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It's time to stop giving a sh*t! Be calm... Stop stressing... Embrace the universe... Try yoga... Be fulfilled... and that's an order! We're overwhelmed with these sorts of commands, and we often torture ourselves to "try harder," yet somehow we never feel we've done quite enough. It's about time we stop pushing ourselves to do what we think we're supposed to do, and inst It's time to stop giving a sh*t! Be calm... Stop stressing... Embrace the universe... Try yoga... Be fulfilled... and that's an order! We're overwhelmed with these sorts of commands, and we often torture ourselves to "try harder," yet somehow we never feel we've done quite enough. It's about time we stop pushing ourselves to do what we think we're supposed to do, and instead simply allow ourselves to be angry, be tired, be silly, be passionate--to stop giving a shit, and just be. An international bestseller (now in English for the first time), The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t by Fabrice Midal explains why the key to true mindfulness is freeing ourselves from social and often self-imposed stresses -- and highlights how we can embrace life more fully by giving ourselves a break. He gives readers permission to: Stop obeying -- you are intelligent Stop being calm -- be at peace Stop wanting to be perfect -- accept life's storms Stop rationalizing -- let things be Stop comparing -- be you Stop being ashamed -- be vulnerable Stop tormenting yourself -- become your own best friend Stop wanting to love -- be benevolent One of the world's leading teachers of meditation and mindfulness, Midal offers us a new solution to the perennial problem of our too-much, too-fast modern life. It's OK, he urges us, to say no. It's fine to quit the things that don't fulfill you. It's necessary, in fact, to give ourselves a break and say, simply, c'est la vie. In The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t, Midal gives each of us permission to stop doing the things that don't make us happy ... so we have room in our lives for the things that do.


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It's time to stop giving a sh*t! Be calm... Stop stressing... Embrace the universe... Try yoga... Be fulfilled... and that's an order! We're overwhelmed with these sorts of commands, and we often torture ourselves to "try harder," yet somehow we never feel we've done quite enough. It's about time we stop pushing ourselves to do what we think we're supposed to do, and inst It's time to stop giving a sh*t! Be calm... Stop stressing... Embrace the universe... Try yoga... Be fulfilled... and that's an order! We're overwhelmed with these sorts of commands, and we often torture ourselves to "try harder," yet somehow we never feel we've done quite enough. It's about time we stop pushing ourselves to do what we think we're supposed to do, and instead simply allow ourselves to be angry, be tired, be silly, be passionate--to stop giving a shit, and just be. An international bestseller (now in English for the first time), The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t by Fabrice Midal explains why the key to true mindfulness is freeing ourselves from social and often self-imposed stresses -- and highlights how we can embrace life more fully by giving ourselves a break. He gives readers permission to: Stop obeying -- you are intelligent Stop being calm -- be at peace Stop wanting to be perfect -- accept life's storms Stop rationalizing -- let things be Stop comparing -- be you Stop being ashamed -- be vulnerable Stop tormenting yourself -- become your own best friend Stop wanting to love -- be benevolent One of the world's leading teachers of meditation and mindfulness, Midal offers us a new solution to the perennial problem of our too-much, too-fast modern life. It's OK, he urges us, to say no. It's fine to quit the things that don't fulfill you. It's necessary, in fact, to give ourselves a break and say, simply, c'est la vie. In The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t, Midal gives each of us permission to stop doing the things that don't make us happy ... so we have room in our lives for the things that do.

