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#1 New York Times bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman sorts through the conflicting research on food to give us the skinny on what to eat. Did you know that eating oatmeal actually isn't a healthy way to start the day? That milk doesn't build bones, and eggs aren't the devil? Even the most health conscious among us have a hard time figuring out what to eat in order to lose #1 New York Times bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman sorts through the conflicting research on food to give us the skinny on what to eat. Did you know that eating oatmeal actually isn't a healthy way to start the day? That milk doesn't build bones, and eggs aren't the devil? Even the most health conscious among us have a hard time figuring out what to eat in order to lose weight, stay fit, and improve our health. And who can blame us? When it comes to diet, there's so much changing and conflicting information flying around that it's impossible to know where to look for sound advice. And decades of misguided "common sense," food-industry lobbying, bad science, and corrupt food polices and guidelines have only deepened our crisis of nutritional confusion, leaving us overwhelmed and anxious when we head to the grocery store. Thankfully, bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman is here to set the record straight. In Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? -- his most comprehensive book yet -- he takes a close look at every food group and explains what we've gotten wrong, revealing which foods nurture our health and which pose a threat. From grains to legumes, meat to dairy, fats to artificial sweeteners, and beyond, Dr. Hyman debunks misconceptions and breaks down the fascinating science in his signature accessible style. He also explains food's role as powerful medicine capable of reversing chronic disease and shows how our food system and policies impact the environment, the economy, social justice, and personal health, painting a holistic picture of growing, cooking, and eating food in ways that nourish our bodies and the earth while creating a healthy society. With myth-busting insights, easy-to-understand science, and delicious, wholesome recipes, Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? is a no-nonsense guide to achieving optimal weight and lifelong health.


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#1 New York Times bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman sorts through the conflicting research on food to give us the skinny on what to eat. Did you know that eating oatmeal actually isn't a healthy way to start the day? That milk doesn't build bones, and eggs aren't the devil? Even the most health conscious among us have a hard time figuring out what to eat in order to lose #1 New York Times bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman sorts through the conflicting research on food to give us the skinny on what to eat. Did you know that eating oatmeal actually isn't a healthy way to start the day? That milk doesn't build bones, and eggs aren't the devil? Even the most health conscious among us have a hard time figuring out what to eat in order to lose weight, stay fit, and improve our health. And who can blame us? When it comes to diet, there's so much changing and conflicting information flying around that it's impossible to know where to look for sound advice. And decades of misguided "common sense," food-industry lobbying, bad science, and corrupt food polices and guidelines have only deepened our crisis of nutritional confusion, leaving us overwhelmed and anxious when we head to the grocery store. Thankfully, bestselling author Dr. Mark Hyman is here to set the record straight. In Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? -- his most comprehensive book yet -- he takes a close look at every food group and explains what we've gotten wrong, revealing which foods nurture our health and which pose a threat. From grains to legumes, meat to dairy, fats to artificial sweeteners, and beyond, Dr. Hyman debunks misconceptions and breaks down the fascinating science in his signature accessible style. He also explains food's role as powerful medicine capable of reversing chronic disease and shows how our food system and policies impact the environment, the economy, social justice, and personal health, painting a holistic picture of growing, cooking, and eating food in ways that nourish our bodies and the earth while creating a healthy society. With myth-busting insights, easy-to-understand science, and delicious, wholesome recipes, Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? is a no-nonsense guide to achieving optimal weight and lifelong health.

