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I closed my eyes as I tried to pick apart every flavour, because nothing had ever tasted so good before. It was like tasting for the first time. Like discovering colour . . . In 1919, the cold sweep of the Norfolk fens only holds for Emeline Vane memories of her family, all killed in the war. Whispers in the village say she’s lost her mind as well as her family - and in a m I closed my eyes as I tried to pick apart every flavour, because nothing had ever tasted so good before. It was like tasting for the first time. Like discovering colour . . . In 1919, the cold sweep of the Norfolk fens only holds for Emeline Vane memories of her family, all killed in the war. Whispers in the village say she’s lost her mind as well as her family - and in a moment's madness she boards a train to France and runs from it all. She keeps running until she reaches a tiny fishing village so far from home it might as well be the end of the world. Transfixed by the endless Mediterranean, Emeline is taken in by Maman and her nineteen-year-old son, and there she is offered a glimpse of a life so different to the one she used to know: golden-green olive oil drizzled over roasted tomatoes, mouth-wateringly smoky red spices, and hot, caramel sweetness. But it's not just the intense, rich flavours that draw her to the village, and soon a forbidden love affair begins. One that is threatened by the whispers from home that blow in on the winds from the mountains . . .


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I closed my eyes as I tried to pick apart every flavour, because nothing had ever tasted so good before. It was like tasting for the first time. Like discovering colour . . . In 1919, the cold sweep of the Norfolk fens only holds for Emeline Vane memories of her family, all killed in the war. Whispers in the village say she’s lost her mind as well as her family - and in a m I closed my eyes as I tried to pick apart every flavour, because nothing had ever tasted so good before. It was like tasting for the first time. Like discovering colour . . . In 1919, the cold sweep of the Norfolk fens only holds for Emeline Vane memories of her family, all killed in the war. Whispers in the village say she’s lost her mind as well as her family - and in a moment's madness she boards a train to France and runs from it all. She keeps running until she reaches a tiny fishing village so far from home it might as well be the end of the world. Transfixed by the endless Mediterranean, Emeline is taken in by Maman and her nineteen-year-old son, and there she is offered a glimpse of a life so different to the one she used to know: golden-green olive oil drizzled over roasted tomatoes, mouth-wateringly smoky red spices, and hot, caramel sweetness. But it's not just the intense, rich flavours that draw her to the village, and soon a forbidden love affair begins. One that is threatened by the whispers from home that blow in on the winds from the mountains . . .

30 review for Where the Wild Cherries Grow: A Novel of the South of France

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    My reviews can also be seen at: https://deesradreadsandreviews.wordpr... I don't read a lot of historical fiction. However, now and then I will try a novel from the genre and I usually end up enjoying it. So when this novel with its gorgeous cover came my way, I was really hoping that I would like it….and I am happy to say that I did. 1919 - The war is over but Emeline Vane has lost so much…. Her uncle Andrew has been sent to watch over her. He doesn't think she should be living alone. They wanted My reviews can also be seen at: https://deesradreadsandreviews.wordpr... I don't read a lot of historical fiction. However, now and then I will try a novel from the genre and I usually end up enjoying it. So when this novel with its gorgeous cover came my way, I was really hoping that I would like it….and I am happy to say that I did. 1919 - The war is over but Emeline Vane has lost so much…. Her uncle Andrew has been sent to watch over her. He doesn't think she should be living alone. They wanted to send her on to England after her mother’s death, but she wouldn’t leave Hallerton. Her little brother, Timothy lives with their Uncle and Aunt though he wants to be home with Emeline. Her uncle wants to sell the house. She doesn’t. “I know this house as well as my own skin. I know its imperfections, its creaking floors and uneven walls, as well as one might know the signs of a hard life on a person’s face; weathered but beloved, nonetheless” After an accident, her uncle makes a decision about her future and Emeline goes along with him. But at the last moment she makes a split decision that will completely alter the course of her life. “I knew that I had to choose. I could sink back into the seat, give myself up, or I could run, I could risk everything” 1969 - William (Bill) Perch is a nineteen year old solicitor’s assistant. He’s excited to be handling his first real case. A family is trying to settle power of attorney over their father’s assets so that they can sell the family home. However, their Aunt’s name is on the deed to the house, and without her they cannot sell. But their Aunt is missing. They have no idea where she is but they say there are rumors she went mad. Their aunt’s name is Emeline Vane and she went missing February 27, 1919. Now it’s Bill’s job to figure out what happened to her. So he sets off on his first business trip to see what he can find at the Hallerton House. But time and neglect has left it looking less than impressive. Then Bill finds out that Emeline was his age when she went missing.... something changes for him. It becomes more than just a case. Bill is determined to find out what happened to Emeline. And then he finds her diary. Soon Bill is also making a life changing decision that sets him on a journey to discover not only Emeline but himself. Will Bill be brave enough to do what he needs to do to find out what really happened to Emeline? Will the chances he takes be worth possible consequences? This was a quick read. I picked it up in the morning and other than a few small breaks, I read it continuously, finishing it in just a few hours. Told in two different time frames 1919 (Emeline) and 1969 (Bill). The story flowed well and it was easy to keep up with everything that was happening. Packed with emotions and many beautiful moments, this was a pleasure to read. I could “see” the beautiful landscapes and the descriptions of food make my stomach growl. The two different story-lines came together in a wonderful but bittersweet ending. The author has written a wonderful story with many great characters, an incredible atmosphere, and a lot of heart. I'd like to thank Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin’s Press for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for my honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    3.5 It is 1919, the war over, but for young Emmaline Vane, her life will never be the same. She has lost much, her grief overwhelming, her Uncle and young brother the only two left. Her Uncle wants to sell the ancestral home, debts to settle, and money so they can start new lives. Worried about the mental state of Emmaline he makes a decision that will set Emmaline on a different path, one far away to the end of the world. 1960, a young solicitor is given the task of proving Emmaline dead. This c 3.5 It is 1919, the war over, but for young Emmaline Vane, her life will never be the same. She has lost much, her grief overwhelming, her Uncle and young brother the only two left. Her Uncle wants to sell the ancestral home, debts to settle, and money so they can start new lives. Worried about the mental state of Emmaline he makes a decision that will set Emmaline on a different path, one far away to the end of the world. 1960, a young solicitor is given the task of proving Emmaline dead. This charge will set him on s different path, one in which he surprises even himself. Two timelines, two very different people. This is a very readable, tenderly written book. Very flavorful descriptives. The setting of part of this is France, the last town before Spain, a town rich in the bounty of the sea. Catalin cooking, it's decriptions and traditions, so mouthwatering, a place that becomes important in Emmalines life. Would have rated this higher because I did enjoy it, but the characters past, especially the 1969 story. The back story of the young solicitor was not really presented enough for me to understand his motivations, Emmalines story was much more fleshed out. The ending of course ties the two threads together, and although one outcome was expected, there was still much to learn, not previously discovered. ARC from Netgalley.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews

    A lost woman, an estate in shambles, a diary, and the South of France. Who doesn't love all of these things...especially a diary. Bill Perch was left to the task of finding Emeline Vane by searching the run down family estate for clues about what happened to her. When he arrived, he found trees growing out of the roof and a total mess. Where is Emeline after all of these years, and why has Hallerton House been left in such a state? When Bill entered the house, he did find a room of boxes and pap A lost woman, an estate in shambles, a diary, and the South of France. Who doesn't love all of these things...especially a diary. Bill Perch was left to the task of finding Emeline Vane by searching the run down family estate for clues about what happened to her. When he arrived, he found trees growing out of the roof and a total mess. Where is Emeline after all of these years, and why has Hallerton House been left in such a state? When Bill entered the house, he did find a room of boxes and papers and began his search there. When he dug into a floor board and found a diary with Emeline's name on it, he knew his search was most likely over, and that he hit the jackpot. Bill was happy but also sad because he truly and unfortunately had become attached to Hallerton House and Emeline. I was very curious to see what Bill would find in those musty papers and diary, and if he could find out where Emeline went. For me, looking through old papers would be such fun. I always enjoy books that move back and forth in time and have treasures to search through as the pieces of an earlier age are put together to get to the truth or mystery. WHERE THE WILD CHERRIES GROW was an incredible read for me. I became engaged with the characters and the setting. Oh to be there on Bill's journey and to be with Emeline, Clemence, and Aaro to smell the delicious aromas, taste the food, and see the beautiful landscape. The description of the food will have your mouth watering. Ms. Madeleine has a smooth, beautiful writing style that pulled me in and kept me intrigued with the story line. The ending was marvelous. 5/5 This book was given to me free of charge and without compensation by the publisher in return for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    ABookwormWithWine

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 / 5 First off, thank you to Thomas Dunne Books / St. Martin's Press for providing me with a free finished copy of this beautiful book in exchange for my review! All opinions are my own. Reading Where The Wild Cherries Grow was quite the experience for me. The writing is so rich, especially in respects to the food and the landscape, that I felt like I was right there for all of it. Where the Wild Cherries Grow switches between perspectives and time periods. Past is 1919 (besides the epilo ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 / 5 First off, thank you to Thomas Dunne Books / St. Martin's Press for providing me with a free finished copy of this beautiful book in exchange for my review! All opinions are my own. Reading Where The Wild Cherries Grow was quite the experience for me. The writing is so rich, especially in respects to the food and the landscape, that I felt like I was right there for all of it. Where the Wild Cherries Grow switches between perspectives and time periods. Past is 1919 (besides the epilogue) and is told from the perspective of Emeline. First from her diary, and then from her POV as she runs from her past. Present is June & July of 1969, and told from the perspective of William Perch who is a 19 year old assistant solicitor. Bill, as he is usually called, gets tasked with figuring out what happened to Emeline when she disappeared in 1919. Her family is trying to sell the family home to a developer, but Emiline is on the deeds to the home and without her, they cannot sell the house. Her family is hoping to find out that she is either dead or that she went mad. Nice huh? Both of the main characters in this book are under the age of 20, but it didn't feel like that at all. Both Emeline and Bill seemed wise beyond their years, and I felt like they were much older than they actually were. The ending was even more beautiful than the rest of the book (if that's possible), and I was in tears more than once. The storytelling in Where the Wild Cherries Grow is a masterpiece, and thanks to Laura Madeleine's descriptions I really want to visit the south of France now! I really don't feel like anything I say can do this book justice. Between the jumping from past to present all the time, the short chapters, and everything going on, I had no problem finishing this book in a short amount of time. The only reason this wasn't a 5 star read for me is because I wish the ending would have had a little more closure. It gives you a hint of what might have happened with some things, but you don't know for sure. Final Thought: If you like historical fiction and food then there is a good chance you will love this novel. There is even a bit of a romance that was completely charming. I cannot wait to read more from Madeleine! *This title was published on 13 Feb 2018*

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lily (Night Owl Book Cafe)

    4.5 Stars In 1919 Emeline Vane has lost most of her family to war and her mother to the flu. When her uncle decides the fate of her house, her youngest brother and her, for her, Emmeline unable to cope with it decides to run away. Now in 1969 Timothy Vane (her youngest brother) is dying and his descendants want to sell the abandoned family home to a developer. Bill Perch a local young solicitor in training is tasked with finding Emeline Vane or find proof that the great aunt was as crazy as they w 4.5 Stars In 1919 Emeline Vane has lost most of her family to war and her mother to the flu. When her uncle decides the fate of her house, her youngest brother and her, for her, Emmeline unable to cope with it decides to run away. Now in 1969 Timothy Vane (her youngest brother) is dying and his descendants want to sell the abandoned family home to a developer. Bill Perch a local young solicitor in training is tasked with finding Emeline Vane or find proof that the great aunt was as crazy as they were said to believe. This was a beautiful, poignant story of self discovery in the face of self perseverance, family and romance, brimming with rich vivid detail of food and French landscape. I loved the book, I loved the strong willed, driven characters. I loved the setting and the descriptions made me feel like I was in France watching the tale unfold. I felt so wrapped up and invested in Emeline story and how she overcame everything, that I found it difficult to part with. I found that the story was never dull as we follow the journey of both Bill and Emeline and the pages flew rather quickly. Thought that being said, I did find Emeline story much more richer not only in the setting that the author enveloped us in but also in quality. The love story between her and the boy that discovers her grows slowly despite the stakes that seemed to rise against them. The ending did feel a little abrupt to me. Bill’s story was left a little open ended, but provided a world of possibilities for the young solicitor. Emeline’s ending thought a happy one, also was a bit sad. Overall, this was a great book. It didn’t feel long, it didn’t drag and the author was a master at creating a rich atmosphere with vivid details of the landscape and the food described in the book. I adored both the characters and their story and am looking forward to more from this author.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dale Harcombe

