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No Way Home: A Memoir of Life on the Run

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Tyler had lived in fifteen houses and five countries by the time she was nine. She didn't think this was strange until Scotland Yard showed up in her bucolic English village, and she discovered her family had been living a lie. Her father was a fugitive and their family name was an alias. They had been living in California back in 1983 when the Feds originally caught up wit Tyler had lived in fifteen houses and five countries by the time she was nine. She didn't think this was strange until Scotland Yard showed up in her bucolic English village, and she discovered her family had been living a lie. Her father was a fugitive and their family name was an alias. They had been living in California back in 1983 when the Feds originally caught up with her dad; it was the same year Tyler was born. Her parents decided to go on the run with the three young children, and they spent the next few years traveling across Europe, assuming different identities, living in a series of beautiful places, from Portugal to Tuscany, paid for with drug money. Now her dad had fled once more, except this time he didn't take her with him. Despite the danger involved, for the following two years he flew Tyler and her siblings out to see him in secret wherever he was in hiding, until on her 12th birthday Scotland Yard followed Tyler to the Caribbean island of Saint Lucia, where her father was eventually captured. It was over the summers spent visiting her dad in prison in California, as she grew into an increasingly self-destructive teenager, that he told her the truth about his criminal life. He had been a pot smuggler in the seventies, and his organization had bought in marijuana worth nearly a half billion dollars from Thailand. In this emotionally detailed and carefully wrought memoir about growing up as a fugitive's daughter, Tyler Wetherall pieces together the story of her parents' past, which ultimately helps her understand her own.


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Tyler had lived in fifteen houses and five countries by the time she was nine. She didn't think this was strange until Scotland Yard showed up in her bucolic English village, and she discovered her family had been living a lie. Her father was a fugitive and their family name was an alias. They had been living in California back in 1983 when the Feds originally caught up wit Tyler had lived in fifteen houses and five countries by the time she was nine. She didn't think this was strange until Scotland Yard showed up in her bucolic English village, and she discovered her family had been living a lie. Her father was a fugitive and their family name was an alias. They had been living in California back in 1983 when the Feds originally caught up with her dad; it was the same year Tyler was born. Her parents decided to go on the run with the three young children, and they spent the next few years traveling across Europe, assuming different identities, living in a series of beautiful places, from Portugal to Tuscany, paid for with drug money. Now her dad had fled once more, except this time he didn't take her with him. Despite the danger involved, for the following two years he flew Tyler and her siblings out to see him in secret wherever he was in hiding, until on her 12th birthday Scotland Yard followed Tyler to the Caribbean island of Saint Lucia, where her father was eventually captured. It was over the summers spent visiting her dad in prison in California, as she grew into an increasingly self-destructive teenager, that he told her the truth about his criminal life. He had been a pot smuggler in the seventies, and his organization had bought in marijuana worth nearly a half billion dollars from Thailand. In this emotionally detailed and carefully wrought memoir about growing up as a fugitive's daughter, Tyler Wetherall pieces together the story of her parents' past, which ultimately helps her understand her own.

30 review for No Way Home: A Memoir of Life on the Run

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisabeth

    Thanks to Netgalley, the publisher. and the author for allowing me to read and review a digital copy of this book. In this emotionally compelling and gripping memoir, Tyler Wetherall brings to life her fugitive childhood.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cortney

    “The things we were running to save is exactly what we ended up losing.” This book gives you a peek at the physical and mental toll a parents illegal actions can have on their children. Her dad was on the run for 11 years and this is the story of how she met up with him in all the different countries he moved to while alluding the authorities and why her mother never turned him in. I found it surprising how often her dad was able to keep in contact and have them visit him while he was on the run. “The things we were running to save is exactly what we ended up losing.” This book gives you a peek at the physical and mental toll a parents illegal actions can have on their children. Her dad was on the run for 11 years and this is the story of how she met up with him in all the different countries he moved to while alluding the authorities and why her mother never turned him in. I found it surprising how often her dad was able to keep in contact and have them visit him while he was on the run. This is definitely the view of a man through his daughter’s eyes; so no mention of the other people who were affected by his crimes. What were his crimes you ask? He was the head of an international pot smuggling ring in the 70’s. He felt it was a victimless crime with rarely any violence. A hobby started while in college with friends that just got out of hand.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Clementine Seely