30 review for The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t: Cut the Crap and Live Your Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    ☆Dani☆ ☆Touch My Spine Book Reviews☆

    I give this book 4 out of 5 I don’t give a freakin’ shit stars! As a person who beats herself up daily and continually has anxiety, I found this book refreshing. This was an easy read that I really enjoyed. I could relate to a lot of the topics that the author covered and it gave me the urge to work on start giving less f*cks. The only thing I didn’t like about this book was it strayed from being a self help book at times and was too focused on the author’s experiences at moments. Overall, I tho I give this book 4 out of 5 I don’t give a freakin’ shit stars! As a person who beats herself up daily and continually has anxiety, I found this book refreshing. This was an easy read that I really enjoyed. I could relate to a lot of the topics that the author covered and it gave me the urge to work on start giving less f*cks. The only thing I didn’t like about this book was it strayed from being a self help book at times and was too focused on the author’s experiences at moments. Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I don’t give a sh*t that most of the reviews I have seen were negative on it. I think this was a great book for me and would recommend to someone who beats themselves up daily and tries to conform to everyone’s standards. I want to thank NetGalley and Hachette Books for providing me with an eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Miller

    This book is nothing like advertised. Based on the cover and description I was thinking it would be how to not give a shit, cut excess crap from your life, and how to live the life you want with a french twist on the whole thing. Instead, this is a philosophical book on meditation that rambles and uses too many exclamation marks. I would not suggest reading this book no matter your interests. I was given a copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kati Polodna

    A good reminder to give yourself a break.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Cecily Kyle

    For some reason I was under the impression that this book was really good. It wasn't... He said the phrase "Not Giving A Shit" wayyy too many times! I mean I have always wanted to learn how to properly meditate, but this book didn't really help. Sure it told me why meditation is good but if it was as easy as just not thinking, I would be good. LOL Some good tidbits in there but I had so much more hope for it. Oh well...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Don't judge a book based on it's title. What I thought would be a modern self-help book of the ''don't give a f-' title type, turned out to be a book on buddhist beliefs and meditation, which themselves are not boring things, but this book didn't make them exciting either. Thank you to Netgalley for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    This book was not what I thought it would be. I was anticipating a series of helpful techniques to not let stuff get under my skin. If that's what you're looking for - keep moving past this book. The book starts out talking about meditation, which seems like a reasonable tactic to "let stuff go", but the book loses focus fast. The author repeats himself all the time, is very repetitive, and redundant... (see what I did there, LOL...) and chooses to use coarse language that could be engaging or hu This book was not what I thought it would be. I was anticipating a series of helpful techniques to not let stuff get under my skin. If that's what you're looking for - keep moving past this book. The book starts out talking about meditation, which seems like a reasonable tactic to "let stuff go", but the book loses focus fast. The author repeats himself all the time, is very repetitive, and redundant... (see what I did there, LOL...) and chooses to use coarse language that could be engaging or humorous - but not in the way it's used here, it's just unnecessary. The book also had a note of arrogance that I found to be off-putting. "I met with other masters, but none of them really knew what they were doing, the only way to find freedom is my way" kind of comments. So why did I give it 2 stars? Well, there were a couple of quotes that the author included that I thought were insightful, and so the book did have a bit of a redeeming quality. But this is not a book that I'll ever go back and read to get more insight - it's a "one and done". I was provided a free ARC copy of this book by the publisher, and this opinion is solely my own. #NetGalley

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lecy

    The subtitle of this book is "Cut the crap and live your life," or, in other words, stop caring about what other people think of how you're living and just live it already. Midal goes through eight principles to live by, or to some, rules: stop obeying, stop rationalizing, stop comparing, stop being ashamed, etc. I had several thoughts as I was reading this. One, there wasn't really anything groundbreaking here. Every major point in this book is something I've read in articles both online and in The subtitle of this book is "Cut the crap and live your life," or, in other words, stop caring about what other people think of how you're living and just live it already. Midal goes through eight principles to live by, or to some, rules: stop obeying, stop rationalizing, stop comparing, stop being ashamed, etc. I had several thoughts as I was reading this. One, there wasn't really anything groundbreaking here. Every major point in this book is something I've read in articles both online and in magazines for years. I didn't read anything that made me have an a-ha moment. Second, and this is merely an observation, but what is everyone's fascination with the French? I've been seeing more and more content online with titles like "What the French eat in a day," "How to stay fit like a French woman," and "Why the French don't stress as much." I literally pulled all three of these from the email newsletters of big online publications in the last two weeks. Do the French have a leg up that I don't know about? Someone, please clue me in. *ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Meagan

