counter create hit Ten Years Gone - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Ten Years Gone

Availability: Ready to download

She gave up her son to save him. Now she wants him back. Germany, 1939 - Henrietta Ackerland, a Jewish mother in Nazi Germany, makes a heart-rending decision. She gives her baby boy, Willie, to a friend who is fleeing Germany to Israel. Henrietta plans on following soon, but World War II breaks out, stranding her in Europe. Israel, 1949 - Henrietta finally makes it to Israel b She gave up her son to save him. Now she wants him back. Germany, 1939 - Henrietta Ackerland, a Jewish mother in Nazi Germany, makes a heart-rending decision. She gives her baby boy, Willie, to a friend who is fleeing Germany to Israel. Henrietta plans on following soon, but World War II breaks out, stranding her in Europe. Israel, 1949 - Henrietta finally makes it to Israel but can't find Willie. She hires private investigator and former Nazi hunter Adam Lapid to find him for her. Adam Lapid knows it will take a miracle to find Willie Ackerland after ten long years. And Adam doesn't believe in miracles. Not anymore. Not after losing his entire family in the Holocaust. Not after experiencing the horrors of Auschwitz. But Henrietta is desperate so Adam agrees to take on the case. What Adam doesn't realize is that this missing person's case will soon land him in a heap of trouble. For what started as a hunt for Willie Ackerland will soon turn Adam into prey - and of more than one hunter. You will love Ten Years Gone because it is an emotional mystery novel full of riveting characters, twists you won't see coming, and heart-wrenching moments. Grab your copy now!


Compare
Ads Banner

She gave up her son to save him. Now she wants him back. Germany, 1939 - Henrietta Ackerland, a Jewish mother in Nazi Germany, makes a heart-rending decision. She gives her baby boy, Willie, to a friend who is fleeing Germany to Israel. Henrietta plans on following soon, but World War II breaks out, stranding her in Europe. Israel, 1949 - Henrietta finally makes it to Israel b She gave up her son to save him. Now she wants him back. Germany, 1939 - Henrietta Ackerland, a Jewish mother in Nazi Germany, makes a heart-rending decision. She gives her baby boy, Willie, to a friend who is fleeing Germany to Israel. Henrietta plans on following soon, but World War II breaks out, stranding her in Europe. Israel, 1949 - Henrietta finally makes it to Israel but can't find Willie. She hires private investigator and former Nazi hunter Adam Lapid to find him for her. Adam Lapid knows it will take a miracle to find Willie Ackerland after ten long years. And Adam doesn't believe in miracles. Not anymore. Not after losing his entire family in the Holocaust. Not after experiencing the horrors of Auschwitz. But Henrietta is desperate so Adam agrees to take on the case. What Adam doesn't realize is that this missing person's case will soon land him in a heap of trouble. For what started as a hunt for Willie Ackerland will soon turn Adam into prey - and of more than one hunter. You will love Ten Years Gone because it is an emotional mystery novel full of riveting characters, twists you won't see coming, and heart-wrenching moments. Grab your copy now!

30 review for Ten Years Gone

  1. 4 out of 5

    George P.

