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Cracking Codes with Python: A Beginner's Guide to Cryptography and Computer Programming

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In Cracking Codes with Python, you'll learn how to program in Python while making and breaking ciphers, which are used to encrypt secret messages. (No programming experience required!). After a quick crash course in programming, you'll make, test, and hack classic cipher programs. You'll begin with simple programs like the Caesar cipher and then work your way up to public In Cracking Codes with Python, you'll learn how to program in Python while making and breaking ciphers, which are used to encrypt secret messages. (No programming experience required!). After a quick crash course in programming, you'll make, test, and hack classic cipher programs. You'll begin with simple programs like the Caesar cipher and then work your way up to public key cryptography and the RSA cipher, which is used for modern secure data transmissions. Each program comes with the full code and a line-by-line explanation of how things work. By book's end, you'll walk away with a solid foundation in Python and same crafty programs under your belt. Learn how to: -Combine loops, variables, and flow control statements into real working programs -Use dictionary files to instantly detect whether text is English or nonsense -Create programs to test that the code you've written is working correctly -Write your own programming modules that you can import and use in other programs -Debug your programs and find common errors Cracking Codes with Python is a chance to pick up some Python skills while getting a peek into the intriguing world of cryptography--what more could an aspiring hacker want?


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In Cracking Codes with Python, you'll learn how to program in Python while making and breaking ciphers, which are used to encrypt secret messages. (No programming experience required!). After a quick crash course in programming, you'll make, test, and hack classic cipher programs. You'll begin with simple programs like the Caesar cipher and then work your way up to public In Cracking Codes with Python, you'll learn how to program in Python while making and breaking ciphers, which are used to encrypt secret messages. (No programming experience required!). After a quick crash course in programming, you'll make, test, and hack classic cipher programs. You'll begin with simple programs like the Caesar cipher and then work your way up to public key cryptography and the RSA cipher, which is used for modern secure data transmissions. Each program comes with the full code and a line-by-line explanation of how things work. By book's end, you'll walk away with a solid foundation in Python and same crafty programs under your belt. Learn how to: -Combine loops, variables, and flow control statements into real working programs -Use dictionary files to instantly detect whether text is English or nonsense -Create programs to test that the code you've written is working correctly -Write your own programming modules that you can import and use in other programs -Debug your programs and find common errors Cracking Codes with Python is a chance to pick up some Python skills while getting a peek into the intriguing world of cryptography--what more could an aspiring hacker want?

30 review for Cracking Codes with Python: A Beginner's Guide to Cryptography and Computer Programming

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michiel

    Starting from the simple Ceasar cipher, you work yourself up to a toy implementation of the RSA public encryption, all using basic Python code. A fun journey for the novice and experienced programmer alike!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne Boyarsky

    “Cracking Codes with Python” is a fun way of leanring Python. The book starts out with no Python at all. Instead it covers the basics of encoding/decoding. Starting with chapter 2, Python is used. The book introduces new concepts at a manageable pace as you need them to follow the examples. It also introducs various cipher techniques. By chapter 3, readers learn how to save and run programs. I like that the book covers good programming practices and not just the basics. While I know Python, the b “Cracking Codes with Python” is a fun way of leanring Python. The book starts out with no Python at all. Instead it covers the basics of encoding/decoding. Starting with chapter 2, Python is used. The book introduces new concepts at a manageable pace as you need them to follow the examples. It also introducs various cipher techniques. By chapter 3, readers learn how to save and run programs. I like that the book covers good programming practices and not just the basics. While I know Python, the book was a good review. I had forgotten a few things like __name__ from disuse. I like that the book included performance testing and complexity of algorithms. Towards the end of the book, the code examples are quite long. Normally, I don't like this in a book, but there were great comments. In conclusion, I recommend this book for anyone who wants to learn Python/programming and is interested in security or puzzles. I give this book 9 out of 10 horseshoes. --- Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for writing this review on behalf of CodeRanch.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ed Kerr

