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Award-winning horror editor Stephen Jones presents thirty-six modern masters of the macabre. Among them are: Harlan Ellison, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, Paul McAuley, Peter Tremayne, Steve Rasnic Tem, and Ramsey Campbell. This anthology collects the very best in vampire fiction which blends sheer horror with dark humor, deadly tenderness with tingling terror. For the classic vamp Award-winning horror editor Stephen Jones presents thirty-six modern masters of the macabre. Among them are: Harlan Ellison, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, Paul McAuley, Peter Tremayne, Steve Rasnic Tem, and Ramsey Campbell. This anthology collects the very best in vampire fiction which blends sheer horror with dark humor, deadly tenderness with tingling terror. For the classic vampire, as this volume amply shows, the Blood is the Life. From Hugh B. Cave's pulp thriller "Stragella" through to Harold Waldrop's bizarre mix of vampire and Nazis in "Der Untergang Des Abendlandesmenschen" and Christopher Fowler's "The Legend of Dracula Reconsidered as a Primetime TV Special." In between lie artful chillers by the likes of Clive Barker, Brian Lumley, R. Chetwynd-Hayes, Robert Bloch and John Burke, along with new and original stories by Niel Gaiman with "Cards from a Vampire Tarot," and Kim Newman with "Andy Warhol's Dracula: anno Dracula 1978-79." You can sink your teeth, too, in F. Paul Wilson's fast-paced thriller "Midnight Mass," Manly Wade Wellman's "Chastel," offering bloody intrigue and adventure with Judge Keith Hilary Pursuivant; and Les Daniel's "Yellow Fog," which features his enigmatic vampire-hero Don Sebastian de Villanueva. CONTENTS Introduction: The Children of the Night by Stephen Jones Human Remains by Clive Barker Necros by Brian Lumley The Man Who Loved The Vampire Lady by Brian Stableford A Place To Stay by Michael Marshall Smith The Brood by Ramsey Campbell Root Cellar by Nancy Kilpatrick Hungarian Rhapsody by Robert Bloch The Legend of Dracula Reconsidered as a Prime-Time TV Special by Christopher Fowler Vampire by Richard Christian Matheson Stragella by Hugh B. Cave A Week In The Unlife by David J. Schow The House At Evening by Francis Garfield Vampyrrhic Outcast by Simon Clark The Labyrinth by R. Chetwynd-Hayes Beyond Any Measure by Karl Edward Wagner Doctor Porthos by Basil Copper Straight To Hell by Paul McAuley It Only Comes Out At Night by Dennis Etchison Investigating Jericho by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro Dracula's Chair by Peter Tremayne A Taste For Blood by Sydney J. Bounds The Better Half by Melanie Tem The Devil's Tritone by John Burke Chastel by Manly Wade Wellman Der Untergang Des Abendlandesmenschen by Howard Waldrop Red As Blood by Tanith Lee Laird of Dunain by Graham Masterson A Trick of the Dark by Tina Rath Midnight Mass by F. Paul Wilson Blood Gothis by Nancy Holder Yellow Fog by Les Daniels Fifteen Cards From a Vampire Tarot by Neil Gaiman Vintage Domestic by Steve Rasnic Tem Try A Dull Knife by Harlan Ellison Andy Warhol's Dracula: Anno Dracula 1978-1979 by Kim Newman


