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On 26 February 1993 a massive bomb hit New York's World Trade Center, creating more hospital casualties than any event in American history since the Civil War. Ramzi Yousef, the young British-educated terrorist who masterminded the attack, had been seeking to topple the twin towers and cause tens of thousands of fatalities. An intensive FBI investigation into the crime qui On 26 February 1993 a massive bomb hit New York's World Trade Center, creating more hospital casualties than any event in American history since the Civil War. Ramzi Yousef, the young British-educated terrorist who masterminded the attack, had been seeking to topple the twin towers and cause tens of thousands of fatalities. An intensive FBI investigation into the crime quickly developed into a man-hunt that took top FBI agents across the globe. But even with the FBI on his trail, Yousef continued with his campaign of terror. He bombed an airplane and an Iranian shrine. He tried to kill Benazir Bhutto, the former Pakistani Prime Minister, and planned to assassinate the Pope, President Clinton and simultaneously destroy 11 airliners over the Pacific Ocean using tiny undetectable bombs. He also plotted an attack on the CIA headquarters with a plane loaded with chemical weapons. His pursuers dubbed Yousef "an evil genius." During their investigation, FBI agents discovered that Yousef was funded and sent on some of his attacks by Osama bin Laden, a mysterious Saudi millionaire. By the mid-1990s they realized bin Laden had become the most influential sponsor of terrorism in the world, and agents now conclude that since the early 1990s a small group of terrorists supported by bin Laden have dominated international terrorism. These "Afghan Arabs" helped defeat the Soviets in Afghanistan before killing thousands of people in campaigns against governments in the West, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. When bin Laden's followers attacked American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania on 7 August 1998, killing 224 people, the U.S. finally launched cruise missile strikes in an attempt to destroy his secret organization. Drawing on unpublished reports, interrogation files, interviews with senior FBI agents who hunted Yousef, intelligence sources and government figures including Benazir Bhutto, Simon Reeve gives a harrowing account of Yousef's bombings, offers a revealing insight into his background, and details the FBI's man-hunt to catch him. Reeve explains how Yousef was one of bin Laden's first operatives and documents bin Laden's life and emergence as the leader of a potent terrorist organization, giving fascinating insights into the man President Clinton has called "the pre-eminent organizer and financier of international terrorism in the world today." Highly detailed and yet immensely readable, The New Jackals sheds new light on two of the world's most notorious terrorists. Reeve warns that Yousef and bin Laden are just the first of a new breed of terrorist, men with no restrictions on mass killing. Reeve also offers evidence that bin Laden's organization may already have chemical and nuclear weapons and explains why the world could soon face attacks by terrorists with weapons of mass destruction.


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On 26 February 1993 a massive bomb hit New York's World Trade Center, creating more hospital casualties than any event in American history since the Civil War. Ramzi Yousef, the young British-educated terrorist who masterminded the attack, had been seeking to topple the twin towers and cause tens of thousands of fatalities. An intensive FBI investigation into the crime qui On 26 February 1993 a massive bomb hit New York's World Trade Center, creating more hospital casualties than any event in American history since the Civil War. Ramzi Yousef, the young British-educated terrorist who masterminded the attack, had been seeking to topple the twin towers and cause tens of thousands of fatalities. An intensive FBI investigation into the crime quickly developed into a man-hunt that took top FBI agents across the globe. But even with the FBI on his trail, Yousef continued with his campaign of terror. He bombed an airplane and an Iranian shrine. He tried to kill Benazir Bhutto, the former Pakistani Prime Minister, and planned to assassinate the Pope, President Clinton and simultaneously destroy 11 airliners over the Pacific Ocean using tiny undetectable bombs. He also plotted an attack on the CIA headquarters with a plane loaded with chemical weapons. His pursuers dubbed Yousef "an evil genius." During their investigation, FBI agents discovered that Yousef was funded and sent on some of his attacks by Osama bin Laden, a mysterious Saudi millionaire. By the mid-1990s they realized bin Laden had become the most influential sponsor of terrorism in the world, and agents now conclude that since the early 1990s a small group of terrorists supported by bin Laden have dominated international terrorism. These "Afghan Arabs" helped defeat the Soviets in Afghanistan before killing thousands of people in campaigns against governments in the West, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. When bin Laden's followers attacked American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania on 7 August 1998, killing 224 people, the U.S. finally launched cruise missile strikes in an attempt to destroy his secret organization. Drawing on unpublished reports, interrogation files, interviews with senior FBI agents who hunted Yousef, intelligence sources and government figures including Benazir Bhutto, Simon Reeve gives a harrowing account of Yousef's bombings, offers a revealing insight into his background, and details the FBI's man-hunt to catch him. Reeve explains how Yousef was one of bin Laden's first operatives and documents bin Laden's life and emergence as the leader of a potent terrorist organization, giving fascinating insights into the man President Clinton has called "the pre-eminent organizer and financier of international terrorism in the world today." Highly detailed and yet immensely readable, The New Jackals sheds new light on two of the world's most notorious terrorists. Reeve warns that Yousef and bin Laden are just the first of a new breed of terrorist, men with no restrictions on mass killing. Reeve also offers evidence that bin Laden's organization may already have chemical and nuclear weapons and explains why the world could soon face attacks by terrorists with weapons of mass destruction.