    I really enjoyed reading, and working through the code examples of Al Sweigart's Cracking Codes With Python. I find the author's writing style to be both engaging and well-paced. Starting from a historical perspective, the book starts from simple concepts and simple codes and leads the reader through to complex patterns and ideas that provide the foundation for modern cipher techniques. By approaching the learning from both the 'building' and 'breaking' perspectives, the author makes clear that t I really enjoyed reading, and working through the code examples of Al Sweigart's Cracking Codes With Python. I find the author's writing style to be both engaging and well-paced. Starting from a historical perspective, the book starts from simple concepts and simple codes and leads the reader through to complex patterns and ideas that provide the foundation for modern cipher techniques. By approaching the learning from both the 'building' and 'breaking' perspectives, the author makes clear that the mindset and techniques used in building cyphers are surprisingly different than those used in 'breaking' cyphers and helps explain and demonstrate why it is so much harder to build effective cyphers than it is to break them. The well-chosen support materials and links for further reading make this book accessible for people of very different skill levels without the material becoming overwhelming. An added benefit of this book is the way it helps demonstrate why Python is such an effective tool for exploring and experimenting with different approaches, and for developing problem-solving coding skills. What I didn't like about the book is that I did not learn to either write an 'unbreakable' code, nor how to 'crack' one. I suppose that is probably an unrealistic expectation due to the nature of secret ciphers. Still, one of the things I like about Sweigart's other books, such as 'Automate The Boring Stuff', is that with those books I generally come away with code I can immediately put to use in my daily life. With this book's information, I need to be a bit more cautious. My take-away from reading this book is a much better understanding and appreciation of the issues and approaches used in both building and breaking ciphers, and an enjoyable time playing with the code and techniques.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jose Lerma

    It's a brief history of cryptography, a guide on how to implement various ciphers in Python, and what about them make them easy to break. You don't need an established background in programming or the Python language because everything is explained line-by-line. I love the teaching style: you are given the full source code and then he explains how each line works with some examples of concepts to try in the interactive shell. At first, you may not know what each line does, but since it is often r It's a brief history of cryptography, a guide on how to implement various ciphers in Python, and what about them make them easy to break. You don't need an established background in programming or the Python language because everything is explained line-by-line. I love the teaching style: you are given the full source code and then he explains how each line works with some examples of concepts to try in the interactive shell. At first, you may not know what each line does, but since it is often repetitive between ciphers, you can begin to understand what it does as you type out the source code. If you don't understand what a line does, then the chapter explains in detail with the examples. Everything is explained in layman's terms and is easy to read. The practice questions as the end test to see if you understood what was being read, or force you to backtrack to review. You need a computer with Python to read this book. In theory, especially if you have a programming background, you can read it without typing a single thing. However, by doing so, you miss out on the programming aspect. In fact, I found some bugs in the chapters because I typed it out and tried to run it. Having that said, this book does not teach you how to program. You sort of get a sense of technique by osmosis, but not by actually sitting down and figuring out how to program something yourself. Even the practice questions don't have you sit down and write code to solve a problem. It's a good primer. It often introduces topics, but recommends further reading elsewhere. I feel I have a greater understanding of string manipulation thanks to this book. If cryptography or discrete mathematics are something that interest you, this is definitely a good place to start. Thanks to Mr. Al Sweigart for giving me a free PDF to binge-read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jay Singh