30 review for Food: What the Heck Should I Eat?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    About a month ago I read Gary Taubes new book called “The Case Against Sugar”...in where he exposes the facade we have been lead to believe about Sugar. Carbohydrates were increasing - diabetes was increasing- while we went through a the anti-fat period. Sugar-pushing companies were benefitting from the ‘fat-is-bad’ for human consumption.... Taubes set the facts straight! His book is the best comprehensive- up-to -date - well respected and documented in “The Case Against Sugar”. .... a very power About a month ago I read Gary Taubes new book called “The Case Against Sugar”...in where he exposes the facade we have been lead to believe about Sugar. Carbohydrates were increasing - diabetes was increasing- while we went through a the anti-fat period. Sugar-pushing companies were benefitting from the ‘fat-is-bad’ for human consumption.... Taubes set the facts straight! His book is the best comprehensive- up-to -date - well respected and documented in “The Case Against Sugar”. .... a very powerful addictive drug-like effect for many people. Mark Hyman and Gary Taubes are both - two of the most respected - committed qualified men restoring the health of our nation. To be fair ....I could name at least a dozen other experts in the field ...all on the same team: restoring the health of our nation.....I’ve been following them all - have participated in summit seminars - weekend workshops with these doctors - and nutritionist for approximately 30 years. I already own most of Mark’s books - listen to his audio video’s from time to time -and have cooked literally dozens of his meals ....so often: I forget they are his: they have become my meals. His spiced ground Turkey Wrap with watercress and avocado is a regular favorite comfort meal around here. —- But I’m here to review Dr. Mark Hyman’s NEW BOOK.....”Food”....What The Heck Should I Eat” ..... I’m Soooooo EXCITED ABOUT THIS BOOK...., I HONESTLY BELIEVE ITS THE BEST BOOK OF ITS KIND....THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE UP -TO -DATE USEFUL INFORMATION that EVERY HOUSEHOLD would benefit owing ...reading ... and referring to as a resource. It’s the PERECT COMPANION to Gary Taubes book, “The Case Against Sugar”. Mark Hyman, MD is - a functional medicine doctor - covers FOOD IN THIS BOOK LIKE NOBODIES BUSINESS! He will cover questions you have - that you didn’t know you had. I had already suspected I would buy his hardcopy book - even if I was granted the opportunity to read this book early from Little Brown and Netgalley.... but now I’m 100% sure I want to own a physical copy. I’d give this book as a ‘perfect gift’ at a BABY SHOWER! No, kidding...raising kids is no easy task ...the the book is the best FOOD BIBLE ...clearing up misconceptions that we have to date — and who better to have written it - but a qualified medical doctor who has solid reputation in this field. The structure is designed to either read straight through - or jump to a particular food group you want to know more about. For example ....let’s talk about BEANS for a moment. Is there any controversy or concerned about the *bean*? High levels of nutrients - and as far as plants go - unmatched amounts of protein..... a cheap and plentiful source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. As you will continue reading about THE BEAN .....( or substitute other foods in this book: vegetables, fruits, poultry and eggs, meats, grains, nuts and seeds, milk and dairy, fish and seafood, fats and oils, sugars and sweeteners, beverages, the pagan diet, etc. etc.), Mark will show us the the beans on beans — ALTHOUGH HAS BEEN KNOWN TO LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE AND LOWER THE RISK OF CANCER.....is NOT A SIMPLE AND CLEAR POSITIVE FOOD FOR ALL PEOPLE. Yes..... they are packed with a lot of nutrients including potassium, zinc, iron, magnesium full light, and vitamin B6 among others....but they also contain lectins which can damage our intestinal lining and prevent us from absorbing all the nutrients we need. FOOD BEGINS TO GET CONFUSING...... However.....Mark clears up the questions-of- concern. .....very easily. By the time you are done reading about a particular food.... YOU WILL BE PRETTY DAMN CERTAIN ....99.9% which foods BEST WORK FOR YOU .....( this book can be validating for things you suspected). Throughout this book ....Mark shares: ....on each food: WHAT THE EXPERTS GOT RIGHT WHAT THEY GOT WRONG WHAT WE STILL DON’T KNOW FOR SURE ......( back to beans....)....NINE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT BEANS ..... GREAT INFORMATION..... There is a great section on GRAINS..... ......with a list of symptoms that ‘some’ people may have. I have 5 of the 7 symptoms listed.... meaning.....I’m not the best candidate for eating grains..... unless I like being depressed, bloated, and gaining weight. OATMEAL....is not a health food... NOT THE BEST CHOICE BREAKFAST.... Why? Spikes blood sugar! Egg whites - avoid the yokes? I have friends who have been doing this for years.... Mark has not only a lot to say about this .... but I was laughing at the ridiculousness I discovered- through reading the EGG SECTION .... of what different egg cartons say on them in the supermarket. FREE RANGE EGGS.... I started laughing when I learned what it really means. GLUTEN FREE EGGES..... OH MY! Best laugh I had! The packaging of our foods - the “PURE SELLING TEASERS” start to be rather funny....if not scary! MEAT.....the *M* word .....a word MY CHILDREN WERE ASKED NOT TO *SAY* in their 4th grade class because their teacher was a vegetarian—and her daughter a veterinarian. It was the beginning of our daughters eating disorder. She came home from school one day - age 9, and said, “I don’t eat Meat”....”I be nice to animals”. Our pediatrician said to honor her wishes and feed her lots of beans. By age 14 - she had a serious eating disorder weighing 65lbs and was hospitalized. Thankfully our daughter is well today - strong & lean - eats lean proteins ( some meat). Mark doesn’t advocate to be or not to be a vegetarian - meat eater - vegan - or any specific spiritual or personal choice diet .... it’s ALL INCLUDED ....but the myths are exposed. I HAD TO FACE THE FACTS THAT DAIRY IS NOT A GREAT SOURCE OF CALCIUM.... and LOW FAT MILK has almost NO VITAMIN D..... .....even though my doctor is telling me to eat dairy products since I was diagnosed with osteoporosis this year. I was never much of a dairy girl...and there still seems to be confusing information of how I’m to GAIN *BACK* my bone loss - build new density. Exercise seems to be the only ‘sure’ thing all experts agree on. Keifer which I’m now taking daily is a “WE STILL DON’T KNOW FOR SURE”, of the benefits. THANK GOODNESS I’m eating those little fishies.....sardines, often now. Trying to build back bone density at age 65 is a challenge - but a game worth fighting for. There is a wealth of HEALTHY SCIENCE -BASED INFORMATION IN THIS BOOK. I haven’t even skimmed the surface. ITS REALLY A HUGE GIFT TO ALL OF US! Mark has many videos worth watching - great books - and many ways he offers support. He says “getting healthy is a TEAM SPORT... and unfortunately many of us are lacking the positive encouragement and supportive relationships we need in order to move toward our best selves”. I had read this quote by him ways back. I happen to agree....that one of the biggest challenges for many of us —is feeling alone, stuck in a rut, unmotivated, sometimes like a complete failure because we gave into our junk food craving — wishing ongoing wellness - personal support if needed - to literally everyone! I include myself - with my own challenges - my family - and close friends. This book is a golden ticket for consumers to cut through all the conflicting messages we receive about food....emphasizing that food is our best preventive medicine in avoiding diseases and living a healthier life. A BIG THANK YOU to Netgalley, Little Brown and Company, and Mark Hyman Note: To get a food fact and weekly recipe directly from the kitchen....sign up for free at www.foodthebook.com. You’ll also be able to read a sample of this book and pre-order it. This book will be out in stores in Feb 2018

