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Murder in an Irish Churchyard

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The village of Kilbane in County Cork, Ireland, has a new garda--and her first case is a grave matter indeed . . . It's official! Siobhán is now Garda O'Sullivan, and her five siblings couldn't be prouder. While brother James runs Naomi's Bistro, Siobhán is doing her part to keep the village safe. Of course, Kilbane is pretty quiet compared to a place like Dublin, where Mac The village of Kilbane in County Cork, Ireland, has a new garda--and her first case is a grave matter indeed . . . It's official! Siobhán is now Garda O'Sullivan, and her five siblings couldn't be prouder. While brother James runs Naomi's Bistro, Siobhán is doing her part to keep the village safe. Of course, Kilbane is pretty quiet compared to a place like Dublin, where Macdara Flannery has gone to be a detective sergeant. Then one night the local priest summons Siobhán to the church cemetery. There's a dead man in the graveyard--aboveground. He lies shot on a blanket of freshly fallen snow, hand stretched out toward a nearby headstone. He's a stranger, but the priest has heard talk of an American tourist in town, searching for his Irish ancestor. A detective sergeant is dispatched from Dublin to assist with the case, and as fate would have it, it's Macdara. After his parting, things are awkward between them, but they have to work together. They learn the victim was from Dublin--Dublin, Ohio, that is. And when his family members are located and told of his murder, the plot thickens. Siobhán begins to dig for a motive among the gnarled roots of the family tree. But as long-buried secrets are unearthed, she and Macdara will need to stay two steps ahead of the killer or end up with more than one foot in the grave.


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The village of Kilbane in County Cork, Ireland, has a new garda--and her first case is a grave matter indeed . . . It's official! Siobhán is now Garda O'Sullivan, and her five siblings couldn't be prouder. While brother James runs Naomi's Bistro, Siobhán is doing her part to keep the village safe. Of course, Kilbane is pretty quiet compared to a place like Dublin, where Mac The village of Kilbane in County Cork, Ireland, has a new garda--and her first case is a grave matter indeed . . . It's official! Siobhán is now Garda O'Sullivan, and her five siblings couldn't be prouder. While brother James runs Naomi's Bistro, Siobhán is doing her part to keep the village safe. Of course, Kilbane is pretty quiet compared to a place like Dublin, where Macdara Flannery has gone to be a detective sergeant. Then one night the local priest summons Siobhán to the church cemetery. There's a dead man in the graveyard--aboveground. He lies shot on a blanket of freshly fallen snow, hand stretched out toward a nearby headstone. He's a stranger, but the priest has heard talk of an American tourist in town, searching for his Irish ancestor. A detective sergeant is dispatched from Dublin to assist with the case, and as fate would have it, it's Macdara. After his parting, things are awkward between them, but they have to work together. They learn the victim was from Dublin--Dublin, Ohio, that is. And when his family members are located and told of his murder, the plot thickens. Siobhán begins to dig for a motive among the gnarled roots of the family tree. But as long-buried secrets are unearthed, she and Macdara will need to stay two steps ahead of the killer or end up with more than one foot in the grave.