    I find Al’s books are always great well written and very interesting and different from other python resources. I am sure you might read ‘Automate the Boring Stuff with Python (if not than that I would recommend to add that to your library too) and this book meets the same standard. Al’s “Cracking Codes with Python“ is a great python resource for everybody who works with python. Book composition and layout of each chapter is well thought. It will keep you hooked. Especially the style of Al’s wri I find Al’s books are always great well written and very interesting and different from other python resources. I am sure you might read ‘Automate the Boring Stuff with Python (if not than that I would recommend to add that to your library too) and this book meets the same standard. Al’s “Cracking Codes with Python“ is a great python resource for everybody who works with python. Book composition and layout of each chapter is well thought. It will keep you hooked. Especially the style of Al’s writing and the use of simple language and practice examples are super useful. The book is written without use of complex jargons and sufficient references and tips. There is lots of learning packed in these 400+ pages. The book serves well to introduce you to python programing concepts and ciphers. The book is very interestingly laid out across 24 chapters and each chapter introduces the reader with different chipper algorithm. Of course the chippers explained in this book are not the basic chippers but by learning them, you’ll learn the foundations cryptography was built on and how hackers can break weak encryption It teaches beginners how to program computers to hack ciphers, and while playing the chippers, It also introduces you with basic programming concepts using the Python programming language. The book have everything you would need to learn and work with the chippers explained in the book. All you would need is a computer to work with. This book is for those who are curious about encryption, hacking, or cryptography. It helps to learn the foundations cryptography and how hackers can break weak encryption. You don’t need a programing experience to read this book. This book can be very conveniently read by any person who have never programmed before. It teaches basic programming concepts using the Python programming language, which is one of the best languages for beginners. It has a gentle learning curve that novices of all ages can master, yet it’s also a powerful language used by professional software developers. Each chapter the book focuses on the complete source code. Instead of teaching you programming concepts and leaving it up to you to figure out how to make your own programs, this book shows you complete programs and explains how they work. Al is very through in giving step by step instruction from pre-requisite, editors to execution of python programs so you will never feel left along while working with the example code. In conclusion, this book is definitely worth the read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    S

    I first got exposed to Python on the numerical side because I worked on dynamical systems with Mathematica. A big scientific publisher (doing lots of yellow-cover books) started doing numerical Python with one of its imprints. I must confess that I didn't find their Python books easy to read. I then went on to look for more trade books of Python and found a nice publisher called No Starch Press. There are many books on using ciphers to encrypt messages and there are some books on hacking ciphers I first got exposed to Python on the numerical side because I worked on dynamical systems with Mathematica. A big scientific publisher (doing lots of yellow-cover books) started doing numerical Python with one of its imprints. I must confess that I didn't find their Python books easy to read. I then went on to look for more trade books of Python and found a nice publisher called No Starch Press. There are many books on using ciphers to encrypt messages and there are some books on hacking ciphers. Al Sweigart's book is unique in that it is about using Python to hack ciphers. I found numerical Python hard and sort of unnatural as compared with other more numerically-oriented languages. The popularity of Python has made me compelled to pick up parts of it here and there. After some work I found that Sweigart's book a nice self-study tool to keep me learning Python. I would recommend that a beginner download Python 3.x from python.org and download Geany from geany.org, rather than using the larger GUI package like Anaconda. With Python and Geany installed, a beginner can enter the Python programs in Sweigart's book and practice. Sweigart provides a special tool, called the Diff tool that quickly tells if something is typed wrong by a practicing beginner. There is usually a big difference between looking at the codes and typing up the codes oneself. Sweigart's Diff tool really motivated me to type up the codes myself. Unlike the trade books on operating systems, administration, and networking which quickly get outdated and second, third, even fifth editions get printed in less than 10 years. Over 20 chapters of Sweigart's book are classic materials of cipher and will not go updated. As the author pointed out, these will lay a good foundation for a learning beginner. The cipher taught in these some 20 chapters is not meant to be used in the real world as a commodity laptop can run codes to crack such classic cipher. I used the book to get to know a part of the multifaceted Swiss knife Python and I found it more natural part of Python than its numerical aspect. With this book I didn't have to push me as hard as I did with other Python books. I highly recommend Cracking Codes with Python for Python learners, especially those who plan on working on ethical hacking.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Gaudet

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Al Sweigart is a great teacher and a gifted technical writer! Python is an incredibly popular language right now, and I would recommend reading this book to anyone who is looking to pick it up. The book only requires a basic understanding of common Python functions, and new functions are introduced along the way. But the language itself isn’t the main focus of the book: it’s a journey through cryptographic methods from the ancient world to modern day. Each “section” of the book explains the theor Al Sweigart is a great teacher and a gifted technical writer! Python is an incredibly popular language right now, and I would recommend reading this book to anyone who is looking to pick it up. The book only requires a basic understanding of common Python functions, and new functions are introduced along the way. But the language itself isn’t the main focus of the book: it’s a journey through cryptographic methods from the ancient world to modern day. Each “section” of the book explains the theory behind the cipher, how it worked in practice, and then covers how to program that cipher using basic Python code. The next chapter then discusses the weaknesses of the cipher and how it can be hacked— again using Python to automate the process. The author mentions throughout the book that these are not professional algorithms. He admits the code is neither optimized nor refactored completely. But, it is very clean, well commented, and easy to follow. Complex concepts, like the Sieve of Eratosthenes, are also illustrated separately. Nothing but great things to say about this book. It’s a great way to learn python, it’s a great way to learn about ciphers and how they work, and — the author makes all the code and examples free on his site. In fact, the entire book is free to read on his site.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Clinton

