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Once the Sith order teemed with followers. But their rivalries divided them in endless battles for supremacy. Until one Dark Lord at last united the Sith in the quest to enslave the galaxy—and exterminate the Jedi. Yet it would fall to another, far more powerful than the entire Brotherhood of Darkness, to ultimately realize the full potential of the Sith and wield the awes Once the Sith order teemed with followers. But their rivalries divided them in endless battles for supremacy. Until one Dark Lord at last united the Sith in the quest to enslave the galaxy—and exterminate the Jedi. Yet it would fall to another, far more powerful than the entire Brotherhood of Darkness, to ultimately realize the full potential of the Sith and wield the awesome power of the dark side as never before. Since childhood, Dessel has known only the abuse of his hateful father and the dangerous, soul-crushing labor of a cortosis miner. Deep in the tunnels of the desolate planet Apatros, endlessly excavating the rare mineral valued throughout the galaxy, Dessel dreams of the day he can escape—a day he fears may never come. But when a high-stakes card game ends in deadly violence, Dessel suddenly finds himself a wanted man. On the run from vengeful Republic forces, Dessel vanishes into the ranks of the Sith army, and ships out to join the bloody war against the Republic and its Jedi champions. There, Dessel's brutality, cunning, and exceptional command of the Force swiftly win him renown as a warrior. But in the eyes of his watchful masters, he is destined for a far greater role in the ultimate Sith plan for the galaxy—if he can prove himself truly worthy. As an acolyte in the Sith academy, studying the secrets and skills of the dark side at the feet of its greatest masters, Dessel embraces his new Sith identity: Bane. However the true test is yet to come. In order to gain acceptance into the Brotherhood of Darkness one must fully surrender to the dark side through a trial by fire that Bane, for all his unquenchable fury and lust for power, may not be strong enough to endure . . . especially since deception, treachery, and murder run rampant among the Sith disciples, and utter ruthlessness alone is the key to survival. Only by defying the most sacred traditions, rejecting all he has been taught, and drawing upon the long-forgotten wisdom of the very first Sith can Bane hope to triumph--and forge from the ashes of that which he must destroy a new era of absolute dark power.


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Once the Sith order teemed with followers. But their rivalries divided them in endless battles for supremacy. Until one Dark Lord at last united the Sith in the quest to enslave the galaxy—and exterminate the Jedi. Yet it would fall to another, far more powerful than the entire Brotherhood of Darkness, to ultimately realize the full potential of the Sith and wield the awes Once the Sith order teemed with followers. But their rivalries divided them in endless battles for supremacy. Until one Dark Lord at last united the Sith in the quest to enslave the galaxy—and exterminate the Jedi. Yet it would fall to another, far more powerful than the entire Brotherhood of Darkness, to ultimately realize the full potential of the Sith and wield the awesome power of the dark side as never before. Since childhood, Dessel has known only the abuse of his hateful father and the dangerous, soul-crushing labor of a cortosis miner. Deep in the tunnels of the desolate planet Apatros, endlessly excavating the rare mineral valued throughout the galaxy, Dessel dreams of the day he can escape—a day he fears may never come. But when a high-stakes card game ends in deadly violence, Dessel suddenly finds himself a wanted man. On the run from vengeful Republic forces, Dessel vanishes into the ranks of the Sith army, and ships out to join the bloody war against the Republic and its Jedi champions. There, Dessel's brutality, cunning, and exceptional command of the Force swiftly win him renown as a warrior. But in the eyes of his watchful masters, he is destined for a far greater role in the ultimate Sith plan for the galaxy—if he can prove himself truly worthy. As an acolyte in the Sith academy, studying the secrets and skills of the dark side at the feet of its greatest masters, Dessel embraces his new Sith identity: Bane. However the true test is yet to come. In order to gain acceptance into the Brotherhood of Darkness one must fully surrender to the dark side through a trial by fire that Bane, for all his unquenchable fury and lust for power, may not be strong enough to endure . . . especially since deception, treachery, and murder run rampant among the Sith disciples, and utter ruthlessness alone is the key to survival. Only by defying the most sacred traditions, rejecting all he has been taught, and drawing upon the long-forgotten wisdom of the very first Sith can Bane hope to triumph--and forge from the ashes of that which he must destroy a new era of absolute dark power.

30 review for Path of Destruction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Markus