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Award-winning horror editor Stephen Jones presents thirty-six modern masters of the macabre. Among them are: Harlan Ellison, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, Paul McAuley, Peter Tremayne, Steve Rasnic Tem, and Ramsey Campbell. This anthology collects the very best in vampire fiction which blends sheer horror with dark humor, deadly tenderness with tingling terror. For the classic vamp Award-winning horror editor Stephen Jones presents thirty-six modern masters of the macabre. Among them are: Harlan Ellison, Chelsea Quinn Yarbro, Paul McAuley, Peter Tremayne, Steve Rasnic Tem, and Ramsey Campbell. This anthology collects the very best in vampire fiction which blends sheer horror with dark humor, deadly tenderness with tingling terror. For the classic vampire, as this volume amply shows, the Blood is the Life. From Hugh B. Cave's pulp thriller "Stragella" through to Harold Waldrop's bizarre mix of vampire and Nazis in "Der Untergang Des Abendlandesmenschen" and Christopher Fowler's "The Legend of Dracula Reconsidered as a Primetime TV Special." In between lie artful chillers by the likes of Clive Barker, Brian Lumley, R. Chetwynd-Hayes, Robert Bloch and John Burke, along with new and original stories by Niel Gaiman with "Cards from a Vampire Tarot," and Kim Newman with "Andy Warhol's Dracula: anno Dracula 1978-79." You can sink your teeth, too, in F. Paul Wilson's fast-paced thriller "Midnight Mass," Manly Wade Wellman's "Chastel," offering bloody intrigue and adventure with Judge Keith Hilary Pursuivant; and Les Daniel's "Yellow Fog," which features his enigmatic vampire-hero Don Sebastian de Villanueva. CONTENTS Introduction: The Children of the Night by Stephen Jones Human Remains by Clive Barker Necros by Brian Lumley The Man Who Loved The Vampire Lady by Brian Stableford A Place To Stay by Michael Marshall Smith The Brood by Ramsey Campbell Root Cellar by Nancy Kilpatrick Hungarian Rhapsody by Robert Bloch The Legend of Dracula Reconsidered as a Prime-Time TV Special by Christopher Fowler Vampire by Richard Christian Matheson Stragella by Hugh B. Cave A Week In The Unlife by David J. Schow The House At Evening by Francis Garfield Vampyrrhic Outcast by Simon Clark The Labyrinth by R. Chetwynd-Hayes Beyond Any Measure by Karl Edward Wagner Doctor Porthos by Basil Copper Straight To Hell by Paul McAuley It Only Comes Out At Night by Dennis Etchison Investigating Jericho by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro Dracula's Chair by Peter Tremayne A Taste For Blood by Sydney J. Bounds The Better Half by Melanie Tem The Devil's Tritone by John Burke Chastel by Manly Wade Wellman Der Untergang Des Abendlandesmenschen by Howard Waldrop Red As Blood by Tanith Lee Laird of Dunain by Graham Masterson A Trick of the Dark by Tina Rath Midnight Mass by F. Paul Wilson Blood Gothis by Nancy Holder Yellow Fog by Les Daniels Fifteen Cards From a Vampire Tarot by Neil Gaiman Vintage Domestic by Steve Rasnic Tem Try A Dull Knife by Harlan Ellison Andy Warhol's Dracula: Anno Dracula 1978-1979 by Kim Newman

