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Chafed by the -sivilized- restrictions of his foster home, and weary of his drunkard father's brutality, 14 year-old Huck Finn fakes his own death and sets off on a raft down the Mississippi River. He is soon joined by Jim, an escaped slave. Together, they experience a series of rollicking adventures that have amused readers, young and old, for over a century. The fugitive Chafed by the -sivilized- restrictions of his foster home, and weary of his drunkard father's brutality, 14 year-old Huck Finn fakes his own death and sets off on a raft down the Mississippi River. He is soon joined by Jim, an escaped slave. Together, they experience a series of rollicking adventures that have amused readers, young and old, for over a century. The fugitives become close friends as they weather storms together aboard the raft and spend idyllic days swimming, frying catfish suppers, and enjoying their independence. Their peaceful existence ends abruptly, however, with the appearance of the King and the Duke, an incorrigible pair of con artists who take over the raft. After many difficulties, Huck and Jim escape their tormentors, and with the help of an imaginative rescue by Huck's old friend Tom Sawyer, Jim gains his freedom. Manga Classics breathes new life into this American Classic with a faithful adaptation of Mark Twain's masterpiece.


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Chafed by the -sivilized- restrictions of his foster home, and weary of his drunkard father's brutality, 14 year-old Huck Finn fakes his own death and sets off on a raft down the Mississippi River. He is soon joined by Jim, an escaped slave. Together, they experience a series of rollicking adventures that have amused readers, young and old, for over a century. The fugitive Chafed by the -sivilized- restrictions of his foster home, and weary of his drunkard father's brutality, 14 year-old Huck Finn fakes his own death and sets off on a raft down the Mississippi River. He is soon joined by Jim, an escaped slave. Together, they experience a series of rollicking adventures that have amused readers, young and old, for over a century. The fugitives become close friends as they weather storms together aboard the raft and spend idyllic days swimming, frying catfish suppers, and enjoying their independence. Their peaceful existence ends abruptly, however, with the appearance of the King and the Duke, an incorrigible pair of con artists who take over the raft. After many difficulties, Huck and Jim escape their tormentors, and with the help of an imaginative rescue by Huck's old friend Tom Sawyer, Jim gains his freedom. Manga Classics breathes new life into this American Classic with a faithful adaptation of Mark Twain's masterpiece.

30 review for Manga Classics: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

  1. 4 out of 5

    [Shai] Bibliophage

    When I was in grade school, I used to watch the anime series of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Hence, when I saw this chance for a reading copy of the classic tale, I immediately grabbed the chance to download it. Reading this manga brings back memory during the time I enjoyed watching the said show. I wasn't able to catch all the episodes of that anime, but through the perusal of this adaptation, I was able to know the rest of Huck's adventures. What I like about these manga adaptation When I was in grade school, I used to watch the anime series of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Hence, when I saw this chance for a reading copy of the classic tale, I immediately grabbed the chance to download it. Reading this manga brings back memory during the time I enjoyed watching the said show. I wasn't able to catch all the episodes of that anime, but through the perusal of this adaptation, I was able to know the rest of Huck's adventures. What I like about these manga adaptations is that they put the original text of the story of these classic stories. Reading this graphic novel is like perusing the original book because the content is exactly the same. Another great factor is that there are illustrations that will help readers to imagine and understand quickly the story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jen/The Tolkien Gal/ジェニファー

    This manga infected me with a bad case of indifference. I don't think many of us envision English or American classics in a manga format. Once you've shaken off the strange feeling that is brought about by the incongruity of anime-styled characters speaking in a Southern accent....well, once you shake that off, there's still nothing to see here. Huck Finn's outrageous adventures do have a lot of promise in manga format - the style draws out the awkward moments quite well. However, I genuinely don' This manga infected me with a bad case of indifference. I don't think many of us envision English or American classics in a manga format. Once you've shaken off the strange feeling that is brought about by the incongruity of anime-styled characters speaking in a Southern accent....well, once you shake that off, there's still nothing to see here. Huck Finn's outrageous adventures do have a lot of promise in manga format - the style draws out the awkward moments quite well. However, I genuinely don't like the way in which Huckleberry is drawn - he does not look like a free-spirited and uncouth Missouri boy. Look at this. Does this look like Huck Finn to you or Sasuke concept art? None of the other characters have extraordinary hair. Maybe this is a case of "spot the main character" You definitely need to have read the book to understand what's going on in the manga - especially since the chapters are out of order (although this is a publisher's error, it definitely affected my inability to finish the book). Huck's realisation of being a "bad" human being enables him to do something that society considered being wrong at the time - that is, freeing a slave. his realisation in the manga is the only part I think was not adapted in a mediocre way. I can see a lot of care and devotion was funneled into this artwork, but overall this was a disappointment as an adaptation. I don't understand how racial slurs were kept in but smoking was omitted. Either omit both or keep them in - but selective censoring really bothers me. It detracts from the original work and is an insult to the reader when we are told what we can and cannot see. This book was provided to me by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review Edit: RTC. It's not the worst thing ever, but there was little that kept me captivated.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    I received a copy of Manga Classics: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is another flawless adaptation into Manga done by the wonderful Chrystal Chan and Chan (the artist). I’ve now read a handful of the Manga Classics, and I’ve got to say, I am still in love with the concept. Converting classics into Manga form creates beautiful and approachable works of art. Chrystal is skilled at adapting the plots into th I received a copy of Manga Classics: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is another flawless adaptation into Manga done by the wonderful Chrystal Chan and Chan (the artist). I’ve now read a handful of the Manga Classics, and I’ve got to say, I am still in love with the concept. Converting classics into Manga form creates beautiful and approachable works of art. Chrystal is skilled at adapting the plots into the shorter length required by the style and Chan is fantastic at drawing all the details that would otherwise be lost when cutting descriptions. Together they’re a fantastic team capable of creating fascinating works. I really enjoyed the adaptation for the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. While there are many parts of the story itself I do not love, I have no intention on blaming the manga version for that. I have to admit I was absolutely tickled seeing Huck in Manga form. Perhaps it is just me, but he totally reminded me of Edward Elric from Fullmetal Alchemist. Needless to say the similarity made me even fonder of Huck than I had been previously (though I had not thought to consider Huck a “pretty” boy before this). I feel like the pacing was better done in the adaptation as well, and can easily see many people having an easier time getting through this version (not to disparage the classic of course). There were certainly multiple points in the novel that were enhanced by the imagery style used. Huck dressing as a girl is an obvious one of course. Another scene that I felt was more impactful was the section containing the feuding families (the Grangerfords and the Shephersons). I felt the loss more keenly than I ever had while reading the original. There were many other scenes as well, but that one in particular really struck me. For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  4. 4 out of 5

