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Till Death Us Do Part: A True Murder Mystery

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On December 11, 1966, a mysterious assassin shot Henry Stockton to death, set his house on fire, and left the scene without a trace. A year later, when a woman was found brutally killed, shreds of evidence suggested a connection between the two murders. In the Palliko-Stockton trial, prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi offered a brilliant summation that synthesized for the jury the On December 11, 1966, a mysterious assassin shot Henry Stockton to death, set his house on fire, and left the scene without a trace. A year later, when a woman was found brutally killed, shreds of evidence suggested a connection between the two murders. In the Palliko-Stockton trial, prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi offered a brilliant summation that synthesized for the jury the many inferences and shades of meaning in the testimony, fitting all the pieces together in a mosaic of guilt. But will the jury be persuaded?


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On December 11, 1966, a mysterious assassin shot Henry Stockton to death, set his house on fire, and left the scene without a trace. A year later, when a woman was found brutally killed, shreds of evidence suggested a connection between the two murders. In the Palliko-Stockton trial, prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi offered a brilliant summation that synthesized for the jury the On December 11, 1966, a mysterious assassin shot Henry Stockton to death, set his house on fire, and left the scene without a trace. A year later, when a woman was found brutally killed, shreds of evidence suggested a connection between the two murders. In the Palliko-Stockton trial, prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi offered a brilliant summation that synthesized for the jury the many inferences and shades of meaning in the testimony, fitting all the pieces together in a mosaic of guilt. But will the jury be persuaded?

30 review for Till Death Us Do Part: A True Murder Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    Bugliosi was the brilliant prosecutor in the Charles Manson case. His book of that case called Helter Skelter is riveting. And the Sea Will Tell is also by him and describes a case in which he worked to convict the man in the case, while setting his girlfriend free, the female half of the couple all the time in her own idiotic way setting up impediments to her own defense. He is dogged and determined to put murderers behind bars. I found this book less interesting than the others, but still very Bugliosi was the brilliant prosecutor in the Charles Manson case. His book of that case called Helter Skelter is riveting. And the Sea Will Tell is also by him and describes a case in which he worked to convict the man in the case, while setting his girlfriend free, the female half of the couple all the time in her own idiotic way setting up impediments to her own defense. He is dogged and determined to put murderers behind bars. I found this book less interesting than the others, but still very good. If you are studying to be a trial lawyer this is the book for you, as the second half of the book is devoted to the trial and describes Bugliosi's method of working.

  2. 5 out of 5

    ♥ Marlene♥

    Finished this morning and just want to say that this is a great book. This has been on my shelf for at least 10 years and do not ask me why. No idea why I did not pick it up to read sooner. So glad I read this cause it was well written. (I feel sorry for the author because I only know Vincent Buglosi wrote it but I assume he told it and the real author wrote it? Highly recommend this old fashioned good true crime book but you have probably already read it ages ago. ;). 4.5 stars

