in gold for showing me that willpower is not a finite resource, and to simply take the first step.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tungstenmouse

    I think this would have been great if it didn’t require supplemental material. The meat is in the last 4th of the book. But, apparently there are lots of other things to go along with this like videos and a podcast. This book alone amounts to a version of the Nike slogan, “Just Do It”. So I would say look for the videos and podcasts but you can skip this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    I like Jocko's message. This is a nice coffee table book to pickup and browse when in a no-action state because it has a simple message: DO. Beyond the value of having a reminder to act, there's not much here. I like Jocko's message. This is a nice coffee table book to pickup and browse when in a no-action state because it has a simple message: DO. Beyond the value of having a reminder to act, there's not much here.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Raine

    I have both versions audiobook and book. I prefer the audiobook.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Five stars for unintentional comedy. This was so different from all of the other self help books written by buddhists and people who sit in chairs. This guy commanded the highest decorated Navy SEAL team, that painted comic book skulls on their uniform and had the motto "NO MERCY". If you put this guy and Carl Rogers in a room, who would win? I'm probably going to read this again, because while the writing style is comical ("GET UP. AND. GO"), I feel like it's worth getting over the aesthetic and Five stars for unintentional comedy. This was so different from all of the other self help books written by buddhists and people who sit in chairs. This guy commanded the highest decorated Navy SEAL team, that painted comic book skulls on their uniform and had the motto "NO MERCY". If you put this guy and Carl Rogers in a room, who would win? I'm probably going to read this again, because while the writing style is comical ("GET UP. AND. GO"), I feel like it's worth getting over the aesthetic and trying to understand his mindset a bit better. Basically he's advocating extreme vigilance, and a ?completely? tyrannical top-down control structure of behavior that gets positive feedback from beating people. In a world where there are enemies, this seems legit. My question for myself, is, do I have enemies? What am I afraid of? Jocko would advocate highlighting that to extreme importance and being vigilant against behavior leading in that direction. It's also inspiring to look at self discipline as a thing which can be practiced, although I have a lot of personal skepticism about whether that is actually desirable for me at the moment. Has some nice workouts and such.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eli Nichols

    This book was like poring through a precocious high schooler’s journal. Throughout the book, I dipped between rolling my eyes, taking notes, reading sentences in a South Park voice, and actually being inspired. Jocko is obsessed. What is he obsessed with? A prose style. Sentence fragments. Strung together. He loves it. Why? Because short sentences fill the page. Every sentence feels lean. Mission critical. It adds gravitas. To uninspired ideas. It’s like Hatchet mixed with Hemingway, and it’s re This book was like poring through a precocious high schooler’s journal. Throughout the book, I dipped between rolling my eyes, taking notes, reading sentences in a South Park voice, and actually being inspired. Jocko is obsessed. What is he obsessed with? A prose style. Sentence fragments. Strung together. He loves it. Why? Because short sentences fill the page. Every sentence feels lean. Mission critical. It adds gravitas. To uninspired ideas. It’s like Hatchet mixed with Hemingway, and it’s really exhausting. The most interesting parts of the book were when he shared in-depth knowledge about what he’s clearly an expert in: strength training, physical fitness, diet, martial arts. The rest of the book comes across as a series of half-baked platitudes. But in the end, the idea is so simple and true that these shortcomings don’t really detract it from its goal. This book is a swift kick in the pants, and a welcome reminder to the reader to “Just Do It.” I’ll probably never read it again, but I’ll keep it on my bookshelf so I can see it as I walk by and be reminded of that elementary, easily forgettable truth.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Boldon

    A short, powerful book about making short, powerful changes in your life. I am not the target market for this book; I'm not a hardcore fitness enthusiast. But there's something for everyone here, and the exhortations to cut the crap and hold the line are useful to me. I started getting up an hour earlier at the beginning of the year and now have a morning routine of yoga, meditation, writing, and reading before breakfast. That said, it's on the extreme side for emotional suppression and relentle A short, powerful book about making short, powerful changes in your life. I am not the target market for this book; I'm not a hardcore fitness enthusiast. But there's something for everyone here, and the exhortations to cut the crap and hold the line are useful to me. I started getting up an hour earlier at the beginning of the year and now have a morning routine of yoga, meditation, writing, and reading before breakfast. That said, it's on the extreme side for emotional suppression and relentlessness.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    A daily dose of motivation Not a traditional book as the first section consists of one or two page chapters based on a singular motivational topic. But lovely and concise for the purpose of motivating and guiding people without boring them or overwhelming them. I'd recommend this to everyone but especially the sort of person who struggles to stick with a book because their mind wanders. I found Jocko's advice on point and reading a couple of pages is enough to turn my lazy negative mindset around A daily dose of motivation Not a traditional book as the first section consists of one or two page chapters based on a singular motivational topic. But lovely and concise for the purpose of motivating and guiding people without boring them or overwhelming them. I'd recommend this to everyone but especially the sort of person who struggles to stick with a book because their mind wanders. I found Jocko's advice on point and reading a couple of pages is enough to turn my lazy negative mindset around. I aim to reread a couple of pages everyday to keep progressing mentally and, as a result of the motivation, physically in the right direction. The book is more than simple motivation as it provides advice on training and diet as well with an appendix including training plans for a variety of exercise experience. Highly recommended to anyone wanting to overcome laziness and underachievment. It's a not a book that will turn you into a world beater but it will make you want to become a better version of yourself!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ramavtar

