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Seven Days a Week: Women and Domestic Service in Industrializing America

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34 review for Seven Days a Week: Women and Domestic Service in Industrializing America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Bakk-Hansen

    Very academic, explains a whole lot about what domestic workers in the US went through, and what the work was like.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Katzman gives readers a detailed stufy into the lives of American servants at the turn of the century, when anyone who was anyone employed themselves a maid of all work to assist with the keeping of houses. I loved hearing the first hand accounts of women who were maids at one time, why they left it, and just how time consuming and back breaking this work really was for women back before the conviences of swifters and vaccuum cleaners. What I did not like about this book was that at times it was Katzman gives readers a detailed stufy into the lives of American servants at the turn of the century, when anyone who was anyone employed themselves a maid of all work to assist with the keeping of houses. I loved hearing the first hand accounts of women who were maids at one time, why they left it, and just how time consuming and back breaking this work really was for women back before the conviences of swifters and vaccuum cleaners. What I did not like about this book was that at times it was too general, lumping it all together.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark Bowles

    David Katzman, Seven Days a Week; Women and Domestic Service in Industrializing America (1988) 1. On the whole domestic servants were paid more (room and board) than other non-skilled jobs yet their job was only temporary and held low status 2. Based on primary sources such as domestic servants diaries

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Although this is an older book, it is still useful. The author looks at domestic service (both employers and employees) from 1870-1820. Because this is a time of rapid industrialization, other occupations were opening to women, leading to an end to live-in work.

  5. 5 out of 5

    C.

    Borderline four stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Wilkins

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fred

  10. 5 out of 5

    Janet Squires

  11. 4 out of 5

    Evelyn

  12. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anne

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emily Rebmann

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  17. 5 out of 5

    Timmothy J.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Candace

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anna Citrino

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nate

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Annette

  26. 4 out of 5

    Evah Njeri

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vera Vera

  28. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  29. 4 out of 5

    A S

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katy

  31. 5 out of 5

    Michele Davis

  32. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  33. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

  34. 5 out of 5

    Sean

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