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Kubes

    From the POV of a prosecutor, Till Death Us Do Part comes from a different perspective. Here, I was reading about a prosecutor’s predicament of trying to convict defendants he knows are guilty but has insufficient evidence to convict in the face of double jeopardy concerns (which leads to the 3 problems above)…and I LOVED IT! Reading this was like smut for me: quick read, dirty true crime, and embarrassing because of the contrary viewpoint. The facts involved a double-murder in L.A. in the 1960s. From the POV of a prosecutor, Till Death Us Do Part comes from a different perspective. Here, I was reading about a prosecutor’s predicament of trying to convict defendants he knows are guilty but has insufficient evidence to convict in the face of double jeopardy concerns (which leads to the 3 problems above)…and I LOVED IT! Reading this was like smut for me: quick read, dirty true crime, and embarrassing because of the contrary viewpoint. The facts involved a double-murder in L.A. in the 1960s. With Part 1, we have the omnisciently told story of what happened, which leads into Part 2, the trial of the perps by the author, Bugliosi. The transition from Part 1 to 2 is phenomenal: “From there [the police] walked down the hallway and appeared at the doorway of my office. Having to be in court in a few minutes, I was finishing a cup of coffee with one hand and rifling through the morning sports page with the other. My name is Vince Bugliosi.” Part 2 was such a humane glimpse into the prosecution trial prep process: Bugliosi considered the families of the defendants he was trying to place in jail/kill via capital punishment; doubted himself and whether he had enough evidence to go forward; and facts and theories changed perpetually throughout the THIRTEEN WEEK trial. The excerpts of cross-examination and closing arguments were absolutely exhilarating, and the “octopus inkbag” metaphor was brilliance. Bugliosi was a moving trial lawyer, cunning & charming, and he also wrote many other books that I’d love to read & agree with…like Helter Skelter (on his prosecution of Charles Manson), and The Prosecution of George W. Bush for Murder (accountability re murder of U.S. soldiers in Iraq), Outrage (on insanity of O.J. Simpson acquittal), and Divinity of Doubt (on agnosticism). Although his latest book, Reclaiming History, makes me a little concerned, as does this interview: http://www.colbertnation.com/the-colb.... Overall...don’t judge a book/prosecutor by his cover, ha.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    I do not believe I would make a very good lawyer, or a very good juror for that matter. At the risk of sounding conceited, I *do* make a very good reader, so you can believe me when I say this book deserves five stars. Bugliosi's trial narrative reads like fiction, and his ethical, just persona shines through this otherwise bleak tale. I've admired Bugliosi ever since I completed my study of the O.J. Simpson trial, and would recommend his books to anyone. Despite being a "true crime" book, or pe I do not believe I would make a very good lawyer, or a very good juror for that matter. At the risk of sounding conceited, I *do* make a very good reader, so you can believe me when I say this book deserves five stars. Bugliosi's trial narrative reads like fiction, and his ethical, just persona shines through this otherwise bleak tale. I've admired Bugliosi ever since I completed my study of the O.J. Simpson trial, and would recommend his books to anyone. Despite being a "true crime" book, or perhaps because of it, the emotional post-verdict culmination is something I find especially dear considering the particularly violent times in which we find ourselves today. Bugliosi's defense of the death penalty is especially insightful, and it is a power he does not wield lightly. I was sorry to discover that he passed away in 2015 - you were a good man, Vince.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susan Liston

    I read this many years ago, and recalled that I found it intriguing and somewhat creepy, but didn't remember many details. That's pretty much what I thought this time around. Bugliosi details how he constructed his prosecution, which was purely circumstantial, and it's pretty interesting. One thing I didn't remember is scratching my head over someone going to all the "trouble" if that's the word, of plotting and committing a murder for money and then blowing so much of it on one trip to Vegas of I read this many years ago, and recalled that I found it intriguing and somewhat creepy, but didn't remember many details. That's pretty much what I thought this time around. Bugliosi details how he constructed his prosecution, which was purely circumstantial, and it's pretty interesting. One thing I didn't remember is scratching my head over someone going to all the "trouble" if that's the word, of plotting and committing a murder for money and then blowing so much of it on one trip to Vegas of all stupid places. Oh well. Although I don't know why I would be expecting logic from psychopaths.....

  6. 4 out of 5

    TXGAL1

    This is the third book written by Bugliosi that I have read. Not only is he an exceptional author, he is the best District Attorney that Los Angeles ever had. If you are a fan of True Crime, please add Vincent Bugliosi to your reading list. His cases are fascinating and his prosecution of them legendary.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Helen Robare