    Ten Years Gonebrings together three things I love: Israel, mystery, and sequels. It is the first of four novels by Jonathan Dunsky featuring Adam Lapid, a private detective in post-Independence Tel Aviv. (By first, I mean that the events it narrates come first in the series. It was actually written third.) Having completed it, I’m already on to the next novel, The Dead Sister. Lapid was a Jewish police detective in Hungary before World War II. His wife and children didn’t survive Auschwitz, but h Ten Years Gonebrings together three things I love: Israel, mystery, and sequels. It is the first of four novels by Jonathan Dunsky featuring Adam Lapid, a private detective in post-Independence Tel Aviv. (By first, I mean that the events it narrates come first in the series. It was actually written third.) Having completed it, I’m already on to the next novel, The Dead Sister. Lapid was a Jewish police detective in Hungary before World War II. His wife and children didn’t survive Auschwitz, but he did. After the Allies liberated Buchenwald, he stayed in Europe for a time, hunting down former Nazi officers and meting out vengeance. Then he immigrated to Palestine, joined the Haganah, and fought heroically in the War of Independence. After the war, he took up private detecting on the streets of Tel Aviv. In that capacity, a German Jewess who was able to pass herself off as Gentile during the war comes to him with a request. In 1939, she had sent her son ahead with a friend to Palestine, hoping soon to follow in their steps. That didn’t happen. Ten years later, she can’t find either the woman or her son, so she hires Lapid to do so. The problem? Both the woman and the boy were murdered in 1939. Lapid doesn’t have the heart to tell his client just yet, so instead, he reopens the case to solve their murders. Along the way, he uncovers secrets and lies involving the dead woman, her circle of acquaintances, and the Irgun, the radical group which worked hard in the pre-Independence era to speed both Jewish entry and British exit from Palestine…violently, if necessary. The tale is competently told. It’s not at the level of Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch novels or Daniel Silva’s Gabriel Allon novels, but it’s good. My first rule for evaluating mysteries is that it must keep me turning pages to see what happens next. Ten Years Gonedid. I look forward to reading the other books in the series. Book Reviewed Jonathan Dunsky, Ten Years Gone: An Adam Lapid Mystery (Charleston, NC: CreateSpace, 2017). P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Yes” on my Amazon.com review page.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Fischer

    This is my first book by Jonathan Dunsky. I can't praise it enough. There are many twists and turns in this book that keep the reader engaged. The characters are very human, imperfections and all. I definitely recommend this book if you are in to twisty mysteries; however, there is also another I highly recommend this book. It takes place almost 70 years ago in Israel, shortly after the war. The main character, Adam Lipid, has suffered great indignities during his time in Auschwitz. For me, a lo This is my first book by Jonathan Dunsky. I can't praise it enough. There are many twists and turns in this book that keep the reader engaged. The characters are very human, imperfections and all. I definitely recommend this book if you are in to twisty mysteries; however, there is also another I highly recommend this book. It takes place almost 70 years ago in Israel, shortly after the war. The main character, Adam Lipid, has suffered great indignities during his time in Auschwitz. For me, a lot of learning went along with the book. The struggles of Israel and its two different factions. It makes me want to learn more. I rarely give five stars, but this book, in my opinion, deserved it. I've already downloaded his next in the series.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    What a terrific mystery. I Really enjoyed this page-turner though parts were pretty dark, and the violence, well let's just say i skipped over a beating or two.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donna Herrick

    Hurrah! A new author, a new detective, a new series of historical detective fiction. Sue Grafton produced the longest series of mysteries by developing a fabulous character, Kinsey Milhone, who lived amongst a milieu of sympathetic supporters whom we all loved. Dunsky's Adam Lapid is a compelling character, with a damaged past that he alternately hides from, relies upon, and rejects. Barabara Cleverly reveals the world of the British Empire after WWI through her Detective Joe Sandilands. To under Hurrah! A new author, a new detective, a new series of historical detective fiction. Sue Grafton produced the longest series of mysteries by developing a fabulous character, Kinsey Milhone, who lived amongst a milieu of sympathetic supporters whom we all loved. Dunsky's Adam Lapid is a compelling character, with a damaged past that he alternately hides from, relies upon, and rejects. Barabara Cleverly reveals the world of the British Empire after WWI through her Detective Joe Sandilands. To understand the demise of royalty and the changing role of women in society in the 1920s is greatly aided by observing characters in fiction, the author can probe the dilemmas that people faced during a transition and how they acted in the face of those dilemmas. Our compassion today can be bolstered by understandings that we gleam from historical fiction novels. Dunsky has set his novels in Israel in the period following the War for Independence. Today we look upon Israel with a sense of sympathy for the peril that they live in, a sense of admiration for having developed such a strong country out of meager resources in such a short time, and a sense of frustration at their inability to address the injustices done to Arab residents of that land. In Ten Years Gone Dunsky begins to show us the character of Israel and Tel Aviv in 1949, two years after the War of Independence. Israel is receiving refugees from all over Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Food is scarce. Israel is filled with people of desperation and determination, hope and sorrow. The third author that I will compare Dunsky to is Sara Andrews, author of the Em Hansen, forensic geologist series. Andrews was a whiz at illuminating an aspect of geology, tying it to a locality, and then weaving the mystery through the geology. One of my favorites was about detecting forged paintings through pigments and how those pigments tied to the rocks in Chugwater, Wyoming Dunsky is taking the politics and the events of the era and weaving his mystery around. In Ten Years Gone he opens us up to learning about the Irgun, and about the conflict between Menachim Begin and David Ben-Gurion. I am hoping that Dunsky weaves as many tales as Grafton and enlightens us as much as Andrews and Cleverly, and continues to entertain us with his character Adam Lapid has he uses his strength and fights his demons.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Hamilton