    "Equality is a myth to protect the weak. Some of us are strong in the Force, others are not. Only a fool believes otherwise." Once upon a time, in the days of Ajunta Pall and Marka Ragnos, of Revan and Vitiate, the Sith were always united under one great leader. A brutal hierarchy of Force-users, masters of the dark side, with the most powerful of them claiming the glorious mantle of the Dark Lord of the Sith. But those days are gone. In the wake of their passing stands Skere Kaan and the Brother "Equality is a myth to protect the weak. Some of us are strong in the Force, others are not. Only a fool believes otherwise." Once upon a time, in the days of Ajunta Pall and Marka Ragnos, of Revan and Vitiate, the Sith were always united under one great leader. A brutal hierarchy of Force-users, masters of the dark side, with the most powerful of them claiming the glorious mantle of the Dark Lord of the Sith. But those days are gone. In the wake of their passing stands Skere Kaan and the Brotherhood of Darkness, a fraternity of equals throwing their combined might against the Republic and its Jedi defenders... On the desolate planet of Apatros, a lowly miner named Dessel is on the run from Republic forces. In desperation he joins the ranks of the armies of the Brotherhood of Darkness. But his true destiny is unknown even to him, for young Dessel will be known to the galaxy by another name. And it is under that name that he becomes one of the most powerful men ever to embrace the Dark Side of the Force... Most of you probably know by now how I feel about Star Wars. Best sci-fi ever, most fascinating fictional universe ever, and all that. Well, the three books making up this trilogy are my favourite Star Wars novels. I've read quite a few of those, but none of the others can match the amazement I felt while reading Path of Destruction, Rule of Two and Dynasty of Evil. The Star Wars Expanded Universe by now contains a whole bunch of different eras, all with their own stories, whether told in movies, books, comics or games. Ever since I played this amazingly wonderful video game called Knights of the Old Republic (aka the best video game ever made), I was addicted to the time period known as the Old Republic era, where Jedi and Sith fought each other in the thousands, and relics of the light and the dark were unearthed on ancient planets like Tython and Korriban. The Darth Bane trilogy takes place at the very end of that era. In many ways, it is like the connecting bridge between the movies and the Old Republic era. Because of that, I would strongly recommend both watching the movies and playing and reading through the games and novels of the main bulk of the Old Republic era before starting these. It is, of course, possible to do without, but I believe it would take away a lot of the enjoyment. "Two there shall be; no more, no less. One to embody the dark side, the other to crave it." Well then, to the reasons why this trilogy is absodamnlutely amazing. First of all, it is written from the point of view of the Sith, the big bad villains themselves. There are a few other POV characters jumping in here and there, but mostly this series is meant to give the reader insight into the minds of those who desire to master the Dark Side of the Force, and to use it to take power for themselves. Second, Drew Karpyshyn is a master of characterisation. He just happens to also be the lead writer for Knights of the Old Republic, (my loving this book has of course nothing at all to do with that), and those who have played BioWare games know how brilliant those guys are at creating deep and fascinating characters. There are not particularly many characters in this series, but those who do appear definitely make up for that. Darth Bane himself is one of the most interesting characters in the Star Wars universe. As a rarity among EU characters, he was originally created by George Lucas himself, but Karpyshyn forges him into a protagonist I'll never forget. His young apprentice Zannah is one of my all-time favourite Star Wars characters. And throw in people like the relentless Jedi generals Hoth and Valenthyne Farfalla, the Princess Serra of Doan and Lord Skere Kaan, the charismatic leader of the Brotherhood of Darkness, and you have a most memorable bunch of people. As a taste, have a look at some of Zannah's thoughts: “I'm not going to hurt you, Quano,” she promised. “I'm not like him.” He enjoys hurting people. I only hurt people if I see some way to profit from their suffering. This trilogy is some of the best this universe has to offer. Vicious betrayals, relics containing the spirits of ancient Sith, and lightsaber duels more awesome than any I've ever encountered.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Karpuk

    Star Wars is funny. Not on purpose, mind you. This book features a protagonist whose chosen name is so stupid I refuse to actually use it. For the purposes of this review, he shall be Darth Tickle. Darth Tickle lives a couple thousand years before Luke ever whines about power converters, born to an abusive father on an unpleasant mining planet. After committing a murder in self-defense, Tickle flees the planet, joining the Brotherhood of Darkness (snicker), and eventually gets recruited by the Si Star Wars is funny. Not on purpose, mind you. This book features a protagonist whose chosen name is so stupid I refuse to actually use it. For the purposes of this review, he shall be Darth Tickle. Darth Tickle lives a couple thousand years before Luke ever whines about power converters, born to an abusive father on an unpleasant mining planet. After committing a murder in self-defense, Tickle flees the planet, joining the Brotherhood of Darkness (snicker), and eventually gets recruited by the Sith, because he's "force sensitive" as we nerds call it. Here's what gets to me about all the history of Star Wars. The Old Republic goes back a couple thousand years, then this book describes space flight and Jedis and light saber battles and holographic technology made 3000 FREAKING YEARS before that by Darth Revan. Not to get tangential here, but that implies that people in this universe have had basically the same technology for roughly 5,000 years! Iain Banks envisioned the human race in a utopian, post-scarcity society on a lesser timeline. What this seems to suggest is that races in the Star Wars universe consume a lot of lead-based products, or are really, really, REALLY comfortable with their current level of technology. I mean, seriously, think of all the things man kind has knocked out in the last 5000 years. Anyhoo, Darth Tickle joins up with the Brotherhood, and the silliness of it becomes apparent really quickly. Even Tickle himself can't help but observe that there's an inherent problem with a large organization entirely devoted to mustache-twirling, overt evil. Evil is not a team sport, there is indeed an I in Evil. It tends to favor self-starters rather than group-think. The first half of the book is him going through a Harry-Potter-style training at the school, before he throws a tantrum and runs off to learn the older, truer ways of the darkside. You see, Darth Tickle is the Kwisatz Haderach, the Boy Who Lived of evil jedi. He's super good, but has to get past his hang ups by reading Joseph Campbell, the Writer's Journey, and going to overpriced seminars about story structure.... I mean he has to get past all his hang ups and doubts. You see, Darth Tickle started that whole rule of two thing that Sidious and Vader do. One guy has the power, the other looks on like a puppy at the dinner table saying, "Oh man, I bet that power tastes soooo freaking sweet." I was fine with the potboiler writing (yes, Aaron, you were right, it's perfect airplane reading) right up until the end (view spoiler)[where the Sith unleash the THOUGHT BOMB (snicker). Yes, a thought bomb, a bomb of thinking. They basically give up on the whole science meets spiritual structure of Star Wars and go full-tilt Dragonball Z on the Jedis. (hide spoiler)] This book deserves some credit for at least being competent. Karpyshyn doesn't embarass himself the way a lot of licensed Star Wars books do. It still doesn't feel like he's trying very hard, more like it's something he did between games he worked on for Bioware. There are some chunks of clumsy prose, some telling rather than showing. And the regular Jedi are actually bigger dorks than usual. But I read the bulk of it in two days, and was reasonably amused, so there's gotta be something to that, right?