    Reading in progress. So far this book is amazing. I've met many french people throughout my life and this book is exactly what they embody: life in moderation with the good and the bad, as well as no bullshit and remaining in the reality of things. By embracing our insecurities, problems and weaknesses this ironically makes us powerful and confident. Many say the french have a waive of arrogance but the reality is they are misunderstood. English culture teaches us to be overly courteous and have Reading in progress. So far this book is amazing. I've met many french people throughout my life and this book is exactly what they embody: life in moderation with the good and the bad, as well as no bullshit and remaining in the reality of things. By embracing our insecurities, problems and weaknesses this ironically makes us powerful and confident. Many say the french have a waive of arrogance but the reality is they are misunderstood. English culture teaches us to be overly courteous and have a mundane, boring life. The french live with passion.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Norah Gibbons

    I received a copy of this book from NetGalley to Read in Exchange for a fair review. As I was reading this book under time constraint in order to read it and write a review in a timely fashion, I think that I will be reading it again later. There are a lot of ideas that I would have liked to spend more time thinking on. For me I feel the ideal way to read this book is to read a chapter think about it for a bit, examine how that chapter pertains to my life and evaluate how to implement the ideas I received a copy of this book from NetGalley to Read in Exchange for a fair review. As I was reading this book under time constraint in order to read it and write a review in a timely fashion, I think that I will be reading it again later. There are a lot of ideas that I would have liked to spend more time thinking on. For me I feel the ideal way to read this book is to read a chapter think about it for a bit, examine how that chapter pertains to my life and evaluate how to implement the ideas that I think work for me before moving on to the next chapter. Once you get past the excessive use of the phrase not giving a sh*t In the first chapter there is a wealth of of ideas and thoughts on creating less stress in our daily lives. The style of writing is engaging and ideas are presented clearly and concisely. I would recommend this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    A quick read about meditation and Buddhist beliefs that tries to present itself as new ideas, but in all honesty is the same as so many of its contemporaries. Midal packages each idea nicely with an "I'm about to tell you something new and life-changing" and instead, simply, re-words and repackages old ideas. I won't say I didn't get anything from the book, but it did not live up to the expectations I had going into the reading. Overall, Midal is right-freedom is attained when you just stop pres A quick read about meditation and Buddhist beliefs that tries to present itself as new ideas, but in all honesty is the same as so many of its contemporaries. Midal packages each idea nicely with an "I'm about to tell you something new and life-changing" and instead, simply, re-words and repackages old ideas. I won't say I didn't get anything from the book, but it did not live up to the expectations I had going into the reading. Overall, Midal is right-freedom is attained when you just stop pressuring yourself to live up to societies expectations, your own expectations and just live life. This book just claimed this was something most people don't already know. Thank you, NetGalley and the publisher for an advanced e-book copy of this work in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura Jones

    Very poorly titled book that is obviously trying to ride the coattails of Sarah Knight’s book. Major marketing fail. I read the first half, then skimmed. There’s nothing French about this others than the author. It’s a book about his philosophy of meditation. If you want a less rigid way to meditate, read this (or Dan Harris’ Meditation for Fidgety Skeptics). If you want what the title promises, read Sarah Knight or Mark Manson’s business version.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lyn Richards

    I enjoyed listening to the audio version of this book. Whilst the title implies you should not give a f*ck about things, it really means for you to not get so caught up in being wound up about things. There were some amazingly simple ideas int this book that I readily adopted and felt at ease. This book helped put a lot of things into perspective for me and provided me with a platform for greater ease in situations where I would normally feel very much out of my comfort zone.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karlha

    ARC provided by NetGalley I have to admited that the tittle is savage because you think that you'll act like nothing matter and bah, i don't give a fuck. But actually, the book is about meditation, and inner stillness, and find peace to confront the shit. Told in first person, with personal' stories about the author, is a good book to read, you learn a lot of things with it