    Not going to rate this as I didn't finish this one. Before I go further as to why, this may not be the book’s fault. It could be me. I am sick of reading depressing books and I found Emeline and her story from 1919 at Hallerton depressing and don’t like reading in italics either. Plus the story of Bill Perch in 1969 coming to Hallerton and investigating what happened to Emeline simply didn’t grab me either. Bill never came across as a strongly developed character. I just wasn’t convinced by him. Not going to rate this as I didn't finish this one. Before I go further as to why, this may not be the book’s fault. It could be me. I am sick of reading depressing books and I found Emeline and her story from 1919 at Hallerton depressing and don’t like reading in italics either. Plus the story of Bill Perch in 1969 coming to Hallerton and investigating what happened to Emeline simply didn’t grab me either. Bill never came across as a strongly developed character. I just wasn’t convinced by him. The story just didn’t grab me at all. So giving up on this one. At this stage and the way I am feeling, I think I need a feel good book not something guaranteed to depress. So many depressing reads around. Any suggestions of feel good books appreciated. However, if this sounds like your thing please give it a go. As I said it could be just me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lynsey Summers

    Every now and then a book comes along whereby when I finish it I think to myself - I will read that again and again - some examples for me include Little Women and The Great Gatsby, more recently Gone Girl and I Let You go.  Where the Wild Cherries Grow by Laura Madeline has just added itself to that list. Now I must admit the cover of this book, well, it didn't enthral or entice me into reading it.  I found it a little dull and twee and was worried the book would be too, perhaps more something m Every now and then a book comes along whereby when I finish it I think to myself - I will read that again and again - some examples for me include Little Women and The Great Gatsby, more recently Gone Girl and I Let You go.  Where the Wild Cherries Grow by Laura Madeline has just added itself to that list. Now I must admit the cover of this book, well, it didn't enthral or entice me into reading it.  I found it a little dull and twee and was worried the book would be too, perhaps more something my mother might enjoy.  THIS WAS NOT THE CASE AT ALL. Inside the reader finds a joyful, pleasure in the beautiful and quite frankly, mouth-watering, story of Emeline Vane.  Disappearing in a puff of mystery when she was just 19, in 1919, she is presumed long dead by the family of 1969 which is our starting point.  With the family eager to be able to sell the derelict manor house sitting on prime real estate to a developer they must seek proof she is actually dead.  They enlist the help of small time solicitors Hillbrand and Moffat and the case falls newbie Bill Perch. Written between two narrators, Bill Perch in 1969 and Emeline Vane in 1919, the world of Emeline is slowly unravelled explaining to the reader the events leading up to her disappearance and pieces together what happened afterwards.  As Bill Perch's investigation continues he begins to feel a bond and obligation to Emeline Vane to discover the truth - he believes she is still alive - going against what he is being paid to do.  Thus not only do we go on Emelines adventure but Bill's as well. There are a whole host of quirky characters within this novel, who open both narrators eyes and I loved them all, particularly Emeline's 'boss' Clemence, with her warm and wise motherly love for the town which she cooks and lives.  The author's use and descriptions of recipes and ingredients are so passionate and vivid you can almost smell the tomato's and garlic roasting.  I loved the stories behind them and, at this point, Kudos must go to Madeline for her research of the traditions and cultures of the cuisine of the time. Although this is tale told gently and with amazing locations and settings the mystery is kept really strong throughout.  It keeps you wondering and turning the pages and I was desperate for Bill to discover what happened to the scared 19 year old who gave up everything she knew in order to have a real life. It was totally absorbing to read about the women's world of the time and I think if I was Bill Perch I would have been inclined to through caution to the wind and do exactly the same as what he does!  This was one of those books whereby you near the end, but still so much is to be discovered and I loved the ending - I wished there had been more of it, a longer scene between the two final characters that went deeper and into more detail.  The final sentence by Bill really made me smile.  For me it would have been the perfect place to end - I personally didn't really feel the epilogue was really necessary. Beautifully paced and written with a gentle hand I can not recommend this book highly enough

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Crytzer Fry

    *** 3.75 to 4 rating*** This was the perfect book for me after consuming a heavy, many-paged, challenging (and wonderful) literary read. This lovely novel, a dual-period story, introduces readers to England in 1969 and moves back in time to a seaside village in Southern France in 1919. Both the more contemporary story and the historical story were quite engaging with likeable characters – equally so (something I feel is difficult to achieve in dual narratives). I also really adored the character *** 3.75 to 4 rating*** This was the perfect book for me after consuming a heavy, many-paged, challenging (and wonderful) literary read. This lovely novel, a dual-period story, introduces readers to England in 1969 and moves back in time to a seaside village in Southern France in 1919. Both the more contemporary story and the historical story were quite engaging with likeable characters – equally so (something I feel is difficult to achieve in dual narratives). I also really adored the character of Jem! Wanted more of her, frankly. Within the pages of this 330-page book are a mystery – as the book jacket copy states – of “What happened to Emeline?,” as well as themes of war, family, love and food-as-healer-of-the-soul. The author writes with an assured style and grace that makes for quick reading and page turning. I found the sensory details engaging – in particular, the landscape descriptions ... and the food descriptions will have you smacking your lips. Ironically, though (and as much as I love food), those elements did end up slowing me down, as I was more interested in the characters than the ‘foodie fiction’ feel the last quarter of the book took on. I will likely be in the minority here, because who doesn’t love home-cooked, gourmet meals? (There is a recipe at the back of the book, created by the author, for a wild cherry cake as well!). This story has emotional appeal, though it is a little less dark and not quite as emotionally deep as what I typically favor. That said, I truly did enjoy it, the timing of it being perfect in my reading rotation – as noted above. It would be a perfect read for those who enjoy upmarket women’s fiction, historical fiction, foodie fiction, love stories, and tales of France. Many thanks to author Erika Robuck, who ran a contest on her blog, offering two copies from the publisher. Many thanks to St. Martin’s Press/Thomas Dunne as well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Park