    Just like his other books and Python tutorials, Cracking Codes with Python is superb. Like always Al's books are an non intimidating and easy to follow along way to learn various topic with Python. This book centers more around learning general cryptography while also getting a stronger grip on the python language itself. Each chapter introduces you to new concepts and starts you from zero to hero so to speak. You do not have to worry about starting a new chapter and suddenly be unable to unders Just like his other books and Python tutorials, Cracking Codes with Python is superb. Like always Al's books are an non intimidating and easy to follow along way to learn various topic with Python. This book centers more around learning general cryptography while also getting a stronger grip on the python language itself. Each chapter introduces you to new concepts and starts you from zero to hero so to speak. You do not have to worry about starting a new chapter and suddenly be unable to understand or keep up with that chapters content. The concepts in each chapters are clearly explained and the author is reachable if you have a question or two. I assume like his other books that you will be able to eventually watch a video version of this book if thats how you prefer to learn. As always you can access this content for free on his website, but since he gives so much back to the Python community it makes sense to just support him directly and its easier to use the book IMO. While this is an introduction of sorts, it will get you headed in the right direction and help you progress as an Python programmer.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sudo

    Cracking Codes is a gentle introduction for someone new to python and walks one through the basics of the language along with the features that make it such a great language. It is also an introduction to cryptography and code cracking. I don't believe the book aims to satisfy the computer science majors out there who may be looking for more detail and difficulty. What it does do, it does well. The book explains cryptography concepts like Kerckhoffs's principle and Shannon's maxim. It covers sev Cracking Codes is a gentle introduction for someone new to python and walks one through the basics of the language along with the features that make it such a great language. It is also an introduction to cryptography and code cracking. I don't believe the book aims to satisfy the computer science majors out there who may be looking for more detail and difficulty. What it does do, it does well. The book explains cryptography concepts like Kerckhoffs's principle and Shannon's maxim. It covers several ciphers including the Caesar, Transposition, Affine, Vigenere, and public-key RSA cipher. It introduces the reader to these ciphers and how to program them, and more importantly, how to "crack" them (well, not *all* of them). It does this and it does it with hands-on coding and non-coding challenges, code examples (available via the website), and great wit. Cracking Codes with Python is the second of Al's books I've gone through. Last summer my son and I plowed through a good bit of Automate the Boring Stuff together. It was a great experience that we both enjoyed. This book is equally fantastic and enjoyable. I look forward to Al's next book. My cat weighs more than Al's cat.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Absolutely loved it! I had an incredible experience reading this book. Thanks for writing it Al. This book kept me interested with its great code, hands on work, helpful encouragements and fantastic Trivia pieces. It gives you the understanding behind why these things are so important and why you should keep reading! It lets you move at your own pace and isn't too aimed at those just starting python which is wonderful. That being said, I never felt bored reading it! In fact I had to walk away, th Absolutely loved it! I had an incredible experience reading this book. Thanks for writing it Al. This book kept me interested with its great code, hands on work, helpful encouragements and fantastic Trivia pieces. It gives you the understanding behind why these things are so important and why you should keep reading! It lets you move at your own pace and isn't too aimed at those just starting python which is wonderful. That being said, I never felt bored reading it! In fact I had to walk away, think a bit, redigest, read again. It kept me wanting more! Downsides? Trying to finish my college course at the same time. I reckon I didn't need to try juggle android and this together... Cheers for a great read! Looking forward to adding more of your books to my library