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda

    Contrary to the author's assertion, this is not an impartial and rational approach to food and eating. His all-or-nothing approach contributes to the escalating eating disorder problem. I was disappointed and appalled when the author recommended a "detox" program in the last part of the book. His application of scientific evidence is unevenly applied. Instead of giving us a simpler, sensible approach to improving our nutritional intake and eating habits, this is just one more of the long line of Contrary to the author's assertion, this is not an impartial and rational approach to food and eating. His all-or-nothing approach contributes to the escalating eating disorder problem. I was disappointed and appalled when the author recommended a "detox" program in the last part of the book. His application of scientific evidence is unevenly applied. Instead of giving us a simpler, sensible approach to improving our nutritional intake and eating habits, this is just one more of the long line of unsustainable, finger-pointing harangues about American diets.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    This book definitely made an impact. It remains to be seen what effect it will have, if any. Hence, the no-rating. In a nutshell: Beans: not as great for you as we’ve been led to believe; dairy: quite harmful; carbs: not needed. Beef/eggs: necessary. Organic, good quality products: almost always the answer! It’s a quick read, extremely accessible, with lots of thought-provoking nuggets: Dr. Mark Hyman isn’t afraid to get political or environmental, either. I’ve gone ahead and ordered myself a good This book definitely made an impact. It remains to be seen what effect it will have, if any. Hence, the no-rating. In a nutshell: Beans: not as great for you as we’ve been led to believe; dairy: quite harmful; carbs: not needed. Beef/eggs: necessary. Organic, good quality products: almost always the answer! It’s a quick read, extremely accessible, with lots of thought-provoking nuggets: Dr. Mark Hyman isn’t afraid to get political or environmental, either. I’ve gone ahead and ordered myself a good multivitamin, some fish oil, purchased some grass-fed beef, avocado oil, and grass-fed ghee. And some cans of Alaskan-wild caught salmon. I’m going to limit carbs (I’ll never give them up) and quit dairy temporarily, just to see if it’s the culprit to acne at 40, low energy, and stomach issues. We’ll see!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Lawson

    If You Come Across A Strange Sea Vegetable, Eat It! That’s right--it’s important to eat a wide variety of veggies, especially the odd ones! Forgot those common veggies you see at the market. Instead, “Eat all the strange, weird, and unpopular veggies instead of the boring, all-too-common ones.” If you find some strange sea vegetable from Japan, eat it! RESEARCH JUST IN: A study too late for the authors to include: Stanford University/NIH Study of 609 dieters concluded that either a low-fat or a lo If You Come Across A Strange Sea Vegetable, Eat It! That’s right--it’s important to eat a wide variety of veggies, especially the odd ones! Forgot those common veggies you see at the market. Instead, “Eat all the strange, weird, and unpopular veggies instead of the boring, all-too-common ones.” If you find some strange sea vegetable from Japan, eat it! RESEARCH JUST IN: A study too late for the authors to include: Stanford University/NIH Study of 609 dieters concluded that either a low-fat or a low-carb diet has similar benefit—as long as the food is HEALTHY. The head researcher notes: “Eat less sugar, less refined flour and as many vegetables as possible. Go for whole foods, whether that is a wheatberry salad or grass-fed beef.” Wow—these recommendations sound very similar to Dr. Hyman’s recommendations. Practical note: As a result of reading this book, I will be planting a garden full of zany, healthy vegetables. I’m really looking forward to putting the ideas in this book into action! (You don’t have to agree with all his points to realize the value of fresh, wholesome vegetables.) Eating unusual veggies is just one of the fun tips that Dr. Mark Hyman presents in, FOOD: WHAT THE HECK SHOULD I EAT? The author covers some of the hottest topics in diet research, and explains what we’ve gotten wrong. Readers familiar with Dr. Hyman’s work will recognize his passion on overuse of sugar. He notes that many health organizations recommend limiting sugar to 10 percent of the daily calories. Alas, the typical American child eats 3-times that amount. One good change is to limit sugary fruit juice. So, skip the O.J., and “Eat the orange instead.” Dr. Hyman notes that eating meat does not really lead to obesity and heart attacks. One reason studies have claimed that, is that people who eat a lot of eat have OTHER bad habits that do indeed cause health problems. To support his point, Dr. Hyman cites one summary of 53 studies, which found that high-fat diets achieved superior weight loss. Also, a comprehensive study “found no link between saturated fat consumption and heart disease.” Yet another large study found “no difference in mortality between vegetarians, pescatarians, and meat eaters.” At first, I found the conflicting conclusion about meat bewildering, but in turns out that his dietary recommendations are very similar to the “limit meat” camp. The doctor recommends big platefuls of colorful vegetables—with only a little meat: “Vegetables should take center stage, and meat should be the side dish.” Here’s what surprised me--I discovered I was woefully ignorant about modern fruits and vegetables. Modern fruits and veggies do not have great nutritional content, compared to less refined produce. We have “bred our produce to be sweeter, less colorful, and less nutritious. . . We’ve taken our wild plants— vegetables and fruit— and stripped them of their best qualities.” Here is my #1 surprise: A wild crabapple has “100x more cancer- and inflammation-fighting anthocyanins than the Golden Delicious variety found in supermarkets.” What? How did I not know that? Ditto for berries: “Wild blueberries have dozens of times more phytonutrients than domesticated berries.” Okay, I totally confess I had no idea about the nutrition of more wild produce compared to modern produce. I am VERY surprised. So all in all, I found FOOD to be a helpful book, with tons of great ideas. I realize that I am chugging down way too much sugar (I love ice cream and pies!) I found the chapters on veggies and fruit the most helpful, as I just didn’t realize how modern fruits and vegetables have so much less nutrition than less refined varieties. Excellent information! Finally, realize that there is a LOT of material in this book, and it can be a little overwhelming. Fortunately, the doctor writes well, and I found his points easy to follow. After presenting each topic, Dr. Hyman summarizes, ”What The Experts Got Right, ”What They Got Wrong,” and “What We Still Don’t Know For Sure.” I liked his succinct summary of the issues, and especially appreciate the author telling us where the science is not really settled. See also Bassocantor.com/blog/food