30 review for The New Jackals: Ramzi Yousef, Osama bin Laden, and the Future of Terrorism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeane

    Luckily this book wasn't written as a he is such a bad guy, whatever his reasons. I didn't realize first that the book was written before the airplanes destroyed the Twin Towers, so was waiting until that would be described. As it was written before, it was kind of fun to see how Reeves wrote about thinks and knowing what really happened afterwards. Spooky sometimes, but also making you feel sometimes like it couldn't be true they managed to do this stuff. I guess Americans will feel different rea Luckily this book wasn't written as a he is such a bad guy, whatever his reasons. I didn't realize first that the book was written before the airplanes destroyed the Twin Towers, so was waiting until that would be described. As it was written before, it was kind of fun to see how Reeves wrote about thinks and knowing what really happened afterwards. Spooky sometimes, but also making you feel sometimes like it couldn't be true they managed to do this stuff. I guess Americans will feel different reading this book, but I liked the way Reeves wrote. Yes, what happened is bad. But the book shows you also the other side and makes you think about what the other side says. Their reasons, their background and what has happened in their countries, now and a long time ago. It isn't a book about the terrorists are wrong and the countries they harm or complete victims. I don't support them, but certain things they say I don't disagree with either. The review Fiona wrote about this book which she gave to me, explains very well what the book is about. So I would advise to read that one too! So my conclusion is that just as with his other book that I read, I thought it would be so so, but again it was interesting to read and well writen.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gary Varga

    A superb piece of work. Nothing created. Just a joining of the factual dots gained through investigative journalism. It reads so well 20 years on as when you interpolate the facts with the predictions you actually arrive in our terrorism reality today. If you are looking for a religion, particularly Muslim, bashing diatribe then you will be disappointed. This isn't prose turning reality into a pantomime. There are some home truths for us in the West to take in. Historical misjudgements that we ar A superb piece of work. Nothing created. Just a joining of the factual dots gained through investigative journalism. It reads so well 20 years on as when you interpolate the facts with the predictions you actually arrive in our terrorism reality today. If you are looking for a religion, particularly Muslim, bashing diatribe then you will be disappointed. This isn't prose turning reality into a pantomime. There are some home truths for us in the West to take in. Historical misjudgements that we are still suffering from today. And by us I mean everyone. I was told that it accurately predicted a particular terrorist action that did occur years after this book was published. It didn't. But what it did predict, which included acts like that particular terrorist action, is a change in what terrorism is and why the easiest way to reduce terrorism is the hard negotiated resolutions of complex issues. An example of one that has been eased this way already is Northern Ireland. It isn't solved but enough comprises have occurred to seriously reduce atrocities committed. Finally, it reads well. Whilst not glamorising anything, it is a page turner nonetheless.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Reader Variety