30 review for The Mammoth Book of Vampires

  1. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    And well does this anthology deserve its “mammoth” title! Another in a series of huge, themed compendiums from reliable editor Stephen Jones, this is an able mix of classic and contemporary vampire fiction. It begins well with Clive Barker’s weird HUMAN REMAINS, about a rent boy haunted by a doppelganger. Fans of the author will know to expect the gruesome stuff in this one. Brian Lumley’s NECROS is less inspiring and more predictable, winning points for the craft evident in the author’s writing And well does this anthology deserve its “mammoth” title! Another in a series of huge, themed compendiums from reliable editor Stephen Jones, this is an able mix of classic and contemporary vampire fiction. It begins well with Clive Barker’s weird HUMAN REMAINS, about a rent boy haunted by a doppelganger. Fans of the author will know to expect the gruesome stuff in this one. Brian Lumley’s NECROS is less inspiring and more predictable, winning points for the craft evident in the author’s writing style rather than the plot, but Brian Stableford’s THE MAN WHO LOVED THE VAMPIRE LADY is an excellent and worthwhile effort, a 17th century horror/romance that never disappoints. FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE, by F. Marion Crawford, is one of the best here, a chillingly atmospheric take on the old legends. It’s slow paced and lengthy, set in old world Italy, and stands as one of my favourite vampire stories of all time. Ramsey Campbell’s THE BROOD is also well written, full of the author’s trademark urban decay and hard to fault. Robert Bloch’s HUNGARIAN RHAPSODY isn’t bad, mixing gangsters and bloodsuckers, but shows that there’s only so much you can do in this overworked genre. Poe’s LIGEIA is one I didn’t care for: it’s a nostalgic piece but the horror feels diluted and the story overwritten, not up to his usual standard. Still, STRAGELLA, by pulp veteran Hugh B. Cave, is top-of-the-genre stuff, a fast-paced vampire pulp full of unique little touches (a Crucifix tattoo, for instance) that I loved. David J. Schow’s A WEEK IN THE UNLIFE, about a vampire hunter, is morbid and depressing, and gory with it, but it has a great climax that lifts it from the mundane. THE HOUSE AT EVENING is by Frances Garfield (Manly Wade Wellman’s wife) and a somewhat erotic, subtle variant on the theme. R. Chetwynd-Hayes delivers THE LABYRINTH, an old “couple takes refuge in ancient house on the moors” type tale full of graphic horror and grim humour that really works. Karl Edward Wagner is the man behind BEYOND ANY MEASURE, a weird work of social realism full of goth parties, drug abuse and lesbians. It’s shocking, but oddly engaging with it. But it pales in comparison to Basil Copper’s monstrous DOCTOR PORTHOS, a short, short effort with a thick, thick atmosphere, a feat that few authors can aspire to achieve. DRACULA’S GUEST, by the ubiquitous Stoker, was originally a chapter excised from DRACULA as it was felt to slow the tale down too much. I’m glad it survived through the years because it stands well as a story in its own right, an excellent description of a barren countryside populated by malignant creatures. Dennis Etchison’s IT ONLY COMES OUT AT NIGHT is at the opposite end of the spectrum – a couple touring a US desert visit an eerie rest stop – but just as scary, with the chills of a heart-stopping variety here. DRACULA’S CHAIR, by Peter Tremayne, is a lesser effort, with the title speaking for itself. It’s a little too normal to register much. But Melanie Tem comes up trumps with THE BETTER HALF, a superb story full of atmosphere and suspense that I can’t rightly describe; the level of growing dread here is tremendous. Equally good is M. R. James’s AN EPISODE OF CATHEDRAL HISTORY, about an evil spirit residing within an ancient tomb. The antiquary background is perfect for this story involving red-eyed demons lurking in the streets and weird screams in the night; one of the author’s lesser-known, but best, tales. Manly Wade Wellman created a psychic detective in Judge Pursuivant and CHASTEL sees him tackling a vampiric creature. Written in 1979, this isn’t as strong as the author’s older pulp efforts, but it’s great to see the character back in action and the story is reminiscent of Seabury Quinn at his best. For a totally ‘outre’ experience, try Howard Waldrop’s DER UNTERGANG DES ABENDLANDESMENSCHEN, about two cowboys hunting a German bloodsucker. It’s jokey, anecdotal and full of knowing references; I had a ball with it. E. F. Benson’s THE ROOM IN THE TOWER is yet another favourite of mine: a subtle, powerful nightmare captured on paper. This is up there with the best of M. R. James. Graham Masterton’s LAIRD OF DUNAIN is pure gristle, packed with the author’s trademark grue and little else. But F. Paul Wilson’s MIDNIGHT MASS is a lot better: lengthy and straightforward, action-focused and always entertaining. A Jewish priest and an alcoholic minister team up to battle a plague of the undead, and a siege in a desecrated church is tremendous stuff. BLOOD GOTHIC, by Nancy Holder, is a dark romance, and not really my cup of tea. But Les Daniels writes a blinder in YELLOW FOG, a Victorian horror story that’s great fun. His London feels real and the story ably mixes together grave robbers, vampires, séances and psychopaths into an enthralling mix. Coming after this, Steve Rasnic Tem’s VINTAGE DOMESTIC is a sickening letdown. Kim Newman was on to a great idea in his novella RED REIGN – what if Dracula survived his novel and took over England? It’s an alternate history effort full of spellbinding spectacle, and was expanded into the equally good novel ANNO DRACULA; both are worth a read. The anthology finishes on Neil Gaiman’s little poem, VAMPIRE SESTINA: tragic, atmospheric, and rather moving. For the most part, this is a splendid collection that I can’t recommend enough in terms of pure enjoyment.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Four stories really stood out from the crowd in this anthology: * Necros by Brian Lumley * Beyond Any Measure by Karl Edward Wagner * The Better Half by Melanie Tem * Midnight Mass by F. Paul Wilson Each one had at least one twist to the vampire lore that I had never seen before and enjoyed immensely. Unfortunately, while those four stories were exceptional, the remaining 25 were not. While none of the stories were bad, they all seemed to lack something new or different. They failed at grabbing m Four stories really stood out from the crowd in this anthology: * Necros by Brian Lumley * Beyond Any Measure by Karl Edward Wagner * The Better Half by Melanie Tem * Midnight Mass by F. Paul Wilson Each one had at least one twist to the vampire lore that I had never seen before and enjoyed immensely. Unfortunately, while those four stories were exceptional, the remaining 25 were not. While none of the stories were bad, they all seemed to lack something new or different. They failed at grabbing my attention. 75 pages of some of the best vampire fiction I've ever read just isn't enough to carry the rest of this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    Many well-known authors contributed short stories to this book. It's a great read. These are well and truly vampire stories, not the current vampire romances that are so popular. Fun to read! Many well-known authors contributed short stories to this book. It's a great read. These are well and truly vampire stories, not the current vampire romances that are so popular. Fun to read!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Giles