    No BS. Straight up manual towards a path of freedom and liberation from a lazy shitty life. Practice to perfection; follow the rules within this manual and be free.

  25. 4 out of 5

    August Andersson

    I love the message. Not really what we're taught in school but if there's anything worth teaching, this it's this kind of wisdom . After reading this I will probably start training martial arts and get up earlier in the morning. I encountered Jocko since I'm follower of Jordan Peterson. I love the message. Not really what we're taught in school but if there's anything worth teaching, this it's this kind of wisdom . After reading this I will probably start training martial arts and get up earlier in the morning. I encountered Jocko since I'm follower of Jordan Peterson.

  26. 5 out of 5

    John MacIntyre

    This book is split into 3 main sections: Thoughts, Actions, & Workouts. The first 2 sections are very short chapters (1-3 pages), which come across to me like short pep talks. If you've ever heard Jacko on podcast, you'll probably hear his voice in your head as you read them. Very motivating. Very impactful. The workouts goes into detail about how to start working out and get to higher levels. I like how he tells you to do "8 sets of as many pull ups as you can do", but then tells you how to get This book is split into 3 main sections: Thoughts, Actions, & Workouts. The first 2 sections are very short chapters (1-3 pages), which come across to me like short pep talks. If you've ever heard Jacko on podcast, you'll probably hear his voice in your head as you read them. Very motivating. Very impactful. The workouts goes into detail about how to start working out and get to higher levels. I like how he tells you to do "8 sets of as many pull ups as you can do", but then tells you how to get there if you can't do a single one, so you're not left behind if you can't do a single one. For me, this is one of those books which you read the entire book, then put it into rotation to read a bite sized chapter daily.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason McCrory

    I really loved this book! The only reason I gave it 4/5 stars is due to the fact that I thought the workout routines section lacked specificity. I understand that this isn't really a workout book, per se, but a large percentage of the book was just that, a workout program. Ergo, I think Jocko could have dived more into explaining the movements a little better. That said, the book is still a must-read for anyone who wants the nitty-gritty on getting off their ass and getting the shit done. Thanks I really loved this book! The only reason I gave it 4/5 stars is due to the fact that I thought the workout routines section lacked specificity. I understand that this isn't really a workout book, per se, but a large percentage of the book was just that, a workout program. Ergo, I think Jocko could have dived more into explaining the movements a little better. That said, the book is still a must-read for anyone who wants the nitty-gritty on getting off their ass and getting the shit done. Thanks for another great read, Jocko!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mason Frierson

    There Is No Shortcut There Is No Hack There’s Only One Way So Get After It Discipline Equals Freedom. A man's entire philosophy boiled down to 3 words. This is what is most incredible about this book. The depth paired with the brevity. At 190 pages it isn't meant to waste your time and that's why I like Jocko's writing. It has an intent and it cuts out all of the clutter. He stays disciplined even within his writing. The book is broken into 2 parts: Thoughts and Actions. Part I (Thoughts) discusses There Is No Shortcut There Is No Hack There’s Only One Way So Get After It Discipline Equals Freedom. A man's entire philosophy boiled down to 3 words. This is what is most incredible about this book. The depth paired with the brevity. At 190 pages it isn't meant to waste your time and that's why I like Jocko's writing. It has an intent and it cuts out all of the clutter. He stays disciplined even within his writing. The book is broken into 2 parts: Thoughts and Actions. Part I (Thoughts) discusses his philosophy and Part II (Actions) discusses physical conditioning (diet, stretching, etc.). There is also a bonus appendix with very, very detailed workouts for different levels of physical condition (i.e. beginner to advanced). What most impressed me about this book was Jocko's ability to discuss a topic in detail and then summarize it succinctly in one line. This is his gift and he uses it in almost every chapter. Glory in solitude. Laughter wins. Curse the warmth of the bed. All of these ideas, and others, are included in Part I (Thoughts) of this field manual. While originally reading Part I (Thoughts), I thought it was somewhat unorganized. Why is he talking about Regret then talking about Focus? However, as I kept reading I realized that Jocko was just attacking the same problem from many different angles. It was as if Jocko were rotating around his core truth (Discipline Equals Freedom) and explaining it using different perspectives. For example, how do you view Discipline Equals Freedom through the lens of stress? Through regret? Through negativity? Through positivity? It is harder to follow the structure initially, but I believe this makes the work more accessible to a wider audience. For example, I found that some chapters spoke to me more than others, and I am guessing you will feel the same way. In Part II (Actions) Jocko summarizes what actions you can take to start moving in the right direction physically. I completely agree that thinking is nowhere near enough to actually make changes in your life. You have to act, and this part discusses the practical side of acting. For example, how to wake up early, how to eat, how to work out while traveling, etc. I recommend spending as much time, if not more, on acting (Part II) as you did on thinking (Part I). While the thinking will get you engaged, the acting will keep you engaged, and this is the key to staying disciplined. In conclusion, this isn't a typical motivational book. When reading it you can tell that the author means business. He lives this lifestyle. EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. His Instagram account illustrates this better than anything. 2 daily photos. One at around 4:30 AM to show he is awake and acting, and one after his daily workout. Simple, but to the point. He lives it and I hope you can take some inspiration from this book to live closer to your truth. With that being said, I will leave you with one of my favorite quotes from the book: "We are defeated one tiny, seemingly insignificant surrender at a time that chips away at who we should really be. It isn't that you wake up one day and decide that's it: I am going to be weak. No. It is a slow incremental process. It chips away at our will-it chips away at our discipline."