    excellent. well written. dynamic. this book was recommended and totally worth it. draws you in from the first line and holds you til the last word. well researched in a time period i love, drawing the reader to the anomie of Post WWII world with all the color and soul i have found in Remarque. Well worth the read. i am voracious and sort of like the bookseller in the book who READS everything though in this day and age of people only reading People , i would brag that i have read 1,000s of books excellent. well written. dynamic. this book was recommended and totally worth it. draws you in from the first line and holds you til the last word. well researched in a time period i love, drawing the reader to the anomie of Post WWII world with all the color and soul i have found in Remarque. Well worth the read. i am voracious and sort of like the bookseller in the book who READS everything though in this day and age of people only reading People , i would brag that i have read 1,000s of books in my lifetime. it is a passion. btw, i did not put the book down til i finished. at my age, i can do this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michele Carpenter

    A Page Turner The only reason I didn't read this book straight through is because I had to recharge my Kindle battery. Best detective story I've read in years. Good writing style, characters, and plot. Can't wait to read next book in the series, which will be today.

  7. 5 out of 5

    George P.

    Ten Years Gonebrings together three things I love: Israel, mystery, and sequels. It is the first of four novels by Jonathan Dunsky featuring Adam Lapid, a private detective in post-Independence Tel Aviv. (By first, I mean that the events it narrates come first in the series. It was actually written third.) Having completed it, I’m already on to the next novel, The Dead Sister. Lapid was a Jewish police detective in Hungary before World War II. His wife and children didn’t survive Auschwitz, but h Ten Years Gonebrings together three things I love: Israel, mystery, and sequels. It is the first of four novels by Jonathan Dunsky featuring Adam Lapid, a private detective in post-Independence Tel Aviv. (By first, I mean that the events it narrates come first in the series. It was actually written third.) Having completed it, I’m already on to the next novel, The Dead Sister. Lapid was a Jewish police detective in Hungary before World War II. His wife and children didn’t survive Auschwitz, but he did. After the Allies liberated Buchenwald, he stayed in Europe for a time, hunting down former Nazi officers and meting out vengeance. Then he immigrated to Palestine, joined the Haganah, and fought heroically in the War of Independence. After the war, he took up private detecting on the streets of Tel Aviv. In that capacity, a German Jewess who was able to pass herself off as Gentile during the war comes to him with a request. In 1939, she had sent her son ahead with a friend to Palestine, hoping soon to follow in their steps. That didn’t happen. Ten years later, she can’t find either the woman or her son, so she hires Lapid to do so. The problem? Both the woman and the boy were murdered in 1939. Lapid doesn’t have the heart to tell his client just yet, so instead, he reopens the case to solve their murders. Along the way, he uncovers secrets and lies involving the dead woman, her circle of acquaintances, and the Irgun, the radical group which worked hard in the pre-Independence era to speed both Jewish entry and British exit from Palestine…violently, if necessary. The tale is competently told. It’s not at the level of Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch novels or Daniel Silva’s Gabriel Allon novels, but it’s good. My first rule for evaluating mysteries is that it must keep me turning pages to see what happens next. Ten Years Gonedid. I look forward to reading the other books in the series. Book Reviewed Jonathan Dunsky, Ten Years Gone: An Adam Lapid Mystery (Charleston, NC: CreateSpace, 2017). P.S. If you found my review helpful, please vote “Yes” on my Amazon.com review page.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ann Haehn