    Marjolein

    2.5 Stars Full review to come!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Adventured of Huckleberry Finn!!! First things first: I received this book through NetGalley.   This review is going to hurt me more than any review I have ever written. I love these Manga Classics, they brought me closer to stories that I never thought I would like.   But this one on the other hand. I thought I was gonna love this. Adventures. I love adventures. But I was just so damn bored throughout this whole book.   The story was beautifully done. I loved the artwork, I loved the way the story w Adventured of Huckleberry Finn!!! First things first: I received this book through NetGalley.   This review is going to hurt me more than any review I have ever written. I love these Manga Classics, they brought me closer to stories that I never thought I would like.   But this one on the other hand. I thought I was gonna love this. Adventures. I love adventures. But I was just so damn bored throughout this whole book.   The story was beautifully done. I loved the artwork, I loved the way the story was told. I loved it. It just didn't work for me at all.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I have tried several times to like Huckleberry Finn, in every form, including the original novel. This was my last attempt, and it was no more successful than any of the others. I at least got all the way through the story this time. The art is fine, though I'm perplexed by Huck being the only character to have improbable manga hair. I also found it very interesting that the adaptation team chose to leave the racial slurs intact from the original, yet cut out every mention of Huck smoking. They I have tried several times to like Huckleberry Finn, in every form, including the original novel. This was my last attempt, and it was no more successful than any of the others. I at least got all the way through the story this time. The art is fine, though I'm perplexed by Huck being the only character to have improbable manga hair. I also found it very interesting that the adaptation team chose to leave the racial slurs intact from the original, yet cut out every mention of Huck smoking. They were concerned about influencing young readers to smoke, but the slurs are apparently not a bad influence? It seemed very strange to me to cut out one, but not the other.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Arybo ✨

    Not bad at all! 3.5 I have never read The adventures of Tom Sawyer or The adventures of Huckleberry Finn, so I threw myself into this manga without knowing anything about the plot or context in which the novel was born. I immediately noticed the warnings at the beginning of the volume, really well written, which underlined the intent of the original author Mark Twain to portray a civilization under the lens of satire. The involvement of black people has also been explained by the authors of the ma Not bad at all! 3.5 I have never read The adventures of Tom Sawyer or The adventures of Huckleberry Finn, so I threw myself into this manga without knowing anything about the plot or context in which the novel was born. I immediately noticed the warnings at the beginning of the volume, really well written, which underlined the intent of the original author Mark Twain to portray a civilization under the lens of satire. The involvement of black people has also been explained by the authors of the manga in an excellent way, as they have explained the use of the various dialects of America. With this premise, we enter the review. The main character is an orphan boy, who decides to escape from human civilization with the help of a black slave, Jim: the two will make a long journey aboard a raft along the Mississippi River. Huck had been abandoned by his father, a poor drunkard, and had begun to live freely, left to himself on the streets of St. Petersburg. The story then begins in this fictional town, based on Hannibal, the real city of Missouri where Twain had spent part of his childhood, on the banks of the great river. Thanks to the apprehension of widow Douglas and Judge Thatcher, the money found by Huck and Tom at the end of the first novel was entrusted to the bank. Huckleberry regrets the free life he had previously led and, having taken his rags, flees temporarily. Attracted by rumors about his son's fortune, Huck's father returns to the scene. The latter took possession of the boy, tearing him from the care of the good widow. The father, after a while, tried to kill him, and Huck decided to make a plan for his escape. The protagonist reproduces a real crime scene, in which he stages his death. Huck, fled, avoids being chased as he reaches the nearby Jackson Island undisturbed by canoe. Here he discovers that he is not alone: ​​there is Jim, the black slave of Miss Watson (sister of the widow Douglas) and a great friend of all the boys of the city. Like the book, the manga also follows the adventures of Huckleberry and Jim. The boy learns to know the man, who opens his heart and shows him the stupidity of prejudices and superstitions. The journey of the boat winds through a beautiful piece of the Mississippi: the two protagonists travel through numerous states, meeting people and varied landscapes. Manga editors have made very good choices, taking into consideration some scenes and cutting others. As always, the drawings are well suited to the story, while the narration goes straight to the end, and it is well done. As always, the Udon Manga Classics never disappoint. I thank the publisher for giving me the opportunity to read this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becca (Coffeebooksandjournals)

    Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with an ebook for an honest review. I enjoyed reading the manga of Huckleberry Finn. I took my time reading it and it was nice. Second time I’ve physically read it earlier this year I listened to the audiobook. I enjoyed seeing the scenes illustrated. I like the idea of having classics in manga form too. If you like Huckleberry Finn you should pick it up it’s a fun way to reread it. I gave this a 3.5 out of 5 stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elliot A

    I was auto-approved by the publisher Udon Entertainment through NetGalley to review this title. The story of Huck is a slow one and requires at times a lot of patience, but it’s worth the effort. Keeping that in mind, the comic also unfolds extremely slowly and requires the reader’s attention and patience. The artwork is very vivid and helps tell the story remarkably well. Overall, it’s a good story and a good comic and when read in small chunks, maybe one chapter at a time, it can be a rewarding I was auto-approved by the publisher Udon Entertainment through NetGalley to review this title. The story of Huck is a slow one and requires at times a lot of patience, but it’s worth the effort. Keeping that in mind, the comic also unfolds extremely slowly and requires the reader’s attention and patience. The artwork is very vivid and helps tell the story remarkably well. Overall, it’s a good story and a good comic and when read in small chunks, maybe one chapter at a time, it can be a rewarding read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kimber

    This is a trimmed down version of my review, to view the full review visit The Book Ramble. I received a copy of this book from Udon Entertainment on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I finally got around to reading this after receiving my ARC sometime in October...and I didn't finish it. I barely got 50 pages in. This manga adaptation didn't have much going for it. I had not read HuckFinn or Tom Sawyer going into the manga adaptation, I can guarantee that I will not be reading them in th This is a trimmed down version of my review, to view the full review visit The Book Ramble. I received a copy of this book from Udon Entertainment on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I finally got around to reading this after receiving my ARC sometime in October...and I didn't finish it. I barely got 50 pages in. This manga adaptation didn't have much going for it. I had not read HuckFinn or Tom Sawyer going into the manga adaptation, I can guarantee that I will not be reading them in the future. The story of HuckFinn, or the little of it I got from the beginning of this adaptation, was not very interesting. I'm not sure if that's a problem of the adaptation but it's a huge fault of this manga either way. HuckFinn also showcases the historical racism of America - the ongoing racism of America as well. The adapters chose to edit things from the source - they removed Huck's smoking habit(!!) - but they left the"n" word in. And they left a lot of it. I understand the desire to maintain the story as much as possible so WHY edit anything out - especially the things they did - only to maintain the frequent use of the "n" word. I didn't finish this book, I couldn't bring myself to. It was boring and problematic to say the least. I really think the Manga Classics team needs to think a little harder about what they're adapting and how instead of just rushing out a ton of these a year. I've kind of given up hope on this series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jodie "Bookish" Cook

    Book Review Title: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Author: Crystal Chan (Goodreads Author) (Adapted by), Kuma Chan (Art by), Mark Twain, Jeannie Lee (Lettering) Genre: Manga/Classics Rating: DNF Review: In the opening of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn we are introduced to Huck Finn in the mid 1800’s in Missouri, USA. Huck is living with a widow and her old maid friend who have taken Huck in away from his father. Huck is a very smart boy as he hides his money with a friend after his father come Book Review Title: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Author: Crystal Chan (Goodreads Author) (Adapted by), Kuma Chan (Art by), Mark Twain, Jeannie Lee (Lettering) Genre: Manga/Classics Rating: DNF Review: In the opening of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn we are introduced to Huck Finn in the mid 1800’s in Missouri, USA. Huck is living with a widow and her old maid friend who have taken Huck in away from his father. Huck is a very smart boy as he hides his money with a friend after his father comes snooping around. While people protect him, his father kidnaps him and holds him prisoner beating him on a regular basis. After a while Huck has had enough and fakes his death and sets off in a boat down the river, but along the way he bumps into his friend Jim and black man who worked for the widow he lived with. As we approach the ¼ mark in the novel, Huck and Jim travel together as both have run away for different reasons, but a prank gone wrong sees Jim bitten by a rattlesnake and it takes him 4 days to recover. In order to get more food and information Huck disguises himself as a girl and heads into the town before they set off in their raft again. He learns that Jim has been named as his murderer as he ran away the night that Huck faked his death and he can’t come out and clear his friend’s name as it would give away his whole plan of running away and starting a new life. Shortly before the halfway mark I had to unfortunately DNF this manga classics. I didn’t want to do it as I was enjoying the art style, but I couldn’t follow the story at all, it was all over the place and it seems liked nothing was happening. This is probably due to the source material, but the style of language used throughout the novel and the use of derogatory terms really put me off. While I recommend all the other manga classics published by Udon Entertainment I really didn’t like this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joana Bookneeders