    I read it one sitting, it is incredible I wept. Page turning, intriguing, funny and loving. An incredible coming of age story in unusual circumstances. I highly recommend reading this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    No Way Home was the first memoir I've read this year. I'd like to thank NetGalley and the publisher, St. Martin's Press for providing me with a galley copy of the book for an honest review. No Way Home was one of the best memoirs I've read. Tyler Wetherall's life on the run with her divorced parents was heartbreaking and painfully honest. By the time she was a teen, Tyler had lived in 35 different homes and locations, with her mother and two siblings or on visits with her father, who was on the No Way Home was the first memoir I've read this year. I'd like to thank NetGalley and the publisher, St. Martin's Press for providing me with a galley copy of the book for an honest review. No Way Home was one of the best memoirs I've read. Tyler Wetherall's life on the run with her divorced parents was heartbreaking and painfully honest. By the time she was a teen, Tyler had lived in 35 different homes and locations, with her mother and two siblings or on visits with her father, who was on the run from both the FBI and Scotland Yard. Her story takes the reader from America to London to Paris to Rome and St. Lucia and back. The fact that Tyler is able to write this story and, from my perspective, to go on a live a relatively normal life is absolutely amazing and fascinating. I recommend this book for young adults and adults alike. I hope the book does well when it is published in April 2018.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    DNF. The premise sounded interesting but the delivery didn't come thru for me, made it thru about a quarter and found myself looking for another book to read. DNF. The premise sounded interesting but the delivery didn't come thru for me, made it thru about a quarter and found myself looking for another book to read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Fascinating memoir of a girl growing up with a fugitive father (who is very much part of her life). I listened to this in audiobook and didn't love the narrator, but that's no fault of the author's. Her dad is a very interesting character (the mom perhaps even more interesting) and she treats him with great empathy, despite his many grave mistakes. Fascinating memoir of a girl growing up with a fugitive father (who is very much part of her life). I listened to this in audiobook and didn't love the narrator, but that's no fault of the author's. Her dad is a very interesting character (the mom perhaps even more interesting) and she treats him with great empathy, despite his many grave mistakes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    This was written well and was a story that really shows the bond of a family/siblings and the effects that decisions made by one family member can have on the rest.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Deenna

    Right off the bat, this book grabbed my attention and I immediately was reminded of The Glass Castle. But about a quarter of the way in, it stalled out- the jumping back and forth in time and memories didn’t help matters. I truly believe the author has an amazing story, but it just wasn’t told in a narrative I found fascinating. Her father’s story, however? I’d like to read that!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    The premise intrigued me but the book fell short. The first half flowed well but then it got choppy. It felt like she ran out of story but just kept writing. It also felt more like a personal cathartic exercise then a story that should be published and sold.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Karen Nelson

    This book was one of the best books I read in 2017. The story was compelling and the book was a page turner for me, having read this book in two days. I will be recommending this book to my book club for consideration. The author told this story of her childhood, as a fugitive due to her father's choices. The book was well written and revealed the author's feelings as a child who was trying to make sense of their dysfunctional family. She wrote in the past, but also wrote present day chapters, w This book was one of the best books I read in 2017. The story was compelling and the book was a page turner for me, having read this book in two days. I will be recommending this book to my book club for consideration. The author told this story of her childhood, as a fugitive due to her father's choices. The book was well written and revealed the author's feelings as a child who was trying to make sense of their dysfunctional family. She wrote in the past, but also wrote present day chapters, which brought the reader to understand the long term effects this life has brought her. The book reads like a novel, which develops the characters that she calls her family. . Thanks to Netgalley, the publisher. and the author for allowing me to read and review a digital copy of this book. for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Absorbing and interesting (non-fiction) read about a family who lives on the run after the father is involved in big time drug trafficking. The author is the youngest daughter in the family, so a lot of details were collected by her from older siblings and parents. I liked it, but the chronology was super unbalanced. I also think she could have dug deeper with the more interesting and eventful periods of their life. A bit too much meditation for my taste. Overall, still worth reading!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gail O'Connor