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Interesting read! Well-researched and well-written, in an easy-to-understand format. However, I do want to caution that the information Hyman presents is as of right now, and I emphasize RIGHT NOW! Nutrition is a science and science is forever changing! Having said this, Hyman tells us what the researchers / science got right (thus far) about specific groups of foods, what they got wrong, and what they don't know yet. He supports each "argument" with various studies (research) that support his st Interesting read! Well-researched and well-written, in an easy-to-understand format. However, I do want to caution that the information Hyman presents is as of right now, and I emphasize RIGHT NOW! Nutrition is a science and science is forever changing! Having said this, Hyman tells us what the researchers / science got right (thus far) about specific groups of foods, what they got wrong, and what they don't know yet. He supports each "argument" with various studies (research) that support his stance and based on this information, makes recommendations for what we should eat, what we shouldn't eat, what we should stay far away from, and in some cases how to find the "good stuff." Some information that I found particularly intriguing: Current research regarding saturated fat -- not all saturated fat is bad for you The chapter on nuts and seeds was absorbing. Does meat contribute to global warming? "Globally, one-fifth of all our energy consumption is used for industrial agriculture. That is more than is used for all our transportation - cars, trucks, planes, trains, boats - combined!" Milk increases our risk for cancer. Avocados are almost 80% fat, most of which is monounsaturated - the kind that's been shown to protect against heart disease and strokes. They contain good amounts of fiber, and even more potassium than bananas! A banana is not the best fruit to eat because it is high in sugar. Kidney beans are high in starch and with regards to plant protein, they rank low, meaning you'd have to eat a ton of beans to get the approximately 30 grams of protein you need per meal, and eating a ton of this bean is not good because of all of the starch. Nuts are antioxidant powerhouses. The best nuts are (in order): Pecans, Walnuts, Hazelnuts, Pistachios, Almonds Seeds recommended by Hyman are: Chia, Ground Flaxseeds, Hemp, and Sesame The section entitled, "There Are Many Ways to Say Sugar" was most enlightening. Another section that was good was the one on things that you can add to your diet, especially with regards to spices and herbs, as well as other condiments. One negative about this book is that it includes some websites for where to find more information, food, etc. Over time, these links will die, thus dating the book and perhaps decreasing its informational value. This book was published this year (2018) and one of the links [that I checked] is already dead. It is a link to the Natural Resources Defense Council for a wallet card that provides info. about mercury levels in fish. The updated web address (I searched the site) is: https://assets.nrdc.org/sites/default... My takeaway is: Take everything you read about this topic with a grain of salt. Scientists are always studying nutrition and how foods affect our bodies. We are all going to die, eventually. Eat in moderation and don't overindulge!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vannessa Anderson

    Food What the Heck Should I Eat opens with an easy challenge to help readers learn how much they know about food. What I learned 1. Pepsi has learned how to grow and harvest human taste buds in the lab. 2. The sugar industry drives our obesity epidemic. 3. We eat Frankenfoods: factory-made, industrial produced food-like substances that contains transfat, high-fructose corn syrup, monosodium glutamate (MSG), artificial sweeteners and colors, additives, preservatives, pesticides, antibiotics, new-to-m Food What the Heck Should I Eat opens with an easy challenge to help readers learn how much they know about food. What I learned 1. Pepsi has learned how to grow and harvest human taste buds in the lab. 2. The sugar industry drives our obesity epidemic. 3. We eat Frankenfoods: factory-made, industrial produced food-like substances that contains transfat, high-fructose corn syrup, monosodium glutamate (MSG), artificial sweeteners and colors, additives, preservatives, pesticides, antibiotics, new-to-mature proteins, and heightened allergens caused by genetic breeding and engineering a/k/a anti-nutrients 4. We should use food as a medicine and cook our way into good health 5. We spend more time watching cooking shows on television than cooking 6. Processed foods are not our friends 7. The American Heart Associates receives $300,000 when a product puts the AHA’s seal of approval on label 8. Fat speeds up metabolism and burns fat-carbs slow down 9. Gluten-free processed foods are not healthy 10. Incredibly ill patients become thriving healthy humans when taking a comprehensive approach to wellness 11. Real food is home-cooked food 12. Eating real food reduces stress 13. Incorporate movement (exercise) 14. Mental health activities include activities like TOASTMASTERS, Red Hats Society, volunteering 15. Margarine and butter substitutes kill tens of thousands of people a year 16. Animal foods are our only source of vitamin B12 17. You are not what you eat, you are what your food eats 18. The liver does not store toxins 19. Farmed Salmon could lead to diabetes 20. Oatmeal spikes insulin and blood sugar which makes you hungry What I concluded 1. Food is Medicine 2. We are willing victims to the food industry 3. We are so lazy or so poor we don’t or can’t invest in our health 4. We don’t love our children enough to the right thing and feed them nutritious meals 5. Don’t trust the American Heart Association health claims. Food What the Heck Should I Eat is for readers who are interested in factual information about food and the food industry. Food What the Heck Should I Eat is comprehensive and the information provided will not only help save my life but help me live a longer healthier life. Included are web sites where you can purchase safe foods. My sincere thanks to Dr. Mark Hyman.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Moaning

    The answer to the title question is apparently - nothing you can buy! If you don't make it yourself from produce you've grown your self, fish you've caught in the wild, or chickens or cows you've raised on grass then you probably shouldn't eat it.... that's how bad our food supply has gotten. No grains? No dairy? Are we really eating cows that have been fed rejected Skittles? I appreciated the straight forward way Dr. Hyman approached the question of food. However, sometimes I wasn't sure how mu The answer to the title question is apparently - nothing you can buy! If you don't make it yourself from produce you've grown your self, fish you've caught in the wild, or chickens or cows you've raised on grass then you probably shouldn't eat it.... that's how bad our food supply has gotten. No grains? No dairy? Are we really eating cows that have been fed rejected Skittles? I appreciated the straight forward way Dr. Hyman approached the question of food. However, sometimes I wasn't sure how much of his recommendations were from a medical perspective versus a political perspective. Should we really only eat grass-fed cows because they are that much better for us? Or do we need to choose grass-fed cows to change the way cows are raised? The answer is both I suppose but at some point how does an individual manage to eat healthy on a budget?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    I was fortunate to receive a free copy of this book. I have followed Dr. Hyman's PBS programs in the past and I like his basics for healthy eating. I read the book and enjoyed it. It is very easy to follow.He lays out the simple basics of healthy eating,just eat nature made foods,not man made. He even lists the do not eat foods.His other list and suggestions for the good foods are laid out in order of best choices as well. This is really common sense basics for food choices. Well written,easy to I was fortunate to receive a free copy of this book. I have followed Dr. Hyman's PBS programs in the past and I like his basics for healthy eating. I read the book and enjoyed it. It is very easy to follow.He lays out the simple basics of healthy eating,just eat nature made foods,not man made. He even lists the do not eat foods.His other list and suggestions for the good foods are laid out in order of best choices as well. This is really common sense basics for food choices. Well written,easy to read. Takes the guesswork out.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Good for those that believe in removing sugar and processed foods from their diet but don't want or believe in eliminating entire food groups, this book provides good information on the best choices from an health, economic and environmental consideration.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hazel Bright