  3. 5 out of 5

    T. T.

    It is easy, especially by some intellectuals, to ignore the beauty or depth of something simple while being carried away by the sheer magic of complex sentences and obscure statements. However as an unmistakable fan of Hegel, Lacan and Zizek i can't help but think the real magic is in telling or expressing something complex in a relatively simpler way. Think about this quote from Hegel: "It is manifest that behind the so-called curtain which is supposed to conceal the inner world, there is nothing It is easy, especially by some intellectuals, to ignore the beauty or depth of something simple while being carried away by the sheer magic of complex sentences and obscure statements. However as an unmistakable fan of Hegel, Lacan and Zizek i can't help but think the real magic is in telling or expressing something complex in a relatively simpler way. Think about this quote from Hegel: "It is manifest that behind the so-called curtain which is supposed to conceal the inner world, there is nothing to be seen unless we go behind it ourselves as much in order that we may see, as that there may be something behind there which can be seen." If Lao Tzu had said something about this, he would have said probably: "We like to think there is something mysterious beyond our very selves, beyond our very shells." :) (of course this sentence is not from Tao te Ching, i totally made it up) I am not trying to undervalue the deep philosophy made and being made by these great people for probably that is what teaches me to understand the value of interpreting things in simpler ways, although it is driving me crazy how people can ignore one of the most profound philosophical approaches to how evil works just because this book is based on a fantasy fiction movie/game. By the way i must say that the rest of the text contains lots of spoilers for those who would like to read the trilogy of Darth Bane and i’d strongly suggest anyone who is into Star Wars lore and/or ethical philosophy to read it. Spoilers don’t spoil the fun i get from a book or movie, but this doesn’t apply to everyone. First of all what Bane tries to do in the first book is all about understanding how evil can work properly in a society. Despite the vertical hierarchy and militarism concepts of an army and competitive and non-Egalitarian structure of Sith society clash with the concept of social state and democratic society, an army in itself harbors the concepts of sacrifice and selflessness in battle and a society relies on mutual benefits/helps and not hurting each other. The Dark Army formed by the Brotherhood of the Sith is an army nevertheless and the Sith are trying to maintain a society in the first book. You can't build an army or form a community by glorifying concepts such as individualism, power hunger, do-whatever-it-takes-to-survive, etc, directly. That is why concepts such as teamwork are boosted in today’s companies, whereas these teams in the same company are expected to compete with each other. And even the individuals compete with each other within the same teams. G. K. Chesterton in his ‘Orthodoxy’ says: “Christianity is the only frame for pagan freedom.” In ‘God in Pain: Inversions of Apocalypse,’ Zizek claims, that only a religious Christian could have dreamed of such a glorious pagan universe, regarding to ‘Lord of the Rings’ of Tolkien. On the contrary of the conventional belief, Zizek claims Paganism is melancholic compared to Christianity. Paganism says; ‘enjoy your life the best you can, but in the end death and decay awaits you.’ Christianity dictates a life of renouncement and constraints, but in the end it promises eternal joy and glory. Zizek says, if you like to enjoy the delightful Pagan life without paying the melancholic cost of it, you need to choose to be Christian. People don't want to live in expectancy of betrayal from one another. The constant pressure of stress hormone would make them age sooner, lose their health and composure. Instead, people want to feel the assurance of written or verbal laws based on common care, respect, common good, etc and meanwhile they want to weave their own individual and selfish intrigues secretly. So if having an ambitious and greedy lifestyle that is fostered by Capitalism seems to be delightful to some, having such a lifestyle is properly possible only by praising and boosting concepts such as sacrifice, selflessness, teamwork, etc. Therefor the selfish individual, the one who wants to get it all, must conceal his/her intentions and work in a society where the good notions such as altruism, brotherhood and selflessness are being praised. That's what Bane comes to understand. And i think that's how our modern world works today. That's how real Sith lords in their nice suites rule the world with their nice person masks on while billions of people are exploited and few warlords and dictators are put on the stage as scapegoats. I am not saying these scapegoats are innocent. I am saying they are like Darth Maul :) Darth Bane is what a real dark lord is though. There is a lot to learn from this book about how the system in our own galaxy works where we lack of force and lightsabers. Also on the contrary of the common belief, the concept of competition never helps the society to improve itself. In fact it has always hindered the society to reach to its full potential, not to mention the hatred, distrust or at least the dislike it creates between the members of the society. Sith society in the book is based totally and directly on competition, power and selfishness. In our world, capitalism boosts altruistic concepts or at least mutual benefits, but meanwhile it encourages companies and especially white-collar workers to compete each other so that a possible solidarity and awareness against the chaotic, speculative and destructive system that rises upon exploitation is constantly undermined. Our Sith lords know how to manipulate the masses. Heed the words of Darth Zannah, apprentice of Darth Bane: "Evil is a word used by the ignorant and the weak. The dark side is about survival. It’s about unleashing your inner power. It glorifies the strength of the individual.” Isn't this all about cynicism? Cynics use the term survivalism often or at least they imply it often: "You should do whatever it takes to achieve success." "That's the rule of the world. If you don't do it to them, they will do it to you." ...And so on, and so on; Cynicism in its purest form. So when we read Zannah's words in reverse, we can infer that cynicism itself is evil. And just like Zizek says, we should look for their hamster :) Zannah's fetish object (hamster) was probably Laa the bouncer. Walter Benjamin said that Capitalism is a form of religion. Zizek says; “It is not true when people attack capitalists as egoists. And ideal Capitalist is someone who is ready to stake his life, to risk everything, just so that production grows, profit grows, capital circulates. Her/his personal happiness is totally subordinated to this.” It is true that in Capitalism, the motivation to grow the capital starts to work as a big other in Lacanian sense and overcomes the primal egotistical drives. But I think there is always a part of the ego that doesn’t totally submit to the superego; a part that might actually prevent one from giving her/his life for a code that fuels the individualism. So on the contrary of Marx’s ideology definition, “they do not know it but they are doing it,” the cynical individual might seem to know it all, but secretly believe in it. This is the first inversion. But there is a second inversion, which makes it a double inversion; they might seem like believing in it, but secretly their cynical survival instincts might overcome their devotion to this belief. I think that is what has happened at the end of the trilogy. Bane tried to become immortal and violated the Sith code he created himself. His egotistical drives overcame it all. However Bane had a hamster too. His hamster was the comradeship he and his comrades once shared among the ranks of Brotherhood. He almost had let his hamster to overcome him, before his egotistical drives did. In the end, the ultimate survivor of the books was Set Harth, a dark Jedi (not a Sith) who likes to enjoy the luxurious and cosy lifestyle. His survival was the deepest message of the book probably. The subject that keeps a distance towards the system and ordeals, to which its agents who try to manage things endure, can have a joyful and reckless life. So the subject who still thinks s/he is a subject turns into an object controlled by true subjects; a typical modern time white-collar worker for example. Yet s/he is the ultimate survivor ;) As last, combine all of these and think about the increasing number of contest programs in today’s TV, especially the combination of contests and survival concept; giving the subliminal message of ‘you all are against each other, you should do whatever it takes to survive,’ to masses; but giving this message always secretly, never directly ;) And also think about the increasing number of movies, TV series, video games and novels based on survival concept. I could write much more about the correlations between deep core philosophy and so-called superficial philosophy, but that is probably needless and boring for the one who is reading this essay now. I would just suggest people to read this trilogy if they are into Star Wars (and if i couldn't spoil it enough yet) and plus into understanding how evil works in its purest form so that they can differentiate the light from the dark easier and see the taints in seemingly good actions and sparkles in seemingly bad actions. May the force be with you guys! ;)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Khurram