    I like true crime. I love sensational true crime even better. I like books about true crime written by authors who know what they're talking about. With this book, 2 out of 3 ain't bad. It is true crime and it is written by someone who knows his way around a courtroom very well, the attorney Vincent Bugliosi. What this book does not have is a media-hyped sensational crime. This book doesn't deal with a serial killer per se. It doesn't deal with a serial rapist. Instead, it deals with a rather or I like true crime. I love sensational true crime even better. I like books about true crime written by authors who know what they're talking about. With this book, 2 out of 3 ain't bad. It is true crime and it is written by someone who knows his way around a courtroom very well, the attorney Vincent Bugliosi. What this book does not have is a media-hyped sensational crime. This book doesn't deal with a serial killer per se. It doesn't deal with a serial rapist. Instead, it deals with a rather ordinary citizen that blended into the framework if he hadn't decided to murder his lovers husband and his own wife. What was interesting about this book is that the case was based on circumstantial evidence and no real hard facts. Still, Mr. Bugliosi manages to convince the reader that the man on trial for killing two people was guilty. While it was a good book, it was not a great book. It was slow going in some parts and the courtroom drama at times got way too technical so if you don't like your true crime books with every detail and information written out, I would not suggest you read this book as an introduction to Mr. Bugliosi's books.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jill Hutchinson

    Vincent Bugliosi made he fame as the LA prosecutor during the Charles Manson trial and went on to write the best seller Helter Skelter about those heinous murders. In this book, again he is prosecuting a murder...in fact a double murder.....and from the beginning, it doesn't appear that the State has a very strong case. It is all circumstantial and some of the witnesses for the prosecution don't appear to be very dependable. A man is shot several time in the head and his home is set on fire. Six Vincent Bugliosi made he fame as the LA prosecutor during the Charles Manson trial and went on to write the best seller Helter Skelter about those heinous murders. In this book, again he is prosecuting a murder...in fact a double murder.....and from the beginning, it doesn't appear that the State has a very strong case. It is all circumstantial and some of the witnesses for the prosecution don't appear to be very dependable. A man is shot several time in the head and his home is set on fire. Sixteen months later a young woman is also shot through the head while exiting her car. These murders appear unrelated but shreds of evidence begin to come together which prove that there may be a conspiracy afoot. I particularly liked the second part of the book which concentrated on the trial itself and the author explains for the layman, the more complex rules of evidence and that trials never reflect the on-the-stand "I did it" confession of the Perry Mason series. Well written and intriguing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    From the author and prosecutor of Helter Skelter(Charles Manson), is another true crime book where he was the L.A. prosecutor for two conspirators of murder. The crimes took place in the late 60's. L.A. was a different place than it is now. The book was written in the 70's and made into a movie in the early 90's. Bugliosi is quite a famous prosecutor and has a great memory for telling a fascinating murder story of 2 cold blooded and greedy killers. I found the book hard to put down, even though From the author and prosecutor of Helter Skelter(Charles Manson), is another true crime book where he was the L.A. prosecutor for two conspirators of murder. The crimes took place in the late 60's. L.A. was a different place than it is now. The book was written in the 70's and made into a movie in the early 90's. Bugliosi is quite a famous prosecutor and has a great memory for telling a fascinating murder story of 2 cold blooded and greedy killers. I found the book hard to put down, even though the story happened many years ago. It was recommended by Ann, a coworker of mine.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    Based on a true story, Till Death Us Do Part is a very compelling read. If you like crime stories, this is definitely one for you. Bugliosi has a way of writing that makes you walk away feeling as though you actually knew all of the characters personally. I found it very easy to get involved with the storyline and when it ended I was disappointed and have made it a point to read more books by Bugliosi now that I am finished with law school.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Greer

