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Good works are no longer optional. For many businesses, success comes in unexpected ways. Toms grew into a $600 million company by giving away 35 million pair of shoes. Patagonia’s profits have climbed year after year even as it funnels heavy investments into sustainability.And it’s not just millennials rewarding companies with causes. In every age group, people commit Good works are no longer optional. For many businesses, success comes in unexpected ways. Toms grew into a $600 million company by giving away 35 million pair of shoes. Patagonia’s profits have climbed year after year even as it funnels heavy investments into sustainability.And it’s not just millennials rewarding companies with causes. In every age group, people commit to brands that show good citizenship. From CVS’s destocking cigarettes to Chipotle’s ethical sourcing, people want to see fair employment practices, social responsibility, and charitable giving — and they quickly call out negligence.Based on extensive research with thousands of consumers, Do Good documents this sea change and explains how to embed social consciousness into a company’s DNA. Packed with examples and original data, the five-step model highlights the new rules of business:TRUST: Deliver on promises ● ENRICHMENT: Make daily life easier or more inspiring ● RESPONSIBILITY: Treat people and the environment with respect ● COMMUNITY: Mirror values shared by customers, employees, and partners ● CONTRIBUTION: Make a difference in the world.Buyers today demand more than half-hearted pledges. By actively linking great brands with higher purposes, companies capture both markets and hearts.


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Good works are no longer optional. For many businesses, success comes in unexpected ways. Toms grew into a $600 million company by giving away 35 million pair of shoes. Patagonia’s profits have climbed year after year even as it funnels heavy investments into sustainability.And it’s not just millennials rewarding companies with causes. In every age group, people commit Good works are no longer optional. For many businesses, success comes in unexpected ways. Toms grew into a $600 million company by giving away 35 million pair of shoes. Patagonia’s profits have climbed year after year even as it funnels heavy investments into sustainability.And it’s not just millennials rewarding companies with causes. In every age group, people commit to brands that show good citizenship. From CVS’s destocking cigarettes to Chipotle’s ethical sourcing, people want to see fair employment practices, social responsibility, and charitable giving — and they quickly call out negligence.Based on extensive research with thousands of consumers, Do Good documents this sea change and explains how to embed social consciousness into a company’s DNA. Packed with examples and original data, the five-step model highlights the new rules of business:TRUST: Deliver on promises ● ENRICHMENT: Make daily life easier or more inspiring ● RESPONSIBILITY: Treat people and the environment with respect ● COMMUNITY: Mirror values shared by customers, employees, and partners ● CONTRIBUTION: Make a difference in the world.Buyers today demand more than half-hearted pledges. By actively linking great brands with higher purposes, companies capture both markets and hearts.

46 review for Do Good: Embracing Brand Citizenship to Fuel Both Purpose and Profit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    The behavior of corporations falls along a spectrum anchored on the ends by those driven only by the numbers for the current or next quarter on one end and by companies that factor in the overall role they play in society on the other. This book concentrates on the organizations that fall on the end of accepting social responsibility. The most impressive point made in the book is on page 31, a famous quote of economist Milton Friedman. Hard-core believers in capitalist free markets regularly c The behavior of corporations falls along a spectrum anchored on the ends by those driven only by the numbers for the current or next quarter on one end and by companies that factor in the overall role they play in society on the other. This book concentrates on the organizations that fall on the end of accepting social responsibility. The most impressive point made in the book is on page 31, a famous quote of economist Milton Friedman. Hard-core believers in capitalist free markets regularly cite the opening of the quote, “In a free enterprise, private-property system, a corporate executive is an employee of the owners of the business. He has direct responsibility to his employers. That responsibility is to conduct the business in accordance with their desires, which generally will be to make as much money as possible . . .” What is almost universally left off is the last segment of the quote, which is extremely important. “ … while conforming to the basic rules of the society, both those embodied in law and those embodied in ethical custom.” The focus of this book is the rise of the new style of companies that take the last part of that quote extremely seriously, in many cases altering the basic rules of society as well as creating new ethical customs. This is done by citing and developing a series of case studies of companies that incorporate putting the welfare of their employees on equal footing with providing a quality product at a good price and being environmentally conscious to the point where lowered profits are accepted. The emphasis is that in many cases being socially responsible does lead to a higher profit number in the ledger. More and more citizens are altering their buying habits as well as their employment choices to reward companies that are socially and environmentally conscious. There is no greater example of this than when American President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Paris Climate Accords. The leaders of many U. S. corporations quickly announced that they would continue to comply with the guidelines and reduce their environmental impact. The word is now out and in a big way, doing good is good business, and ample justification for that statement is found in this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    If you are a person clawing your way through the business world, you might want to consider reading Do Good. Today's consumer demands more than just a satisfactory product, they require knowledge that a company is looking out for more than Number One. That is Brand Citizenship and any business person should be acutely aware of and embracing it because it's the only future. "Based on extensive research with thousands of consumers, Do Good documents this sea change and explains how to embed social If you are a person clawing your way through the business world, you might want to consider reading Do Good. Today's consumer demands more than just a satisfactory product, they require knowledge that a company is looking out for more than Number One. That is Brand Citizenship and any business person should be acutely aware of and embracing it because it's the only future. "Based on extensive research with thousands of consumers, Do Good documents this sea change and explains how to embed social consciousness into a company’s DNA. Packed with examples and original data, the five-step model highlights the new rules of business: TRUST: Deliver on promises ENRICHMENT: Make daily life easier or more inspiring RESPONSIBILITY: Treat people and the environment with respect COMMUNITY: Mirror values shared by customers, employees, and partners CONTRIBUTION: Make a difference in the world." Anne Bahr Thompson sets forth a clear and candid handbook citing real world examples and detailing the nitty gritty of the way to the hearts of consumers. No longer is the stereotypical shrewd, heartless business giant poised to snag the loyal buyer. A smaller, social conscious company known to nurture employees and embrace environmental friendliness can and likely will win the hearts and therefore the devotion of those with their fingers on the button of their success or failure. So simple and a long time coming!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Charles Franklin