  14. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Intriguing title and fascinating book. It explains how wrong everything you think you know about meditation really is. Uplifting and worth the read even if you don’t meditate. Give yourself permission to not give a shit, be true to yourself while dealing with reality and enjoying each moment and seeing the world with the curiosity and fascination of a child.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mickey

    I gave this a try as an audio book, not really expecting to get much from it. I'm happy to report I was wrong. I'm going to try to stop giving as much attention to the pointless things and concentrate on just being me. BTW, the version I listened to was narrated by Ben Willbond. Having heard his voice, I can tell you that I would happily listen to him read a phone book!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    I listened to the entire audioCD and am still not sure if he is for or against meditation! One thing he did confirm, which I am a true believer in is that you do not tell people to "calm down," it never calms anyone down, in fact quite the opposite. He has some thoughtful insights.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Wow! I will definitely be rereading this. Not at all what I thought it would be about. It’s about being present and mindful and the profound happiness that can come from letting go, allowing yourself to be and live the best life you can. An excellent read for humans in the 21st century.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    1.5 stars. I couldn't finish this one; had to put it down after around 100-110 pages. I bought it from my favorite bookstore on the Oregon coast, because I always buy something from them when I go (support local booksellers!). I was intrigued by the title, and expected a humorous book that also engaged in some light philosophy. What I got was a book about meditation... but one that is different than any other book on meditation I've read, or anything I've ever learned about it. This, in itself, i 1.5 stars. I couldn't finish this one; had to put it down after around 100-110 pages. I bought it from my favorite bookstore on the Oregon coast, because I always buy something from them when I go (support local booksellers!). I was intrigued by the title, and expected a humorous book that also engaged in some light philosophy. What I got was a book about meditation... but one that is different than any other book on meditation I've read, or anything I've ever learned about it. This, in itself, intrigued me, and caused me to continue reading long after I probably should have thrown in the towel. While the author's view of the world and meditation is intriguing, it doesn't speak to my experience of the world, nor to my almost 20 years' experience as a practicing meditator. Furthermore, he often resorts to making unearned generalizations and oversimplifications. He also harps on the same point over and over - that the entire world conspires to make us conform to some vague standard that we can't discern but that we nonetheless support through our own acts of conformity, and meditation can help us set ourselves free - a point that may have some merit, but that never really gets adequately developed, beyond the argument of, "Look at my experience and how it supports this point; it must therefore be true for you as well." And at one point, he makes a criticism of the "Western Mind," that it's really only suited to learning the most "simple forms of meditation," that came off to me as arrogant and kind of insulting. In the end, I can't really recommend this book. But as with all things, your mileage may vary.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t is a very powerful book on examining one's habits and considering the patterns and beliefs that may not be serving us. Unfortunately, the book's biggest problem is its title. Nothing that Midal promotes has anything to do with being French. On the contrary, Midal shows again and again that the ideas that he espouses are actually counter to mainstream French culture. Perhaps the many negative reviews reflect the erroneous expectation that this book would give o The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t is a very powerful book on examining one's habits and considering the patterns and beliefs that may not be serving us. Unfortunately, the book's biggest problem is its title. Nothing that Midal promotes has anything to do with being French. On the contrary, Midal shows again and again that the ideas that he espouses are actually counter to mainstream French culture. Perhaps the many negative reviews reflect the erroneous expectation that this book would give one the excuse to drink wine all day, smoke copious amounts of Gauloises and look effortlessly chic, even in one's shabbiest clothes. If you are interested in growing as a human being, being more present, challenging patterns of behavior that don't serve you and experiencing more joy, you may like this book. If you are interested in philosophy and literature (Midal references The Odyssey and other classic texts, as well as philosophers Wittgenstein, Heidegger, Nietzsche, etc.), you may enjoy this book. If you are simply interested in "not giving a sh*t", you may want to look elsewhere.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    I loved this book. It came at the perfect time in my life. The fact that I was traveling to France at the time made it even more amusing. Good lessons on how to not take many things in life so seriously. I recommended to many friends.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Misha Kuehn

    This has been one of the best audiobooks of late. To be honest, it was nothing I expected as it delved deep into meditation and personal inner grown.