    This book is the journey of Des who becomes Bane then Darth Bane. The story is well written and griping the last few chapters are from the Star Wars: Jedi vs. Sith. I enjoyed this book, it is a constant reminder of how evil and self-serving the Sith really are, no matter how much power they promise. Des joins the Sith out of necessity, there he finds the current Sith Lords watered down versions of the Sith Lords of old. So much so that they do not even use the title of Darth any more. Bane rejec This book is the journey of Des who becomes Bane then Darth Bane. The story is well written and griping the last few chapters are from the Star Wars: Jedi vs. Sith. I enjoyed this book, it is a constant reminder of how evil and self-serving the Sith really are, no matter how much power they promise. Des joins the Sith out of necessity, there he finds the current Sith Lords watered down versions of the Sith Lords of old. So much so that they do not even use the title of Darth any more. Bane rejects their teachings and decides it is time to rebuild the order from the shadows.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Angel

    I may have mentioned before that I don't read a lot of Star Wars novels. I consider myself a casual fan. Like many fiction series, the SW books are very "hit or miss." I have enjoyed some, but I have also found others were not very good. This is one I highly recommend. I think the more "hardcore" fans will definitely appreciate it. I also think more casual readers like me will like it. The book gives the origins of the Sith, explaining why it is that we only see two Sith, a master and an apprent I may have mentioned before that I don't read a lot of Star Wars novels. I consider myself a casual fan. Like many fiction series, the SW books are very "hit or miss." I have enjoyed some, but I have also found others were not very good. This is one I highly recommend. I think the more "hardcore" fans will definitely appreciate it. I also think more casual readers like me will like it. The book gives the origins of the Sith, explaining why it is that we only see two Sith, a master and an apprentice in the movies and in the later books. Darth Bane, the protagonist, is definitely a bad guy, yet at times a reader cannot help but root for the guy. If you are one of those people who like rooting for the bad guy, then this is your book. The book has good detail in exploring the legend of the Sith, but it also has good action and story to move things along. I read some reviewer here who was not as satisfied with the ending. I think the ending may be quite fitting; it worked for me, but I will let readers decide. Overall, of the many SW books out there, this one is definitely worth picking up.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 to 3.5 stars. A good addition to the Star Wars mythos. Darth Bane is a fairly well drawn character and the story is fast paced and fun. Will certainly read the sequel to see whether the author goes with the story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    "One to embody the power and one to crave it" A thousand years before The Phantom Menace, Anakin Skywalker, Palpatine, and the Clone Wars, the Sith and the Jedi were large forces and at war with each other. On a God-forsaken world, Apatros, better known for being a source of cortosis, a mineral used in deflecting lightsabers, Dessel mined the tunnels as his abusive father before him. His life is pretty dreary until he plays cards with some Republic soldiers and wins. The soldiers seek to show him "One to embody the power and one to crave it" A thousand years before The Phantom Menace, Anakin Skywalker, Palpatine, and the Clone Wars, the Sith and the Jedi were large forces and at war with each other. On a God-forsaken world, Apatros, better known for being a source of cortosis, a mineral used in deflecting lightsabers, Dessel mined the tunnels as his abusive father before him. His life is pretty dreary until he plays cards with some Republic soldiers and wins. The soldiers seek to show him whose boss but one Republic officer is killed in the process. Dessel is on the run, seeking refuge in the only place left: the Sith. He rises to fame in the army then as Bane at the special Masters Academy on Korriban. Slowly, this Sith establishes the order that would keep the Sith alive during the peace, in wait for their unveiling in Revenge of the Sith. What I Liked: So much to choose from! The first thing I loved was Bane/Dessel. Although he is a bad guy, allied to the Dark Side of the Force, Drew Karpyshyn is adroit at being able to write so that we the readers are rooting for him all the way. I enjoyed his backstory, how similar, yet different it was to Anakin Skywalker. Both came from harsh worlds, suffered harsh losses, and were given an out-of-this-world chance at freedom. However, Dessel's story is more tragic as his father was abusive while Anakin's mom was loving. Then, his growth from miner to soldier to apprentice to Sith Master was well-done. You watch as he gradually learns of his skills, begins to use them, fails, succeeds, learns of the Dark Side, and gives himself over. This is amazing as Karpyshyn is the first novelist to detail a story with the primary view from the Sith (all other novels had a Jedi emphasis). The plot is not complicated (the demise of the Brotherhood of the Sith), however, it is done so well, kept interesting and briskly written. We all know the outcome (or if you didn't, I divulged, sorry), but it's not the destination, it's the journey that makes it enjoyable. Karpyshyn takes us where no other Star Wars novelist has done: he takes us into the heart of the Sith Order, the tension, the anger, the hatred, the barely concealed restraint the Sith Masters have to each other and the bare tendrils Kaan has to keep his brood in order. It is a visceral story, harsh and gritty, yet satisfying. Then sidelines characters: I enjoyed Kas'im, the Sith swordsmaster. I felt he was real, he was a mentor, but not afraid to push his student. I also enjoyed General Hoth, the Jedi leading the Army of Light. I liked how he really treaded the line between the Light and Dark Side, how he fought partially for revenge. While I was not fond of Githany, I did appreciate how Karpyshyn did keep her from being too omnipotent, by having her miss out on Bane's ultimate request. Also, I think Karpyshyn did not allow her complete sway over her male counterparts, as seen in the character, Kaan. This simple scene keeps her from being a groan worthy Mary Sue...mostly (see below). There is more I could detail, but I think you get the picture. What I Did Not Like: What to say? There is so much that I enjoyed in this book, it was really challenging to find much that I did not. But there are two things that come to mind. The first is a continuity slip (which Karpyshyn has admitted). Bane says he is studying Vapaad, which is not possible as Mace Windu developed Vapaad nearly 1000 years before the events in this book. However, Karpyshyn admitted this was a mistake; Bane should have said he was studying Juyo, a form that was in existence during the era of this book. My second dislike is probably the character of Githany. While not as frustrating and annoying as many other females I have encountered in fiction (and I found out in the graphic novel, Jedi vs. Sith, she is not quite the Mary Sue she tends to be here), I grew tired of how the author went to great extents to detail her sexuality and beauty and how her greatest skills were basically seduction. A rhetorical question, but why is it that female villains are only "villainous" in the fact that they can seduce men to do their whims? Why can men be bad ass fighters, superb Force Users, or great pilots, but the only skill women are allowed is the ability to romp in the bedroom? Time and again, women's roles are reduced to objects of gratification or duties deemed "feminine" (and I am not even a feminist!). Dialogue/Sexual Situations/Violence: Star Wars expletives are about as rough as it gets. Githany reveals she had a lover. She also flirts frequently with her male companions and develops feelings for Bane. Violence is the real kicker in this one. Dessel's father dies and this is shown in retrospect and in a vision/dream sequence. The first murder shown is the death of a Republic ensign. From there, the body count increases. This doesn't even include multiple injuries. A miner's finger is bitten off; Bane and another student end up so badly damaged as to spend weeks in bacta therapy. And frequently, the details are pretty graphic. Overall: WOW! After reading a few downer Star Wars books, this revives faith in the EU franchise. If you are interested in learning more about the Sith, reading about good characters, crisp dialogue, and intense, fast-paced action, then Path of Destruction is your book! Five stars, no questions asked.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    This was a lot better than I expected. There was a lot of great lightsaber/force action, we get a good look at Old Republic-era Sith and Sith training, and Bane wasn't a Mary Sue like I had expected him to be. He gets his ass handed to him almost as much as he wins. We also get an interesting take on the Sith. Their codes and philosophies aren't a universal truth, and different Sith believe different things. Best of all, Karpyshyn didn't take the easy way out and make them all cackling villains. This was a lot better than I expected. There was a lot of great lightsaber/force action, we get a good look at Old Republic-era Sith and Sith training, and Bane wasn't a Mary Sue like I had expected him to be. He gets his ass handed to him almost as much as he wins. We also get an interesting take on the Sith. Their codes and philosophies aren't a universal truth, and different Sith believe different things. Best of all, Karpyshyn didn't take the easy way out and make them all cackling villains. Some of the Sith are even relatively nice.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melissa | melisthereader