    * Received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you very much! This doesn’t affect the review in any way. My opinions are, as always, my own.* 3.5 stars I was really excited for this book since I've never read the original classic but I've always wanted. I can't say this is one of my favorite manga classics. But it's a pretty good one nonetheless. It talks about racism, feuding families, abuse, alcoholism, friendship, etc. It's quite a full novel and a * Received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you very much! This doesn’t affect the review in any way. My opinions are, as always, my own.* 3.5 stars I was really excited for this book since I've never read the original classic but I've always wanted. I can't say this is one of my favorite manga classics. But it's a pretty good one nonetheless. It talks about racism, feuding families, abuse, alcoholism, friendship, etc. It's quite a full novel and an interesting one. Some parts are more interesting than others but all of them talk about important matters. I really liked the story for how fun yet heartbreaking it is. The best part for me was the humor. Now, I don't know how humouristic is the original one, but if it is something like this, I will definitely enjoy it.  I loved all the adventures and how ridiculous some moments were. There are all types of persons in this book, but my favorite was Jim! Some characters really made me mad although they were ridiculous... But Jim is such a precious character! I really liked Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer, especially together! They are just so spirited and strong boys always trying to do the right thing. But what is the right thing? That's what a lot of the book is about. It has a lot of racism and Huckleberry Finn didn't know what he should do. Should he help Jim or not? Black people were supposed to be slaves and not friends. So the right thing would be to enslave them, or in case of a runaway, take them to their owner. And so, he decided to do the wrong thing and free him. It was really interesting seeing him trying to see what is the right thing to do and what he actually did.  The adventures were quite funny and interesting and the art only made everything better. Things happen quite quickly so I definitely want to read the original classic. But it was overall a very expressive, fun and important novel about racism - in a lovely format if you enjoy manga!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Soobie's scared

    Well, this has been extremely difficult to finish! The adaptor chose to maintain the different dialects Mark Twain used in the original book and from an Italian point of view that was hard to read. When it was Jim's turn to speak... Oh my... I mean, it took me almost 120 pages to understand that gwyne meant going. Funny that they chose to maintain the N-word all over the place but they eliminate every mentions of Huck smoking. It seems weird. I mean, in the afterword Crystal Chan writes: «I believ Well, this has been extremely difficult to finish! The adaptor chose to maintain the different dialects Mark Twain used in the original book and from an Italian point of view that was hard to read. When it was Jim's turn to speak... Oh my... I mean, it took me almost 120 pages to understand that gwyne meant going. Funny that they chose to maintain the N-word all over the place but they eliminate every mentions of Huck smoking. It seems weird. I mean, in the afterword Crystal Chan writes: «I believe it's clear now how hard I worked to keep the plot intact, but there's one detail that was omitted. In the original book Huck often smoked tobacco and would go ashore to buy it; this bad habit showing to strengthened Huck's image as a bad kid. He doesn't smoke in the MANGA CLASSICS adaptation because we don't want to encourage this harmful habits!OK, I can agree with that... But it's still a novel written in 1884 depicting a Southern antebellum society. If people could use the N-word back then, they could smoke as well. By the way, after a couple of years in which smoking was completely banned from TV series and movie, if you pay attention, you'll notice that nowadays smoking is cool again. Apart from that, I found the story a bit confusing. Or maybe I didn't get the satire. Unfortunately, I've never read the original novel; probably this matters somehow. I don't know, the adaptation is wonderful as usual. The art is perfect and I love it. Maybe it's all about the original novel. Anyway, this is the weakest Manga Classics I've read so far. I'll probably read the Tom Sawyer one, when it comes out. And they are planning d to adapt both Hamlet and Romeo & Juliet. I'm extremely curious about this titles. The Manga Shakespeare adaptation I've been reading weren't that good, despite using the original lines by Shakespeare.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nana Spark

    I really enjoyed this one. The art is very good and has a great deal of emotion to it. The characters are very colorful, especially Huck and seeing the world through a 14 year old boy's eyes during the 1800s was very interesting. At times, it was absolutely hilarious. However, since the original novel was published in the 1800s as well, the multiple dialects used are, at times, very hard to understand. I had to re-read some speech bubbles multiple times just to understand what the character was I really enjoyed this one. The art is very good and has a great deal of emotion to it. The characters are very colorful, especially Huck and seeing the world through a 14 year old boy's eyes during the 1800s was very interesting. At times, it was absolutely hilarious. However, since the original novel was published in the 1800s as well, the multiple dialects used are, at times, very hard to understand. I had to re-read some speech bubbles multiple times just to understand what the character was trying to say. All in all, the story was fun, a bit dark at times, and we'll worth a read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Peachy