    Ten Years Gone popped up as I was browsing through Kindle Unlimited choices. I haven't read mystery books for a lot of years, although I've been trying to get back into that genre. I'm highly critical of writing style and will toss a book out if the writing is terrible, no matter how good the plot. We're not reading high literature with Dunsky, but his writing is tight and the plot moves with sufficient action. Characters are well developed, although I had to suspend reality about the character Ten Years Gone popped up as I was browsing through Kindle Unlimited choices. I haven't read mystery books for a lot of years, although I've been trying to get back into that genre. I'm highly critical of writing style and will toss a book out if the writing is terrible, no matter how good the plot. We're not reading high literature with Dunsky, but his writing is tight and the plot moves with sufficient action. Characters are well developed, although I had to suspend reality about the character Michael and his motivations and actions. What Michael did just didn't ring as plausible and I wish Dunsky had worked a bit more on the denouement. Also, I guessed fairly early on about what really happened to Willie Ackerland. Don't want to write too much here because then I'd have to add a spoiler alert. At any rate, dialogue and narration for the most part held my attention (there were some scenes that didn't resonate with me as a woman, but they are easily overlooked). What I really liked was the setting (Tel Aviv) and Dunsky's descriptions of Israel as a young country. I use to travel to Tel Aviv for work, and I felt I was right back there while reading Ten Years Gone. Net-net, I recommend Ten Years Gone, and I've downloaded the other three books in the series. Starting The Dead Sister tonight.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    Like the detective, Adam Lapid, I’m losing sleep. But the problem is that I’ve been binge reading the last two nights in order to read the first two books of the series. And I’m afraid I’ll read late tonight as well. I lived in Israel 21 years after these books take place, but parts of it still feel true to my memory. I know Yafo well because my sister lives there. Many of the streets he mention I’ve walked down within the last year. Having said all this, these books are original and bear no rese Like the detective, Adam Lapid, I’m losing sleep. But the problem is that I’ve been binge reading the last two nights in order to read the first two books of the series. And I’m afraid I’ll read late tonight as well. I lived in Israel 21 years after these books take place, but parts of it still feel true to my memory. I know Yafo well because my sister lives there. Many of the streets he mention I’ve walked down within the last year. Having said all this, these books are original and bear no resemblance to the Israel I know today. They are noir in the same way that Sam Spade is noir, dark and honorable, romantic and brutal, all at the same time. Lapid struggles with some of his choices, and hates his desire for violence which is over-matched by his desire for justice. Today we live in a world of corruption and evil on a much larger scale than the human-sized corruption and evil described in these books, and our heroes are relatively much smaller. Part of the appeal of these books for me is the same appeal that westerns have for the detective: the problems are dealt with expeditiously; there is an answer to the problems and everything is completed by the final page. However, the author never lets us forget the inexplicable desire to destroy others that seems to be part of human nature so far.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jaqui

    Utterly brilliant. The best crime thriller I have read in two years. I loved this book. It is rare, I have found, that a crime thriller writer can write characters that have depth and dimension and feel real in a genre that is primarily plot driven. Often irritatingly, many are exciting but with characters it is hard to feel any empathy for and with writing that is all tell and not any show. This writer writes so well and has succeeded in bringing to life characters that sing from the pages. He h Utterly brilliant. The best crime thriller I have read in two years. I loved this book. It is rare, I have found, that a crime thriller writer can write characters that have depth and dimension and feel real in a genre that is primarily plot driven. Often irritatingly, many are exciting but with characters it is hard to feel any empathy for and with writing that is all tell and not any show. This writer writes so well and has succeeded in bringing to life characters that sing from the pages. He has welded together a great plot with twists and turns that kept me guessing. The book was absolutely terrific. I loved Adam Lapid. He is a flawed hero who has survived Auschwitz and become a Private Investigator in Israel in the early years of Israel's birth. It's intelligent, thought provoking writing on big questions, the characters are well drawn, the dialogue is great, and I loved the setting and time frame. "This is a great story, Adam," he said grinning " They'll talk about this in the cafes on Dizengoff for weeks. " I've had this book on my kindle for months. I wish now I had leapt to read it earlier.Terrific!! Intricately weaved, politically telling and with a great main character I fell in love with. Recommended. I have already bought the next book in the series. Can't wait to begin reading it. A new favorite writer I think.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Evonne