30 review for Murder in an Irish Churchyard

  1. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    What a turn this series has taken! Books one and two were apolitical, fast paced mysteries with compelling characters and an interesting subplot. This third installment is an anti-American screed cloaked in a cozy police procedural. Now, it’s one thing to write in supporting characters with unsavory attitudes, but when the protagonist for whom we’re supposed to be rooting devolves into a fount of xenophobia, we’ve got a problem. I’m not talking one instance, or even a dozen; I’m talking chapter What a turn this series has taken! Books one and two were apolitical, fast paced mysteries with compelling characters and an interesting subplot. This third installment is an anti-American screed cloaked in a cozy police procedural. Now, it’s one thing to write in supporting characters with unsavory attitudes, but when the protagonist for whom we’re supposed to be rooting devolves into a fount of xenophobia, we’ve got a problem. I’m not talking one instance, or even a dozen; I’m talking chapter after chapter of “Americans are always trying to appropriate or lay false claim to an Irish heritage,” “the only people who should be forced to deal with Americans are other Americans,” “Americans are uncultivated," “Americans are inherently rude," “Americans have little in which they should take pride," “Americans are loud and boorish," and, my personal favorite, “All Americans everywhere are easily manipulated because they think all Irish people everywhere are inherently cheerful, warm, friendly, leprechaun chasing, ruddy faced Liam or Siobhan O'Shamrocks.” I understand the importance of distinguishing the contents of a book from its author. There are many, many rhetorical and literary reasons why an author would employ the repugnant as a plot device. J. A. Konrath, Robert K Tanenbaum, and the ghostwriters of James Patterson’s Women’s Murder Club series (all favorites of mine) have churned out some extremely repugnant content. Thing is, not a single one of their hero’s or heroines gets behind these attitudes or behaviors. This indicates, to me at least, that they understand the importance of audience awareness, even if they happen to harbor such attitudes (I’ve read nothing to suggest that this is the case) themselves. Mark Twain penned what I’d argue to be one of the most powerful condemnations of American slavery, and the N word is woven all through the story. In Carlene O’Connor’s case, the anti-American sentiments are clear, both in the problematic depictions of every single one of the American characters (and of course, they're all so jealous because Ireland, with its magestic castles and beautiful cemetaries, is so much prettier to look at than America) and in Siobhan’s failure to recognize and work to deal with her own xenophobia. Maybe its just the paranoid reader/reflexive rhetorical analyst in me, but the Irish Village series (maybe it’s just this installment) doesn’t appear to have been written for an American audience. All in all, if I do decide to give time to free (she gets not one more cent of my money) copies of the remaining books in the series, I won’t be recommending them to anyone or shelving them where they might encourage others to read them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    I want to start by saying that I listened to this book and absolutely loved the narration. Hearing this story with an Irish lilt gave it a realistic feel, especially with the Irish sayings and slang. The narrator, Caroline Lennon, did a great job with expression, voices and the telling of the story. I would recommend that you try to listen to this one if you can get your hands on an audiobook. Siobhán is now Garda O'Sullivan and is getting ready for her first day. When she is summoned in the wee I want to start by saying that I listened to this book and absolutely loved the narration. Hearing this story with an Irish lilt gave it a realistic feel, especially with the Irish sayings and slang. The narrator, Caroline Lennon, did a great job with expression, voices and the telling of the story. I would recommend that you try to listen to this one if you can get your hands on an audiobook. Siobhán is now Garda O'Sullivan and is getting ready for her first day. When she is summoned in the wee hours of the morning by the local priest, Father Kearney, she heads off to the cemetery in the Churchyard to investigate a dead body above ground. With it being a murder, Sergeant Macdara Flannery, Siobhán's ex-boyfriend, is summoned from Dublin to head the case. The victim is an American in Ireland to make a documentary about his Irish roots and ancestors. As Siobhán and Macdara investigate the family and documentary makers, it seems there is more than one suspect, as well as an old lady that has been seen skulking around. I really enjoy the character of Siobhán, a smart woman who uses her intuition and gut feelings to her advantage. She is a family woman, who takes care of her siblings and still makes the bread for the family bistro. She is hurting about the loss of her relationship of Macdara and I was happy to see that perhaps they might get back together. Technically, she is no longer an amateur sleuth, but I still consider this a cozy mystery. Her immediate supervisor, Garda O'Reilly, is not a very likeable character at all. He is constantly trying to get her in trouble and write her up, personally I think he is jealous of her success solving previous murders. The plot was well done with red herrings, clues sprinkled sporadically, some likeable characters, some not and a well paced storyline. I really enjoyed this story and figured out some things, but was still pleasantly surprised when the culprit and the motive were revealed in the story. I will definitely continue to read or listen to this wonderful series from Carlene O'Connor and recommend it to cozy mystery lovers or those who enjoy a nice visit to the countryside of Ireland.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    "In Ireland the inevitable never happens and the unexpected constantly occurs" -Sir John Pentland Mahaffy I have to say this quote struck me as almost perfect for describing the cozy mystery of Murder in an Irish Churchyard. I loved everything about this book, title, cover, and every word in the book. The lovely lilt of the Irish accent, sprinkled throughout the dialog enchants you as it dances in your mind and makes you wish it came out of your own mouth. A murder mystery about family, community "In Ireland the inevitable never happens and the unexpected constantly occurs" -Sir John Pentland Mahaffy I have to say this quote struck me as almost perfect for describing the cozy mystery of Murder in an Irish Churchyard. I loved everything about this book, title, cover, and every word in the book. The lovely lilt of the Irish accent, sprinkled throughout the dialog enchants you as it dances in your mind and makes you wish it came out of your own mouth. A murder mystery about family, community, history, friendship, and the strength of integrity. Start to finish a very fine mystery indeed! This one is out in February 27th and is the third book in the series by Charlene O'Connor