    "guns don't kill people, but Alan Palliko enjoys doing so" Bugliosi, despite being a high-powered attorney, was an excellent writer. It's a pleasure to read through the wisdom and insight the author brought to the prosecution of two losers, Alan Palliko and Sandra Stockton. Incredible really. It's simply hard to imagine people so depraved and psychologically aberrant; I keep reminding myself that Bugliosi spent his professional life trying to make sense of such people. I haven't done that so I ha "guns don't kill people, but Alan Palliko enjoys doing so" Bugliosi, despite being a high-powered attorney, was an excellent writer. It's a pleasure to read through the wisdom and insight the author brought to the prosecution of two losers, Alan Palliko and Sandra Stockton. Incredible really. It's simply hard to imagine people so depraved and psychologically aberrant; I keep reminding myself that Bugliosi spent his professional life trying to make sense of such people. I haven't done that so I have to look up to Bugliosi and his descriptive powers, otherwise these imbeciles would be only works of fiction. But, sadly, they are all too real. The way into the psyche of Alan Palliko, should you ever wish to visit that collection of refuse, is through the female connections. I focus on these four: Katherine Drummond: this woman was down-to-earth, "unadorned" and "typical" American woman. She was from Dearborn, Michigan and moved to Los Angeles in the sixties for some personal development. She was attractive, but for all that, romantic prospects were not forthcoming. Lonely, she reached out to Alan. A big mistake. Someone Alan's self-importance must have attracted her due to her low self-esteem; such people see little reason to admire themselves so they are surprised to find someone who thinks highly of himself or herself. Drummond, believe it or not, was actually impressed by the fraternity system at USC. Poor girl(((( Sandra Stockton: Sandra is a turn off right away because of her weight, but many men were attracted to her fine facial features and skin tone. Sandra met Alan while working for the Automobile Club of Southern California. One reason I find her interesting is that she grew up in Downey, was familiar with South Gate and probably Maywood/Huntington Park. Readers rarely have a chance to explore these unflattering venues in literature. Bugliosi, if for no other reason, was able to uncover what goes on in these places that as Chris Darden remarked at "dumps" but densely populated dumps. Debbi Simmons: Bugliosi writes, "Almost all of Alan's dates were striking, but Debbi was extraordinary. A complexion out of a Swedish travel brochure and flowing blond hair down to the bottom that would make burlap cling-one hundred and twenty pounds of impeccably distributed woman on a five feet, seven inch frame." Sounds like a man admiring the latest automobile import. The wonderful thing about this woman is that Alan thought she ought to be drugged and tossed off his apartment balcony; or so he said, when Michael and Debbi lied to him for the sake of some money. Judy Davis: I have the most sympathy for this character because she actually had something going for herself. She might have been able to make a life for herself with the talent and energy she was blessed with. Instead her skull was banished in with a revolver that Alan demanded she keep in her purse. Don't get me wrong. I would never have found Judy the woman of my dreams, but she had something the others were missing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Craig Adamson

    I found this book at the bookstore and since I already read Helter Skelter (the audiobook) and enjoyed it so much I decided to grab this one and read it. Bugliosi is a very interesting person in the sense that he is so detail-oriented I almost can’t imagine him in any other role than as an attorney. He obviously takes his job very very seriously which is what you would want if you were a taxpayer in the state of California or if you were your defense attorney. I decided to give this book a four s I found this book at the bookstore and since I already read Helter Skelter (the audiobook) and enjoyed it so much I decided to grab this one and read it. Bugliosi is a very interesting person in the sense that he is so detail-oriented I almost can’t imagine him in any other role than as an attorney. He obviously takes his job very very seriously which is what you would want if you were a taxpayer in the state of California or if you were your defense attorney. I decided to give this book a four star rating mainly due to the fact that it’s just not as compelling as helter-skelter was. And I do not mean that in any disrespectful way to the two people who were murdered nor to the woman who was married to the killer who he beat unmercifully and almost to death on a separate occasion. I just wasn’t as enamored with the story because I was unfamiliar with it and it not being a celebrated as the Manson family murders. Another reason for the four star review is the weird throwaway lines from Bugliosi related to his wife and kids. There are several times at the end of chapters where he makes mention of his family and the way that he does it makes it seem like the quart room is his first wife and everything else is a complete afterthought on his part. I hope that is not the case for his wife and kids, But I have a hard time believing as much as he works on these cases and then is able to write a book about them immediately afterwards that the guy either never sleeps or eats or sees his family and possibly all three. Again I think he’s a very talented attorney and I enjoy the books that I have read by him but I do wonder what his family does and his prolonged absences. I guess that’s a bad reason to give him a four instead of five Starreview but that’s where it is. I would certainly encourage somebody who’s interested in true crime novels to read this book. But we’ll see does a great job of introducing the cast of characters as if you’re reading a murder mystery and then brings himself in later as the prosecuting attorney to take you through the trial phase. I don’t know if this is her usual way to write this type of book, but it works well and makes the story very interesting as far as getting to know the main characters. The most difficult thing about this book and the helter-skelter book it’s just a disgusting way that human beings treat each other. I feel so bad for the families involved and obviously for the people who died because somebody else is just a rotten person.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katy Koivastik