    The book gave me a paper cut...like it wanted my blood...enough said.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Johnson

    This collection of short stories is, in itself, a tribute to something quite remarkable, in that over the past one hundred and twenty years the Vampire has become such powerful favourite among fictional characters that it has spurned its own sub-genre. There are vampire movies just as there are cowboy movies and there are vampire stories just as there are detective stories. Other mythical monsters have come and gone, from Frankenstein to the Alien, but none has been so enduring, so universally l This collection of short stories is, in itself, a tribute to something quite remarkable, in that over the past one hundred and twenty years the Vampire has become such powerful favourite among fictional characters that it has spurned its own sub-genre. There are vampire movies just as there are cowboy movies and there are vampire stories just as there are detective stories. Other mythical monsters have come and gone, from Frankenstein to the Alien, but none has been so enduring, so universally loved as the vampire. So many tales have been written of this nocturnal revenant, then, that it should come as no surprise that a bumper collection, such as the Mammoth Book of Vampires, should grace our bookshelves, feeding the public appetite for horror, if not for blood. I found the tales to be well chosen, well introduced and well written. This is a good book. In fact, for those who like short stories and also like vampires, it is a very good book and excellent value for money,though it did, ultimately, cause me to question my own long term fascination with the genre. The stories were 'interesting.' They were well written. They were professional. That said, I did not find them horrifying, thrilling, or fascinating and I found myself wondering why. Looking back and reading some of them for a second, or even a third, time I began to realise that these were 'good' stories even though they were not 'good stories'. They were well written, with rich language and colourful descriptive passages, they had style and they colour and they had clearly come from the labours of very competent authors. They were good to read. They were well done, well written, but they just weren't good stories. The plots were all much too familiar, strange man lives in old house with beautiful young woman: we know from the start that this will not end well. I cannot say that any of them had a surprising ending, not even an interesting ending. For readers who enjoy the quality of good prose, and those who love to bury themselves in all things vampiric, this really was a good book, and superb value for money, but don't expect to feel the tingle of fear up your spine, nor a moment of heart-wrenching empathy for a star crossed Gothic lover. It needs more bite.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Glissadevil

    4.2 stars! I've yet to stumble upon a five star vampire anthology. That said, Mammoth is one of the best vampire horror anthologies I read. I prefer evil scary vampires to sexy ironic blood suckers. Mammoth provides a decent number of the blood type of stories I like. It's a solid read and a valuable reference book for scanning horror authors previously unknown to me. Excellent addition to any serious horror or vampire collection. 4.2 stars! I've yet to stumble upon a five star vampire anthology. That said, Mammoth is one of the best vampire horror anthologies I read. I prefer evil scary vampires to sexy ironic blood suckers. Mammoth provides a decent number of the blood type of stories I like. It's a solid read and a valuable reference book for scanning horror authors previously unknown to me. Excellent addition to any serious horror or vampire collection.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    very hit and miss as the first 9 stories were pretty average but it did get better in the end and the stories to the end of the book were a lot better,