    What a fun read! Adam Lapid, an Auchwitz survivor and, before that, Hungarian police detective, is hired to find a Jewish woman's son five years after WWII in the newly established nation of Israel. He finds the boy has been murdered, but there's more.... and he's going to dig it all up to get the answer to every question. He meets all kinds of characters in post-war Israel, and is caught up in the swirling current of a dozen or so implicated lives. The cast is appealing, and you can tell right a What a fun read! Adam Lapid, an Auchwitz survivor and, before that, Hungarian police detective, is hired to find a Jewish woman's son five years after WWII in the newly established nation of Israel. He finds the boy has been murdered, but there's more.... and he's going to dig it all up to get the answer to every question. He meets all kinds of characters in post-war Israel, and is caught up in the swirling current of a dozen or so implicated lives. The cast is appealing, and you can tell right away which ones will be returning in the rest of the series, and which are staying inside the pages of Ten Years Gone. It's good though - it created a kind of family feel. I wanted to meet up with some again, and was happy to find some left behind. The style is very much true to the detective genre, and Adam Lapid is very much the classic wounded and closed detective who just wants to make the world a better place maybe in order to quell his own demons. He's a cliche, but a very likeable one. I read it on a plane both going and coming on a weekend trip - it was the perfect length; it held my attention; it left me smiling. Recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Adams

    Was not disappointed I enjoyed Ten Years Gone very much. It read at a nice pace and it held my interest from beginning to end. I really liked the main protagonist, Adam Lapid. He’s a good man with a tragic past. He believes in justice and will do his best to find it for those deserve it. He has a bit of darkness inside him (I believe we all have a bit) but you only see it when it’s absolutely necessary and, in my opinion, warranted. I liked that the story took place in the past; it’s nice to tra Was not disappointed I enjoyed Ten Years Gone very much. It read at a nice pace and it held my interest from beginning to end. I really liked the main protagonist, Adam Lapid. He’s a good man with a tragic past. He believes in justice and will do his best to find it for those deserve it. He has a bit of darkness inside him (I believe we all have a bit) but you only see it when it’s absolutely necessary and, in my opinion, warranted. I liked that the story took place in the past; it’s nice to travel back to another time; I have been reading books lately, some fiction and nonfiction, that have taken place in and around WWII and the Holocaust; I have learned a lot. I also appreciated that the story took place in Israel; I enjoyed looking up the places mentioned in the story like Moghrabi Theater and Zion Square and learning what tehine is. I’ve always wanted to visit Israel and our church takes groups there a couple of times a year but my husband and I can’t afford to go; maybe someday. Anyway, I look forward to reading the next book in the series.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    Always great to find a new mystery series, and the Adam Lapid Mysteries get off to a strong start with Ten Years Gone. The setting is Tel Aviv in 1949. Israel is newly independent, and the nation is flooded with Holocaust survivors. One of them is Adam Lapid, who was formerly a Hungarian police officer, and now works as a private investigator. He has secrets. As does everyone else he encounters. The chief cause of this book's success is the location, both place and time. Dunsky makes Tel Aviv com Always great to find a new mystery series, and the Adam Lapid Mysteries get off to a strong start with Ten Years Gone. The setting is Tel Aviv in 1949. Israel is newly independent, and the nation is flooded with Holocaust survivors. One of them is Adam Lapid, who was formerly a Hungarian police officer, and now works as a private investigator. He has secrets. As does everyone else he encounters. The chief cause of this book's success is the location, both place and time. Dunsky makes Tel Aviv come alive with skilful touches of authenticity. The characters are sharply drawn (Lapid is terrific, and easily keeps the reader's interest as the central figure). My only criticism is a mild one; at a certain point it becomes obvious that there is a red herring, but it is a great red herring, and even brought a certain amount of relief to a harrowing story. Other than that, this book was flawless, and I look forward to the next in the series. Recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I didn’t like this book. At the beginning where the protagonist murders several Nazis after the war, and we’re told he lost his wife and 2 daughters in the Holocaust, it’s done in a matter of fact way with little well-written feeling. That he was a detective in pre-war Budapest is mentioned without embellishments as if on a resume. Now in Israel, commissioned to find a boy not seen by his mother in 10 years, except for frequent mentioning of many common street names in Tel Aviv, the writing, dia I didn’t like this book. At the beginning where the protagonist murders several Nazis after the war, and we’re told he lost his wife and 2 daughters in the Holocaust, it’s done in a matter of fact way with little well-written feeling. That he was a detective in pre-war Budapest is mentioned without embellishments as if on a resume. Now in Israel, commissioned to find a boy not seen by his mother in 10 years, except for frequent mentioning of many common street names in Tel Aviv, the writing, dialogue and actions could all be that of a tough, jaded New York City gumshoe tracking down a missing person. I never felt the unique nuances of culture and place of Israel I experience in other books that take place there, and how things are said and done differently. The plot wasn’t bad, but to me, well-written books are much more than just a good plot.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeannette M. Hartman