    This memoir of life on the run was a little too slow for me. The characters appeared too staid for the storyline.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Lindsay

    Emotionally detailed and tense, NO WAY HOME is a coming-of-age memoir of a fugitive family on the run from the FBI told from the POV of the youngest daughter. Secrets are the stuff of memoir and NO WAY HOME is stuffed to the gills with them. Tyler Wetherall writes with beautiful prose and raw honesty about what it was like being born into a 'fugitive family.' When she's born, in 1983, the 'men in black' where already living on the family's California property in a small shack. They watched every Emotionally detailed and tense, NO WAY HOME is a coming-of-age memoir of a fugitive family on the run from the FBI told from the POV of the youngest daughter. Secrets are the stuff of memoir and NO WAY HOME is stuffed to the gills with them. Tyler Wetherall writes with beautiful prose and raw honesty about what it was like being born into a 'fugitive family.' When she's born, in 1983, the 'men in black' where already living on the family's California property in a small shack. They watched every move, every coming and going of the family because her father (who goes by a series of aliases, but given name is Ben), is already in deep doo-doo. But why, exactly maintains a mystery--at least in the first third of the book. We know he did something deplorable, but it's not revealed until later. The first part of the book focuses on the author's experience as a young child living in various places in Europe. They ski in the Swiss Alps. They scuba dive in St. Lucia, they have a lovely little villa in the same town Picasso once lived in France. They have homes in Portugal and England.The kids attend boarding school. In some ways, it seemed as though they were army brats with ever advantage at their fingertips. But there are also clandestine phone calls with her father from the depths of a phone booth in the woods. Hidden cell phones in attics. Scotland Yard shows up at their home. Something is terribly wrong and the family can't keep going on like this forever...can they? NO WAY HOME is not a linear memoir and in that sense, it builds a sense of mystery. But it might also cause a bit of reader confusion. I sort of wanted it to begin at the beginning, but it could be that the author wasn't even sure herself where the story began because there's good deal of cyclical dealings; chicken-and-egg, if you will. We alsodelve into the past, when Tyler's parents were young, their 1960s meeting in NYC and some early touches from both parents' family of origin (her mother left home at age 16 to marry and pursue a modeling career and her father was from a NY Jewish family and told his parents everything about his fugitive lifestyle). I found the writing quite good and the story enthralling, and I wanted everything to turn out for the best. And mostly, it does. In other memoirs, I found this one similar to THE GLASS CASTLE (Jeanette Walls) mostly due to the nomadic family lifestyle, the father-daughter relationship (in that sense, this may be a good Father's Day read/gift), but it also has touches of ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK (Piper Kerman), and also, maybe, EAT PRAY LOVE (Elizabeth Gilbert) for the travel piece. For all my reviews, including author interviews, please see: www.leslielindsay.com Special thanks to St. Martin's Press for this review copy. All thoughts are my own.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jacky Torrisi