    What sets this book apart from other books about food is its global perspective: Dr. Hyman describes the environmental impact of each food category he discusses, generally arriving at the conclusion that foods that nourish us best also nourish our spirits and our entire planet. He has a strong focus on the humane treatment of animals, given his life experience as a (former) vegan. Had I read this book twenty years ago, I could have saved myself a lot of stomach aches and probably thirty pounds. What sets this book apart from other books about food is its global perspective: Dr. Hyman describes the environmental impact of each food category he discusses, generally arriving at the conclusion that foods that nourish us best also nourish our spirits and our entire planet. He has a strong focus on the humane treatment of animals, given his life experience as a (former) vegan. Had I read this book twenty years ago, I could have saved myself a lot of stomach aches and probably thirty pounds. Dr. Hyman offers a lot of information I already knew, but information so correct and useful that it deserves repeating: fake oils, fake sugar, sugar, highly-processed foods, and much of the western diet may keep people's stomachs full, but it kills us little by little. I mourn when I see people purchasing soda and white bread. The information in this book is also scientifically well-documented, apart from the discussion of dairy: Dr. Hyman never discussed raw milk products, which are entirely different from pasteurized, homogenized dairy products. I am one of the 30% of people (according to Hyman's statistics, and 30% of people is a substantial number of people) of Scandinavian descent whose ancestors developed a capacity to tolerate milk, who survived because of that capacity, who enjoy dairy products, and who gain benefit from including dairy in our diets. I also did not believe it when eggs were considered Satan incarnate and never gave up my yolks, and I'm not going to give up milk. Maybe Dr. Hyman is like my husband, and cannot tolerate dairy products, but I have not seen research showing that raw dairy products are harmful to people like me, who tolerate milk well. In spite of my disagreement with maligning dairy and ignoring raw dairy, I found the work to be enlightening and engaging.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Awai

    This book was awesome! I love how it was set up and how it tackled ethical and sustainable issues with each food in addition to health benefits and pitfalls. It is backed by research, explained in a way that does not require you to have an extensive medical background, leaves the reader with no further questions.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy Kreydin

    I received an advanced review copy of Mark Hyman's forthcoming book Food: What The Heck Should I Eat? which I enjoyed a good deal. Full review: http://www.thebarefootdragonfly.com/b... I received an advanced review copy of Mark Hyman's forthcoming book Food: What The Heck Should I Eat? which I enjoyed a good deal. Full review: http://www.thebarefootdragonfly.com/b...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    This book was recommended to me by a friend who knows what it is like to struggle with intestinal issues and never quite know which food is the culprit. There is a tremendous amount of scientific research that Dr. Hyman has collected regarding which foods we can eat to help us become healthy again. His diet called "Pegan," a cross between the Paleo and Vegan diets, makes perfect sense to me. He writes about so many facts about the food industry that are very disturbing....look at any label on jus This book was recommended to me by a friend who knows what it is like to struggle with intestinal issues and never quite know which food is the culprit. There is a tremendous amount of scientific research that Dr. Hyman has collected regarding which foods we can eat to help us become healthy again. His diet called "Pegan," a cross between the Paleo and Vegan diets, makes perfect sense to me. He writes about so many facts about the food industry that are very disturbing....look at any label on just about any can, bottle, or boxed food item, and you will find sugar as an ingredient among other unhealthy additives. I liked how this book was structured, so I could easily read a chapter or two a day without becoming overwhelmed with the truth about our foods. I acknowledge how difficult it is to change eating habits....I also realize that it is essential to do so unless I want to continue having an upset stomach every few days. Even if you are a person who has been blessed to have an "iron-clad" stomach and has not experienced intestinal problems, I would recommend this book. It is most informative....what could be more important in our lives than to stay as healthy as we possibly can so that we might enjoy life to the fullest?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mom2triplets04

    Listened to this on audio. It was a great read for my weight watcher journey. Highly recommend you read this one. Learned some things about all the food groups. Remember it's not a diet it's a way of life. Highly recommend you listen or read this one.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dramatika