    What I liked: I liked the overall concept behind the book, that companies need to embrace more than just a logo or brand name to get a profit. Businesses have to embrace purpose in their communications and actions with customers, employees, supplies and other stakeholders. I like the detailed case studies of businesses trying to "take a stand and do the right thing" on issues like sustainability, worker's rights, etc. Anne Thompson shares the events that inspired the campaign, the results, and h What I liked: I liked the overall concept behind the book, that companies need to embrace more than just a logo or brand name to get a profit. Businesses have to embrace purpose in their communications and actions with customers, employees, supplies and other stakeholders. I like the detailed case studies of businesses trying to "take a stand and do the right thing" on issues like sustainability, worker's rights, etc. Anne Thompson shares the events that inspired the campaign, the results, and her assessment of what went right (or wrong). I also like the conceptual model behind "Do Good", the Me-We brand citizenship. What needs more work: The book focuses on the big efforts of "big" brands, which is good in one way and tiring in another. It's good because the book shows show brands have succeeded (or failed) at aligning their brand with a set of values. The bad part is that the book doesn't provide a lot of action-oriented tips for small or mid-sized businesses. Overall, It's like "Ooh, this company is doing x for the environment. We should try that."...but there is only a conceptual model and a few recommendations to guide you.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shanell Meek

    Excellent and informative! Do Good: Embracing Brand Citizenship to Fuel both Purpose and Profit is a fantastic book for anyone who is trying to get ahead in the business and marketing world. Anne Bahr Thompson has done extensive research over the years to discover the ways that companies have used to maximize their growth in their communities. The book covers the five different steps of social consciousness of business which are trust, enrichment, responsibility, community and contribution. Thom Excellent and informative! Do Good: Embracing Brand Citizenship to Fuel both Purpose and Profit is a fantastic book for anyone who is trying to get ahead in the business and marketing world. Anne Bahr Thompson has done extensive research over the years to discover the ways that companies have used to maximize their growth in their communities. The book covers the five different steps of social consciousness of business which are trust, enrichment, responsibility, community and contribution. Thompson does an amazing job of writing out excellent points and strategies, some of which I had never thought of using in business before. I love that Thompson really focuses on doing good in the community when you want to build your business to its highest potential. A community that trusts you and sees you using your position for the betterment of the community is more likely to give you their business freely and happily. I’ll definitely be looking out for more of Thompson’s wisdom in the future!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elle Crosby

    Great concept and the book gave me some hope for humanity with the several examples of corporations choosing to enact policies that helped their work force, the environment, their community, or some other social cause over their bottom line. However, I did find it quite repetitive. There were so many examples of very similar actions that I started skimming because it felt more like detailed case studies of different companies rather than a guideline for how you could embrace brand citizenship to Great concept and the book gave me some hope for humanity with the several examples of corporations choosing to enact policies that helped their work force, the environment, their community, or some other social cause over their bottom line. However, I did find it quite repetitive. There were so many examples of very similar actions that I started skimming because it felt more like detailed case studies of different companies rather than a guideline for how you could embrace brand citizenship to fuel purpose and profit for your own company.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    As our society continues to align with brands/businesses who support a social good, this book is a must read for those in business. An excellent read and I have quoted it frequently since reading it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Romeva Prcela

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anika

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Do Good: Embracing Brand Citizenship is a very educational book on company image and the public view of large companies today that is increasingly more important today then it has ever been in the past. It brings to notice such things as the immediate effect social media on business practices and the effects on the planet and the environment. It also enlightened me on ways business’s conduct their business. Weather it is green or some other color, and the immediate effect of a few bad thoughts m Do Good: Embracing Brand Citizenship is a very educational book on company image and the public view of large companies today that is increasingly more important today then it has ever been in the past. It brings to notice such things as the immediate effect social media on business practices and the effects on the planet and the environment. It also enlightened me on ways business’s conduct their business. Weather it is green or some other color, and the immediate effect of a few bad thoughts made public, though social media and how they can spread at a rapid pace, costing thousands of sales to customers and millions of dollars lost in those potential sales. This is a very interesting book that brought to my attention the power in social media.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rusha Rawaf

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lily

  12. 4 out of 5

    Spencer DuBois

  13. 5 out of 5

    John Leemhuis

  14. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Manning

  16. 4 out of 5

    Evan Piekara

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Buivid

  18. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kris

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nathalie Soeteman

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dr Phyllis

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amacom Books

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  24. 5 out of 5

    Inventory

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gerald

  27. 4 out of 5

    Selina Delimini

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike Young

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  32. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  33. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Buxton

  35. 5 out of 5

    Melly Mel

  36. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  37. 4 out of 5

    Haley

  38. 5 out of 5

    Amber Griffith

  39. 5 out of 5

    Wanda C

  40. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

  41. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Salvaggio

  42. 4 out of 5

    Todd Rumsey

  43. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  44. 4 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  45. 4 out of 5

    Scott Harris

  46. 4 out of 5

    Siouxicue

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