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

    Livro realmente fantástico e muito divertido. O livro consiste basicamente em apresentar modelos de criptografia que avançam em complexidade no correr do livro. O autor parte da simples cifra de César e até a complexa (and still hackeable) cifra de RSA. Ao longo do caminho o autor também apresenta alguns conceitos de criptografia, como o principio de Kerckhoffs. É uma leitura divertida e é direcionada para não programadores. Para quem já sabe um pouco de programação, tentar aplicar os modelos de Livro realmente fantástico e muito divertido. O livro consiste basicamente em apresentar modelos de criptografia que avançam em complexidade no correr do livro. O autor parte da simples cifra de César e até a complexa (and still hackeable) cifra de RSA. Ao longo do caminho o autor também apresenta alguns conceitos de criptografia, como o principio de Kerckhoffs. É uma leitura divertida e é direcionada para não programadores. Para quem já sabe um pouco de programação, tentar aplicar os modelos de cifra do livro em pequenos programas executáveis e tentar decifrá-los posteriormente é um bom exercício (principalmente para treinar flow statements e condicionais). O livro pode ser lido online nesse link: http://inventwithpython.com/cracking/

  12. 4 out of 5

    Adam Reinard

    As a student leader for a group of students going into the security professions, I found this book to be an excellent introduction to both the basic ideas of cryptography and more advanced uses of python. It goes into enough depth with python to be useful in other applications, and does it in an entertaining and educational way. The cryptography portion focuses mainly on the contemporary ciphers, things like substitution ciphers and the like, but near the end it starts to get into more modern cip As a student leader for a group of students going into the security professions, I found this book to be an excellent introduction to both the basic ideas of cryptography and more advanced uses of python. It goes into enough depth with python to be useful in other applications, and does it in an entertaining and educational way. The cryptography portion focuses mainly on the contemporary ciphers, things like substitution ciphers and the like, but near the end it starts to get into more modern ciphers with public key generation. Overall, if you're a budding information security student, programmer, or cryptography enthusiast who would like to learn Python, I highly recommend this book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kerwin Lim

    As a beginner programmer, my knowledge of python were limited to only the fundamentals. As such, I was skeptical if i would be able to understand this book. However, after the first chapter I was not at all lost but instead more clear on the concepts that were being used. A very step-by-step book that guides readers v smoothly. Am still in the middle of reading this book but it has been informative and educational so far. Would highly recommend this book to people not just interested in programmin As a beginner programmer, my knowledge of python were limited to only the fundamentals. As such, I was skeptical if i would be able to understand this book. However, after the first chapter I was not at all lost but instead more clear on the concepts that were being used. A very step-by-step book that guides readers v smoothly. Am still in the middle of reading this book but it has been informative and educational so far. Would highly recommend this book to people not just interested in programming but cryptography as well. The series has been extremely helpful in building my basics in programming and teaching me cryptography.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    "I'm a technology teacher in the secundary school (hihg school). I found this book in Internet searching books and manuals about programming with python. His online readind has allowed me find a very interesting way to teach/learn programming to my pupils. The content is very structured, and I personally think that will be a motivated to learn python. Craking codes with python, with his 24 chapters, is a book with enough conent to learn starting from scratch. I encourage to the authot to continue "I'm a technology teacher in the secundary school (hihg school). I found this book in Internet searching books and manuals about programming with python. His online readind has allowed me find a very interesting way to teach/learn programming to my pupils. The content is very structured, and I personally think that will be a motivated to learn python. Craking codes with python, with his 24 chapters, is a book with enough conent to learn starting from scratch. I encourage to the authot to continue improving the content to convert the book in a clssic python book, for the beginners and dummies programmers. Totally advisable"

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maxim

    The book has some value and, overall, I liked it. The main problem is that it covers the language basics. AGAIN. If author wouldn't bother with covering all the basics [that you can learn in, at most, 3 days by completing any sensible Python tutorial], the book would be: 1. Either 120-150 pages long and less noisy 2. Or contain much more valuable information on its main topic 3. Or some combination of (1) and (2) Considering the con, I'd give it 4/5 if not for one major lack: there aren't any Unit Tes The book has some value and, overall, I liked it. The main problem is that it covers the language basics. AGAIN. If author wouldn't bother with covering all the basics [that you can learn in, at most, 3 days by completing any sensible Python tutorial], the book would be: 1. Either 120-150 pages long and less noisy 2. Or contain much more valuable information on its main topic 3. Or some combination of (1) and (2) Considering the con, I'd give it 4/5 if not for one major lack: there aren't any Unit Tests. And you can feel it in the code quality. Also, the code is utterly unpythonic.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eric Fletcher