    3.5 stars. This is a book about Tyler’s childhood with a fugitive father on the run from the FBI and her experiences coming to understand, accept, and forgive these actions which tore their family apart. She has a knack for telling the stories of her remembered past with beautiful detail. She describes the struggle of trying to express her feelings to her father for a long sought after apology for putting his drug smuggling business before his family, as well as her internal fight to determine w 3.5 stars. This is a book about Tyler’s childhood with a fugitive father on the run from the FBI and her experiences coming to understand, accept, and forgive these actions which tore their family apart. She has a knack for telling the stories of her remembered past with beautiful detail. She describes the struggle of trying to express her feelings to her father for a long sought after apology for putting his drug smuggling business before his family, as well as her internal fight to determine where she calls home. Her stories are captivating, though she tends to tell stories picked from many different moments in her past which makes for a bit of a disjointed storyline. The book is divided into three parts- Before (before father was imprisoned, life on the run), After (after her father was caught and serving his sentence), and Now (presumably the present tense as she was writing the book). However, in each section she was still recounting ideas from her past and present within the main shifting timeline of the book- overall it was very disorienting. But the book still managed to entertain and shed light into a life that I couldn’t even begin to imagine living.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book caught my eye on the display shelf at the library, and the storyline intrigued me. I expected a “Blow”, “Narco”-esque narrative of drug lords, or violent anecdotes from the world of organized crime. Instead, the book unfolded painfully slowly, recounting a tense and mysterious childhood trying to reconnect with a fugitive father. But what was the crime? The stress and worry of carrying his secrets, of trying to connect with him while he ran from Scotland Yard and the FBI, was maddening This book caught my eye on the display shelf at the library, and the storyline intrigued me. I expected a “Blow”, “Narco”-esque narrative of drug lords, or violent anecdotes from the world of organized crime. Instead, the book unfolded painfully slowly, recounting a tense and mysterious childhood trying to reconnect with a fugitive father. But what was the crime? The stress and worry of carrying his secrets, of trying to connect with him while he ran from Scotland Yard and the FBI, was maddening. The writing was good - Wetherall knows how to use words and she paints vivid pictures in her narration - and it took me nearly a third of the book to realize she was doing this on purpose. By NOT sharing the crimes, she draws the reader in to the consequences, so that by the time we find out what he did, we are already weighing out his choices - was it worth all that they went through? In the end I am impressed and deeply respectful of Wetherall’s writing - this was a finely crafted book and a ponderous story.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leonard

    By the time she was nine years old Tyler had lived in thirteen houses and five countries. It turned out that her father was a fugitive, wanted in more than one country, and they were frequently moving as well as changing their names to stay ahead of the law. This book starts out strong and then fades a little toward the end. Tyler has a sister and a brother and their lives growing up were quite different from other children. This book is illuminating and also troubling, sad as well as happy, and By the time she was nine years old Tyler had lived in thirteen houses and five countries. It turned out that her father was a fugitive, wanted in more than one country, and they were frequently moving as well as changing their names to stay ahead of the law. This book starts out strong and then fades a little toward the end. Tyler has a sister and a brother and their lives growing up were quite different from other children. This book is illuminating and also troubling, sad as well as happy, and it seems as if the author, as well as the reader, is trying to make some sense out of what happened to her and her family.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Stephens

    "At some point, Mom said she was sorry the holidays she gave us weren't as glamorous as our trips to visit Dad. I don't know what we said, probably nothing adequate to reassure her, but she didn't realize that those trips down to the Cornish coast, or similar ones in the hills of the Lake District, or wherever we went, normally involving long walks and tents and packed lunches and anoraks, they meant something else to us entirely." "I squeezed my eyes shut so I didn't see her reaction, but I felt "At some point, Mom said she was sorry the holidays she gave us weren't as glamorous as our trips to visit Dad. I don't know what we said, probably nothing adequate to reassure her, but she didn't realize that those trips down to the Cornish coast, or similar ones in the hills of the Lake District, or wherever we went, normally involving long walks and tents and packed lunches and anoraks, they meant something else to us entirely." "I squeezed my eyes shut so I didn't see her reaction, but I felt it through the particles of air that carry hurt feelings without sound. I felt her stand and leave, patiently heartbroken."

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I've read every book there is about prison and prisoners' children--because I raised two kids with a dad in prison. Because I work with children who struggle with the pain of having loved ones in prison. Because I care about what the incarceral state does to human beings. And I have to say that Wetherall's memoir is one of the most compelling, moving and inspiring of memoirs I've read on the subject. It brims with deep understanding and sorrow and it is suffused with love. The book is a page-tur I've read every book there is about prison and prisoners' children--because I raised two kids with a dad in prison. Because I work with children who struggle with the pain of having loved ones in prison. Because I care about what the incarceral state does to human beings. And I have to say that Wetherall's memoir is one of the most compelling, moving and inspiring of memoirs I've read on the subject. It brims with deep understanding and sorrow and it is suffused with love. The book is a page-turner, and I cannot wait to see what Wetherall does next. She is a storyteller with a heart equal to her sizable brain.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    This is a fascinating memoir! The narrative drug a little in spots, but overall I enjoyed this true story of growing up in a family with a fugitive for a father. Unbelievable that for most of their lives, the children did not know as they suffered from never really laying down roots. Lots of emotion here too, especially as the children become adults. and navigate parent-child relationships that make the typical drama pale in comparison. Thank you NetGalley and publishers for providing a digital This is a fascinating memoir! The narrative drug a little in spots, but overall I enjoyed this true story of growing up in a family with a fugitive for a father. Unbelievable that for most of their lives, the children did not know as they suffered from never really laying down roots. Lots of emotion here too, especially as the children become adults. and navigate parent-child relationships that make the typical drama pale in comparison. Thank you NetGalley and publishers for providing a digital ARC for review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    shannon