    "Because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog." Themes: slavery, racism, adventures, mischief, family rivalries, religion, morality, childhood, growing up, friendships I've always loved manga and I've always loved classics. So to be able to read a combination of both is such an incredible experience. My first pick is Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. I used to watch the animated Tom Sawyer series when I was young and of course, as is usual, I loved our m "Because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog." Themes: slavery, racism, adventures, mischief, family rivalries, religion, morality, childhood, growing up, friendships I've always loved manga and I've always loved classics. So to be able to read a combination of both is such an incredible experience. My first pick is Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. I used to watch the animated Tom Sawyer series when I was young and of course, as is usual, I loved our main character, Tom Sawyer. When I read the original classic, Huck Finn’s story resonated with me a lot more than Tom Sawyer’s – maybe because unlike Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn wasn’t privileged and educated enough to conform with society’s norms, and that in turn, gave him freedom to make decisions based on his own concepts of morality. I don’t know – there’s something about Huck Finn’s character that is undeniably charming and charismatic and appealing. And for Huck Finn’s character to come alive in Kuma Chan’s illustrations – I was overjoyed! For me, it was also important that the sensitive subjects (and sometimes, language) were retained. The authenticity of Mark Twain’s original work would have been lost otherwise. There’s also a treat for map lovers, like me – detailing Huck Finn’s journey across multiple states! Overall, I’m so impressed with the Manga Classics (I’ve also scanned some of the others, my next read is Romeo & Juliet). If I’m being honest, I will go so far as to say that I enjoyed reading this even more than I did the original classic in novel form! So, whether you like Manga or you like your classics or simply want to branch out to reading graphic novels, I think you should give this one a try! Thank you UDON Entertainment for my review copy! AMAZON ASSOCIATE LINK: Buy a copy! BLOG REVIEW: https://goo.gl/cv6nFg

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kitty Marie

    Many thanks to Udon Entertainment and Netgalley for providing an e-ARC of this title for review. Another nicely done adaptation from Manga Classics. The art style is befitting for the characters. There is a lot of charm in the rendering of Huck, Jim, and Tom. I did find Huck’s shadeless eyes a bit odd though. The direction and flow of the panels is well done and kept me into the story. There are certain dramatic and emotional moments that are conveyed well and in fitting somber ways, while the li Many thanks to Udon Entertainment and Netgalley for providing an e-ARC of this title for review. Another nicely done adaptation from Manga Classics. The art style is befitting for the characters. There is a lot of charm in the rendering of Huck, Jim, and Tom. I did find Huck’s shadeless eyes a bit odd though. The direction and flow of the panels is well done and kept me into the story. There are certain dramatic and emotional moments that are conveyed well and in fitting somber ways, while the light comedic moments are also well handled and fitting to manga stylization. There are a number of end notes from the staff that go well in explaining their methods of adaptation and how they approached certain scenes. At almost 400 pages and almost 40 chapters, they took great care in trying to keep a great deal of the story intact. The language utilized is, as customary for Manga Classics, purely faithful to the subject matter. I did grapple at times with the speech patterns of some characters and the addition of artwork assists with the context. Overall I enjoyed this one but on a subjective level, there are classics that I feel are more outstanding and show off the skill of Manga Classics adaptation abilities more readily. The Count of Monte Cristo and Les Miserables still stand out as my favorites. But for pre-existing fans of Huckleberry Finn who may have some nostalgia for the work, you wouldn’t be steering wrong in checking this out. Overall Rating – 8.5/10 Why You Should Check It Out – A charming adaptation of the original story that does well in conveying the seriousness and the humor of its source material in appropriate measure. Character designs are well thought out and match the characters, especially the main characters, nicely. Why You Might Not Like It – There are other adaptations by Manga Classics that are more enthralling choices. If you’re not a fan of Huck Finn, this adaptation probably won’t change your mind.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ...

    This is the fifth or sixth Manga Classics I have reviewed thanks to the auto approval that UDON granted me. Unfortunately this is my least favorite of those I have read. Huckleberry Finn is a book that I love. The setting on the Mississippi River is viivd. You can feel the mosquitos biting, the water rushing over your toes, and smell the fresh cut grass. Twain brought the river, the insects, the steamships into the reader's vision like you are part of the goings on. And even better are his chara This is the fifth or sixth Manga Classics I have reviewed thanks to the auto approval that UDON granted me. Unfortunately this is my least favorite of those I have read. Huckleberry Finn is a book that I love. The setting on the Mississippi River is viivd. You can feel the mosquitos biting, the water rushing over your toes, and smell the fresh cut grass. Twain brought the river, the insects, the steamships into the reader's vision like you are part of the goings on. And even better are his characters. Huck is mischievous, smart, funny, and a good friend. There is an innocence to him that lends credibility to the story. The problem with this manga version is that the art doesn't feel like it lends itself to the story or the characters. Huck looks far too mature, angry, and pessimistic. He doesn't have the same humor that Twain instilled in him. And the river doesn't come through as a viivd lifeblood of the area. The history of the place is completely lost. I will not give up on these volumes but cannot really recommend this one in particular. Thank you to Netgalley and UDON for the digital ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Madao