    1919 Emmeline Vale finds herself alone and grief stricken the Great War having claimed the lives of her two eldest brothers and her mother succumbing to the Spanish flu. Lost in her grief and unable to cope with her uncle's visions for her future, Emmeline makes the decision to run. Fifty years later, trainee solicitor Bill Perch is assigned to find out what happened to Emmeline. Whilst searching he finds her old diary and finds himself drawn into her story. Desperate to discover the truth he ab 1919 Emmeline Vale finds herself alone and grief stricken the Great War having claimed the lives of her two eldest brothers and her mother succumbing to the Spanish flu. Lost in her grief and unable to cope with her uncle's visions for her future, Emmeline makes the decision to run. Fifty years later, trainee solicitor Bill Perch is assigned to find out what happened to Emmeline. Whilst searching he finds her old diary and finds himself drawn into her story. Desperate to discover the truth he abandons everything and sets off to find her. But what will he discover and what really happened to Emmeline? Where the Wild Cherries Grow is a beautifully vivid and delicious story, and one that will definitely stay with me. The story is divided into two storyline told in alternating chapters. Emmeline's from 1919 & Bill Perch's from 1969. Unusually for me I found both storylines interesting and wanted to continue reading to find out what happened in both of them. I think this was helped hugely by the amazing characters the author has created. I liked how real they felt and how both go through such a huge journey throughout the book. It's lovely how both of their stories are quite similar and that both of them end up finding themselves in one way or another. I found I cared about both of them and wanted to see them succeed and find happiness. The author's descriptions are so vivid that you can really imagine the scenery and places in your mind. She is especially good Shen it comes to describing food- warning do not read this book when hungry! The descriptions of the food Emmeline helps cook was so vivid I felt that I could almost smell of cooking! I ended up having to look up quite a few of the dishes as I wanted to try them for myself they sounded so delicious. The story was quite realistic, with the events/ action seeming real and never forced. There wasn't a lot of huge leaps to make the two stories fit together which was great and neither Emmeline or Bill had an easy journey. This was well done and often left me guessing as to what was going to happen next. The book was quite difficult to put down because if this as there always seemed to be new twists and turns that kept me intrigued and wanting to read more! I really didn't want this book to end and was quite sad when it did. I wish that the boom had continued for linger as I would have loved to have read more about Emmeline and Bill's lives. This is the second book I have read by this author and it definitely won't be my last. I didn't think it would be possible for her to top her debut but she had as I think this book is even better! This book would be perfect for fans of Kate Morton & Victoria Hislop as they are similar in style. Huge thanks to Hannah Bright and Transworld Publishers for giving me a proof copy of this book. I loved it!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    In Where the Wild Cherries Grow, author Laura Madeleine has intersected two different stories, set 50 years apart and very different in feel: a foreboding tale of 19-year-old Emmeline Vane, driven to the edge of literal madness by the deaths of all but one member of her immediate family in 1919, and the light-hearted tale of brand-new solicitor Bill Perch, who is tasked in tracking her down in the swinging 1960s. The different tones prove a bit jarring, and it proved really difficult for me to m In Where the Wild Cherries Grow, author Laura Madeleine has intersected two different stories, set 50 years apart and very different in feel: a foreboding tale of 19-year-old Emmeline Vane, driven to the edge of literal madness by the deaths of all but one member of her immediate family in 1919, and the light-hearted tale of brand-new solicitor Bill Perch, who is tasked in tracking her down in the swinging 1960s. The different tones prove a bit jarring, and it proved really difficult for me to maintain focus on the novel. Perhaps if it hadn’t taken so long for the stories to truly intersect? Alas, by the time they did, I no longer cared what became of Emmeline in that long ago and very little more about Bill Perch, either. In the interest of full disclosure, I received this book from NetGalley, Thomas Dunne Books and St. Martin’s Press in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Letty

    A lovely read. So lovely that it's one I would read again, and it is going on my "Favorites" shelf for 2018. The book is written in dual time narratives that take place in 1919 with Emeline Vance and 1969 with Bill Perch. I loved both narratives and felt they flowed beautifully. Emeline is heartbroken over losing two brothers in the war and then losing her mother as well. She dislikes her uncle's decision to commit her to a hospital to help her deal with her mental anguish and decides it is not t A lovely read. So lovely that it's one I would read again, and it is going on my "Favorites" shelf for 2018. The book is written in dual time narratives that take place in 1919 with Emeline Vance and 1969 with Bill Perch. I loved both narratives and felt they flowed beautifully. Emeline is heartbroken over losing two brothers in the war and then losing her mother as well. She dislikes her uncle's decision to commit her to a hospital to help her deal with her mental anguish and decides it is not the best option for her. She runs away, leaving a younger brother Timothy behind in the care of said uncle, and ends up in Cerbere, a small seaside town in the South of France where she's taken in by cafe owner Clemence and her son Aaro. The descriptions of the landscape and the food prepared by Clemence are wonderful! I loved the relationship that developed between Clemence, Aaro and Emeline. Bill Perch is a solicitor hired by Timothy's children to find evidence that will prove Emeline has passed away. He returns to the house where Emeline last lived with her family and while there going through boxes of documents, he finds Emeline's diary. Reading her entries, and with this being his first case, he is very determined to find out what indeed happened to Emeline. Did she pass years ago or is it possible she is still alive? I loved Bill and his determination to continue on in this journey. This is such an exquisitely written book with an ending that I thought that was fabulous. I was quite sorry to see it end. I also enjoyed reading the Q&A with Laura Madeleine at the end. AND...there's also a recipe included for Wild Cherry Cake. A real bonus!! I highly recommend Where the Wild Cherries Grow. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for the advance copy.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    I must admit that I was a bit concerned because the cover of this book is not that great, but...Ms. Madeleine pulled me into this journey of Emmaline and Bill right away with her evocative writing. She does a really impressive job with her descriptions of Hallerton, the characters, settings and most of all, the food. You can practically taste it! I was right there with Bill as he went on his journey to find Emmaline. As for Emmaline, I felt her pain and joy, frustrations and fear. I didn't want h I must admit that I was a bit concerned because the cover of this book is not that great, but...Ms. Madeleine pulled me into this journey of Emmaline and Bill right away with her evocative writing. She does a really impressive job with her descriptions of Hallerton, the characters, settings and most of all, the food. You can practically taste it! I was right there with Bill as he went on his journey to find Emmaline. As for Emmaline, I felt her pain and joy, frustrations and fear. I didn't want her story to end. A most enjoyable read and I would certainly read more by this author. **Thank you to the publisher and Net Galley in exchange of an honest review.**