    The writing was good, and I was pretty much hooked throughout the whole story. The problem I had with this story is all the talk of power and destruction.....I know it may be wrong of me to point this out but it felt very targeted for boys....I also had a problem with Dessel's looks, oh man, I sound so shallow.....I guess this just wasn't for me. But the writing is awesome and learning about the sith was cool too.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    Being a bit masochistic, I have read many a crap Star Wars book in my day. Jedi Trial, The Ruins of Dantooine, Labyrinth of Evil, Dark Lord, The Black Fleet Crisis Trilogy and Children of the Jedi all spring to mind, among others. Suffice to say, Darth Bane: Path of Destruction joins the ranks of its less-than-illustrious predecessors. This book is pure crap. Seriously, how does this kind of shit even make it to press? Has Del Rey even heard of quality control? The writing is shoddy, the charact Being a bit masochistic, I have read many a crap Star Wars book in my day. Jedi Trial, The Ruins of Dantooine, Labyrinth of Evil, Dark Lord, The Black Fleet Crisis Trilogy and Children of the Jedi all spring to mind, among others. Suffice to say, Darth Bane: Path of Destruction joins the ranks of its less-than-illustrious predecessors. This book is pure crap. Seriously, how does this kind of shit even make it to press? Has Del Rey even heard of quality control? The writing is shoddy, the characterization is laughable and the plot is weak and uninspired. What a waste of time.

  11. 4 out of 5

    TheBookHunter

    Only the strong will survive Darth Bane: Path of Destruction, written by Drew Karpyshyn is a finer Star Wars book. It is the story of a man named Dessel that escapes a life of hardship on a mining colony to join the Sith Empire against their never-ending battle against the Republic and the Jedi Order, roughly a thousand years before the events of The Phantom Menace. Des is recognized for his exceptional skills in the military and latent abilities in the Force and is taken to the Sith Academy on Only the strong will survive Darth Bane: Path of Destruction, written by Drew Karpyshyn is a finer Star Wars book. It is the story of a man named Dessel that escapes a life of hardship on a mining colony to join the Sith Empire against their never-ending battle against the Republic and the Jedi Order, roughly a thousand years before the events of The Phantom Menace. Des is recognized for his exceptional skills in the military and latent abilities in the Force and is taken to the Sith Academy on Korriban to train in the ways of the Dark Side. But Des, taking the name of Bane, begins to see the problem with the modern Sith Order also known as the Brotherhood of Darkness, and how they're not accomplishing their goal of annihilating the Jedi Knights. Growing disillusioned with the disregard for ancient knowledge the Sith masters have, Bane begins to study said ancient knowledge for himself and begins to plan a way to reshape the Sith into a far more craftier, illusive adversary and destroy the weak and foolish of the Brotherhood of Darkness for they will have no place in his concept of The Rule of Two. One Master, and One Apprentice at any time. This book was very good, and it actually made me sympathize with a bad guy. It also paints who we perceive the good guys to be, such as the Jedi and Republic, as jerks. Bane starts off as pretty much a nobody, but his ambition drives him to gain more power, and as much as he can, he's also very intelligent as well. Most of the other characters are good, but Bane is the one who really shines. My only complaint is the epilogue with the girl Zannah, it felt completely out of the blue, and I found it ridiculous how a child could just snap and kill two trained Jedi. Also the fact that of all ancient Sith that Bane searches information about, the one holocron he finds is of Darth Revan. A little pointless fan service, really. However overall, I enjoyed this book, and I look forward to reading the next two in the trilogy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Leeloodallas