    I received an ARC from Netgalley for a honest review. Thanks to Netgalley, the publisher and the author for providing me the free copy of the book. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn had lots of potential, but it fell victim to bad narration and lazy artwork. This book is a sequel of Tom Sawyer, and describes the adventures of his friend Huckleberry Finn. We get to see a unique friendship blossom despite slavery between Jim, a black slave and Huck, as well as the harsh society of those times. However, I received an ARC from Netgalley for a honest review. Thanks to Netgalley, the publisher and the author for providing me the free copy of the book. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn had lots of potential, but it fell victim to bad narration and lazy artwork. This book is a sequel of Tom Sawyer, and describes the adventures of his friend Huckleberry Finn. We get to see a unique friendship blossom despite slavery between Jim, a black slave and Huck, as well as the harsh society of those times. However, instead of having actual dialogues in the story, the book just keeps yammering what happens. Despite being a graphic novel, this book tells, not shows. It makes the story less thrilling, when it actually is. Secondly, the use of accents. I understood the part of using accents to keep the story real, but there were lots of incidents when the accent became confusing and the story became difficult to understand. It would had been good if the accents were toned down a bit. Then comes the art style. There seemed to be little originality while drawing this book. The three sisters in book had too similar hairstyles,and if it weren't for their height difference, it would had been impossible to distinguish them. The backgrounds were an okay job. Overall, this book would had been good if it had taken more efforts to change the original story line into more reader-friendly.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    This manga version of Twain's masterpiece is very similar to the series' same handling of Tom Sawyer. There are places where the storyline is thin -- that is, a connectedness and causality between events aren't readily apparent -- and a knowledge of the original is necessary. And there are a couple of key scenes, such as Huck's "I'll go to hell" decision, that are muted in this version's rendering. But overall, it's an interesting adaptation. I'm particularly interested in Twain adaptations in c This manga version of Twain's masterpiece is very similar to the series' same handling of Tom Sawyer. There are places where the storyline is thin -- that is, a connectedness and causality between events aren't readily apparent -- and a knowledge of the original is necessary. And there are a couple of key scenes, such as Huck's "I'll go to hell" decision, that are muted in this version's rendering. But overall, it's an interesting adaptation. I'm particularly interested in Twain adaptations in comics, so I absolutely had to read this text.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Clark

    This continues to be a cute manga series with great character designs and attention to detail. Some details of the book are lost, but not much. Overall, a good way to explore Tom and Hucks world.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    A wonderful adaptation of Mark Twain's Adventure of Huckleberry Finn into manga form! I think the authors and illustrators did an excellent job of condensing the story into a small volume without losing the integrity or flavor of the story. I love how the various accents of the characters are preserved, but the dialogue is still clear and easily understood. The artwork brings a lot of emotion into the story, and firmly connects the reader to the characters. Seeing the expressions on character's A wonderful adaptation of Mark Twain's Adventure of Huckleberry Finn into manga form! I think the authors and illustrators did an excellent job of condensing the story into a small volume without losing the integrity or flavor of the story. I love how the various accents of the characters are preserved, but the dialogue is still clear and easily understood. The artwork brings a lot of emotion into the story, and firmly connects the reader to the characters. Seeing the expressions on character's faces as they experience joy, grief, fear, sadness, or relief, made me feel those things too as I was reading! This book, of course, deals with many difficult topics like slavery, and the skewed moral code that Huck has been exposed to. Seeing Huck grappling with his conscience, and trying to determine what is "right" is what makes this story such a classic. I thought this adaptation did a superb job of showing Huck's internal struggle between what "civilized society" tells him is right, and what his heart tells him is true and right. Beautiful manga of this favorite classic! Disclaimer: I received an ecopy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for a free and honest review. All the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts, and are not influenced by anyone.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Manga Classics: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' is an ambitious retelling of the famous book by Mark Twain. The adaptation is by Crystal Chan and the art is by Kuma Chan. After 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' Tom and Huck are flush with money. The attempts by the town folks to civilize Huck make him itch to be free. When his drunk father shows up and threatens to take all of Huck's money, he sets out to hide. Going with him is runaway slave Jim. Before long, they are heading down the Mississipp 'Manga Classics: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn' is an ambitious retelling of the famous book by Mark Twain. The adaptation is by Crystal Chan and the art is by Kuma Chan. After 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,' Tom and Huck are flush with money. The attempts by the town folks to civilize Huck make him itch to be free. When his drunk father shows up and threatens to take all of Huck's money, he sets out to hide. Going with him is runaway slave Jim. Before long, they are heading down the Mississippi river and running into all sorts of people. The book starts with an essay stating why they are using the word that usually gets this book banned. It makes a solid argument for why it belongs in this work and why it deserves discussion. I give the writers kudos for that. They lose some points with me by omitting Huck smoking. It should be included also to be discussed, but it's a smaller omission. All in all, it's another solid adaptation from Manga Classics. I received a review copy of this manga from Udon Entertainment and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this manga.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Taylor (TaysInfiniteThougts)