    After a somewhat slow, prosaic beginning, this book turned into a real page turner. Adam Lapid, once a detective with the Hungarian police, now a private investigator in the newly created State of Israel, survived Auschwitz but is struggling in post-war Tel Aviv. When Henrietta Ackerland asks for his help finding the son she gave to an acquaintance to escape from Nazi Germany, Lapid believes the attempt will be futile and hear-breaking. But as he digs, he proves himself wrong. This story takes u After a somewhat slow, prosaic beginning, this book turned into a real page turner. Adam Lapid, once a detective with the Hungarian police, now a private investigator in the newly created State of Israel, survived Auschwitz but is struggling in post-war Tel Aviv. When Henrietta Ackerland asks for his help finding the son she gave to an acquaintance to escape from Nazi Germany, Lapid believes the attempt will be futile and hear-breaking. But as he digs, he proves himself wrong. This story takes unforeseeable twists and turns that will keep you hooked to the end. Lapid is a sympathetic character and the backdrop of the new State of Israel with its flood of immigrants and economic challenges is fascinating.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christina (Ensconced in Lit)

    I'm really picky with thrillers and not really into historical, so I was a bit dubious going into this one. But there was just something about it. The main character reminds me of the Punisher, who I love, and is totally bad ass, so I liked him. And while I didn't necessarily FEEL like I was in post WWII, it still felt too modern, I was still very interested in the story. It dragged a little in the middle but the ending was totally worth it. I didn't see it coming and I'm pretty hard to surprise I'm really picky with thrillers and not really into historical, so I was a bit dubious going into this one. But there was just something about it. The main character reminds me of the Punisher, who I love, and is totally bad ass, so I liked him. And while I didn't necessarily FEEL like I was in post WWII, it still felt too modern, I was still very interested in the story. It dragged a little in the middle but the ending was totally worth it. I didn't see it coming and I'm pretty hard to surprise these days. I'd definitely be open to reading another one by him. This is particularly impressive bc I think it is either self pubbed or released by a small publishing company so the fact it was so well written, I give it props for that.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gesundheit

    This book was added to one of the book clubs I'm part of by a gal who has a very diverse library so I really didn't know what to expect. Hands down, this is one of the best books I've read in a long time. Part of it was a bit difficult to read but was necessary to the story. It is extremely well written and I read it in record time. What started out as a search for a missing child put the detective in one very dangerous situation. I thought I had read more of WWII than /post WWII books than I ne This book was added to one of the book clubs I'm part of by a gal who has a very diverse library so I really didn't know what to expect. Hands down, this is one of the best books I've read in a long time. Part of it was a bit difficult to read but was necessary to the story. It is extremely well written and I read it in record time. What started out as a search for a missing child put the detective in one very dangerous situation. I thought I had read more of WWII than /post WWII books than I needed, but this gave me a lot of new information on the origin of the State of Israel. Great read!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    A new book from an author new to me. Dunsky is an Israeli and his detective, Adam Lapid is living in Israel in 1948. A woman has come to him to find her son. She’d given the baby away in 1938 to save his life. The woman who took the baby was to have gone to Israel with him. She’s now made it to Israel and wants to see if her child survived. Adam lost everything in the Holocaust and agrees to help. What he finds is way more than he expected. I liked the mixing of history and politics. There were A new book from an author new to me. Dunsky is an Israeli and his detective, Adam Lapid is living in Israel in 1948. A woman has come to him to find her son. She’d given the baby away in 1938 to save his life. The woman who took the baby was to have gone to Israel with him. She’s now made it to Israel and wants to see if her child survived. Adam lost everything in the Holocaust and agrees to help. What he finds is way more than he expected. I liked the mixing of history and politics. There were a couple of violent moments that surprised me and Adam isn’t Gamache but he has his moments. He’s more a Philip Marlowe kind of guy. I look forward to the next in the series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Bornhoeft