    The long and the short: The Sith finally get smart and use some of the better Jedi ideas to actually score some real victories against their enemies. Then some retro-idiot gets obsessed with scrolls and destroys the one hope the Dark Side had for victory over the light side by manipulating a power-hungry Sith into using a WMD (weapon of mind-destruction). In the process, he reduces the Sith to less than nothing: one shadowed, "cunning," figure who trains a second to lust for his power. No matter The long and the short: The Sith finally get smart and use some of the better Jedi ideas to actually score some real victories against their enemies. Then some retro-idiot gets obsessed with scrolls and destroys the one hope the Dark Side had for victory over the light side by manipulating a power-hungry Sith into using a WMD (weapon of mind-destruction). In the process, he reduces the Sith to less than nothing: one shadowed, "cunning," figure who trains a second to lust for his power. No matter how "explained" the Rule of Two was, it essentially reduced the Sith to complete and utter irrelevance from a massive force to be feared. Once the Sith evolved past the failed nonsense of the past, the "Brotherhood of Darkness" had me hoping the Sith would actually do something useful and productive for a change. You know, like taking over the galaxy, or eliminating the Jedi, especially considering what inflexible, vain ninnies they had become. Instead, we got, well, some loser hermit and a ten year-old kid. Shame. You could just as easily call this book, "Path of Irrelevance," or "Path of Regression," and you'd capture Darth Loser equally well. Much leaden writing and little character development further marred what might otherwise be an interesting story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lance Shadow