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kerry

    This compilation of vampire stories allows you to see vampires as you never would have thought

  9. 5 out of 5

    Max

    This might be the single best collection of vampire stories I've read thus far. It has a lot of the truly great stories from the Vampire Archives book, such as Human Remains, Doctor Porthos, and Midnight Mass while being in a much more manageable (though sadly out of print) package. It also has some truly great vampire tales I haven't encountered before. There are two tales that consider the vampire on film, one about a man's attempt to create a new adaptation of Dracula in which the film itself This might be the single best collection of vampire stories I've read thus far. It has a lot of the truly great stories from the Vampire Archives book, such as Human Remains, Doctor Porthos, and Midnight Mass while being in a much more manageable (though sadly out of print) package. It also has some truly great vampire tales I haven't encountered before. There are two tales that consider the vampire on film, one about a man's attempt to create a new adaptation of Dracula in which the film itself feeds upon it's hopeful creator, and a story by Kim Newman that mixes Andy Warhol's real Dracula film and countless other works with a continuation of the Anno Dracula universe. There are clever and fun variants on vampires, stories where the heroes don't realize they've already become vampires, the occasional psychic vampire, and other such riffs. There's a great one that mixes vampirism and reincarnation, allowing a woman to effectively fight herself as the vampire spirit inhabiting a corpse is pitted against the reincarnated soul of who the corpse was in life. There's a vampire who was only sort of killed and has effectively become a vampiric haunted house. There are vampire rockstars not in the Lestat mold. There's a wonderful story called Investigating Jericho which is basically the IRS versus Salem's Lot post vampire takeover. It builds up the horror nicely and it's one of the stories that I'd love to see a follow up to. There's a rather strange tale the combines cowboys, vampires, and Hitler, and Tanith Lee has yet another vampire story (I swear I read a new vampire story by her in every vampire anthology) in which Snow White is a force of darkness, much as in one of my favorite Neil Gaiman stories. He's here too with his Vampire Tarot, and though it isn't my favorite of his stories it's still a nice choice for this collection. I also enjoyed A Trick of the Dark, where a sickly woman becomes a vampire to escape her life, a theme I like - it's nice to see some sympathetic vampire stories in the mix. And there's a great contrast in Blood Gothic, another story that may or may not have an actual supernatural element. Another woman wants to have a vampire lover and become a vampire herself, but it seems that all her longing and waiting accomplishes nothing more than driving her insane. It's probably one of the most horrifying stories in the collection. There's a nice mix of lengths of stories here, with novellas like Midnight Mass and stories that pack a huge emotional punch into just a few short pages. It was a great collection for picking up and putting down, though in the end I raced through to the finish to see just what kinds of horror and blood it could throw at me. I can't call this the definitive vampire collection since it's focused almost entirely on relatively recent authors (or at least those from the early 20th century and later), but it's definitely one of the best I've ever read, and it's well worth tracking down for any vampire fan. I've already started Jones's anthology focused solely on Dracula, and I also look forward to reading his book of vampire tales by women. Judging by this and his Frankenstein book, I think he's an excellent horror anthologist and I will have to track down more of his collections.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    A pretty fair assortment of classic and (at the time) new tales of vampires. I've highlighted the ones I've particularly liked. This includes: Human Remains by Clive Barker Necros by Brian Lumley The Man Who Loved the Vampire Lady For the Blood is the Life by F. Marion Crawford The Brood by Ramsey Campbell Hungarian Rhapsody by Robert Bloch Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe Vampire by Richard Christian Matheson Stragella by Hugh B. Cave A Week in the Unlife by David J. Schow The House at Evening by Frances Garfield A pretty fair assortment of classic and (at the time) new tales of vampires. I've highlighted the ones I've particularly liked. This includes: Human Remains by Clive Barker Necros by Brian Lumley The Man Who Loved the Vampire Lady For the Blood is the Life by F. Marion Crawford The Brood by Ramsey Campbell Hungarian Rhapsody by Robert Bloch Ligeia by Edgar Allan Poe Vampire by Richard Christian Matheson Stragella by Hugh B. Cave A Week in the Unlife by David J. Schow The House at Evening by Frances Garfield The Labyrinth by R. Chetwynd Hayes Beyond Any Measure by Karl Edward Wagner Doctor Porthos by Basil Copper Dracula's Guest by Bram Stoker It Only Comes Out at Night by Dennis Etchison Dracula's Chair by Peter Tremayne The Better Half by Melanie Tem An Episode of Cathedral History by M.R. James Chastel by Manly Wade Wellman Der Untergang Des Abendlandesmenschen by Howard Waldrop The Room in the Tower by E.F. Bensen Laird of Dunain by Graham Masterton Midnight Mass by F. Paul Wilson Blood Gothic by Nancy Holder Yellow Fog by Les Daniels Vintage Domestic by Steve Rasnic Tem Red Reign by Kim Newman Vampire Sestina by Neil Gaiman