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Morin

    Murder in an Irish Churchyard by Carlene O'Connor is the third book in this series. Siobhan is now a garda! I was so happy to see her grow and become a police officer. It's the night before her first official work day, and we start off by experiencing some of her nervousness. Just because she was able to solve some earlier investigations, she still questions her abilities. A knock at her door in the early morning hours leaves Siobhan running through the cemetery, dodging the heavy snowflakes that wi Murder in an Irish Churchyard by Carlene O'Connor is the third book in this series. Siobhan is now a garda! I was so happy to see her grow and become a police officer. It's the night before her first official work day, and we start off by experiencing some of her nervousness. Just because she was able to solve some earlier investigations, she still questions her abilities. A knock at her door in the early morning hours leaves Siobhan running through the cemetery, dodging the heavy snowflakes that will surely destroy any evidence of wrong doing. Her discovery sets off an investigation so bizarre and also brings Macdara back into Siobhan's life. The cast of characters in this story are over the top. They all have secrets and they all have motives. Will Siobhan be able to suss out the truth? Find out February 27th! I voluntarily read an ARC of this book provided by the publisher and NetGalley.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan (tigress5cubs)

    I love this series, and I love the characters, but this one was ..... well..... let's just say it's not smart of an author who wants to make it to insult and criticize a huge population. The way Americans were portrayed was unacceptable. Since I'm not easily offended, I will move on from this and read the next installment. I love this series, and I love the characters, but this one was ..... well..... let's just say it's not smart of an author who wants to make it to insult and criticize a huge population. The way Americans were portrayed was unacceptable. Since I'm not easily offended, I will move on from this and read the next installment.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    Siobhan is now a garda, aka police officer, after two years of schooling. The night before her first official day of work there is a knock on the door early in the morning. The village priest leads her to the cemetery, where she makes a gruesome discovery. Her former boyfriend, Detective Sergeant Macdara Flannery, is called in from Dublin, and together they investigate an American family researching their family's roots, as well as an overblown filmmaker who is documenting said research, plus a Siobhan is now a garda, aka police officer, after two years of schooling. The night before her first official day of work there is a knock on the door early in the morning. The village priest leads her to the cemetery, where she makes a gruesome discovery. Her former boyfriend, Detective Sergeant Macdara Flannery, is called in from Dublin, and together they investigate an American family researching their family's roots, as well as an overblown filmmaker who is documenting said research, plus a couple of villagers. It was an enjoyable read with a very good mystery, though it felt a little busy at times. Let me tell you, though, the constant jabs at Americans became extremely tiresome. Because, you know, we're not all that bad. A disparaging remark here and there in keeping with the plot would have been more than enough.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Another Great Irish Village Murder Mystery This is my favorite so far off this series. I actually had an idea of who the murderer was this time. Great characters with great story lines and mysteries!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This third book in the series is quite possibly my favourite! The Irish village and its inhabitants are a pleasure to read about. The whodunit was well written and kept me guessing right until the reveal. The relationship between Siobhan and her siblings and their personalities ring true to life for me. I really enjoyed this book and look forward to reading more in the series. I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denise Spicer

    In this “Irish Village Mystery” young Siobhan O’Sullivan is on her first day as a guard in the small village and she already has a murder on her hands! This enchanting story is set in a charming Irish village with a cast of interesting characters. The author does a great job of capturing (and keeping) our attention from the first few pages where Father Kearney leads Siobhan through wintery snow inside the medieval stones gates of the local cemetery to where the mysterious body lay pointing to a In this “Irish Village Mystery” young Siobhan O’Sullivan is on her first day as a guard in the small village and she already has a murder on her hands! This enchanting story is set in a charming Irish village with a cast of interesting characters. The author does a great job of capturing (and keeping) our attention from the first few pages where Father Kearney leads Siobhan through wintery snow inside the medieval stones gates of the local cemetery to where the mysterious body lay pointing to a tombstone. Together with her erstwhile boyfriend Detective Sergeant Macdara Flannery , Siobhan sifts through some puzzling clues and assorted suspects (a wealthy American family researching family roots, a filmmaker shooting a documentary about their genealogical search, and assorted local villagers including Siobhan’s large clan of siblings). A page turner!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kate Baxter