  22. 4 out of 5

    McYang

    Thank you to NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for my honest review. I am sorry I purchased this title for my library before getting a chance to read the ARC. The title is appealing, the cover is eye-catching, and the premise is in line with current trends (The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F* and Bringing Up Bebe). But it reads like an angry social media post. The author means to come across as hip and wise, but instead comes off sounding like an angry media troll. The chapter headings are Thank you to NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for my honest review. I am sorry I purchased this title for my library before getting a chance to read the ARC. The title is appealing, the cover is eye-catching, and the premise is in line with current trends (The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F* and Bringing Up Bebe). But it reads like an angry social media post. The author means to come across as hip and wise, but instead comes off sounding like an angry media troll. The chapter headings are confusing too - why tell someone to stop meditating when you really mean they should stop trying so hard and let things flow naturally? He tears sage advice apart and then gives it again in a different way - so he supports these practices? But doesn't want to outright say so? The title has a swear word - that tells me right off the bat I should anticipate unconventional writing style and out-of-the-box suggestions. What it really does is further the stereotype that French people are jerks who are too cool for school and if you want to be like them you need to stop trying so hard. I know this isn't true and, frankly, it sucks that he'd disrespect a culture that way. To sum it up - remember when a band came out with an awesome new sound that started a movement? And the bands that followed were initially really awesome? Then after a few years it became pop and mainstream and a shadow of its former self? Yeah, this book is the Blink 182 of the Grunge movement. Save your money and move along...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    Not a bad quick read. Brought up some interesting perspectives on today’s society and our need to be perfect.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sal

    Meh at best ... too bad, I’d hoped for more

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carlin

    This should be called "a book on mindfulness" or something other than what it's called. It's not particularly French in anyway, but the way Midal teaches mindfulness is great. Very Accessible.

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Harlan

    I didn’t like it much. I am not sure what I was hoping for, but this wasn’t it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Burgundy Bug

    Fabrice Midal’s 2017 self-help book serves as a public service announcement that advises against traditional means of meditation and social structures. Throughout the book, the author uses his background in Philosophy and years of experience in the meditation and wellness field to share what he has learned with the reader. While meditation is the central focus of “The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t,” Midal’s ideology branches off in a way that it can be applied to multiple aspects of life. Overal Fabrice Midal’s 2017 self-help book serves as a public service announcement that advises against traditional means of meditation and social structures. Throughout the book, the author uses his background in Philosophy and years of experience in the meditation and wellness field to share what he has learned with the reader. While meditation is the central focus of “The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t,” Midal’s ideology branches off in a way that it can be applied to multiple aspects of life. Overall, “The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t” is a digestible read that offers another perspective on wellness. Midal’s views that are discussed throughout the book are grounded in the philosophy of personal development and empowerment. Although I dove into it knowing that Midal’s life work was devoted towards meditation, I was actually surprised by how present it was throughout the book. Nevertheless, I didn’t find that it necessarily altered the core philosophy of Midal’s sentiment. I found “The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t” delightful and insightful all at once. In addition to redefining what I thought I knew about meditation, it reinforced what I already knew I needed to do: cut the crap and stop giving a shit; to stop holding myself back, wanting to be perfect, trying to understand everything, rationalizing, and tormenting myself. Chapter eight, “Stop Wanting to Be Perfect” was particularly touching for me. By the end of “The French Art of Not Giving a Sh*t,” I felt refreshed with a new outlook on meditation and self-care. Overall? I give Midal’s book 3.5 out of 5 deep breaths. Full review: click here.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Good book. Very simple-- not about giving the reader any mystical insight to nirvana. :) It really opened up for me at Chapter 13, Stop Tormenting Yourself. Right on from there through the appendix, I felt like I >saw< his meaning as though a fog had lifted. Meditation--not a gimmick--is one of those so-simple-it's-hard sort of things. It's hard because we refuse to "give ourselves a break." It has been exploited commercially, gurus abound, but there's really no trick to be taught; really we just Good book. Very simple-- not about giving the reader any mystical insight to nirvana. :) It really opened up for me at Chapter 13, Stop Tormenting Yourself. Right on from there through the appendix, I felt like I >saw< his meaning as though a fog had lifted. Meditation--not a gimmick--is one of those so-simple-it's-hard sort of things. It's hard because we refuse to "give ourselves a break." It has been exploited commercially, gurus abound, but there's really no trick to be taught; really we just need to be open and give ourselves a break. Don't bother to analyze and scrutinize everything or set out to calm oneself. Just be. Be happy, sad, or angry, exhausted, elated, or silly. Accept vulnerability and imperfection. I appreciated the author's enlightening comments about peace: "Peace does not imply protecting yourself from the tumult of emotions, life, waves, and stormy weather. On the contrary, it includes them in its fullness...it is not an absence of trouble but the capacity to patiently and gently engage with the bulk of reality, including our own rage, or sorrow, whose existence we also must recognize rather than deny." These statements and many others make this book about meditation unlike any I've previously read. This one is to be read and re-read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Staci