    No detail is too small for Vincent Bugliosi when putting together a ”mosaic of guilt”, as he calls it, in a purely circumstantial case. The first part of the book introduces the perpetrators, “Alan Palliko” and “Sandra Stockton” (whose names have been changed for legal reasons), and their milieu: the sunny, swinging Southern California of the mid 1960s. We also meet the victims “Judy Palliko” and “Henry Stockton”. We learn much about the murderers’ early lives and their affair begun in their mutua No detail is too small for Vincent Bugliosi when putting together a ”mosaic of guilt”, as he calls it, in a purely circumstantial case. The first part of the book introduces the perpetrators, “Alan Palliko” and “Sandra Stockton” (whose names have been changed for legal reasons), and their milieu: the sunny, swinging Southern California of the mid 1960s. We also meet the victims “Judy Palliko” and “Henry Stockton”. We learn much about the murderers’ early lives and their affair begun in their mutual workplace, the insurance claims department of the Auto Club; the press and Mr. Bugliosi cannot help referencing the classic noir thriller “Double Indemnity”. The second part of the book is devoted to prosecuting “Alan” and “Sandra”. Mr. Bugliosi tirelessly prepares the people of California’s case, spending nights, weekends and even movies with his wife, thinking and writing. He also does much of the investigative work himself, before and during the trial. Prospective prosecutors would do well to read the penultimate chapter for what the judge told Mr. Bugliosi was one of the finest summations he had ever heard. Mr. Bugliosi considers the summation the most important part of a prosecutor’s case and therefore he begins writing it soon after getting the case. His genius is in exploding what defense counsel may not want the jury to clearly see. He never makes assumptions about what the jury knows or understands; he leaves nothing to chance. For example, he says: “I think it’s a fair inference that Alan and Sandra were boyfriend and girlfriend, that there was an emotional-physical relationship. They were having an affair. “Mr. Goldin (‘Alan’s’ attorney) had a very interesting observation. He denied any romance between Alan and Sandra. He said Sandra ‘wasn’t Alan’s type,’. He didn’t say Alan wasn’t Sandra’s type, he said Sandra wasn’t Alan’s type. “If we assume that Sandra was not Alan’s type, this all the more points to the fact that Palliko had to have had some reason other than love to romance Sandra. Some other reason, ladies and gentlemen.” Mr. Bugliosi also goes into lengthy discussions on the death penalty and the difference between innocent and not guilty. Anyone with an interest in criminal law will learn much from this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    E Wilson

    This was certainly an interesting murder case, but I don't know if it was interesting enough for a full length book. I think the first half was 3 stars and the second half covering the trial was 2 stars. It is really alarming to know there are psychopaths such as Alan Palliko who will kill for a relatively small amount of insurance money and then shop around for a wife for a second helping of insurance money. Also alarming that a women like Katherine would still have anything to do with him aft This was certainly an interesting murder case, but I don't know if it was interesting enough for a full length book. I think the first half was 3 stars and the second half covering the trial was 2 stars. It is really alarming to know there are psychopaths such as Alan Palliko who will kill for a relatively small amount of insurance money and then shop around for a wife for a second helping of insurance money. Also alarming that a women like Katherine would still have anything to do with him after he beat her almost to death. He obviously had some sort of charisma as he didn't seem to lack women who were devoted to him. Was Sandra Stockton also so cold-blooded or was she just enthralled by Alan. I suppose a little of both. After all, it was her husband they conspired to murder and I believe she remarried him after they were divorced for that purpose. The court room account was too drawn out and technical for me. A lot of the procedures that Mr. Bugliosi explained went right over my head and some seemed to fly in the face of common sense, but them I'm not a lawyer.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andee