    "Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall." - Proverbs 16:18 Ahh, whoever said the Irish aren't proud, really do not know them well. You really can't fault them on that count as there's much of which to be proud. This holds true in the case of a wealthy American of Irish descent visiting the Green Isle while digging into his family history. That is until he winds up dead - above ground - in the local churchyard among those who went before. Newly made Garda Siobhán O'Su "Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall." - Proverbs 16:18 Ahh, whoever said the Irish aren't proud, really do not know them well. You really can't fault them on that count as there's much of which to be proud. This holds true in the case of a wealthy American of Irish descent visiting the Green Isle while digging into his family history. That is until he winds up dead - above ground - in the local churchyard among those who went before. Newly made Garda Siobhán O'Sullivan, is first official on scene at the local churchyard after being rousted by Father Kearney. She knows she should have called it in first, being that she's so new to the force. But Father Kearney is just a tad too insistent and who could argue with the good Father. Plus with the snow just starting and evidence soon to be obscured, time was of the essence. This third book in series was my first foray into Carlene O'Connor's Irish Village Mystery series and what a delightful cozy mystery it turned out to be. Loved it enough to request from the local library the first two books of the series. Sláinte!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Lovely scenic details of Ireland provide the background for a cozy murder mystery set in the country village of Kilbane. Siobhan O'Sullivan has completed 2 years at Garda College and it's her first day on the job when Father Kearney convinces her to come with him to the cemetery instead of phoning in the body he has found. It's been a year since Macdara Flannery became an Detective Sergeant and moved to Dublin, the pain of loss love still lingers in Siobhan. The dead man is American, Peter Mallon Lovely scenic details of Ireland provide the background for a cozy murder mystery set in the country village of Kilbane. Siobhan O'Sullivan has completed 2 years at Garda College and it's her first day on the job when Father Kearney convinces her to come with him to the cemetery instead of phoning in the body he has found. It's been a year since Macdara Flannery became an Detective Sergeant and moved to Dublin, the pain of loss love still lingers in Siobhan. The dead man is American, Peter Mallon, here to document his family history on film. Peter's dysfunctional family, the filmmaker and local Kilbanites all come together to provide plot complications, and plot twists for Siobhan & Macdara to figure out, drawing their personal history into the present working investigation. This third installment in the Irish Village mystery series is not a 'light' as the previous novels but was equally enjoyable.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Aisling

    My bookgroup is reading this author this month. I started with #3 in this series Murder in an Irish Churchyard and loved it for all its Irishness. This is the most authentic voice I have read in Irish mysteries. The expressions and descriptions of food and people and weather all made me smile. The mystery is quite good and is discovered through a genealogy search; the original mystery happened two generations back and the modern day murder is to both harm the benefitting heir and keep the secret My bookgroup is reading this author this month. I started with #3 in this series Murder in an Irish Churchyard and loved it for all its Irishness. This is the most authentic voice I have read in Irish mysteries. The expressions and descriptions of food and people and weather all made me smile. The mystery is quite good and is discovered through a genealogy search; the original mystery happened two generations back and the modern day murder is to both harm the benefitting heir and keep the secret from being exposed. There were lots of credible suspects and I really enjoyed the romantic tension between McDara and Siobhan. There was even an Aisling in book 3 so that was fun. A great series I will definitely continue!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christa

    I enjoyed this installment in the series. My favorite part was seeing Siobhan working as a garda. At the same time, I felt almost like I had skipped a book. I felt a little lost with the time that had passed since the last book and the fact that MacDara had transferred and Siobhan hadn't seen him in a long period of time. When she decided to become a garda, MacDara pretty well just dropped her. I was disappointed in him for that. I enjoyed catching up with Siobhan and all of her siblings. It was I enjoyed this installment in the series. My favorite part was seeing Siobhan working as a garda. At the same time, I felt almost like I had skipped a book. I felt a little lost with the time that had passed since the last book and the fact that MacDara had transferred and Siobhan hadn't seen him in a long period of time. When she decided to become a garda, MacDara pretty well just dropped her. I was disappointed in him for that. I enjoyed catching up with Siobhan and all of her siblings. It was interesting to be amongst them again. I liked the mystery storyline and the usual background of village and bistro.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kav