    Hello there! Recently I have read this beloved novel once again, and I am revisiting this entry in my library of reviews because my thoughts have changed. So consider this an updated review. I first read this book in the summer of 2016- and found it massively disappointing. I heard the same tunes for years about the Darth Bane Trilogy, especially Path of Destruction, being this immaculate masterwork, and a pinnacle of the original Star Wars Expanded Universe. So when I finally got down to read th Hello there! Recently I have read this beloved novel once again, and I am revisiting this entry in my library of reviews because my thoughts have changed. So consider this an updated review. I first read this book in the summer of 2016- and found it massively disappointing. I heard the same tunes for years about the Darth Bane Trilogy, especially Path of Destruction, being this immaculate masterwork, and a pinnacle of the original Star Wars Expanded Universe. So when I finally got down to read the first book in the trilogy, I had sky-high expectations for it- and then found myself questioning why this book was considered to be so good when I found problem after problem. Then, in a review of Jedi vs Sith from my fellow goodreads friend Jared , I noticed something interesting- I didn't know that the later portions of Path of Destruction adhered to earlier lore that was already established. A few years later I acquired a copy of Jedi vs. Sith, read it, hated it, and then felt the need to reevaluate Path of Destruction, because I realized how many of the problems I had on my first read came right out of Jedi vs. Sith. Now that the reread is done, I can say this: I was too harsh initially. This novel is a good deal better than I remember it. Is it the masterpiece it's usually hyped up to be? No. But by and large, the good stuff I remember from before got better, and I no longer have some of the problems I had before. THE STORY: Most of us at least know the basics of the legendary sith lord that is Darth Bane: roughly 1000 years before The Phantom Menace, the sith had all but disappeared- except for one single sith, Darth Bane. He established a new paradigm for the sith order known as the "Rule of Two": where only a Master and an Apprentice could exist at any given time. Bane's reforms were so successful that they allowed the sith to sicken and eventually topple the galactic republic, turn it into Galactic Empire, and persist until the very end of Return of the Jedi. This basic story is true in both the legends continuity and the new canon (even if other incarnations of the sith continued in the Old EU or the Knights of Ren took their place during the sequel trilogy). Anyways, Path of Destruction tells the origin story for the man who would become Darth Bane, at least as far as the legends timeline is concerned. Dessel is a down-on-his-luck cortosis miner on the backwater planet of Apatros, scraping by as he extracts the coveted metal for a republic-aligned mining company. After a series of mishaps that weren't necessarily his fault, he decides to join the sith as a soldier in their armies. Eventually he is recognized for his amazing potential and enrolled in the sith academy on Korriban. As Bane learns how to harness his immeasurable strength in the force and discovers more about the secrets of the sith, he comes to a realization: the sith order needs to be redefined if they are to prevail in their struggle with the jedi. THE BAD: While some of the problems that I had before are no longer there, I still find this book to be fairly flawed. Most of these issues come down to the writing, particularly some of the choices that author Drew Karpyshyn makes with both the characters and the worldbuilding. While I thought Bane was the best part of this book (and a legitimately good aspect of it), there are points where I think he could have been written better. Particularly, when he is at the sith academy. I understand that he is supposed to be the most powerful force user of his time, and it makes sense given that he is supposed to be the single survivor out of all the sith at the end. But Bane feels like a Gary stu in this novel and it doesn't make for the most interesting character arc to read about. This is especially problematic when Karpyshyn places a moment in the story where Bane deals with his past, causing him to struggle for a bit (view spoiler)[ After Bane defeats Fogargh, he starts reliving memories of his abusive father and the trauma causes him to lose his connection to the force. It causes Bane to lose prestige and the other members of the academy go from fearing him to ignoring him. Later on he moves past this and things go back to the status quo for Bane and his dynamic with the other sith. (hide spoiler)] . This moment should have been placed earlier when Bane first gets to the academy (or before his first combat against a fellow apprentice) as a personal trial he must pass to further gain power, instead of just dropped in the middle when he has already been excelling in his studies. As is, this moment feels more like a contrived obstacle to distract us from Bane's overpowered qualities than it does a compelling source of character growth, because it feels like once this segment of the book is over it has no effect on Bane moving forward. This whole portion of the story could have been cut out and we would have missed nothing. I was also disappointed when Karpyshyn references the "canonical" ending to the first KOTOR game and Revan's "canonical" identity. I'll go more into detail on how Revan is talked about later, but it feels like the references to the "official" version of Revan's story were simply lip service for those that wanted confirmation on what is definitively canon. (view spoiler)[ The only time Revan's light side ending is mentioned is on page 264 when Karpyshyn describes Lehon. The only time Revan is referred to by gender is on page 274 when describing Revan's achievements, and nothing would have been missed from Bane's perspective if the wording was changed to take out that reference. (hide spoiler)] I know this won't bother those who are fine with the "canon" Revan, but it felt unnecessary when taking into account how Revan's story actually affects the characters in this book specifically. But let's get to my biggest problems by far with this book- how Karpyshyn uses the lore and characters from the Jedi vs. Sith comics. When I first read Path of Destruction, the segments focusing on characters like Lord Hoth, Valenthyne Farfalla, Githany, Lord Kaan, and Lord Kopecz were a big sticking point for me. Not only did I find these characters to be one dimensional and bland, I disliked how the war between the Republic and the Brotherhood of Darkness was presented. While these characters for the most part weren't quite as bad as I remember them (and they are a hell of a lot more memorable in this book than they were in Jedi vs Sith), they often detracted from the main story centered on Bane's rise. Despite this book supposedly being about Bane, there is a significant amount of pages devoted to these other characters- and I can't think of a single good reason for this book to devote such lengthy subplots to them. First, is how most of these characters add nothing to Bane's character. This book mostly plays out as an intimate character study about arguably the most important sith lord in Star Wars history. Most of these secondary characters serve no purpose in developing Bane as a person whatsoever. For Lords Kaan and Kopecz, neither of them had any personality outside of their disagreements on sith philosophy and tactics. I didn't find any reason to care about them because we know that they will be eliminated by either Bane or somebody else by the end of the book. Karpyshyn tries extremely hard to give Hoth and Farfalla some layers, but it ended up feeling like wasted effort. Despite some success in this regard (especially with Hoth), I didn't care in the end because neither of these two characters actually interract with Bane directly, and as a result their POVs felt pointless. The only secondary character with time devoted to their POV that actually seems to serve a purpose is Githany. The problem is that I still didn't care for her POV because she was so bland- her only defining character traits were her beauty/sexuality and the fact that she was Bane's love interest. Second, and most importantly, if these subplots were supposed to support Bane's quest to reform the sith order and make it stronger, Karpyshyn completely fails in these intentions. The Brotherhood of Darkness feels like they are fairly on top of things for almost the entire book. When characters allude to the fact that the sith are all of a sudden losing the war, it comes off as lazy writing to me, as if Karpyshyn forgot to actually prove that Bane's actions were the right thing to do. (view spoiler)[ in the chapters with Bane as a soldier Karpyshyn describes battles on Kashyyk and Phaseera where Bane helped bring the sith to victory. But even when a battle on Trandosha was talked about as a disaster, the sith still win in the end so the "disaster" didn't seem to matter. There's also aspace battle showing Kaan and Kopecz wiping out republic forces seemingly with little difficulty. Finally, right after the scene showing the beleaguered sith forces on Ruusan towards the end of the book, it cuts to the army of light, presenting them as even more beleaguered. (hide spoiler)] All the time when discussing this book I have had people tell me things like "oh but the lore says that the sith will always go back to fighting each other for dominance", or nonsense about the dark side being diluted with too many sith, or how the sith being unified makes them corrupted and weak- but those arguments come off as shallow when this book portrays the brotherhood of darkness as seemingly the most efficient and effective incarnation of the sith ever up to this point. If the book cut out all the subplots with the jedi and sith armies, it would have actually served Bane's story better. But as is, by giving us this additional information it muddles the message the book is trying to get across- and leaves me wondering why the kriff Bane doesn't just cooperate with the Brotherhood of Darkness and use his insane levels of power to crush the republic and the jedi right then and there. This war subplot could have been fine if the book portrayed Bane as a powerhungry individual only obsessed with hoarding power for himself and not actually caring about the state of the galaxy around him. Or, if the war scenes actually showed the sith consistently losing, it actually could have played really well into Bane's journey, especially his case for reforms. (view spoiler)[ It would have added another layer of weight and complexity to the scene where Qordis decides to take all the apprentices on Korriban, make them fellow sith lords, and send them to Ruusaan. (hide spoiler)] But when the book is trying to present Bane as the "sithari" who supposedly knows the "correct" way for the sith to operate, these extraneous subplots with the war make him look like an aloof, uninformed fool rather than the cunning and calculating villain that he is supposed to be. My last problem, although it is very, very minor, is the epilogue. The final sentence of the last chapter would have been a powerful way to definitively end the book. The scene from the epilogue is good, but I think it sort of deflates the magnificently tense moment that ends the last chapter, and should have been used as the prologue for book 2 instead. THE GOOD: For everything that was bad in this book, its more than balanced out by the good. First and foremost, this book succeeds with flying colors as a character study for Darth Bane. Does he often feel like a Gary Stu? Yes. But if there's any character in star wars that can get away with some Gary Stu qualities, it's Bane. It works because enough of the book is focused on other, more interesting aspects of the character for me to forgive him being a Gary Stu when it comes to his talents in the force and in combat. His character traits are effectively established early on, and his eventual descent into evil becomes compelling to witness. My absolute favorite part of the novel hands down is the first 5 chapters. Karpyshyn does a brilliant job in setting up Bane's character, establishing Dessel's cold and cynical personality. It works so well because it's not only perfectly sets up his eventual descent into evil, but also why Des would have the worldview that he does- I love how Karpyshyn shows the environment where Bane begins his life, resulting in a very compelling and even sympathetic origin for the character. I also like the parallels Bane's origins have to Anakin, Luke, and even Rey. Sure having a person who is insanely strong in the force coming from unforgiving and humble origins is a derivative concept, Path of Destruction adds enough of a fresh spin to make it feel distinct. Most importantly, Bane's origins serve as a reminder for what the heroes we take for granted could have become, ultimately making those heroes even greater. It's the same reason why I like the parallels between the origins of Zayne Carrick and Haazen in the John Jackson Miller's Knights of the Old Republic comics. Finally, the side characters in these chapters are actually quite good, from the rough but caring cantina owner Groshik to the unnamed Republic soldiers that antagonize Des and lend credence to his cynicism. While the progression of events could have been sequenced a bit better and the background war subplots take away from the credibility of Bane's beliefs, these first five chapters do a great job leading up to Bane's eventual decisions to reform the sith. Even though reforming the Brotherhood of Darkness feels unnecessary when taking into account the book as a whole, it's still compelling from the perspective of Bane as a character, because in the scenes with Bane's POV, Bane himself isn't given a good reason to believe the Brotherhood of Darkness and their methods are right. Now lets talk about Revan again, because this book frequently references the lore surrounding the first KOTOR game. Despite my misgivings I mentioned earlier, upon more thought this book actually handles Revan very well for the most part. When specifically concerning character interactions directly, Karpyshyn does a great job showing how Revan (and Malak) impacted the galaxy thousands of years later while still staying true to the core of the character(s). Additionally, it was an effective choice when playing into Bane's questioning personality. Again, the references to Revan's "canonical" story more come off as detached expository lip service than as a representation of how the characters in the book actually view the events surrounding it. (view spoiler)[ during the sabacc scene in the first 5 chapters Des and the republic soldiers do not refer to Revan as male or female, just "Revan". There is also a fascinating exchange within this scene between Des and the soldiers, where the soldiers say Revan was a hero, but Des countering by saying that Revan formed a sith empire and nearly destroyed the republic. I also love how Karpyshyn just refers to Revan as "Revan", or "Revan's avatar" during the scene on Lehon where Bane has Revan's holocron and he is obtaining its knowledge. (hide spoiler)] . While the worldbuilding with the Jedi vs. Sith lore wasn't very well done, Karpyshyn's original additions are great. I really liked how the sith academy was explored, and to this day remains the best exploration of the sith order's inner workings in a star wars novel. Karpyshyn also does a good job showing how the Brotherhood of Darkness, despite following a philosophy of greater cooperation and equality among sith, still has many traits of a traditional sith order, and in the end the only reason why the brotherhood worked at all was because of Lord Kaan. The dark side still drives people to compete for power, and it is compelling from Bane's perspective why a "rule of two" would be the way for the sith to embody their strengths of immense power but also minimize their weaknesses from infighting. Finally, the action sequences are fantastic, even if they are during the scenes focused the secondary characters. I have come to expect this much because Path of Destruction is a Drew Karpyshyn novel- but in this book the action is particularly raw and gritty. The action sequences with Bane in particular are surprisingly intense, and I sometimes even felt scared for Bane because of how well done they were. (view spoiler)[ the first action scene between Bane and Gerd in the mines is still one of my favorite fight sequences in ANY star wars book. (hide spoiler)] THE CONCLUSION: Final rating is 3.5 stars, rounded up because of a) how much more I liked this book after a second reading and b) how much I loved those opening 5 chapters. I still consider this to be the most overrated star wars novel out there. The writing is not always good, and the other characters that aren't Bane were mishandled. That said, I can see now why people are so drawn to it- Villain centric star wars books still remain the exception rather than the rule, and i don't think there is any other story in either legends or canon that takes the approach that this one did. To Karpyshyn's credit, he mostly does a good job taking the antihero route with Darth Bane's story. For those who have yet to read this book, I can give this a confident recommend to legends enthusiasts. And until bane's story has been re-explored in canon, I can recommend this book to the more canon-focused crowd too. That said, I encourage anybody going into this book for the first time or even those who are going into a repeat read to temper their expectations a bit. I made the mistake of going in the first time with ungodly expectations from the ungodly amount of hype that surrounds Darth Bane: Path of Destruction to this day. After falling victim to overhype, my opinions on this book were a bit sour for almost three years, and those thoughts persisted until i finally read Path of Destruction again. As for my thoughts now, I am happy that I reread it, and I look forward to giving the other two books in the trilogy a try. Path of Destruction definitely does not rank among my favorite stories from the old republic era, but it remains a good addition nonetheless. And at the end of the day, hopefully that's what matters.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jody Ellis