    I very much enjoyed the first portion of the book, before the trial. Bugliosi did a terrific job of setting up the story, describing all of the various persons in great detail, as well as carefully explaining all of the evidence law enforcement was gathering. The trial, my god the trial. If ever there was a more tediously boring huge hunk of a book, I don’t know what it could be. I finally ended up skimming about 100 pages or so, until there was only about 10 pages left, basically just enough to I very much enjoyed the first portion of the book, before the trial. Bugliosi did a terrific job of setting up the story, describing all of the various persons in great detail, as well as carefully explaining all of the evidence law enforcement was gathering. The trial, my god the trial. If ever there was a more tediously boring huge hunk of a book, I don’t know what it could be. I finally ended up skimming about 100 pages or so, until there was only about 10 pages left, basically just enough to learn the verdicts and aftermath. I’ve read Helter Skelter, so I know Bugliosi is a brilliant tactician as a prosecutor as well as an outstanding writer. The way he tells a story can be absolutely masterful. But in this book, as soon as it really started to get into the real meat of the trial, it became SO painfully tedious and boring. To me, he comes across as almost condescending when it came to his need to explain every single tiny bit of courtroom procedure, and he began to sound increasingly puffed up like a peacock and very impressed with himself. In any case, no. No, I cannot possibly recommend this after having to basically skip nearly 100 PAGES of a book!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    This is a very interesting memoir, in the "true crime" genre: Two people plot to kill each other's spouses for the insurance money. The author, Vincent Bugliosi, was District Attorney in Los Angeles. In the first half of the book he gives background information about the murders. In the second half he gives a first-hand account of the trial, including his advice on the best ways to handle cross-examinations. It was all very interesting. Bugliosi was a very smart, articulate prosecutor, and an ex This is a very interesting memoir, in the "true crime" genre: Two people plot to kill each other's spouses for the insurance money. The author, Vincent Bugliosi, was District Attorney in Los Angeles. In the first half of the book he gives background information about the murders. In the second half he gives a first-hand account of the trial, including his advice on the best ways to handle cross-examinations. It was all very interesting. Bugliosi was a very smart, articulate prosecutor, and an excellent writer. Another book of Bugliosi's I highly recommend is "Helter Skelter". It covers Charles Manson's murders and trial. Bugliosi was prosecutor for Manson's trial, and his "Helter Skelter" book is one of the best ever written in this genre.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jak60

    The book has not aged well; since it was written, we’ve had John Grisham and Scott Turow - and then the myriad of followers who have contributed to the boom of the legal thriller genre. This has made us all quite familiar with the intricacies of court dramas, in a way it made us all trial lawyers. So, when Mr Bugliosi interrupts his narration (and he does that with excruciating frequency) to offer us interludes where he explains what is happening and why, well that’s a big yawn.... The prose is ra The book has not aged well; since it was written, we’ve had John Grisham and Scott Turow - and then the myriad of followers who have contributed to the boom of the legal thriller genre. This has made us all quite familiar with the intricacies of court dramas, in a way it made us all trial lawyers. So, when Mr Bugliosi interrupts his narration (and he does that with excruciating frequency) to offer us interludes where he explains what is happening and why, well that’s a big yawn.... The prose is rather dull and flat, the book is a dry account of events interrupted only by the author's pontificating about the functioning of law. The only emotion surfacing in the book is the author's self-congratulatory depiction of his smartness.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Arostegui

    Once again, Bugliosi is quite full of himself, but it is a legal thriller, in every sense of the phrase. Vincent Bugliosi tells us the story of a murdering couple and their spree to kill each other's spouses in order to collect insurance and be rid of their significant other. The names have been changed but the stories are true. I found myself skipping through a lot of the legal play by play that Bugliosi belabors in the second half of the book. It was a little bit too much "patting himself on t Once again, Bugliosi is quite full of himself, but it is a legal thriller, in every sense of the phrase. Vincent Bugliosi tells us the story of a murdering couple and their spree to kill each other's spouses in order to collect insurance and be rid of their significant other. The names have been changed but the stories are true. I found myself skipping through a lot of the legal play by play that Bugliosi belabors in the second half of the book. It was a little bit too much "patting himself on the back" for me. But the first half of the book was better than the last.