    A very disappointing book, I ended up more confused than ever about the healthy diet. The author keeps reminding us that we are supposed to eat like our ancestors, the hunter gatherers before the invention of the great evil the agriculture. Yet we are not living that lifestyle anymore, spending endless hours siting at our desk or on the way to and from places, no do we have the luxury clean air and long sleep. We freed our time and our bodies with the invention of agriculture and now can enjoy d A very disappointing book, I ended up more confused than ever about the healthy diet. The author keeps reminding us that we are supposed to eat like our ancestors, the hunter gatherers before the invention of the great evil the agriculture. Yet we are not living that lifestyle anymore, spending endless hours siting at our desk or on the way to and from places, no do we have the luxury clean air and long sleep. We freed our time and our bodies with the invention of agriculture and now can enjoy doing other staff rather than chewing tough barely cooked meats or bitter greens. Apparently, the author of this book wants to ignore the reality of our wonderful modern lives and go back to what? Hunting our own prey? Almost, since he thinks we have endless free time to hunt down dubious supposedly healthier variety of wild salmon or grass fed beef. Dubious because the certification of the organic variety is rather haphazard and tough to check on your own (but he provides a handy list for you at the end). Also supply of the wild fish is dwindling down all over the world and unsustainable at the current rates of fishing. Same with the grass fed beef, it is too much strain on the planet as it is as more and more people all over the world eat lots of meat. Regarding meat consumption, the book is structured that way that you get the impression that this is the way to eat, also I doubt our ancestors eat any meat for days or weeks at times, certainly not everyday! I laugh on the advice on dairy, as people do evolved to digest eat quite well even in Asian countries. Antibiotics use is of concern, but we all live with certain restrictions, it is a trade of for convenience, nothing less. GMO is good for the planet and for the future of food, stop with the fear mongering! Soda is not good for you, but diet soda doesn't promote weight gain. Tons of studies on this, juts look it up. As a student I survived for years on my favorite diet coke, yet never gain any weight or had any sugar cravings. Grains are a major staple all over the world, including countries with long longevity rates such as Japan. One has to wonder how they managed to survive this supposedly toxic level of rice consumption and still live into the late 90s or even 100s! Coconut oil is just another hype product, all over the news as healthy alternative to everything bad from yesterday. Wait a little bit, it might soon become the evil bad food again, don't jump on the hype bandwagon too fast. In fact, it seem to be the only valid point in the current overwhelming research on nutrition. So many contradictory new theories ans studies, so many long established facts completely turned upside down that one is at a loss. This book seems to be written for the elusive 1 % of the population with enough resources and time (or the ability to outsource all this hunting for organic everything and long hours cooking it).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    If you are confused by all the conflicting information about food and what we should eat, then read this. I heard Dr. Hyman on a podcast and decided to read this book and I am so glad I did. He has done an insane amount of research and his advice and guidelines make total sense. The government really did us dirty by promoting a low fat diet back in the 90s and 2000s, telling us that fat and saturated fat and meat would cause heart disease. Guess what? It doesn't. Know what's making America fatte If you are confused by all the conflicting information about food and what we should eat, then read this. I heard Dr. Hyman on a podcast and decided to read this book and I am so glad I did. He has done an insane amount of research and his advice and guidelines make total sense. The government really did us dirty by promoting a low fat diet back in the 90s and 2000s, telling us that fat and saturated fat and meat would cause heart disease. Guess what? It doesn't. Know what's making America fatter and sicker? SUGAR. By telling us to eat low fat, companies produce all kinds of processed low fat junk that's augmented with sugar, chemicals, and all kinds of stuff that we can't pronounce. Dr. Hyman's approach is a cross between Paleo and vegan which he calls Pegan. Basically it's eating real, high quality food. I have already made changes in my kitchen and will continue to implement this approach. Makes total sense and I am so glad I read this.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Donna Markussen

    This is an exceptional book. Everything you want to know about food, our Food Industry, the way food is grown, the things we should become aware of that may be harming us, even though the label may say "all natural" and other names disguising a food product as healthy. Dr. Hyman breaks it down to a simple science and has plenty of studies to back this information up. Everyone should have this book, and should also be included in nutrition education, as well as medical education. It's time to kno This is an exceptional book. Everything you want to know about food, our Food Industry, the way food is grown, the things we should become aware of that may be harming us, even though the label may say "all natural" and other names disguising a food product as healthy. Dr. Hyman breaks it down to a simple science and has plenty of studies to back this information up. Everyone should have this book, and should also be included in nutrition education, as well as medical education. It's time to know that "Food is the Best Medicine" and stop reaching for the foods that will cause chronic inflammation, which in turn leads to chronic disease. There is a way out of the epidemic of obesity, diabesity and auto-immune disease. Change the way we grow, farm, and produce our food supply, is the first step in combating chronic disease.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kay Vanatta

    This book contains fairly clear explanations of the types of food we should include in our diets. It's a pretty common sense approach espousing whole real foods. I like that he doesn't exclude whole categories - like dairy or wheat -but explains why one should limit them - and which varieties are easier for our bodies to handle. It's an easy book to read and backs up much of the current real food philosophies.... I gave it a 3 because there isn't much new in it - I kind of felt like it was more This book contains fairly clear explanations of the types of food we should include in our diets. It's a pretty common sense approach espousing whole real foods. I like that he doesn't exclude whole categories - like dairy or wheat -but explains why one should limit them - and which varieties are easier for our bodies to handle. It's an easy book to read and backs up much of the current real food philosophies.... I gave it a 3 because there isn't much new in it - I kind of felt like it was more of the usual..

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ariste Egan

    Already being a fairly healthy eater, I'm not sure what I expected from this book . But I know I didn't expect to come away feeling that nothing is safe to eat! Unless I have access to only grass fed lamb and beef, chickens that run happily around on the farm all day and produce that has never been touched by a chemical, then I'm doomed to eat garbage- literally! I find that what this book suggests is out of the grasp of most people.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Val bernard

    This is one of the most comprehensive and well-researched books on nutrition that I have come across. The author broke each section into food groups making it easy to read and understand. It also allowed me to jump ahead or return to certain sections. It amazes me how much misinformation there is regarding what food is healthy... Snackwells anyone?? How was that even a thing? I will be recommending this book to my patients.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Missy

    If you’re someone who wants the WHY behind your nutrition choices - this is the book for you. Dr. Hyman breaks down the science, the research and the business behind what we eat and what’s being sold to us - to help give you a clear picture of what you want to eat to be your healthiest and WHY. I listened to this on audiobook and I’ll be picking up a hard copy so I can refer back to it often.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gloria Zak

    I like the way the book is written: things you should know, what experts got right/got wrong, what are the good foods in a category, which are not so good. My biggest issue is the stress on meat, and no bread/potatoes, etc. I don’t think most people can live on a diet like this for an extended length of time

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    When he said he worked on the "Fed Up" documentary, I stopped reading. My opinion is based on that.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charlene

    Enjoyed this; most of it made good sense to me. The reminder that the grain and corn we eat today is very different (thanks to Round-up and GMOs) from the grain our grandparents ate helps me realize how much the food world has changed. I know I won't follow Dr. Hyman's recommendations right now -- I won't limit my dairy, bean, grain and sugar consumption as much as he suggests. But I am making some changes based on his ideas. I've bought chia seeds. I'm switching over to whole milk, non-sweeten Enjoyed this; most of it made good sense to me. The reminder that the grain and corn we eat today is very different (thanks to Round-up and GMOs) from the grain our grandparents ate helps me realize how much the food world has changed. I know I won't follow Dr. Hyman's recommendations right now -- I won't limit my dairy, bean, grain and sugar consumption as much as he suggests. But I am making some changes based on his ideas. I've bought chia seeds. I'm switching over to whole milk, non-sweetened yogurt. My breakfast now is just a little oatmeal with a lot of yogurt and berries (instead of bananas). It's hard to buy as much organic as he recommends but I'm doing a little more. I had already been trying to eat more fruit, less juice. I respect what he says about corporations and lobbies driving the American diet. My guess is that not all of his ideas will stand up to future research but I think a lot of them will. If only my mother could know that he agreed with her about whole milk being better than lowfat and that lard is an acceptable fat to cook with!