    How to put it The story was interesting enough to keep reading.. The post world war two era was a good choice of the author. Part of the story that held me was how little I knew about refugees fight to create a new life after losing Traditions and family , the mental torture of survival. I never write harsh criticism of authors out of respect For the work that they do. I found myself reading this book in a mental accent. So the author created good ppl' Characters. But I felt every sentence was adj How to put it The story was interesting enough to keep reading.. The post world war two era was a good choice of the author. Part of the story that held me was how little I knew about refugees fight to create a new life after losing Traditions and family , the mental torture of survival. I never write harsh criticism of authors out of respect For the work that they do. I found myself reading this book in a mental accent. So the author created good ppl' Characters. But I felt every sentence was adjective heavy. It made for a repetitive beat that slowed down The book by the end

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Beaser

    Excellent mystery which takes place in Israel. Adam Lapid, the protagonist, is drawn into the story which revolves around finding a missing child that was “given away” by his mother during the Holocaust, in order to spare his life. Fast forward ten years, now the biological mother has hired Lapid to find her son. I was fully engaged in the plot as the story line has many twists and turns until the final climax of the book. An excellent book well worth reading! I look for to reading more from thi Excellent mystery which takes place in Israel. Adam Lapid, the protagonist, is drawn into the story which revolves around finding a missing child that was “given away” by his mother during the Holocaust, in order to spare his life. Fast forward ten years, now the biological mother has hired Lapid to find her son. I was fully engaged in the plot as the story line has many twists and turns until the final climax of the book. An excellent book well worth reading! I look for to reading more from this skilled writer.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Harriet B Gold

    In The Beginning. 10 years ago a woman travels to Israel to find her son. She was able to find a young woman who would care for him as she would her own until she was able to r.reclaim him. Unfortunately the pair were murdered not long after they arrived. The hunt for the missing woman and son begins 10 years later. The boy's Mother is finally able to get a visa and arrives in Tel Aviv ready to reclaim her son. Having lost everyone in Auschwitz,she is determined to find the only family she has le In The Beginning. 10 years ago a woman travels to Israel to find her son. She was able to find a young woman who would care for him as she would her own until she was able to r.reclaim him. Unfortunately the pair were murdered not long after they arrived. The hunt for the missing woman and son begins 10 years later. The boy's Mother is finally able to get a visa and arrives in Tel Aviv ready to reclaim her son. Having lost everyone in Auschwitz,she is determined to find the only family she has left.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John Grinstead

    Although I quite liked the central character - Adam Lapid - and he and the story raise a number of interesting talking points, the book didn’t really work for me. There were just too many areas where the suspension of one’s disbelief didn’t work, there were inconsistencies in characterisation or actions or events defied logic. I also found the writing style somewhat naive - the descriptions of characters’ features and clothing were very childlike. Sadly, I do not feel drawn into reading the next Although I quite liked the central character - Adam Lapid - and he and the story raise a number of interesting talking points, the book didn’t really work for me. There were just too many areas where the suspension of one’s disbelief didn’t work, there were inconsistencies in characterisation or actions or events defied logic. I also found the writing style somewhat naive - the descriptions of characters’ features and clothing were very childlike. Sadly, I do not feel drawn into reading the next in the series and finding out what happens next.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    Ten Years Gone I just read this historical novel. I don't usually go for this particular genre, however since I am Jewish i decided to read it. I'm so glad I did. The plot and characters are real. Who is to say that this plot couldn't have happened in real life. Just thinking of what the holocaust did to the spirit of those who survived. Some like Henretta never gave up, Adam became a hero that doesn't like the fame becomes a loner. That's just two of the characters. Amazing story. Thank you Jona Ten Years Gone I just read this historical novel. I don't usually go for this particular genre, however since I am Jewish i decided to read it. I'm so glad I did. The plot and characters are real. Who is to say that this plot couldn't have happened in real life. Just thinking of what the holocaust did to the spirit of those who survived. Some like Henretta never gave up, Adam became a hero that doesn't like the fame becomes a loner. That's just two of the characters. Amazing story. Thank you Jonathan Dunsky