    I absolutely love this series and particularly enjoy listening to the audible editions (the ones without the infernal music drowning out the narration!) I love that amateur sleuth Siobhan is now a Garda and can legally solve crimes. Though she still has a hard time working by the book which continues to get her into all sorts of trouble and makes this cozy mystery all the cozier because of it. :-) An intriguing murder mystery paired with a complicated non-romance romance and this heroine's fierc I absolutely love this series and particularly enjoy listening to the audible editions (the ones without the infernal music drowning out the narration!) I love that amateur sleuth Siobhan is now a Garda and can legally solve crimes. Though she still has a hard time working by the book which continues to get her into all sorts of trouble and makes this cozy mystery all the cozier because of it. :-) An intriguing murder mystery paired with a complicated non-romance romance and this heroine's fierce love and loyalty to her family kept me rabid-listening right to the very end. Now I'm off to download #4.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Peggy R

    This third installment in the Irish Village Mystery series was a really enjoyable read. For me, I love the Irish setting and the way the author has weaved authentic dialect into the story. The characters are well written and I enjoy the growth we see in all the O'Sullivan siblings with each new book. There have been a lot of changes for the siblings, but most notable is that Siobhan is now part of the garda (Irish Police). This has also brought about changes in her relationship with Macdara Flan This third installment in the Irish Village Mystery series was a really enjoyable read. For me, I love the Irish setting and the way the author has weaved authentic dialect into the story. The characters are well written and I enjoy the growth we see in all the O'Sullivan siblings with each new book. There have been a lot of changes for the siblings, but most notable is that Siobhan is now part of the garda (Irish Police). This has also brought about changes in her relationship with Macdara Flannery. One of the things I enjoy is how the siblings tend to play a part in each mystery, even if a small one. This third book had a stead plot that kept this reader turning pages. There are two mysteries inter-woven in this story - a historical mystery that has a bearing on the present day murder mystery. As Macdara and Siobhan work together while trying to keep their personal life separate, there are plenty of suspect, clues, twists and forks in the road while trying to uncover the true story and catch a killer. I voluntarily read an advanced reader copy of this book provided to me by the publisher, Kensington, through Netgalley.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    4.5 stars This was my favorite of the series so far! I often find myself in the mood for cozy mysteries but then struggle once I start because of the light, jokey nature of it or the suspension disbelief required. But what I love about this series is the way Siobhan's career takes all the natural steps. Rather than just being some local always happening on a murder she is the only one smart enough to solve. Instead, she grows and devlops and learns and follows a career path. And I love it. It's w 4.5 stars This was my favorite of the series so far! I often find myself in the mood for cozy mysteries but then struggle once I start because of the light, jokey nature of it or the suspension disbelief required. But what I love about this series is the way Siobhan's career takes all the natural steps. Rather than just being some local always happening on a murder she is the only one smart enough to solve. Instead, she grows and devlops and learns and follows a career path. And I love it. It's what I loved most about this book. Including the ways in which it has complicated her relationship with Macdara. Also the O'Sullivan Six, particularly Ciarán, are just an utter delight adding to all the reasons I love this series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Sometimes the biggest mystery she faced was what to do with all the random thoughts ping-ponging through her mind. This is easily my favorite book of the series! I admit to being somewhat sad over the 2 year time jump in between books 2 and 3, but it didn't take long to be completely on board. I adore Siobán and how she continues to develop as a character. I look forward to book 4. Sometimes the biggest mystery she faced was what to do with all the random thoughts ping-ponging through her mind. This is easily my favorite book of the series! I admit to being somewhat sad over the 2 year time jump in between books 2 and 3, but it didn't take long to be completely on board. I adore Siobán and how she continues to develop as a character. I look forward to book 4.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hollyberye

