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In his last years as president of the United States, an embattled George Washington yearned for a time when his nation would have "the strength of a Giant and there will be none who can make us afraid." At the turn of the twentieth century, the United States seemed poised to achieve a position of world power beyond what even Washington could have imagined. In The American C In his last years as president of the United States, an embattled George Washington yearned for a time when his nation would have "the strength of a Giant and there will be none who can make us afraid." At the turn of the twentieth century, the United States seemed poised to achieve a position of world power beyond what even Washington could have imagined. In The American Century and Beyond: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1893-2014, the second volume of a new split paperback edition of the award-winning From Colony to Superpower, George C. Herring recounts the rise of the United States from the dawn of what came to be known as the American Century. This fast-paced narrative tells a story of stunning successes and tragic failures, illuminating the central importance of foreign relations to the existence and survival of the nation. Herring shows how policymakers defined American interests broadly to include territorial expansion, access to growing markets, and the spread of the "American way of life." He recounts the United States' domination of the Caribbean and Pacific, its decisive involvement in two world wars, and the eventual victory in the half-century Cold War that left it, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the world's lone superpower. But the unipolar moment turned out to be stunningly brief. Since the turn of the twenty-first century, conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq and the emergence of nations such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China have left the United States in a position that is uncertain at best. A new chapter brings Herring's sweeping narrative up through the Global War on Terror to the present.


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In his last years as president of the United States, an embattled George Washington yearned for a time when his nation would have "the strength of a Giant and there will be none who can make us afraid." At the turn of the twentieth century, the United States seemed poised to achieve a position of world power beyond what even Washington could have imagined. In The American C In his last years as president of the United States, an embattled George Washington yearned for a time when his nation would have "the strength of a Giant and there will be none who can make us afraid." At the turn of the twentieth century, the United States seemed poised to achieve a position of world power beyond what even Washington could have imagined. In The American Century and Beyond: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1893-2014, the second volume of a new split paperback edition of the award-winning From Colony to Superpower, George C. Herring recounts the rise of the United States from the dawn of what came to be known as the American Century. This fast-paced narrative tells a story of stunning successes and tragic failures, illuminating the central importance of foreign relations to the existence and survival of the nation. Herring shows how policymakers defined American interests broadly to include territorial expansion, access to growing markets, and the spread of the "American way of life." He recounts the United States' domination of the Caribbean and Pacific, its decisive involvement in two world wars, and the eventual victory in the half-century Cold War that left it, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the world's lone superpower. But the unipolar moment turned out to be stunningly brief. Since the turn of the twenty-first century, conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq and the emergence of nations such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China have left the United States in a position that is uncertain at best. A new chapter brings Herring's sweeping narrative up through the Global War on Terror to the present.

30 review for The American Century and Beyond: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1893-2014 (Oxford History of the United States)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian Hutzell

    Like the other volumes in the Oxford History of the United States, this book is engaging and informative. Unfortunately, it contains some editorial errors that are impossible to ignore. Most inexplicable is the entirely unnecessary three chapter overlap with the previous volume, Years of Peril & Ambition. There are also incorrectly labelled photos in both volumes, and some comically bad hyphenation such as “pla-nning” (p. 282), “inte-rAmerican” (p. 548), and “twel-vethousand” (p. 589). Like the other volumes in the Oxford History of the United States, this book is engaging and informative. Unfortunately, it contains some editorial errors that are impossible to ignore. Most inexplicable is the entirely unnecessary three chapter overlap with the previous volume, Years of Peril & Ambition. There are also incorrectly labelled photos in both volumes, and some comically bad hyphenation such as “pla-nning” (p. 282), “inte-rAmerican” (p. 548), and “twel-vethousand” (p. 589).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    A necessary summary for anyone taking International Relations, History or Politics seriously. Like most books rushing through numerous major events (ex Spanish War, Panama Canal, WWI and II, forming UN, Cold War hot points, Vietnam era) it of course often feels rushed. Fortunately, the core facts are there and told with good clarity, so you will come away with something for each period. One weakness is the author is clearly just summarizing what the most popular writers have agreed what the 'narr A necessary summary for anyone taking International Relations, History or Politics seriously. Like most books rushing through numerous major events (ex Spanish War, Panama Canal, WWI and II, forming UN, Cold War hot points, Vietnam era) it of course often feels rushed. Fortunately, the core facts are there and told with good clarity, so you will come away with something for each period. One weakness is the author is clearly just summarizing what the most popular writers have agreed what the 'narrative' leaving the areas where the author is most deficient of knowledge to be obvious. Some of the strongest areas were (not too surprisingly) the Kennedy and Nixon presidencies, and the Iraq War. Everything through WWI is very rushed, but interesting if you don't know much to begin with. The author offers little for WWII, keeping the focus on the much longer and more significant Cold War decades.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Herring's work is unique so far in the Oxford History of the Unite States for its broad time-period and focused interest in one sphere. While this book is not fully satisfying in balancing out the complexity of individual events, it provides a great rough outline of over one-hundred years of foreign relations. This is my second favorite book in the series that I've read after White's tremendous "The Republic for Which it Stands."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Claire Webb

    I learned so much from this book! However, the author frequently expressed his opinions as historical facts, which bothered me and made me feel like I was learning only one man’s view. I know true objectivity is impossible, but it would’ve been nice to at least read some opposing opinions!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    This was a great read and I learned a lot. This is an essential for history majors.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terry Tucker

    A Survey Although this book is packed with detail, it is so as a result of the authors extensive use of secondary sources. I was also very bored with the writing style by chapter 3. I struggled to finish the book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lori May

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chris Willms

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joe Trigg

  11. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Kniphfer

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emrys

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  14. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brad Hampton

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo Fernandez

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tom Agnew

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Fawcett

  20. 4 out of 5

    Adeyinka Makinde

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Frago

  22. 5 out of 5

    Arieh Sclar

  23. 5 out of 5

    Prentice Sargeant

  24. 5 out of 5

    Connor Brady

  25. 5 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bradley Cortright

  27. 5 out of 5

    Agustin Gonzalez

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bert Maxwell

  30. 4 out of 5

    Richard Womack

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