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Crisis of Faith

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A T'au Empire novel Fresh from his victory on Arkunasha, the young Commander Farsight leads a crusade to reclaim colonies lost to mankind's Imperium. But stiff resistance will test him to his limits, and beyond. READ IT BECAUSE Phil Kelly continues his look at the life of Commander Farsight with his first campaign against the full might of the Imperium, and shows how the T'au A T'au Empire novel Fresh from his victory on Arkunasha, the young Commander Farsight leads a crusade to reclaim colonies lost to mankind's Imperium. But stiff resistance will test him to his limits, and beyond. READ IT BECAUSE Phil Kelly continues his look at the life of Commander Farsight with his first campaign against the full might of the Imperium, and shows how the T'au Empire's technological superiority fares against Imperial grit. THE STORY The t'au are a mysterious alien race, diametrically opposed to the Imperium of Man in every possible way - in their mastery of technology, methods of warfare and social structure. Yet in galactic terms they are a young race, and naive when it comes to the manipulations of Chaos. When promising young Commander Farsight is promoted to lead a crusade across the Damocles Gulf to reclaim the T'au Empire's lost colonies from mankind, the mood is one of optimism. With their mighty fleet, and superior weapons and machines, how can their endeavour possibly fail? However, despite a parade of early successes, Commander Farsight soon faces enemies he wasn't anticipating, and finds not only his courage but also his soul tested to the very limit.


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A T'au Empire novel Fresh from his victory on Arkunasha, the young Commander Farsight leads a crusade to reclaim colonies lost to mankind's Imperium. But stiff resistance will test him to his limits, and beyond. READ IT BECAUSE Phil Kelly continues his look at the life of Commander Farsight with his first campaign against the full might of the Imperium, and shows how the T'au A T'au Empire novel Fresh from his victory on Arkunasha, the young Commander Farsight leads a crusade to reclaim colonies lost to mankind's Imperium. But stiff resistance will test him to his limits, and beyond. READ IT BECAUSE Phil Kelly continues his look at the life of Commander Farsight with his first campaign against the full might of the Imperium, and shows how the T'au Empire's technological superiority fares against Imperial grit. THE STORY The t'au are a mysterious alien race, diametrically opposed to the Imperium of Man in every possible way - in their mastery of technology, methods of warfare and social structure. Yet in galactic terms they are a young race, and naive when it comes to the manipulations of Chaos. When promising young Commander Farsight is promoted to lead a crusade across the Damocles Gulf to reclaim the T'au Empire's lost colonies from mankind, the mood is one of optimism. With their mighty fleet, and superior weapons and machines, how can their endeavour possibly fail? However, despite a parade of early successes, Commander Farsight soon faces enemies he wasn't anticipating, and finds not only his courage but also his soul tested to the very limit.