    This was a really interesting story of a life I can't really imagine living...what I liked best about it (when finished reading) is that we don't learn until very late in the book what Tyler's father has done to create this life on the run - which I really wanted to know! So it did a great job of demonstrating how frustrating/infuriating/curiosity-inducing it must have been, for years!, for the author not to know why the heck all this stuff was happening in her life. This was a really interesting story of a life I can't really imagine living...what I liked best about it (when finished reading) is that we don't learn until very late in the book what Tyler's father has done to create this life on the run - which I really wanted to know! So it did a great job of demonstrating how frustrating/infuriating/curiosity-inducing it must have been, for years!, for the author not to know why the heck all this stuff was happening in her life.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Novick

    Tyler and her two siblings grew up moving from place to place as her father eluded the FBI and Scotland Yard. His crime isn’t revealed until the fourth quarter of this memoir. The book is well written and demonstrates what appears to be family devotion. The family is close and loving and always on the move. But...what kind of father puts his family through this turmoil for years and years? In the end, Tyler makes this clear to her dad but his narcissism is incurable.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Madge

    I heard the author speak and was captivated by her life on the run with her family. Her dad was a drug smuggler and this book is the story from her young life to her 20’s. She introduces us to her Dad, Mom, brother and older sister. They were always on the move and separated from her dad. This book tells us how it all happened and what the consequences were to her and her relationship with both her Mom and dad. Very well written.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alanna Smith

    This was an interesting read and Wetherall is a great writer. I had never considered what it might be like grow up with a father on the lam, but she paints a really fascinating (and terribly sad) picture. Her father is an interesting person and you can see her struggle between loving him for being a wonderful dad to her and hating him for ruining it all with his drug trafficking. Definitely recommend.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Martha Kuder

    Tyler’s descriptive writing style made this impossible to put down. Her gypsy-like moving from house to house broke my heart for her. She had little sense of belonging though her hippie like mother desperately tried to make homes out of the places they briefly rested, before having to go on the run again.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tra Cey

    Initial part of the story was a little dry because she is telling the story from the perspective of a child not truly knowing what is happening but as you get further into the book and she starts understanding herself what was happening to her family, it does get more engaging. Style was an easy read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    It was a good story, It went back and forth from past to present a little so I sometimes found it hard to focus what part of the story we were in now, and I found myself a little frustrated at how the author went about her teen years...her dad was in jail for drug smuggling...yet she did drugs...I guess that was her way to deal. Overall I found it interesting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    Girl who’s father was an international drug dealer and money launderer describes the family’s unpredictable lifestyle and works out her feelings about it all. I read her article in NYT’s Modern Love and I liked her writing style but I think I like her better as an essayist. The book just went on and on and I felt like saying, “Enough already!”

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda Lomazow

    A memoir you will not forget.Tyler Wetherall and her family lived life on the run always fleeing from one place to the next.As tTyler realizes this is due to legal problems of her fathers she starts to realize why her parents force them to live like this,Highly recommend,

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    This memoir of a life on the run was really interesting. The difficulties of visiting her father in prison and how the separation of living on the run affected her was thought provoking. Really enjoyed this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Mac

    Very interesting and exciting memoir! Gives you a different perspective on crime and family. This memoir is much much more engaging than the current best selling memoir Educated. This book should be the to read memoir of 2018!

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