    I was excited about reading this book because I've never read the original classic so this was basically a new story for me. This book cover many topics, racism, friendship, abuse, etc. While some parts of the story were more interesting than others, all in all the book is good. The story is both heartbreaking and funny. The graphics are easy to follow even though there are several types of dialect throughout the book. As with most manga books, the artfully crafted graphics make the story easier I was excited about reading this book because I've never read the original classic so this was basically a new story for me. This book cover many topics, racism, friendship, abuse, etc. While some parts of the story were more interesting than others, all in all the book is good. The story is both heartbreaking and funny. The graphics are easy to follow even though there are several types of dialect throughout the book. As with most manga books, the artfully crafted graphics make the story easier to understand and imagine. With a story like this, the pictures only made the story more interesting. I look forward to reading more manga classics by Crystal Chan.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This is a rather strange story for a modern reader, because apart from the boyish mischief Huck never quite seems to grow out off, most of Huck’s adventures bring him into contact with humanity’s darker side. A drunk father who locks up and physical abuses his son, needless death and grief due to a senseless feud, frauds profiting off of gullible people to name a few things and most jarringly of all, the racism and white supremacist beliefs that were so prevalent during that time, and which are This is a rather strange story for a modern reader, because apart from the boyish mischief Huck never quite seems to grow out off, most of Huck’s adventures bring him into contact with humanity’s darker side. A drunk father who locks up and physical abuses his son, needless death and grief due to a senseless feud, frauds profiting off of gullible people to name a few things and most jarringly of all, the racism and white supremacist beliefs that were so prevalent during that time, and which are shared by our hero as well. Though his feelings towards his travel companion and runaway slave, Jim, change over the course of the book. I like that they didn’t clean up the racial slurs. Uncomfortable as it might be to read this, hiding from the truth of the original book would defeat the purpose of the author in writing it this way and how can we learn from history and literature if we censor it? Jim’s a good friend to Huck, protects and takes care of him, seemingly oblivious to or not minding the fact that Huck doesn’t think of them as being on equal footing, at least not at first. But he comes around slowly, although for a long time he feels guilty about letting Miss Watson’s “property” get away like that and initially he also believes Jim is in the wrong for wanting to free/buy his wife and children. Huck feels very conflicted about what’s right and wrong, and the pious teachings of his guardians are no help, rather the opposite even. I loved the accents, though they weren’t always as easy to decipher when English isn’t your native language. I liked that the author decided to stay so true to the original and it also helps the reader to get a feel for the period in which the story is set. The illustrations also seem to reflect that choice to be as historically correct as possible, because they are very lifelike and natural, with not that much of the more exaggerated & vivid facial expressions or more imaginatively drawn scenes we typically find in manga. To me, it felt a bit more like a regular comic, rather than a manga, though it was still a very enjoyable read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vidya Tiru

    My Thoughts My son (and I) read the original just a few weeks ago as part of his required reading for school. And reading it again in this manga version was a pleasure. With Huck, much of the original slang, spelling, and dialog is used to help with understanding life in the south at the time, as well as giving the characters their unique Twain flavor. The team of Chrystal Chan (story adaptation) and Kuma Chan (artwork) has skillfully adapted Twain’s story into the manga format, with the details i My Thoughts My son (and I) read the original just a few weeks ago as part of his required reading for school. And reading it again in this manga version was a pleasure. With Huck, much of the original slang, spelling, and dialog is used to help with understanding life in the south at the time, as well as giving the characters their unique Twain flavor. The team of Chrystal Chan (story adaptation) and Kuma Chan (artwork) has skillfully adapted Twain’s story into the manga format, with the details in the illustrations making up what gets lost in this adaptation. The creators include a foreword and explanatory at the beginning (well, the back of the book as this is manga) and a note on how the chapters from the original are organized in this adaption. Manga Moment Each book’s artwork is absolutely beautiful and the adaptation as well as the storytelling is brilliant. I love that each of them include details on the adaptation process at the end (rather the beginning) of the book which help the reader understand the choices the creators made, as well as get an insight into the process itself. These books make the classics more approachable for those who were hesitant to read them, and will definitely want them either reading more or reading the originals. And I feel either reaction from the reader is good. If a book leaves a reader wanting them to read again, then it has done its job! And these books manage to do that while leaving the reader (me included) with a blissful feeling of satisfaction of having seen and read something beautiful. I now look forward to getting the physical copies of these books (definitely the Poe one) as well as to reading more in the series. And yes, to trying to emulate the adaptations – both text and artwork – myself. Check my blog - LadyInReadWrites - for more reviews Disclaimer: Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for the digital RC of the books; these are my honest opinions after reading these books.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Littlest Bookshelf

    Written by Mark Twain in 1884, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the controversial story of Huck Finn and Jim as they sail down the Mississippi River to leave their pasts behind. This version of the story does a commendable job of maintaining the original intent of Mark Twain while adapting it to the graphic novel format. I found some of the eye dialect a little difficult to understand because of the spelling and grammar contained in the story. This style of writing isn’t unique to the manga b Written by Mark Twain in 1884, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the controversial story of Huck Finn and Jim as they sail down the Mississippi River to leave their pasts behind. This version of the story does a commendable job of maintaining the original intent of Mark Twain while adapting it to the graphic novel format. I found some of the eye dialect a little difficult to understand because of the spelling and grammar contained in the story. This style of writing isn’t unique to the manga but still makes it more challenging to read than other stories in the Manga Classics collection. Reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as a manga is a great way to experience the story. Whether you’ve read it before, or are getting into classics for the first time, the paneled format brings the world to life in a new way for readers to enjoy. The illustrations in this adaptation are also striking, injecting some humour to the characters as they encounter new threats on the Mississippi. The manga does an excellent job of representing the black characters in the story without resorting to racist traits, an important distinction from other mangas on the market. This version of the story does censor Huck’s smoking because the creators didn’t want to promote the habit to their readers. This is a strange choice because of how faithful the adaptation is to the other aspects of the story, such as the use of outdated and offensive terminology. Overall, the Manga Classic adaptation of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a great way to experience the story. While not as easy to read as some of the other stories in the manga series, this version has plenty to offer interested readers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    zapkode