30 review for Crisis of Faith

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Farsight was a new experience for me. It deals with the Tau, a race that I am not all that familiar with. The Tau, relative to the other powers of the galaxy including the Imperium, seem to be the most forward thinking and are almost benign in relation to the other powers. The Tau work for something called the Tau'Va (The Greater Good) and their society is divided into different castes. From the workers of the Earth caste, to the diplomats of the Water caste, the warriors of the Fire and the poli Farsight was a new experience for me. It deals with the Tau, a race that I am not all that familiar with. The Tau, relative to the other powers of the galaxy including the Imperium, seem to be the most forward thinking and are almost benign in relation to the other powers. The Tau work for something called the Tau'Va (The Greater Good) and their society is divided into different castes. From the workers of the Earth caste, to the diplomats of the Water caste, the warriors of the Fire and the political leaders of the Ethereal caste. Commander Farsight, of the Fire Cast, is tasked with leading a battle group to the Damocles Gulf to reclaim some previous Tau colonies. The Tau are ready and willing to deal with the human forces they run into but, to my surprise, the Tau have a nominal to nil presence in the Warp. Thus of all the races of the 40K universe they are the least coveted and noticed by the Chaos powers. This is a story where they will cross paths and it is not something that the Tau are prepared to deal with on any level. An interesting look at the Tau and their worlds. It was instructive but lacked some of the action I was used to in this series. The other problem was the confusing prologue. It begs the question as to the future fate of Commander Farsight. If so, then I am interested in finding out more. The Tau were an interesting race to read about and likely to have the "best" motivations for what they do. Though, as with all things, that is a matter of perspective. Faright was a nice addition to my Warhammer 40K collection. While not the best of the stories from this series, it was still a fun and interesting read about a species I am not that familiar with-the Tau.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    PROS: Giving Farsight’s story room to breathe, to explore his relationship with the various castes (especially the Ethereals) and his slow unravelling of the secrets behind the Tau’va and the nature of Chaos is amazing. Kelly isn’t afraid to have the heroes suffer defeats. There’s no ridiculous plot armour for Farsight Expedition (although naturally, there is some) Not chock full of endless descriptions of near identical battles (looking at you ‘Horus Heresy’). As much time is given to the actual e PROS: Giving Farsight’s story room to breathe, to explore his relationship with the various castes (especially the Ethereals) and his slow unravelling of the secrets behind the Tau’va and the nature of Chaos is amazing. Kelly isn’t afraid to have the heroes suffer defeats. There’s no ridiculous plot armour for Farsight Expedition (although naturally, there is some) Not chock full of endless descriptions of near identical battles (looking at you ‘Horus Heresy’). As much time is given to the actual expedition as to ‘bolter porn’ Kelly’s doing some interesting things with the Farsight myth. Similar to how some details, big and small, have been changed in the ‘Horus Heresy’ series to give the readers some surprises. CONS: Pacing’s a bit iffy, especially at the end. However, if youre interested in more than just battles then thismis mitigated somewhat. Kelly’s style is a bit rough; the same phrases pop up repeatedly, almost exclusively (‘bulbous stealth suits’, ‘writ large’ etc’). Normally this is a nit-pick, but its often enough to be starkly noticeable. There’s also the habit of using impressive sounding synomyms or obscure words with a specific meaning, then unpacking the specific meaning of the synonym/obscure word in the rest of the sentence (for example “...her mouth a moue of amused disapproval"). Maybe this was only noticeable to me because I like to look up words I don’t know when I’m reading, but it’s there and it’s definitely bad practice. OVERALL: Definitely read it if you’re a T’au or Farsight fan. Well worth a read if you’re a 40K fan and looking for a xeno-centered perspective. Read it later if you’re curious about the 40K universe; there’s definitely easier places to start. Avoid if you can’t be bothered with wiki-consultation and constant reference to the cast list at the beginning, or if stylistic shortcomings will kill your enthusiasm.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Norman

    An exciting book detailing Commander Farsight's adventures during the Second Sphere Expansion as he confronts the Imperium of Man in his mission to expand Tau territory. First of all there's great Tau worldbuiling here which is well worth the time of anyone curious about this seemingly benign force in the chaotic universe of WH40k. There's a lot of caste interactions as well as descriptions of their roles in society and the creative ways the Tau and their allies have worked together to further t An exciting book detailing Commander Farsight's adventures during the Second Sphere Expansion as he confronts the Imperium of Man in his mission to expand Tau territory. First of all there's great Tau worldbuiling here which is well worth the time of anyone curious about this seemingly benign force in the chaotic universe of WH40k. There's a lot of caste interactions as well as descriptions of their roles in society and the creative ways the Tau and their allies have worked together to further their empire which I feel is a theme reflected through out the whole book meaningfully yet not overly emphasized. This serves to create a sense of wonder at the Tau's coordination, discipline and potential as a galactic force which I feel is essential for developing in the reader some sense of attachment toward the Tau and their heroes as well as curiosity for their future. Wisely the author also avoids painting a completely utopic alternative for the Imperium in the Tau Empire. While mainly showcasing the very best of the blue aliens he nevertheless takes his time to sow the seeds of disquiet in the reader as he hints at darker forces at work within Tau society like the deceptive nature of the Ethereals, the influence of chaos on the Tau or the unchecked relationship they seem to be developing with advanced AI and digital technologies (which in itself could bring a hell of their own making to Tau society). Another aspect I really enjoyed was the pacing of the book, it rarely felt as though the shift in POV narrators were jarring but instead worked to build up anticipation which nearly always paid in full with well realized and creative battle scenes. The descriptions were evocative and not confusing for the reader to imagine, with heart pumping battle scenes between the Tau Empire and the Imperium where we got to enjoy the awesomeness that are the Tau battle suits in their different variations as well as the advanced arsenal the aliens use in their tactics of war. That's not to say there aren't any negatives and I can easily point at two of them. For a novel dedicated to the Tau Empire and one of its greatest heroes we sure get a lot of scenes with the Tau getting their asses kicked over and over, enough for it to be noticeable and feel silly. We have already many books with the Imperium crushing xenos completely and it seems like even in their own book the author wasn't willing to give the Tau a stronger image. This book is about the Tau and Commander Farsight, we don't need a 7th scene where another great Adeptus Astertes beats a xenos with righteous fury. There's like 100 other 40k books of nothing but that. Second unforgivable sin was the part where (view spoiler)[the Chapter Master of the space marines mistakes a disfigured and burned Tau battlesuit fighter for dead and convinces his squad to leave his "corpse" behind, this after one single look at the body. Not going to say anything else other than it's supposed to be the 40th millennium and there should be better ways of confirming the living status of a body than an old fashioned look over (heat signature reading at least?) (hide spoiler)] In the end reading this book was a very enjoyable time between the interesting details of Tau society and the exciting battle suit fights with its flaws being minor enough to make it a really good book just not a great one.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    This is largely what readers of Black Library have come to expect from novels that aren't particularly stand out, but not necessarily bad either. Some action, 1-3 cool characters, maybe a little character development. What I really enjoyed about this story is it does not revolve around the Imperium, but rather gives us the perspective of the Tau, particularly focusing on Commander Farsight. Kelly does an excellent job making these aliens feel alien, while still relatable. We get some nice overvi This is largely what readers of Black Library have come to expect from novels that aren't particularly stand out, but not necessarily bad either. Some action, 1-3 cool characters, maybe a little character development. What I really enjoyed about this story is it does not revolve around the Imperium, but rather gives us the perspective of the Tau, particularly focusing on Commander Farsight. Kelly does an excellent job making these aliens feel alien, while still relatable. We get some nice overview of Tau culture and philosophy, as well as their perspectives on the Imperium, which was great! The Tau method of war was intriguing, and battle suits are just plain cool. But this book does have several stumbling blocks. A random chaos demon is thrown in, seemingly for no reason. Not every warhammer book needs Chaos... The Space Marines are pretty stupid in this book, perhaps to highlight the problem solving of the Tau, but it still felt like they were dealing with the "trainee" branch of marines. And the characters themselves are not heavily explored, except Farsight. Part of this is because a lot of the out of fighting scenes revolve around the chaos person, which again was unnecessary. Overall enjoyable, but nothing to rave about.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Liam Tondeur