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Unlike every review, and my best friend who touted this book as one of the best she had read in a long time, I unfortunately, do not share their glowing critiques. Yes, it did keep me riveted, with the twists and turns, admissions and revelations. But I couldn’t get past the gruesome details and descriptions of crimes committed in the 10 years prior to the story’s beginning. In all fairness, mystery novels are not my favorite genre to begin with, so it was no surprise that I didn’t love this stor Unlike every review, and my best friend who touted this book as one of the best she had read in a long time, I unfortunately, do not share their glowing critiques. Yes, it did keep me riveted, with the twists and turns, admissions and revelations. But I couldn’t get past the gruesome details and descriptions of crimes committed in the 10 years prior to the story’s beginning. In all fairness, mystery novels are not my favorite genre to begin with, so it was no surprise that I didn’t love this story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Linda Branham Greenwell

    It is the first of four novels by Jonathan Dunsky featuring Adam Lapid, a private detective in post-Independence Tel Aviv. It is about Israel, a mystery, and survival. Adam was in Germany during the Holocaust - his wife and children did not survive. He suffers from their loss, and is willing to kill when necessary, In this story a mother comes to him to help her find her child. She had a friend take the child to Israel while she stayed in Germany to look for her husband, 10 years have passed. Her It is the first of four novels by Jonathan Dunsky featuring Adam Lapid, a private detective in post-Independence Tel Aviv. It is about Israel, a mystery, and survival. Adam was in Germany during the Holocaust - his wife and children did not survive. He suffers from their loss, and is willing to kill when necessary, In this story a mother comes to him to help her find her child. She had a friend take the child to Israel while she stayed in Germany to look for her husband, 10 years have passed. Her husband did not survive and she cannot find her friend or her son. Adam takes the case

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Fraley

    Well written, inspiring and informational book of the Jewish escape to Israel, smuggling of those refugees onto the country safely. A European woman gave her baby to another woman who was leaving the country in 1939. She feared the nazi forces coming to occupy her country. She was to follow shortly, however, the German army intervened. Years passed and a tortured survivor of auschwitz, Adam Lapid, begins to investigate the lost child. Read the book. It is well worth it. thank you to Jonathan Duns Well written, inspiring and informational book of the Jewish escape to Israel, smuggling of those refugees onto the country safely. A European woman gave her baby to another woman who was leaving the country in 1939. She feared the nazi forces coming to occupy her country. She was to follow shortly, however, the German army intervened. Years passed and a tortured survivor of auschwitz, Adam Lapid, begins to investigate the lost child. Read the book. It is well worth it. thank you to Jonathan Dunsky for a wonderful post ww2 novel.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Adams

    Book 1 of 4 of the Adam Lapid series set in Israel after Israel's independence in the late 1940's. Adam is an independent private investigator, Holocaust survivor, and former police detective from Hungary. Henrietta hires Adam to search for her son that 10 years previously she gave to a childhood friend, Esther to save him from the Nazi death camps. I enjoyed the setting of this novel, the characters and the story. I would definitely read another book in the series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Enjoyed this quite a bit. I liked that it was set after WWII and had a different take on the issues with the Holocaust. The characters were good ones and the author wrote them in a way that I could visualize them well. I also cared about what was happening to them. As an Adoptee the subject of a mother giving up her child and then looking for it was one I could relate to. I'd definitely read more of this series.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Scott K

    The plot sounded very interesting but I was waiting for it to be a page-turner. One way I know I'm enjoying the story is I want to read it whenever the opportunity presents itself. Not the case here. Adam Lipid I understand has some 'anger issues' and a reason to be so, but he came across to me more of bully type. It moved so slow I gave up on it after about a third of the way if that far. I put it on my yawn shelf.

  30. 4 out of 5

    kay keller

    Keeps Your Interest Excellently written book that sustains a reader's interest from beginning to end. The author realistically captured the social and political turmoil of 1948 Israel. Very few of the characters are "nice"as much as they all suffer from the angst of a new country dealing with people trying to exist in a new country with varied beliefs and varied histories. I recommend this book and plan to read more books by this author.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.