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Human Remains by Clive Barker Necros by Brian Lumley The Man Who Loved The Vampire Lady by Brian Stableford A Place To Stay by Michael Marshall Smith The Brood by Ramsey Campbell Root Cellar by Nancy Kilpatrick Hungarian Rhapsody by Robert Bloch The Legend of Dracula Reconsidered as a Prime-Time TV Special by Christopher Fowler Vampire by Richard Christian Matheson Stragella by Hugh B. Cave A Week In The Unlife by David J. Schow The House At Evening by Francis Garfield Vampyrrhic Outcast by Simon Clark The L Human Remains by Clive Barker Necros by Brian Lumley The Man Who Loved The Vampire Lady by Brian Stableford A Place To Stay by Michael Marshall Smith The Brood by Ramsey Campbell Root Cellar by Nancy Kilpatrick Hungarian Rhapsody by Robert Bloch The Legend of Dracula Reconsidered as a Prime-Time TV Special by Christopher Fowler Vampire by Richard Christian Matheson Stragella by Hugh B. Cave A Week In The Unlife by David J. Schow The House At Evening by Francis Garfield Vampyrrhic Outcast by Simon Clark The Labyrinth by R. Chetwynd-Hayes Beyond Any Measure by Karl Edward Wagner Doctor Porthos by Basil Copper Straight To Hell by Paul McAuley It Only Comes Out At Night by Dennis Etchison Investigating Jericho by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro Dracula's Chair by Peter Tremayne A Taste For Blood by Sydney J. Bounds The Better Half by Melanie Tem The Devil's Tritone by John Burke Chastel by Manly Wade Wellman Der Untergang Des Abendlandesmenschen by Howard Waldrop Red As Blood by Tanith Lee Laird of Dunain by Graham Masterson A Trick of the Dark by Tina Rath Midnight Mass by F. Paul Wilson Blood Gothis by Nancy Holder Yellow Fog by Les Daniels Fifteen Cards From a Vampire Tarot by Neil Gaiman Vintage Domestic by Steve Rasnic Tem Try A Dull Knife by Harlan Ellison Andy Warhol's Dracula: Anno Dracula 1978-1979 by Kim Newman