    I didn't enjoy it as much as the first two (which were immensely interesting and fast, absorbing reading), because all the American characters were extremely foul, extraordinarily obnoxious, and I lost track of who's who in the cast of characters. That meant the wrap-up didn't mean as much to me as it did in the prior book. The book was still good and I enjoyed many aspects, just not nearly as much as books one and two in the series. I will certainly keep reading her novels. A highlight was the h I didn't enjoy it as much as the first two (which were immensely interesting and fast, absorbing reading), because all the American characters were extremely foul, extraordinarily obnoxious, and I lost track of who's who in the cast of characters. That meant the wrap-up didn't mean as much to me as it did in the prior book. The book was still good and I enjoyed many aspects, just not nearly as much as books one and two in the series. I will certainly keep reading her novels. A highlight was the help a sibling gave, and another was the main character's self-realization when she was given Macdara's point of view. That was an eye opener for Siobhán, and written extremely well, in a way that reflected similar moments for me in my life. Ms. O'Connor is an excellent writer.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    The third book in Carlene O'Connor's Irish Village series jumps ahead 2 years from the end of the previous book. Following the decision Siobhan O'Sullivan made at the end of Book 2, she's about to start her first day as a local Garda in her home village of Kilbane. It's been a hard two years that have seen a lot of changes and upheaval in her life. Her younger siblings are growing up, with one just home for a visit now that she's living in New York City. Her older brother is running the family bis The third book in Carlene O'Connor's Irish Village series jumps ahead 2 years from the end of the previous book. Following the decision Siobhan O'Sullivan made at the end of Book 2, she's about to start her first day as a local Garda in her home village of Kilbane. It's been a hard two years that have seen a lot of changes and upheaval in her life. Her younger siblings are growing up, with one just home for a visit now that she's living in New York City. Her older brother is running the family bistro and has a new girlfriend who has seemingly alienated everyone except the boyfriend. And one of Siobhan's best friends has moved back home after time at school. More telling, her relationship with Macdara Flannery has ended. Her decision to join the Garda changed their relationship and he moved off to Dublin and a promotion. But many things are about to change when the night before her first shift, the local priest shows up on Siobhan's doorstep claiming there is a dead body in the local cemetery. And this one is above ground. While it makes no sense that the priest didn't report it to the actual cops on duty, Siobhan heads off to the cemetery to check out the story. Sure enough, there's a dead body and she calls it in. Displeased that she didn't immediately call in the crime, Siobhan's superiors dress her down but soon she is immersed in the case. The past is prologue seems to a running theme in this book because the murder victim was an American on the hunt for his Irish roots. His family and a filmmaker making a documentary of the man's search are on hand and their constant backbiting and bickering lead them all to be considered suspects. But it isn't just the past of the victim that comes calling. Who's sent to be in charge of the murder inquiry? None other than Macdara. While she ends up tasked to help him with the case, their shared recent past makes for an uncomfortable working relationship. When circumstances conspire to reveal one new clue after another, the two put aside their differences in order to bring a killer to justice. But when Siobhan learns details of Macdara's new life in Dublin, she is inexplicably upset and more than a little jealous. Of course, the whys and wherefores of finding out why the American victim was killed takes precedence and in that, the two make and excellent team. Siobhan's rookie enthusiasm tends to find her making mistakes with procedure but the duo invariably start to piece things together. The one note about what I didn't think all that highly of was the seeming disdain that a number of the Irish characters held for the Americans. While those Americans were indeed rather odious to have to deal with, it didn't seem that the dislike was aimed solely towards them. One minor character went so far as to say that he just doesn't like any Americans. Is that true of the actual Irish people? The mystery of the story spun out into a number of false leads but always kept me intrigued. I wanted to see where they were going with each clue that came to light. Given that my mother was also into genealogy, I could at least appreciate what the search was all about. I also liked the way the subplots featuring the O'Sullivan children showed them growing up and not nearly as dependent on Siobhan as they once were. While Siobhan missed that connection somewhat, I also appreciated how she knew she had to let go and let her brothers and sisters find their own way. I've been waiting a long time for this book to come out in paperback after its hardcover release last year and it was a story that was well worth the wait. With the fourth book due out in a few months, I can only say that Carlene O'Connor has me waiting with breathless anticipation for where she's going to take Siobhan and company next.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    “Murder in an Irish Churchyard” earns 5/5 Shiny Gardai Badges! For the past two Februarys Carlene O’Connor has given us engaging mysteries with a delightful Irish twist, so what does she have for us fans of Siobhán, the O’Sullivan Six, and residents of Kilbane, County Cork, Ireland? Murder in an Irish Churchyard! The Irish countryside may be quaint, but watch out for the dead bodies! Siobhán O’Sullivan is anxious to start her new career as a member of the An Garda Siochána, The Guardian of the Pea “Murder in an Irish Churchyard” earns 5/5 Shiny Gardai Badges! For the past two Februarys Carlene O’Connor has given us engaging mysteries with a delightful Irish twist, so what does she have for us fans of Siobhán, the O’Sullivan Six, and residents of Kilbane, County Cork, Ireland? Murder in an Irish Churchyard! The Irish countryside may be quaint, but watch out for the dead bodies! Siobhán O’Sullivan is anxious to start her new career as a member of the An Garda Siochána, The Guardian of the Peace or Irish police, stationed in the quaint Irish village Kilbane, County Cork…but in her pajamas? Father Kearney shows up at one in the morning frantic after finding a dead body in the churchyard. Ok, it is a place riddled with dead bodies, however this particular dead body is above ground and lying in a pool of blood. Call 9-9-9 and a seasoned Garda will be assigned to the case; her novice status will undoubtedly be paperwork and answering phone calls, so maybe she should check it out first? Siobhán has an opportunity to put her recent studies at the Garda College into practical application: observe the scene, don't touch the body, keep an open mind, and take photos before the snow obliterates footprints and evidence. All following protocols. However, she is frowned on by the arriving Detective, and given a verbal warning…not a great first day on the job. But, her critical thinking skills and investigative talents could put her on the trail of a killer, instead she's on the trail of a pair of missing wooly socks. I have become a big fan of Carlene O’Connor’s Irish Village Mystery series, but newbies should not worry that starting with the third book might put them at a disadvantage…this is not the case. There were plenty of references to background and character connections to make this a great place to start, although the details and nuances are well worth revisiting by going back and reading or listening to both previous books. This “…Churchyard” mystery is clever, nail-biting at times, with a plethora of suspects and motives to keep you engaged. But beyond the delightful Irish tone (the dialogue is written with an obvious sense of the Irish brogue), the focus on family ancestry was a fascinating theme sending me to revisit information on my own English/German/French pie chart. However, it is the characters with which I have become invested. Siobhán still struggles with the death of her parents in a tragic car accident and laments that her life’s path and romantic interests took an unexpected turn and her role as mother to her younger siblings often goes without recognition, but family is important…well, the dynamic between Siobhán and her new sister-in-law and the “Brown Bread” conflict is so eerily realistic (my potato salad is the family tradition). Former love interest Detective Macdara Flannery has been brought in from Dublin to head the investigation creating an interesting dynamic between exes. I highly recommend the series…it is a perfect example of a “cozy mystery.”