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thebooktrail

    Booktrail the locations in the novel - Cherry Trail here What a lovely story of war, love, hope and secrets! I gobbled this up almost as fast as the cherry pie I made with the receipes at the back of the book. The book is full of foody and cake references so if you’re hungry, it might be a good idea to wait until you’ve eaten before you dig into this! You can tell the author knows her food as the beauty of food in the fresh atmosphere of France is a joy to read. This is where Emeline has come fo Booktrail the locations in the novel - Cherry Trail here What a lovely story of war, love, hope and secrets! I gobbled this up almost as fast as the cherry pie I made with the receipes at the back of the book. The book is full of foody and cake references so if you’re hungry, it might be a good idea to wait until you’ve eaten before you dig into this! You can tell the author knows her food as the beauty of food in the fresh atmosphere of France is a joy to read. This is where Emeline has come following the rations of the war in England so it’s even more of a feast for her. The story alludes to the pain and anguish felt by those affected by war. Survivors might still be living in body, but in spirit, it’s quite another story. The plot, told over two time periods, is told through the eyes of Emeline and the man who finds her diaries. There’s just something delicious about lost diaries and trails to find the truth so I was immersed in this from the start. The cover is gorgeous too which helps but the story is the bowl where you mix all the ingredients and find yourself licking your lips as the story unfolds. And the icing on the cake? The writing – “The hot afternoon is sliding over the edge of evening” and “I felt cold upon mu face. It smelled of frozen fields , of smoke, of rivers deep in winter’s hold” and wait until you taste the words describing the food itself?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Erika Robuck

    Review to come on publication (Feb. 2018).

  15. 4 out of 5

    MsArdychan

    Please Note: I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions of my review in any way. Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres. A well written one can transport you to a long ago time and place, making you feel as though you knew how the people lived. Where The Wild Cherries Grow, by Laura Medeleine, not only accomplishes that, it's lush descriptions will have you racing for a Catalan cookbook in order to eat as Please Note: I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions of my review in any way. Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres. A well written one can transport you to a long ago time and place, making you feel as though you knew how the people lived. Where The Wild Cherries Grow, by Laura Medeleine, not only accomplishes that, it's lush descriptions will have you racing for a Catalan cookbook in order to eat as wonderfully as the characters do! What I Liked: Dual Stories: I loved the alternating chapters with the dual stories. In 1919, young Emeline is battling depression and nearly winds up in a Swiss asylum (the standard way of dealing with women back in the day). Instead, she escapes and discovers a new way to live. Fifty years later in 1969, William, a young solicitor's clerk, is tasked with trying to find Emeline. He too learns there is a wider world, as he meets an array of people in his quest to find out what happened to Emeline. Characters: Both Emeline and William start out as characters who are a product of their environments. After she becomes an orphan after the devastating Spanish Flu epidemic of 1919, Emeline begins to be pressured into complying with the expectations of her uncle. In other words, shut up and find a husband quickly. The men in her life don't seem to care that she is still mourning the loss of her mother and two of her brothers. William has been set on a path to become a solicitor. When he is meeting his family's and his employer's needs, everything is fine. But he begins to question the boring trajectory his life is taking, and suddenly he is an outcast. Setting: If I didn't want to go before, I certainly now NEED to travel to the Catalan region of southern France and Spain. The author weaves such vivid descriptions of the scenery and the food, that I would certainly want to make an extended stay there to discover the region for myself. But the physical setting alone is not the only attraction. I adored the sense of community in Cerbere, France that this book portrayed. The seasons, the festivals and celebrations, and even the weather, played important parts in the life of the village. I also love the English setting in 1969. When we first see the stately manor of Hallerton in 1919, it is cold, vast and utterly heartless. Over the decades the house is abandoned, and when William finds it in 1969, it has nearly been reclaimed by the elements. But in this process, we see the startling beauty of the British countryside. William wanders among this bucolic setting and it dawns on him that he doesn't have to live a boring, predictable life. Food: What can I say. The moment I finished this book I ran out and bought a book on Catalan cooking! The book makes a stark contrast between the overly complicated cuisine of the upper crust British of long ago, and the straight forward approach of Mediterranean cooking, using the best seasonal ingredients. You can tell which style will result in the healthier life for Emeline! I also loved the concept of cooking just the right dish for what the town needed. Clemence, who takes Emeline in, runs the village cafe. She takes into account not just the weather when deciding what to cook, but the mood of the people in the town. This almost reminded me of the book, Like Water For Chocolate, by Laura Esquivel (But this story remains solidly in the realm of realism). This book was truly satisfying.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    I did enjoy this book , but it was a bit lacklustre in its plot at times. I loved Emmeline/Emilie as a character , she was so interesting and I'm glad she found happiness​. The back and forth of the plot in time worked well in the structure of the book, but I preferred Emilie's time in Cerbere . I did enjoy this book , but it was a bit lacklustre in its plot at times. I loved Emmeline/Emilie as a character , she was so interesting and I'm glad she found happiness​. The back and forth of the plot in time worked well in the structure of the book, but I preferred Emilie's time in Cerbere .

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vicki_cosy.books

    More 4.5 stars... Dual time narratives are one of my favourite plot devices going. I love the alternating chapters, skipping between one era to the other and tying both times together. So when I read the synopsis for Where The Wild Cherries Grow, I knew this was going to be a book for me. In 1919 Emmeline faces an uncertain future, following the successive loss of her brothers to war and her Mother to heartbreak. Alone in the imposing family mansion, she's vulnerable to her unscrupulous uncle and More 4.5 stars... Dual time narratives are one of my favourite plot devices going. I love the alternating chapters, skipping between one era to the other and tying both times together. So when I read the synopsis for Where The Wild Cherries Grow, I knew this was going to be a book for me. In 1919 Emmeline faces an uncertain future, following the successive loss of her brothers to war and her Mother to heartbreak. Alone in the imposing family mansion, she's vulnerable to her unscrupulous uncle and his vision for the ancestral home. When faced with an alarming and terrifying realisation, she makes a spontaneous bid for freedom across France. Fifty years later and solicitor, Bill Perch, embarks on his first case. Young and eager to please, his first case seems straightforward enough. But when he comes across a diary, written fifty years ago, he becomes more and more intrigued and connected, until he must confront a moral dilemma, leading him on a journey of his own. What I loved about this book was how both Emmeline and Bill's chapters captivated me and complimented each other. They both begin in situations of suffocating formality, baring the pressure of the expectations of others and being stifled. Emmeline is trapped by her position as a young lady in 1919 and society's expectations which are imposed on her. Without any family left, she can't support herself or make choices about the future of her family home. Bill may initially seem to have the world at his feet, but he's also stifled by life and the expectations of his parents, his girlfriend and the monotony of his professional life in a claustrophobic city. As the chapters alternated, I could see the journey both character went on to individual freedom, and feel the development of both as they surged towards new beginnings. Usually, in this type of narrative, I favour one perspective or era more than the other. In Where The Wild Cherries Grow I found both voices equally as enjoyable, making this book flow beautifully, intertwining both Emmeline and Bill's stories effortlessly. Laura Madeleine has a beautiful descriptive prose, which transports the reader to the times and places of this book. The smells, the sounds, the sights...all brought alive in wonderful, multi-coloured vividness. And the food....oh the food! My mouth watered as I read about the sumptuous recipes. I could almost taste them. I wanted nothing more than to be in a beautiful coastal village in the Mediterranean, eating fresh and delicious food once I'd finished reading. But Laura's stunningly descriptive prose extends to the unsaid and unseen too. The love affair between Emmeline and Aaro was intense and breathtaking. Impressive as Aaro is deaf and has no speech, and so conveying his feelings relies on the author's poetic turn of phrase and tender and intricate detailing of a look or a touch. I adored this book, and was fully immersed in it as I read. Not only did the intrigue of Emmeline's secrets keep me glued, but the feeling of truly being transported to another place had me transfixed and I felt almost to sad to have ended it. For quite a short book, there's a lot packed in and I found myself turning the pages effortlessly and enjoying every single mouthwatering word. This is the first book I've read by Laura Madeleine, but it won't be the last and I highly recommend this book for those times when you have a few hours to spare and just want to be carried away on a beautiful story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shaz Goodwin