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    First off, hats off to these writers, because there were a LOT of scary vampires in this book! Some of the stories were of course better than others, and a few I just really could not get into, but this book definitely offered a wide range of vampirism, and I appreciated that most of all! Every story was different. Some of them even incorporated actual events and history into the stories, which added to it for me. I really enjoyed the majority of this collection.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Like most anthologies it's some good, some bad. Quick highlights: Clive Barker's story is good but very non-traditional as far as vampires go. Richard Matheson's was more an experiment than a story and it offered me nothing short of 30 seconds to read it. Disappointing because I expect more from him. Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite story-tellers. This story was, hmmm, a taste...? Short. Interesting. Well worked even if not what I was hoping for. Like most anthologies it's some good, some bad. Quick highlights: Clive Barker's story is good but very non-traditional as far as vampires go. Richard Matheson's was more an experiment than a story and it offered me nothing short of 30 seconds to read it. Disappointing because I expect more from him. Neil Gaiman is one of my favorite story-tellers. This story was, hmmm, a taste...? Short. Interesting. Well worked even if not what I was hoping for.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Collection of short stories and novellas by Clive Barker, Les Daniels, Brian Lumley, F. Paul Wilson and oodles more. Especially notable for the many little-read or little-known stories such as "Dracula's Guest" by Bram Stoker or "Stragella" by Hugh B. Cave. The novella "Red Reign" by Kim Newman included in this collection was later expanded to a full-length novel and published under the title "Anno-Dracula." Collection of short stories and novellas by Clive Barker, Les Daniels, Brian Lumley, F. Paul Wilson and oodles more. Especially notable for the many little-read or little-known stories such as "Dracula's Guest" by Bram Stoker or "Stragella" by Hugh B. Cave. The novella "Red Reign" by Kim Newman included in this collection was later expanded to a full-length novel and published under the title "Anno-Dracula."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elise

    A fun fact: this was one of the first books I can ever really remember reading as a child, and it was one of the various vampire books I read when I was a kid that really cemented my love of vampires and the supernatural. My mum had the older copy (with the vampire lady on the cover) and I think I must have consumed all the stories a fair few times over by now. It's been quite a few years now since I re-read this collection and I'm thinking I will definitely need to do one soon. A fun fact: this was one of the first books I can ever really remember reading as a child, and it was one of the various vampire books I read when I was a kid that really cemented my love of vampires and the supernatural. My mum had the older copy (with the vampire lady on the cover) and I think I must have consumed all the stories a fair few times over by now. It's been quite a few years now since I re-read this collection and I'm thinking I will definitely need to do one soon.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sketching Girl

    I absoultely loved this collection of Vampire Stories, there's something for everyone, and amazingly, I loved them all. There were no "dud ones". I was very impressed. I have read this collection many times over, and will no doubt read them many times again in the future. A book I will not part with. I absoultely loved this collection of Vampire Stories, there's something for everyone, and amazingly, I loved them all. There were no "dud ones". I was very impressed. I have read this collection many times over, and will no doubt read them many times again in the future. A book I will not part with.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim Townsend

    A fangtastic anthology of vampire tales, both short stories and novellas, that shows the range and traditions of the vampire legend, although parts of it are pretty gross. Horror stories all, with little humor. Fans of horror fiction will like this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

    I liked this collection way more than the Mammoth book of Zombies. "Midnight mass" and "Red Reign" were revelations, and I got the opportunity to revisit classics like "For the blood is the life" and "Ligeia". There are tales here that I will definitely read again in the near future. I liked this collection way more than the Mammoth book of Zombies. "Midnight mass" and "Red Reign" were revelations, and I got the opportunity to revisit classics like "For the blood is the life" and "Ligeia". There are tales here that I will definitely read again in the near future.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chere

    A must-read for vampire (and horror, in general) fans! I love vampires, so I have a bias giving this rating, but as far as vampire collections go, this one is a real keeper!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    I think I would have rated it higher if I hadn't already read so many of these in other places. The ones I hadn't...well...there was a reason. I think I would have rated it higher if I hadn't already read so many of these in other places. The ones I hadn't...well...there was a reason.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kat (idangerous)

    I read a few short stories in it. I wanted only one and I thought it was too short. Sadly...I wanted to know what happened next but there was nothing left lol.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    A random mix of stories about vampires; some tradition and some very out there. Enjoyable and interesting.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    I don't know if it's the year this came out or the writing that turned me off, but I read most of the first story before deciding that vampires would hate this book. .. I don't know if it's the year this came out or the writing that turned me off, but I read most of the first story before deciding that vampires would hate this book. ..

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bindu Jojo

  25. 5 out of 5

    Viviana

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jerriann

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

  28. 5 out of 5

    Allen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bookwhore Extraordinaire!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bobby

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