    2.5 stars I'm not sure what exactly is FRENCH about this book, other than the author. Nothing he writes about or suggests that the reader should or should not do is particularly French. Furthermore, although the first chapter is entitled "Stop Meditating" Midal actually talks about meditation A LOT, like in practically every chapter. And fine, he doesn't mean "stop meditating" like don't meditate at all but rather don't feel that you have to do meditation according to certain rules or practices o 2.5 stars I'm not sure what exactly is FRENCH about this book, other than the author. Nothing he writes about or suggests that the reader should or should not do is particularly French. Furthermore, although the first chapter is entitled "Stop Meditating" Midal actually talks about meditation A LOT, like in practically every chapter. And fine, he doesn't mean "stop meditating" like don't meditate at all but rather don't feel that you have to do meditation according to certain rules or practices or whatever but he then goes on to seemingly suggest that meditation can be something of a cure-all, able to deal with any problem whatsoever. That probably shouldn't be too surprising since it even says on the cover how he is the Founder of the Western School of Meditation but given that the first chapter says "Stop Meditating" I was quite surprised with how much this book talked about meditation. Overall, didn't really care for this book; I preferred the similarly titled The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella

    A philosophical opinion about removing your sense of obligation and using what you want to accomplish to dictate your journey, rather than the journey to dictate what you want to accomplish. He aims to teach ways of feeling more alive by removing boundaries and preconceived notions about what mindful and calm mean. Excerpt: "We are the patient who continually claps his hands until the psychiatrist asks: "Why are you clapping?" The patient then answers: "To chase away any elephants!"But there are A philosophical opinion about removing your sense of obligation and using what you want to accomplish to dictate your journey, rather than the journey to dictate what you want to accomplish. He aims to teach ways of feeling more alive by removing boundaries and preconceived notions about what mindful and calm mean. Excerpt: "We are the patient who continually claps his hands until the psychiatrist asks: "Why are you clapping?" The patient then answers: "To chase away any elephants!"But there aren't any elephants here," the psychiatrist answers. And the patient replies, while continuing the clap: "See, it's working!" Just because we are busy, he goes on the describe, doesn't mean we are succeeding. Meditative practice in the manner applied by Western society isn't the answer, but to be calm and allow for yourself to just be alive seems to be his message. Do I think it's the answer? It's certainly the answer to a few questions, probably not the ultimate answer. I loved his point of view however and think it's a worthy read.

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