  19. 4 out of 5

    deborah eden perfidio

    I loved helter skelter and one of my favorite books of all time is And the Sea will Tell. But this one ?? It was soo dry and I don’t mind when he goes on his word for word transcripts of what he said in court but this time oh boy it just took everything I had to finish it and I did there were some really good parts but the bulk of it was a Snoozer sorry Vincent May you RIP because I think you were a great lawyer but this one just wasn’t for me

  20. 5 out of 5

    Frances

    I finally sat down to read this book after having it for years. I’ve kept it because my Grandfather played a small part in the case and it was surreal to see his name on a few pages. Aside from that, the book wasn’t written to my liking; however, it was an interesting read. I was amazed at how well the case was put together and presented in court despite the evidence. Very good on the prosecution’s part.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dana Hall

    The Judge who taught my Trial Techniques class in law school assigned this book. It's value is, it explains the California Evidence Code, and various stages of a criminal trial in an easy to read format. It also includes insights in to how a prosecutor would handle various aspects of criminal trial. Recommended for students at California Law Schools, budding prosecutors and criminal defense attorneys. Not so much for fans of true crime. The Judge who taught my Trial Techniques class in law school assigned this book. It's value is, it explains the California Evidence Code, and various stages of a criminal trial in an easy to read format. It also includes insights in to how a prosecutor would handle various aspects of criminal trial. Recommended for students at California Law Schools, budding prosecutors and criminal defense attorneys. Not so much for fans of true crime.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jaymee Splude

    I found the explanation of the legal terminology and process helpful, yet waaaay too lengthy. By the end I found myself skipping pages of trial script as i felt the only point to making it this lengthy was too show off the author's courtroom skill. BUT! I did find the story fascinating, and well written. I found the explanation of the legal terminology and process helpful, yet waaaay too lengthy. By the end I found myself skipping pages of trial script as i felt the only point to making it this lengthy was too show off the author's courtroom skill. BUT! I did find the story fascinating, and well written.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Second book by Vincent Bugliosi. The first was Helter Skelter about the Manson family which I read at least twice. This book was true crime and involved two murders. This book is about the crime, the trial and sentencing. Bugliosi so clearly explains everything and lets us in to his process for prosecuting a case, you feel like you were there with him.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    While the first half of the book was interesting, the rest of the book was a court room recap which I was not really expecting from a true crime book. Usually I only enjoy about 3-4 chapters worth of court reporting/court room drama, but this was too much for my current interests. It was written well and easy to follow, but it felt repetitive and was slow during the last half of the book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I read this book because I loved Helter Skelter, when I read it years ago. I had never heard of this true crime, and Bugliosi brings it to life. Some times when he is talking about himself it takes me away from the story. It's a good read though. If you are a true crime reader it's worth a shot I read this book because I loved Helter Skelter, when I read it years ago. I had never heard of this true crime, and Bugliosi brings it to life. Some times when he is talking about himself it takes me away from the story. It's a good read though. If you are a true crime reader it's worth a shot

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jane Thompson

    True Crime Story This is excellent book, written in the true Bugliosj style, with suspense and legal strategy thrown in. All of the author's books are good and we'll worth reading. I recommend it. True Crime Story This is excellent book, written in the true Bugliosj style, with suspense and legal strategy thrown in. All of the author's books are good and we'll worth reading. I recommend it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Peggy Otto

    First half, investigative details; second half, trial details from the author’s perspective as prosecutor—thorough and engaging. I found myself taking a reader’s role as though a juror sitting for a complex and engrossing case.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Susan McConnell

    Very interesting case. I enjoy Bugliosi’s writing style and would have given it 4 stars except he gets wordy in the trial phase. I didn’t need page after page of his trial strategy. The evidence was compelling enough....

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steve Matthews

    It’s an interesting story and gives you lots of insight into how a prosecutor views a case, presents a case and make arguments. I found the story and narrative quite interesting but also a little predictable. No doubt the author was a world-class prosecutor.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diane Waddington

    good true crime a little dry at places

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