    http://www.jerasjamboree.co.uk/2017/0... If you read my reviews you’ll know I’m a fan of dual timelines. In Where the Wild Cherries Grow, Emeline Vane narrates in 1919 from shortly after her mother’s death at Hallerton in Norfolk and Bill Perch narrates in 1969 London on his quest as a solicitor’s assistant. The two different times in history felt authentic. The sleepy village of Hallerton in 1919 not dissimilar to how it is in 1969 although very different to the hurly burly of 1969 London. I thi http://www.jerasjamboree.co.uk/2017/0... If you read my reviews you’ll know I’m a fan of dual timelines. In Where the Wild Cherries Grow, Emeline Vane narrates in 1919 from shortly after her mother’s death at Hallerton in Norfolk and Bill Perch narrates in 1969 London on his quest as a solicitor’s assistant. The two different times in history felt authentic. The sleepy village of Hallerton in 1919 not dissimilar to how it is in 1969 although very different to the hurly burly of 1969 London. I think it shows how real the story felt to me as I pondered after the story ended if they continued the same festivals in Cerbére in 1969 or had they been forgotten! I loved the mirroring in the dual timelines of the two train journeys and the significance of the crows. I do have a favourite character! Clémence. She is so solid and ‘present’ (no doubt at all why she is known as Maman) however it’s something unseen and intangible but with such an impact that drew me to her. Cerbére is an amazing community with depth and belonging. The story has a great pace with the conflict known at the start of the story and with the timelines drawing closer and closer to the resolution, lots of tension for me (would I get the ending I wanted? Not just for Emeline but for Bill too). I always think it’s such a skill to create a story that takes the reader full circle. Whilst on the one hand I didn’t get the ending I wanted (don’t get me wrong it made perfect sense), in another way I did … Entertainment and escapism doesn’t get much better than with these characters and their lives in Where the Wild Cherries Grow. Highly recommended. Don’t miss it! (psst, food is important in the story and with her culinary background, Laura Madeleine has created an apt recipe, Wild Cherry Cake. How awesome is that!).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Bailey

    This is the second of Laura Madeleine’s books I have read & she’s fast becoming one of my favourite authors. I love the way she weaves a dual timeline together without the usual issues of one timeline being unputdownable but the other one being a little- meh. We follow runaway heiress Emmeline Vane in 1919 striving to carve a new life in Europe. And trainee solicitor Bill Perch in 1969 setting out to prove her either mad or dead 50 years on, in order to sell her Norfolk-based inheritance. I foun This is the second of Laura Madeleine’s books I have read & she’s fast becoming one of my favourite authors. I love the way she weaves a dual timeline together without the usual issues of one timeline being unputdownable but the other one being a little- meh. We follow runaway heiress Emmeline Vane in 1919 striving to carve a new life in Europe. And trainee solicitor Bill Perch in 1969 setting out to prove her either mad or dead 50 years on, in order to sell her Norfolk-based inheritance. I found the whole story totally engrossing & couldn’t turn the pages fast enough. My only criticism is all the unanswered questions at the end. I really felt as though it stopped a chapter too soon. Fabulous summer read. I’m hoping for a sequel now though!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Laura Madeleine has delivered yet another fantastic novel. Just as with her debut, I found myself turning the pages at a rapid-fire pace, needing to know more and wanting to sink deeper into the story. I’ll admit I preferred Emeline’s story in 1919 to Bill’s in 1969, but both stories beautifully blended together and Where the Wild Cherries Grow easily turned into a one-sitting read. For the full review and more, head over to The Pretty Good Gatsby! Laura Madeleine has delivered yet another fantastic novel. Just as with her debut, I found myself turning the pages at a rapid-fire pace, needing to know more and wanting to sink deeper into the story. I’ll admit I preferred Emeline’s story in 1919 to Bill’s in 1969, but both stories beautifully blended together and Where the Wild Cherries Grow easily turned into a one-sitting read. For the full review and more, head over to The Pretty Good Gatsby!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gaele