    I really like the way Al presents this topic. It is very clear and easy to follow. If you are into solving puzzles and figuring things out, this is a great book to stimulate that part of your brain. What I like most about this book is that it is for any skill level. I have a few of Al's books, and I love how he uses specific topics like Cryptography to teach python to us. He shows us how ciphers work and how we can use Python to crack these codes; It appeals to the hacker in us all. I really like the way Al presents this topic. It is very clear and easy to follow. If you are into solving puzzles and figuring things out, this is a great book to stimulate that part of your brain. What I like most about this book is that it is for any skill level. I have a few of Al's books, and I love how he uses specific topics like Cryptography to teach python to us. He shows us how ciphers work and how we can use Python to crack these codes; It appeals to the hacker in us all.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Warren Mcpherson

    A very good introduction to programming and the Python language. Using cryptography as a hook also leads technical ideas that are very well explained. It starts out at a very simple level and explains basic concepts. As the book progresses there are a couple chapters where the reader should be prepared to slow down to understand the calculations. The book gently introduces several good software design ideas.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hamid RaKhsha

    If you want to learn python and basic of cryptography in fun and easiest way ....don't hesitate pick this book up ....when I started read this book beside the other python books I decide to close the rest and finish 'Cracking Codes with Python' ..... this book is good if you have some basic knowledge of python its improve your writing and working with tools and functional programing ..... If you want to learn python and basic of cryptography in fun and easiest way ....don't hesitate pick this book up ....when I started read this book beside the other python books I decide to close the rest and finish 'Cracking Codes with Python' ..... this book is good if you have some basic knowledge of python its improve your writing and working with tools and functional programing .....

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    An Excellent book. This book walks through implementation and hacking of several classical ciphers in Python. Along the way, it teaches readers how to manipulate the essential Python data types - string, list, dictionarie and tuple. It is also offers good lessons for problem solving with non-trivial data structures. Would recommend to anyone interested in the history of Cryptography.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Cracking Codes with Python is a great way to learn Python, while also exploring ciphers and Python's practical applications with them. The book is great even with no prior Python knowledge or experience, and dives into cryptography without any using any high-level mathematics. This book is great for any aspiring programmer or cryptographer such as myself. Cracking Codes with Python is a great way to learn Python, while also exploring ciphers and Python's practical applications with them. The book is great even with no prior Python knowledge or experience, and dives into cryptography without any using any high-level mathematics. This book is great for any aspiring programmer or cryptographer such as myself.

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Souza

    Cracking codes with python is a fantastic introduction to basic Python programming as well as a thorough course on multiple cryptography methodologies. I really enjoyed the book and was able to learn easily with AL’s excellent teaching method. I would recommend this book for sure, as well as the Automate the Boring stuff book as well.

  22. 5 out of 5

    John Todd

    A good read. The Python was pretty basic, but it has an easy introduction to simple forms of cryptography. I especially like the discussion of the RSA algorithm, which I had read about before but never fully understood. I like it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    You can copy code from papers by taking a picture with your cell phone, pasting it in onenote, and then copying the text from the picture. This book can be read here: https://inventwithpython.com/cracking/ You can copy code from papers by taking a picture with your cell phone, pasting it in onenote, and then copying the text from the picture. This book can be read here: https://inventwithpython.com/cracking/

  24. 4 out of 5

    Umegbewe

    A really wonderful book for concept about cryptography. I loved the quotes in each Chapter

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tim Wallace

    An overall enjoyable read. Though, as a programming book it was a bit shallow on the math behind ciphers, just as my number theory textbook was a bit light on the computer science behind ciphers.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brett Barker

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Kunzman

  28. 5 out of 5

    نوري يقين

  29. 5 out of 5

    Blkrog .

  30. 4 out of 5

    Markus

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