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Braine

    Have to admit, it’s the great title that lured me in more than anything. The fact that I’ve already read Fat Chance meant that I had already read a lot of the items covered in this book. I already knew that the low fat movement that has dominated the last few decades is based on very bad science. And that sugar is the biggest demon in food, not fat. This fact was repeated over and over. Worth repeating. But quite repetitive when you already know. I don’t think he’s quite as on point with the sci Have to admit, it’s the great title that lured me in more than anything. The fact that I’ve already read Fat Chance meant that I had already read a lot of the items covered in this book. I already knew that the low fat movement that has dominated the last few decades is based on very bad science. And that sugar is the biggest demon in food, not fat. This fact was repeated over and over. Worth repeating. But quite repetitive when you already know. I don’t think he’s quite as on point with the science, research and experience as Robert Luster when it comes to sugar, and I saw some inconsistencies here. They both say you should eat your fruit not drink it. Fruit juice is just sugar water, no better than soda. Fruit needs to be eaten with the fibre intact. And although smoothies aren’t quite as bad as juice, Lustig point blank says no shakes or smoothies. Whereas Hyman adds them to his OK list. He also seemed to think honey is ok. And Lustig is clear that Honey is just another delivery method for fructose. Paleo people getting stung to bits stealing honey once a year is one thing. But there’s nothing natural about being able to buy huge jars of it and using it every day. Hyman : physician Lustig: paediatric endocrinologist specializing neuroendocrinology, and childhood obesity, recognised as one of the leading experts in the ill-effects of sugar. So, anything sugar related, I’m definitely going with Lustig. Otherwise, there’s a huge amount to take in. I need to scan through it again and take notes. But initially my biggest takeaway is the difference between buying organic or not. And I definitely want to start eating a lot more organic meat, fruit and veg. I didn’t quite realise how problematic dairy can be. But I’m not in a mad rush to give it up just yet. Also great that it ends with meal plans and recipes at the end of the book. Otherwise WTF can I not eat, would have been a better title.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stacy M. Patton

    I deeply respect Mark Hyman and have been wanting to read his books for quite a while. So when this book came out, I quickly purchased it. Mark Hyman, MD, is the director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. He believes we should get to the root of the problem and not just cover up the symptoms with prescription drugs. I truly believe in this too, thus my deep respect for doctors such as Mark Hyman. I also deeply respect him because he is passionate about what he does. Now abo I deeply respect Mark Hyman and have been wanting to read his books for quite a while. So when this book came out, I quickly purchased it. Mark Hyman, MD, is the director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Functional Medicine. He believes we should get to the root of the problem and not just cover up the symptoms with prescription drugs. I truly believe in this too, thus my deep respect for doctors such as Mark Hyman. I also deeply respect him because he is passionate about what he does. Now about the book ... I loved this book! Why did I love this book? 1. The information is phenomenal. In this day and age, it's hard to say what is healthy and what is not. There are so many conflicting opinions and so much information to convince you that any one diet is correct and the others are wrong. One doctor may say Vegan is the way to go and to eat lots of whole foods like rice and beans along with vegetables. Another doctor/nutritionist/health guru may say to stay away from heavy carbs like rice and beans and to eat more meat. And yet other opinions, like the Keto enthusiast may say to eat lots of dairy vs. other authoritative figures that may tell you that dairy is inflammatory and to stay away from ALL dairy. And what about things like potatoes? The Whole 30 diet says they are fine, but the Paleo diet says otherwise. Who do we believe and what do we do? And then there are anti-cancer diets that tell us to eat ALL vegetable and ALL fruits, yet again, Keto enthusiasts will tell us that certain vegetables and fruits are high in carbs and rank high on the glycemic index and to stay away from those. What the heck do we do?! It used to be as simple as just eating whole foods, but that is no longer the case!! Well, I believe the answers to all of these questions are in this book! Mark Hyman spells it out for you in a very clear and concise way. He simplifies your approach to eating. Hint: he does believe you can eat things like rice in moderation IF you aren't trying to loose weight or have any other major health problems. 2. I loved the format of this book. Part I addresses the food confusion, fear and insecurity and it is short and to the point. Part II is the bulk of the book and each chapter in this section is organized by food group (meat, poultry and eggs, milk and dairy, fish and seafood, vegetables, fruit, fats and oils, beans, grains, nuts and seeds, sugar and sweeteners, beverages). *The food group chapters each start with a nutrition IQ Quiz. The quizzes are full of statements that most of us have been taught, either by the FDA / the government pyramid or by other "experts". *He then explains very briefly why those statements are true or false. *He then talks briefly about the science of that particular food group. *Next he address what the experts got right and what they got wrong. He backs up this information with research. *He then goes into detailed information about the food group, how to buy it, where to buy it, how to cook it, and addresses myths about that food group, etc. This makes up the bulk of the chapter and is very interesting information that will be very useful to understanding they why's and why not's of eating this food group and the how to. *Finally the chapter summarizes what the chapter provides: this section really simplifies and re-iterates what we just read in the chapter. For those who don't care to read all the scientific data or they "why's" behind whether we should or shouldn't eat a food group, you could skip right to this section and still gain all the information you need to know what the heck you should eat! Part III goes into what you should keep out of your food. He goes into things like unhealthy processed foods, pesticides, additives, GMO's, antibiotics, hormones, chemicals, refined oils, salt, etc. and explains what is okay and what is not. This information basically is one chapter of the book and is very informative and after reading it, I am definitely more aware of what is in foods and what I should be looking for and what is okay. Part IV is basically the "how to". He explains the importance of first detoxing and then he gives you a specific meal plan with recipes to get you started. The diet seems pretty do-able and it actually a lot easier then most diets out there in my opinion. **Interesting notes: Dr. Hyman calls his diet "The Pegan Diet". This name came to him when he was sitting on a panel with two other doctors; one was a Paleo advocate and the other a strict vegan cardiologist. Dr. Hyman was sitting in the middle so he joked , "Well if you're Paleo and you're vegan, then I must be a Pegan. Opinion Summary: I am glad I bought this book! Dr. Hyman cleared up quite a bit of confusion for me and I now have a solid understanding of what I should eat every day, what is okay to eat in moderation, and what I should avoid at all cost. I plan to keep this book in my kitchen and pull it out to reference it as it IS packed full of valuable information.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vincent