    {My thoughts} – I remember having to read the original of this story in the 8th grade. It was a required reading in my class at the time. I remember re-reading the first chapter of and over because I was struggling with the way in which it had been written. I didn’t do very well on any of the quizzes that we had been given on that book, I had barely understood it. I really enjoyed reading this book. The text and the images go together nicely. They help the reader to better understand the story an {My thoughts} – I remember having to read the original of this story in the 8th grade. It was a required reading in my class at the time. I remember re-reading the first chapter of and over because I was struggling with the way in which it had been written. I didn’t do very well on any of the quizzes that we had been given on that book, I had barely understood it. I really enjoyed reading this book. The text and the images go together nicely. They help the reader to better understand the story and what is taking place. I think the the images are a nice touch. I didn’t fully understand this book when I’d read it in school, but thanks to this version of the book, I have a clear understanding of the story that Mark Twain was trying to convey to his readers. I think that this book should be offered as an alternate reading for children that may struggle with the original book. I think that this book has the potential to help children better understand the reading material. I also think that turning the classics into Manga is a great way to get more children interested in reading them. This particular book covers so many different topics that are universal even in today’s modern world. Friendship, adventure, abusive parents, children’s imagination, running away, fear of one’s life, bad language – all these things happen in today’s world. I really like how the classic story was brought to life. I like how it helps to show children that many of the issues they are dealing with today, were current issues back when the original book was written. This is a definite must read book for anyone that enjoys the classics, is interested in reading the classics, or is just trying to kill some time with a new book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Monica Reents

    Thank you to NetGalley and UDON Entertainment for approving my request to read and review The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Manga Classics) by Mark Twain. As someone who read this story as a child, I was interested in reading it as a Manga and seeing how the artwork would depict this classic tale. This isn't the first classic tale I have requested from UDON, and it probably won't be the last. I enjoy seeing the artwork styles used for stories I loved as a child. I felt the story was still enjoy Thank you to NetGalley and UDON Entertainment for approving my request to read and review The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Manga Classics) by Mark Twain. As someone who read this story as a child, I was interested in reading it as a Manga and seeing how the artwork would depict this classic tale. This isn't the first classic tale I have requested from UDON, and it probably won't be the last. I enjoy seeing the artwork styles used for stories I loved as a child. I felt the story was still enjoyable to read; I was happy that the text hadn't been altered for the format. It is the original story with the addition of beautiful artwork. This format adds an interest that will attract/introduce young readers to classics. Honestly, these Manga Classics are my first introduction to reading Mangas. I'm not sure that I can say I enjoy reading them on my phone, the effort needed to constantly scan/scroll/enlarge/etc.. to read each section takes away from the experience (for me). I will read the others on my laptop. Overall, the story moved along easily, taking me back in Mississippi with Huck and friends as they embarked on their adventures. If you enjoy these classic stories, reading them as a Manga is a fun experience and allows a bit of a different (visual) take on the story. If you have never read the classics, or are interested in where to begin, this might be a great way to introduce yourself. These stories are timeless and I think everyone should give them a try. Highly recommend!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yakira Goldsberry

    What an adventure! Diving into Manga Classics: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was like taking a trip back into the past, reminding me of lazy summer days reading books under the bright sun, or under the shade of a tree that lined the driveway. It left me feeling somewhat nostalgic for my adventurous childhood. The drawings were amusing to look at, especially the comical ones. And I liked how when it came to touchier subjects, the artist softened the events to make the illustrations more child-fr What an adventure! Diving into Manga Classics: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was like taking a trip back into the past, reminding me of lazy summer days reading books under the bright sun, or under the shade of a tree that lined the driveway. It left me feeling somewhat nostalgic for my adventurous childhood. The drawings were amusing to look at, especially the comical ones. And I liked how when it came to touchier subjects, the artist softened the events to make the illustrations more child-friendly. Huck and Jim are a lovable duo, and it warmed my heart every time Huck remained loyal to his friend instead of turning him in. It was sad that he thought that sending Jim back into slavery was the “moral” thing to do, especially when the Bible clearly condones slavery. But it did add a nice touch of character development. The arrival of Tom Sawyer made things a whole lot more interesting, as Huck’s friend blazed across the pages in a fit of passion and imagination. The whole story tells the tale of boyhood freedom and adventure. Overall, Manga Classics: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was a fun read, and is perfect for anyone who enjoys action adventure, and tales with child protagonists. NOTE: I received an ARC copy from the publisher through NetGalley for review purposes only. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn

    * Received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.* This manga is based on the classic The adventures of Huckleberry Finn. I’ve never read the original story, so I was quite excited to start reading this manga. In the beginning of this book ‘Huck’ lives with a widow, who tries to raise him. After a while his father comes back to town, and isn’t happy with the way he is being raised. So his father kidnaps his son, ‘Huck’ doesn’t like this, so he acts like he is * Received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.* This manga is based on the classic The adventures of Huckleberry Finn. I’ve never read the original story, so I was quite excited to start reading this manga. In the beginning of this book ‘Huck’ lives with a widow, who tries to raise him. After a while his father comes back to town, and isn’t happy with the way he is being raised. So his father kidnaps his son, ‘Huck’ doesn’t like this, so he acts like he is being murdered. This story tells the adventures he gets himself into after this. I thought it would be a really original way to read the story, and it definitely was. Unfortunately, it wasn’t as good as I expected beforehand. It started great, with the introducing of the main characters. But at a certain point the story became really confusing, I didn’t get where they were or how they got there, and then when I found at what was happening I enjoyed the story, but shortly after a new adventure would begin and I again needed to start find out where they were. Also, some of the characters really looked alike so it was hard to remember who was who. I did really enjoy the artwork in this manga.

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