    Having read The Confectioner’s Tale and loving it, there was no way I could miss this title – and what a complex yet lovely story it was. Dual narrators separated by fifty years bring us a story of finding who you are and just where you are meant to be. In 1969 London, Bill Perch is working toward becoming a solicitor, and his boss presents him with the lead on an investigation. Prove the death of Emeline Vane, who disappeared in 1919, in order to sell the family estate to a developer. To this e Having read The Confectioner’s Tale and loving it, there was no way I could miss this title – and what a complex yet lovely story it was. Dual narrators separated by fifty years bring us a story of finding who you are and just where you are meant to be. In 1969 London, Bill Perch is working toward becoming a solicitor, and his boss presents him with the lead on an investigation. Prove the death of Emeline Vane, who disappeared in 1919, in order to sell the family estate to a developer. To this end, Bill is sent on his first ever business trip (first out of London as well) to a small village in order to search the family papers to find his proof. He finds more – including a diary belonging to Emeline, and starts to believe, as her ailing brother does, that she is alive and didn’t simply wander off to die somewhere close. Emeline Vane was the only daughter, with two elder and one younger brother – she was always imaginative and curious, and prone to her own flights of imagination. Now with the death of her mother from the Spanish Flu, and her older brothers at war, she’s the only person in the family home, Hallerton House, in Norfolk. In need of repairs, maintenance and money, there isn’t enough to go around and Emeline’s uncle is negotiating the sale. She’s still grieving and lonely, and her family believes she is not ‘all there”. A dinner party goes awry, and arrangements are made for her to be committed to a sanitorium in Switzerland, leaving her uncle in charge of her youngest brother, her life and her future. Emeline has consistently been plagued by her memories – using her mother’s remaining morphine to escape, and drugged by her uncle as she travels with him to Paris, awaiting a transfer to Switzerland, she jumps off the train and is rescued by a young man, loaded onto a freight train to ride the rails south. Poor Bill, truly a fish out of water and far more conservative than the times and most of his friends, his first trip out of London faced with travel delays and hiccups and a decrepit house full of memories and strange noises, he’s befriended a distant relation of his boss – a “hippie’ who is both intriguing and scaring him. Piles of disorganized papers, holes and crows nesting and a strange sense that someone is watching have him all unsettled, and then he discovers Emeline’s diary – and starts to feel that she may actually have left for good reasons. When he returns to London, diary and photo in hand – and then leaves to meet the ailing brother that believes Emeline is alive – he’s off again – this time to Paris to track down her trail. Armed only with a letter and an address, he meets Puce, the man who rescued Emeline years ago – and is sent on a journey of discovery. From trains south to meeting a group of students intent on entering Spain via a little-known and less guarded crossing at the south of France – his story is one of a journey to being a ‘really good or horridly bad’ solicitor. But, throughout Bill’s travels and travails, we learn of Emeline: her discovery of Cerbère in the south of France, and the woman Clëmence, her deaf son Aaró, and her new name, Emilie. Rich in history and tradition, Emilie takes her place in the family: learning to cook and feel again, falling in love with Aaró, and making a place for herself in this strange place: influenced by tradition, family, Catalan history and plenty of community. Another place at “the end of the world”, Emilie is making a new life with new hope, even as her old worries never quite leave her. From her arrival to the end of her story, she’s adjusting, growing and finding a path that is more than waiting about – forget waiting for her family to find her. Lushly evocative with wonderful moments of food, description and traditions, the story does take a bit of time to acclimate to: as we meet Emeline first and her narratives are very detailed yet dreamy – almost as if she is setting a screenplay. Bill is intriguing for his flexibility and willingness to step out of his comfort zone: enjoying the adventure and difference even as he can’t explain why he needs so badly to find Emeline. Then the magic of the region, the traditions and the voices take over as each character comes alive and shares moments, giving a sense of who they were, who they are, and just who they are meant to be. Another slow to develop but poignantly rich tale that will keep readers happy in their own little mystery escape. I received an eArc copy of the title from the publisher via NetGalley for purpose of honest review. I was not compensated for this review: all conclusions are my own responsibility. Review first appeared at I am, Indeed

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kate Baxter

    It is 1919, the War now over, the Spanish Flu having run its course and what poses as Emeline's life is in total shambles. Does she acquiesce to the will of her uncle or flee as far away as she can to heal her wounded soul? Fifty years later, a young solicitor is charged with finding the evidence to support accusations of Emeline's ill mental health or her demise in order that the estate she and her now dying brother inherited can be be liquidated by his greedy children. The solicitor, by chance It is 1919, the War now over, the Spanish Flu having run its course and what poses as Emeline's life is in total shambles. Does she acquiesce to the will of her uncle or flee as far away as she can to heal her wounded soul? Fifty years later, a young solicitor is charged with finding the evidence to support accusations of Emeline's ill mental health or her demise in order that the estate she and her now dying brother inherited can be be liquidated by his greedy children. The solicitor, by chance, discovers Emeline's diary and is struck by the circumstances in which she found herself. His conscience is heavy. Does he have the strength of character to do the right thing? This tender story of loss, grief, sorrow, fear, anxiety, love and healing was lovely and well told. The primary character was well developed. However, in my opinion, the secondary character could have stood a bit more development in order that the reader better understood his motivations. The descriptions of Catalan cooking were rich and savory - thoroughly delighting the senses. The settings were so well described that one could taste the tang of the Mediterranean breeze across one's tongue or feel a shiver as "La Tramontana" blew down from the snow covered mountains. I was transported in time and place through the rich prose of this story. Well done Ms. Madeleine! I am grateful to author Laura Madeleine, publisher St. Martin's Press and Goodreads First Reads for having provided an advance uncorrected proof of this book. Their generosity, however, did not influence this review - the words of which are mine alone.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Edee

    Where the Wild Cherries Grow is an engaging read, telling the story of Emeline Vane in 1919 and the young solicitor Bill Perch who is trying to follow her trail some fifty years later. Emeline Vane lost so much in the war and just when she thinks she can't handle any more, her uncle is trying to force a husband upon her and remove her from her family estate Hallerton House, the only home she has ever known. Emeline escapes and travels to the south of France where she finds life anew, but is this Where the Wild Cherries Grow is an engaging read, telling the story of Emeline Vane in 1919 and the young solicitor Bill Perch who is trying to follow her trail some fifty years later. Emeline Vane lost so much in the war and just when she thinks she can't handle any more, her uncle is trying to force a husband upon her and remove her from her family estate Hallerton House, the only home she has ever known. Emeline escapes and travels to the south of France where she finds life anew, but is this new future that she dares to imagine for herself too good to be true. Will her uncle track her down and make her return? Will some other fate befall her? Young solicitor Bill Perch is eager for his first real assignment to unearth some evidence that Emeline Vane should be declared dead so that her niece and nephew can move forward with a planned development on the family estate. When Bill discovers Emeline's diary, he feels drawn to her plight and becomes conflicted about whether to complete his assignment or continue to search for Emeline. Where the Wild Cherries Grow was a solid four star read for me. I was drawn into both character's stories and found them both equally compelling. My only disappointment was in the ending of the story. Without giving away any spoilers, a detail was revealed about the character's lives that was unexpected to me and I would have much liked to explore that area of time in more detail. My hope is that the author will use that to develop another novel and to continue the families stories. I appreciated the commentary and questions at the end of the novel and feel those would enhance any reading or book club discussion. I received this book courtesy of St. Martin's Press Thomas Dunne Books through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    3.5-4 Where the Wild Cherries Grow is dual-time storyline that will have your mouth watering with the food descriptions and will transport you to another place with the visual imagery! I was also able to read this book in one day (thanks to a low key holiday)! I enjoyed following the characters in both time periods—they were believable and invoked sympathy. Emeline and Bill both had a lot of heart which showed in their actions. Overall didn’t have trouble following the narrator switch (as long as 3.5-4 Where the Wild Cherries Grow is dual-time storyline that will have your mouth watering with the food descriptions and will transport you to another place with the visual imagery! I was also able to read this book in one day (thanks to a low key holiday)! I enjoyed following the characters in both time periods—they were believable and invoked sympathy. Emeline and Bill both had a lot of heart which showed in their actions. Overall didn’t have trouble following the narrator switch (as long as I looked at the dates at each chapter head). Also, since one was a woman and one a man that helped me to keep things clear. The plot threads dropped a little at times, but maybe it was intentional to let you use your own mind to decide what happened. Food was big in the book, and reminded me how food ties my own extended family together. I liked how things ended and tied the two time periods together. I would recommend this book, especially to historical fiction fans and those who like dual timeline books. **Thanks to NetGalley, Laura Madeleine, and St Martin’s Press-Thomas Dunne Books for an ARC in exchange for an honest review**