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    First I would like to thank Netgalley and Kensington books for the opportunity to read and review this book. Siobhán is now a Garda, and her first day on the job involves a murder. She is called to the churchyard in the middle of the night by the Father, even though she knows she should call it in first she can't help the allure of mystery and has to go check things out for herself. Needless to say when she does report the body she starts off in trouble with her supervisor. When Dublin sends dow First I would like to thank Netgalley and Kensington books for the opportunity to read and review this book. Siobhán is now a Garda, and her first day on the job involves a murder. She is called to the churchyard in the middle of the night by the Father, even though she knows she should call it in first she can't help the allure of mystery and has to go check things out for herself. Needless to say when she does report the body she starts off in trouble with her supervisor. When Dublin sends down a detective inspector who else would it be but Macdara. Siobhán tries to be professional but her natural nosiness and ongoing attraction to Macdara make it hard for her to toe the line. I'm not going to give anything away but Siobhan is stubborn and continues to work the case until she solves it. I love the way Ms. O'Connor describes the scenery, I can see the village, and the characters. The siblings are all growing up and I can see this while I read the story. I was fortunate to read the first 2 books in this series as audio books because the voice of Caroline Lennon rang in my head while reading this one I could hear the lovely Irish accent and actually knew how the names should be pronounced. I highly recommend this latest installment in the Irish Village Mystery series and suggest that anyone who hasn't started this series to start from the beginning, it adds so much to the background of the characters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vickie