    Interesting that this book was published in 1999, but of course few people, to include me, read it until after Sept. 11th. The FBI was able to infiltrate Sheikh Omar's group, which prevented bridge and tunnel bombings Ramzi Yousef was not an observant Muslim - he just used Islam to further his cause. Bhutto supported the US move to seize Yousef in Pakistan. Reeve foresees the fall of the Egyptian govt. Interesting that this book was published in 1999, but of course few people, to include me, read it until after Sept. 11th. The FBI was able to infiltrate Sheikh Omar's group, which prevented bridge and tunnel bombings Ramzi Yousef was not an observant Muslim - he just used Islam to further his cause. Bhutto supported the US move to seize Yousef in Pakistan. Reeve foresees the fall of the Egyptian govt.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vivek Gaurav

    A very must interesting read to comprehend the rise of new brand of Islamic terrorism of 1990s which is sponsored and manned by sophisticated young evil geniuses. The world is at greater danger now than ever...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    Another small fry ready to use whatever to sell the fear that gets him paid.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Griffiths

    This work has obviously lost some of its punch since publication but had I read this prior to 9/11 then this certainly would have got a five star rating. New Jackals is an excellent analysis of the career of one terrorist in particular and through his investigation of Yousef's career, Reeve demonstrates the complexity and reach of international terrorism in the early 1990s and how it was poised to strike internationally. Many of the predictions about terrorist attacks or the direction terrorism This work has obviously lost some of its punch since publication but had I read this prior to 9/11 then this certainly would have got a five star rating. New Jackals is an excellent analysis of the career of one terrorist in particular and through his investigation of Yousef's career, Reeve demonstrates the complexity and reach of international terrorism in the early 1990s and how it was poised to strike internationally. Many of the predictions about terrorist attacks or the direction terrorism would follow are remarkably accurate and credit is due. The flaws in the predictions made were that terrorism would increasingly take place in the west with the wars in the Middle East proving that terrorism has mostly been used as a weapon against the near enemy not the far one and the other predictions that missed were that fundamentalist terrorists were eagerly seeking access to wmd's as it seems that bombings have proven effective enough for them. I would happily re-read this if a new edition was released to incorporate developments in terrorism since publication as while this is certainly not the most scholarly discussion of the topic, Reeve writes with a verve that makes some of the more technical or repetitive aspects of the story just as interesting as the most engrossing aspects of the narrative. Would highly recommend this to anyone interested in similar topics

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trishers

    Well, I will hold my hand up and say I had absolutely no recollection of an attack on the twin towers in 1993. To read this book and understand what happened and the knowledge and insights gained on Ramzi Youself and Osama bin Laden following the attacks, knowing what would come later - quite frankly it's astounding. Knowing what we knew, and reading articles about the attack written at the time (http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/da...) - I don't know what to make of it all. Could we really not Well, I will hold my hand up and say I had absolutely no recollection of an attack on the twin towers in 1993. To read this book and understand what happened and the knowledge and insights gained on Ramzi Youself and Osama bin Laden following the attacks, knowing what would come later - quite frankly it's astounding. Knowing what we knew, and reading articles about the attack written at the time (http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/da...) - I don't know what to make of it all. Could we really not have put all the knowledge to good use to try to prevent the atrocity that was to come? It's particularly harrowing to read in the article the experiences of those in the towers on the day of the 1993 attack - in particular the quote "it felt like an airplane hit the building". Absolutely chilling.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    I read this book for informational purposes only. It was interesting enough on its own but its importance I think lies in understanding the development of the terrorist cells we see today and how they operate and recruit.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bryan White

    Good background to the precursors of 9/11, other than that it's a pretty hard read. Good background to the precursors of 9/11, other than that it's a pretty hard read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Stockley

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rkrauson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Foster

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rich Roohan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Jarvis

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  17. 4 out of 5

    John Wimmer

  18. 4 out of 5

    Fern

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lcat

  20. 5 out of 5

    Martin Gregg

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rhys Parry

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lance Kellar

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  24. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rickey

  26. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Hegghammer

  27. 5 out of 5

    Martin LaLonde

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  29. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Viral Misra

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