    The underlying story for this is great and adds more to one of the better characters in the grimdark future. My major niggles are the way the story jumps around in different chapters without really setting it up. It jerks you out of the book and makes you have to think about where you are in the tale. Another niggle is that I do not think the author did a good job of the space combat. I do not think he knows how space itself works. We have displacing pressure waves from cannons in space; the main The underlying story for this is great and adds more to one of the better characters in the grimdark future. My major niggles are the way the story jumps around in different chapters without really setting it up. It jerks you out of the book and makes you have to think about where you are in the tale. Another niggle is that I do not think the author did a good job of the space combat. I do not think he knows how space itself works. We have displacing pressure waves from cannons in space; the main character dampening external sounds while in space so that he isn't deafened; and a jet-turbine engine working without incident even with a lack of oxygen! The last one is most likely due to it being a Chaos Heldrake chasing the main character however this could've easily been explained if the main character expressed confusion at this as he is slowly being shown the reality-distorting effects of those bound to the immaterium but that was absent. My low score is due to the jerky story despite the actual plot being interesting. I would very much like to see the storyline continue and even have Farsight meeting Mr Guilliman in the future.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Cope

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Overall: good book, don't necessarily agree with possessed tau but how it was done made it plausible. Interesting read. The longer bit: Preferred the predecessor 'Farsight' due to some repetition in a loose kind of way. Felt like saying: "oh Ob'lotai, not again" and there were elements of the 14 year old book Fire Warrior by Simon Spurrier - without giving too much away. The layout of the book is a bit confusing. You have Arthas Moloch at the start, which is a good start. Then it goes back to jus Overall: good book, don't necessarily agree with possessed tau but how it was done made it plausible. Interesting read. The longer bit: Preferred the predecessor 'Farsight' due to some repetition in a loose kind of way. Felt like saying: "oh Ob'lotai, not again" and there were elements of the 14 year old book Fire Warrior by Simon Spurrier - without giving too much away. The layout of the book is a bit confusing. You have Arthas Moloch at the start, which is a good start. Then it goes back to just after the 1st Damocles Gulf Crusade (ok so a leading-up-to kind of story?), only to say: "all but 1 caste" at the end... and no mention of Arthas Moloch. So, does the whole caste thing at the end relate to the water caste (of which all the main leads died) or the 3 Ethereals (which are stated at the start as being killed at Arthas Moloch)? On that note, why put Arthas Moloch in at all when it doesn't add to the story? Save it for the next book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Connor