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    Where the Wild Cherries Grow by Laura Madeleine is a historical novel that takes readers from 1969 to 1919. In 1969 William “Bill” Perch is a solicitor’s assistant at Hillbrand and Moffat Solicitors. Mrs. Mallory and her brother need the firm’s assistance in locating Emeline Vane. Emeline is one of the estate’s heirs, and she has been missing for fifty years. They are unable to sell the derelict manor house until they can prove that she is dead. It is up to Bill to locate Emeline or proof of her Where the Wild Cherries Grow by Laura Madeleine is a historical novel that takes readers from 1969 to 1919. In 1969 William “Bill” Perch is a solicitor’s assistant at Hillbrand and Moffat Solicitors. Mrs. Mallory and her brother need the firm’s assistance in locating Emeline Vane. Emeline is one of the estate’s heirs, and she has been missing for fifty years. They are unable to sell the derelict manor house until they can prove that she is dead. It is up to Bill to locate Emeline or proof of her death. Bill travels to the family estate in Norfolk where he discovers an old diary of Emeline’s along with other papers. Through Emeline’s words, Bill feels a connection with this woman from the past. Bill knows that she disappeared at the train station in Paris and this is where he begins. The journey to uncover Emeline’s whereabouts starts Bill on a new path and a chance for rich, full life. Where the Wild Cherries Grow is a dual timeline novel. The story is told from Bill and Emeline’s point-of-views in alternating chapters. Ms. Madeleine has a nice descriptive writing style. The pace is a little slower than I normally like, but it does go with the story. The author provides vivid descriptions that allow the reader to visualize the scenes (brings the scenery of France alive). The food depictions will have your mouth watering. Emeline and Bill are well-developed characters. I found them to be real and fit into their time periods. I found the slang from 1969 to be entertaining (made me chuckle). Readers experience Emeline’s journey and I can certainly understand why she took off. Life was very different for women in 1919 especially if they were under the age of majority. Where the Wild Cherries Grow is a unique tale that will keep you reading to find out what happened to Emeline.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my unbiased opinion. After losing two brothers in World War I and her mother to the 1918 flu epidemic, Emiline Vane heart is shattered one final time when her uncle tells her they will have to sell her family home, Hallerton House. After Emiline hurts herself, her uncle contrives to have her sent to a mental health facility in Switzerland to recover. However, Emiline escapes at the last minute, taking a train south from Paris to the bo I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for my unbiased opinion. After losing two brothers in World War I and her mother to the 1918 flu epidemic, Emiline Vane heart is shattered one final time when her uncle tells her they will have to sell her family home, Hallerton House. After Emiline hurts herself, her uncle contrives to have her sent to a mental health facility in Switzerland to recover. However, Emiline escapes at the last minute, taking a train south from Paris to the border town of Cerbère. Fifty years later, Emiline's niece and nephew want to have her declared dead so that they can sell Hallerton. William Perch, training to be a solicitor, is sent to Hallerton to collect evidence to have Emiline declared dead; instead, he becomes enthralled by her story. I usually love books with dual timelines, where the younger person is trying to figure out what happened in the older person's life, but this story fell flat for me. I didn't understand why Bill felt so compelled to continue tracking down Emiline with virtually all evidence pointing in another direction, even to the point of likely losing his job and girlfriend. Looking at the other reviews, I see that I am a minority, so if the plot sounds intriguing to you, give it a try.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Louise Morris

    Great book! I love duo timelines. Emeline Vane is grieving for two lost brothers when she does the unthinkable and is then forced to go to an asylum. She disappears before she gets to the asylum. Cut to fifty years later, Bill Perch is set on to find out proof that Emeline committed suicide, so her relatives can sell the estate that she grew up on. Bill becomes obsessed with finding out what really happened to her and travels to the South of France. Both characters undergo a transformation on th Great book! I love duo timelines. Emeline Vane is grieving for two lost brothers when she does the unthinkable and is then forced to go to an asylum. She disappears before she gets to the asylum. Cut to fifty years later, Bill Perch is set on to find out proof that Emeline committed suicide, so her relatives can sell the estate that she grew up on. Bill becomes obsessed with finding out what really happened to her and travels to the South of France. Both characters undergo a transformation on their journeys.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Regina Spiker

    Favorite quotes: *"I closed my eyes as I tried to pick apart every flavour, because nothing had ever tasted so good before. It was like tasting for the first time. Like discovering colour . . ." * “I knew that I had to choose. I could sink back into the seat, give myself up, or I could run, I could risk everything” * “I know this house as well as my own skin. I know its imperfections, its creaking floors and uneven walls, as well as one might know the signs of a hard life on a person’s face; weath Favorite quotes: *"I closed my eyes as I tried to pick apart every flavour, because nothing had ever tasted so good before. It was like tasting for the first time. Like discovering colour . . ." * “I knew that I had to choose. I could sink back into the seat, give myself up, or I could run, I could risk everything” * “I know this house as well as my own skin. I know its imperfections, its creaking floors and uneven walls, as well as one might know the signs of a hard life on a person’s face; weathered but beloved, nonetheless”

  29. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    This was a really quick book. I enjoyed the story but think the author could have added a few more chapters. The ending seemed a little rushed

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    I was disappointed when I finished the book as I really wanted to know what happened next! I mean, it gives you enough to go on that you can imagine what happens to both characters, but I enjoyed it that much that I would have happily carried on reading.

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