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Stacy

    3.5 rounded up While I appreciate that this book exists, it just really wasn't for me. "Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual," by Jocko Willink (2017), is a heavy dose of motivation for anyone who wants to exercise, eat a paleo diet, and go to sleep every night by 9:30 p.m. so they can wake at 4:30 a.m. for an intense, muscle-building workout. The text reads like a drill sergeant yelling at the reader nonstop. Willink frames all of life as a war, in which you, the reader, must learn to be ever 3.5 rounded up While I appreciate that this book exists, it just really wasn't for me. "Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual," by Jocko Willink (2017), is a heavy dose of motivation for anyone who wants to exercise, eat a paleo diet, and go to sleep every night by 9:30 p.m. so they can wake at 4:30 a.m. for an intense, muscle-building workout. The text reads like a drill sergeant yelling at the reader nonstop. Willink frames all of life as a war, in which you, the reader, must learn to be ever-vigilant against "the enemy" all around you. "The enemy" in your life is anything from a free donut at the office, to staying up late on the weekend to watch a movie, to a mass shooter that you'll need to kill with your own pistol. If you are someone who wants to treat civilian life like you're in the U.S. Marine Corps, I would definitely recommend this book. If you are someone who longs to have a drill sergeant shouting at you in book form, telling you to exercise, then this will be a good read. There are pages and pages of intense, military-style exercise routines that fill up the last fifth of the book. Personally, I don't think it's productive to view life as a war. Willink encourages his readers to use anger and fear as their daily fuel to power them through demanding workouts, and give them the "aggression" to stay hyper-vigilant all day, and remain on guard against "the enemy." I find this mentality exhausting and unhelpful; there are other ways to be highly disciplined without viewing daily life as "a war." But if this mentality works for Willink and his podcast fans, then power to them. I'm glad that people have the messaging that works for them to stay motivated. I personally would *not* recommend this book to anyone with PTSD. Willink's constant focus on "war" and "the enemy" frames all of life as a combat zone, and if I actually thought of life this way, I doubt I'd be able to sleep at night, especially if I had PTSD. This is not a bad book. But it just really wasn't for me.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Good, practical advice from someone with abundant credibility This book got off to an uneven start for me: Jocko begins with some very short, rhythmic, poetic chapters on perseverance, will, and discipline. He comes off as a very ‘run through walls to get success!’ kind of motivational speaker, and I wasn’t getting much out of it. I realize that mentality comes before action whatever we’re doing, but my figurative ears perked up once Jocko got onto specific tactics and strategies. He IS a fan of Good, practical advice from someone with abundant credibility This book got off to an uneven start for me: Jocko begins with some very short, rhythmic, poetic chapters on perseverance, will, and discipline. He comes off as a very ‘run through walls to get success!’ kind of motivational speaker, and I wasn’t getting much out of it. I realize that mentality comes before action whatever we’re doing, but my figurative ears perked up once Jocko got onto specific tactics and strategies. He IS a fan of rest, recovery, and not overtraining, but that doesn’t show up until you read the second half of the book. I think the book as a whole might have been more valuable with the concrete training, eating, and living advice up front, with the mental exhortations to follow. You’d know more about what exactly you’re kicking ass to achieve! That aside, I think this book is a great intro to working out, martial arts (it’s gotten me fired up to try some Brazilian Jiu Jitsu!), and paleo eating. Definitely a worthwhile quick read.

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