    A book full of interesting characters and plot points, which seems to unfortunatley bounce between them all without time to delve too deeply into any of them. There are many stories worth telling clearly present in this book, many that would be worth whole novels by themselves. While I don't feel this speedrun through Farsight's adventure is the fault of the writer, who evidently has placed an incredible amount of effort into establishing T'au culture as well as the stories we follow, but more li A book full of interesting characters and plot points, which seems to unfortunatley bounce between them all without time to delve too deeply into any of them. There are many stories worth telling clearly present in this book, many that would be worth whole novels by themselves. While I don't feel this speedrun through Farsight's adventure is the fault of the writer, who evidently has placed an incredible amount of effort into establishing T'au culture as well as the stories we follow, but more likely is the result of an ironic lack of faith in pushing too many novels involving the character. Despite this, I still enjoyed the book greatly and would highly recommend it to any who want to learn more about the T'au, Farsight and the interactions between them and the Imperium.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sontaranpr

    The Legendary Farsight takes command of the Second Sphere Expansion and heads into the Damocles Gulf. Then it all turns to shit basically. True to GW style Tau and Imperial forces take staggering losses in every battle yet come back for more. Some interesting scenes such as Gun Drones chatting with each other than their attendant. Battlesuit AI giving no end of side eye and shade to Farsight as he keeps doing dangerous things the suit would really rather he didn't. Then we have a rather delicate The Legendary Farsight takes command of the Second Sphere Expansion and heads into the Damocles Gulf. Then it all turns to shit basically. True to GW style Tau and Imperial forces take staggering losses in every battle yet come back for more. Some interesting scenes such as Gun Drones chatting with each other than their attendant. Battlesuit AI giving no end of side eye and shade to Farsight as he keeps doing dangerous things the suit would really rather he didn't. Then we have a rather delicate scene where you get to see why screwing around with a Warp drive is a REALLY bad idea in a laboratory. No spoilers but REALLY bad idea.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    This was Avery measured background story of one of my favorite characters and it expresses the pressures within Tau society. Farsighted is a very sympathetic character as he must negotiate expectations that his superiors and his own growing legend have of him. The action in the book is enhanced by the depth of personality of the characters in the story and the work, as a whole, feels very mature for bolter porn.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liam Exelby

    Exciting and a great book for Farsight fans. The tau commander is brought to life through exciting action and wonderful moments of introspection. The challenges and enemies he faces are also well rounded and developed. Slight spoiler My only real complaint is that the 'crisis of faith' after which the book is named takes a backseat through much of the story. I had hoped for more when it comes to his relationship with the ethereals. Exciting and a great book for Farsight fans. The tau commander is brought to life through exciting action and wonderful moments of introspection. The challenges and enemies he faces are also well rounded and developed. Slight spoiler My only real complaint is that the 'crisis of faith' after which the book is named takes a backseat through much of the story. I had hoped for more when it comes to his relationship with the ethereals.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Banbury

    A good first part, an middle part that drags a bit, despite the interesting combat scenes it can feel like it needs to end sooner then it does. An excellent 3rd part. Overall a great idea, that was executed well but could have been better. Still enjoyed it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    JOHN MITCHELL

    A Crisis contained! An excellent book by Kelly. Well written with a good insight into the Tau culture. Overall an enjoyable read with a good storyline.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Petermathieson

    For a book taking place in the 40k universe this was pretty good and gave me a better understanding of the Tau; their heroes and ideology.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro León

    Mi primer Bólter-porn: 3/5, filler entretenido.

  15. 5 out of 5

    AJ

    I really wanted to like this book, but it was just all over the place. There was potential in some small scenes, but they were split by long poorly written sections.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ned Leffingwell

    A 40K book from the Tau perspective. This did what a good 40K book should do. It had lots of action and gave insight into a faction in the universe.

  17. 5 out of 5

    M Hamed

    ‘– – YOUR WEAPONS CANNOT HARM ME, XENOS – –’ read the autotrans. ‘– – I EMBODY THE EMPEROR’S HOLY FLAME – –’

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Knolla

    An interesting time to be reading a book about how leaders interpret and shape what is meant by the phrase “greater good” with my son. The issues at hand here couldn’t, of course, be farther removed from our current situation but nonetheless watching a frontline leader navigate and make decisions without real visibility and not enough resources still feels poignant. My son is really looking forward to the second book and I have to admit he’s winning me over to the Tau.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Artas130

  20. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Heder

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dewey Square

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tejvir

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  26. 5 out of 5

    Fynn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Reuben Giles-Clark

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colton Cutshaw

  29. 5 out of 5

    Martin Janáček

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bvb

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