    Book review - Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? This is really a great book laying out problems and options in our American food consumption system. Dr. Hyman, the author, also lays out the evolutions of some recent and abandoned nutritional strategies over the last several decades. The book explains the risks today due to factory farms, pesticides and GMOs and other industrial dangers to our food system. It explains how to limit one’s exposure to these problems To be fair the author also recognize Book review - Food: What the Heck Should I Eat? This is really a great book laying out problems and options in our American food consumption system. Dr. Hyman, the author, also lays out the evolutions of some recent and abandoned nutritional strategies over the last several decades. The book explains the risks today due to factory farms, pesticides and GMOs and other industrial dangers to our food system. It explains how to limit one’s exposure to these problems To be fair the author also recognizes that we all come from different economic strengths and while he is mostly stressing organic foods he is aware of financial limitation and explains how to choose depending upon what limits you and what foods are more or less susceptible to degradation. For example as I recall - it is a detail filled book - lambs and sheep will not eat grains so are always (?) grass fed and their meat is therefore safer and more natural (beef were never eating grains as wild creatures) that feedlot raised cattle, pigs, chickens etc. The book opens the door, or your mind, to thinking about food in a way or ways that is not the normal progression in our society. The continuing and changing role of the FDA is examined and the influences of the AMA in their role in food including naming foods “heart healthy” and other industrial and profit oriented policies that have evolved in the industries supplying our food. So I took this book from the library and decided I had to buy a copy so that it is available as a “home reference”. It is changing the way I think about food - increasing my food budget but likely helping me eat healthier - and maybe if food volume declines and habits change it will not in the end increase my food costs. Another book that I have read that I think would be a good supplement to reading this book is Foodopoly by Wenonah Hauter - who happens to be the founder and leader of Food and Water Watch. So I suggest reading the book and then deciding if you, like me, feel you will need a copy. And if you want to understand better the food industry try Foodopoly.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    In “Food: What the Heck Should I Eat?” Dr Mark Hyman expertly guides the reader through the many nutrition pitfalls of modern life. Each chapter goes deep into a food group, starting with meat. Nutritional studies are mentioned and meticulously noted. He is as concerned about the environment as he is about human health, so environmental factors pop up in every food chapter, giving weight to the advice to eat better, not just for ourselves, but also for future generations and the health of the pl In “Food: What the Heck Should I Eat?” Dr Mark Hyman expertly guides the reader through the many nutrition pitfalls of modern life. Each chapter goes deep into a food group, starting with meat. Nutritional studies are mentioned and meticulously noted. He is as concerned about the environment as he is about human health, so environmental factors pop up in every food chapter, giving weight to the advice to eat better, not just for ourselves, but also for future generations and the health of the planet. I have been reading a lot of new books on nutrition recently, so much of the information was not surprising to me. The author advises us to avoid all processed foods and industrial seed oils. He suggests to be wary of dairy, sugar and grains but to eat lots and lots of vegetables with grass fed meat, sustainable seafood and pasture-raised chicken & eggs. Even though I agree wholeheartedly with his advice, I don’t know if I can stop eating bread, or if I’ll ever have the willpower to give up dairy. I like vegetables but eating them three times a day is not going to be easy. I already cook most of my own food and avoid processed junk, I’m not sure how someone eating the standard American diet would manage to make such sweeping changes. This advice is also going to be tough for people on a strict budget. Veggies are affordable but high quality oils and fats are not, and grass fed meat is very expensive. It would be wonderful if we could all eat this way, but can we? Regardless of the difficulties in implementing the nutrition advice in the book, it is still one of best I’ve found on the subject. It’s straightforward, easy to read, well-organized and meticulously researched. If you read one book about nutrition this year, make it this one.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Scott County Library System

    "The choice of nutritional philosophies is endless these days: we can go vegan; vegetarian; ketogenic; Paleo; fleixarian; pescatarian; Mediterranean; high-fat low-carb; high-carb low-fat; raw; and on and on. Trying to find the best one can be overwhelming." (page 288 Food by Mark Hyman, 2018) In his new book titled simply Food, Mark Hyman summarizes conflicting diet research from the past few decades and makes recommendations on what you should actually eat. Hyman uses clear language to explain d "The choice of nutritional philosophies is endless these days: we can go vegan; vegetarian; ketogenic; Paleo; fleixarian; pescatarian; Mediterranean; high-fat low-carb; high-carb low-fat; raw; and on and on. Trying to find the best one can be overwhelming." (page 288 Food by Mark Hyman, 2018) In his new book titled simply Food, Mark Hyman summarizes conflicting diet research from the past few decades and makes recommendations on what you should actually eat. Hyman uses clear language to explain differing opinions and debunk common myths. Hyman is not selling a system or a method, he's simply talking about food and how to eat healthier.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Great book As someone with autoimmune disease I have looked at both paleo and vegan diets as a way of trying to heal. This book combines the best of both (he calls it Pegan) and encourages us to have a whole food diet free of rubbish. It was really informative, easy to read and backed up by research

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