    Is a book still in the genre of amateur sleuth/cozy if the main character has become a police officer? Is it now a mystery set in Ireland? Whatever you want to call the it, this is a good book. It has intriguing characters, a great setting and an enticing mystery to draw the reader in. Siobhan has taken her life into her own hands and forged her own path and become a garda, police officer in Ireland, as well as running the family bistro. It's meant moving on from the man she loves but he seems to Is a book still in the genre of amateur sleuth/cozy if the main character has become a police officer? Is it now a mystery set in Ireland? Whatever you want to call the it, this is a good book. It has intriguing characters, a great setting and an enticing mystery to draw the reader in. Siobhan has taken her life into her own hands and forged her own path and become a garda, police officer in Ireland, as well as running the family bistro. It's meant moving on from the man she loves but he seems to have moved on as well. Siobhan's family makes me laugh. They are varied in personalities and they all love each other. I want to start at the beginning of this series and learn more about them. The mystery is interwoven and really good. It begins from the first page and the book is off and running. It has a study of family history going on as much as the investigation. Kind of makes me want to go digging around in my family tree to see what shows up. I can definitely recommend this book, author and series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Milica

    At this point, I am just two books removed from Murder in an Irish Cottage which I won in a Giveaway. The present book is another entertaining installment in this series. This time around the victim and the suspects are imported all the way from the US. Siobhan is now a member of An Garda Síochána, i.e., she graduated from police academy and is a uniformed police officer. So, she can be referred to as garda O'Sullivan and it makes at least legal sense that she is privy to so much information abo At this point, I am just two books removed from Murder in an Irish Cottage which I won in a Giveaway. The present book is another entertaining installment in this series. This time around the victim and the suspects are imported all the way from the US. Siobhan is now a member of An Garda Síochána, i.e., she graduated from police academy and is a uniformed police officer. So, she can be referred to as garda O'Sullivan and it makes at least legal sense that she is privy to so much information about an international murder case. On the other hand, she is a rookie. Any attempts to address this issue are at best perfunctory. In other news, the Americans are all suspicious, secretive, and loud. The Irish are charming and quirky. What can I say? There is some weird nostalgia going on here .... On the bright side, it's entertaining and Macdara is back.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This is the 3rd installment in this series and I continue to love every one. Time has passed since the last installment and Siobhan has been to school to be a police officer or Garda as they are called in Ireland. She is set to start her first day on the job when the parish priest comes to her telling her there is a body (dead and not buried) in the churchyard! Siobhan should have called this in but off she goes investigating (getting into a little hot water with her supervisor). A detective is d This is the 3rd installment in this series and I continue to love every one. Time has passed since the last installment and Siobhan has been to school to be a police officer or Garda as they are called in Ireland. She is set to start her first day on the job when the parish priest comes to her telling her there is a body (dead and not buried) in the churchyard! Siobhan should have called this in but off she goes investigating (getting into a little hot water with her supervisor). A detective is dispatched from Dublin and of course, it is Macdara! Things are a little awkward at first but they work well together. Siobhan is so dedicated to her family and the entire village that has not changed from any of the books in the series. The kids are all growing up and it is good to see the development of the family dynamics. The characters are so real and you feel like you are part of the village and in Ireland. Hope this series continues.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Micky Cox

    These books just keep getting better and better. This one was well plotted with many potential villains in the same family that keeps everyone on their toes and fingers being pointed in every which direction. The characters are well developed and enhance the story very well. Even better this book also was available on audio so you can read on the go!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    Loved this trip to the village of Kilbane. Had not read the previous books but plan to do so soon. Loved the connection with the genealogy of the American family. Read this in one day. Was hard to put down once you started it. You will Like this book!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Murder set in Kilbane a village near Cork in Ireland. Siobhan O'Sullivan is a brand new garda and discovers a murder victim on her first day on the job! There is sexual tension between Siobhan and her boss Macdara. I enjoyed the romance as well as the mystery. Murder set in Kilbane a village near Cork in Ireland. Siobhan O'Sullivan is a brand new garda and discovers a murder victim on her first day on the job! There is sexual tension between Siobhan and her boss Macdara. I enjoyed the romance as well as the mystery.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Niles Perkins

    moderate paced mystery

  29. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    All the books in this series have such similar plots, but I’m finding that fact soothing. Like if Maeve Binchy met Joanne Fluke and had a baby.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Susan Lindemulder

    Third book in the series. I enjoy the mystery; keeps you guessing till near the end. A quick, fun read.

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