    As always a Star Wars text does not disappoint. It was only the ending that seemed flat but overall a well rounded book. The battles are clear and the whole book devoid of fillers. I do look forward to the second but I think a small break from Star Wars is needed before I start the second!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    This was very good! It’s an era of Star Wars I’m not familiar with. I haven’t read many of the Legends books (I only started reading Star Wars novels around when Disney took over so stuck to mainly canon stuff) but I loved reading a book prominently from the point of view of the Sith! It’s something that’s not been explored much in the movies and the recent canon stuff.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    More like "Darth 'Meh'." I'm a huge Star Wars fan, I am. But I really just couldn't bring myself to care at all about anything going on in this book. It didn't help that there was little in the way of character development and not much of a story here to begin with. Add in the author's background as a video game writer and you get a big pile o' mediocre.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Won't enrapture you like Darth Plagueis, who as a protagonist is horrifyingly slick. Darth Bane starts as a handsome, burly, and patient Sith lord... but lives too much in his own head. The result is a slow plot and characters we don't care about. An excellent ending, however. Cool quotes: -------------- “Agree with someone, and they’ll be your friend for the rest of the night. Cross them, and they might hate you for weeks.” “Dez had learned long ago not to escalate a fight unless he was willing to Won't enrapture you like Darth Plagueis, who as a protagonist is horrifyingly slick. Darth Bane starts as a handsome, burly, and patient Sith lord... but lives too much in his own head. The result is a slow plot and characters we don't care about. An excellent ending, however. Cool quotes: -------------- “Agree with someone, and they’ll be your friend for the rest of the night. Cross them, and they might hate you for weeks.” “Dez had learned long ago not to escalate a fight unless he was willing to pay the price of losing.” “He didn’t care much for equality. Working to make everybody equal didn’t leave much chance for anyone to achieve greatness.” “…Materializing from the darkness like a nightmare given substance.” “When in need, look to the Self.” “That name is mine. Nobody uses it against me.” “Equality is a myth to protect the weak.” “Forgive me…”, he said bowing. “I meant no offense. I only sought to draw upon your wisdom to explain that which I could not understand myself.” “It was time for his hate to set him free.” “He understood that the crushing victory he sought would only come through patience, a virtue not normally encouraged in followers of the Dark Side.” “He achieved… not because he was better… but because he was smarter. Let this be a lesson to you all ! Secrecy can be your greatest weapon. Keep your true strength hidden, until you are ready to unleash the killing blow.” “Fear the wrath of the female sword.” “Those who ask for mercy are too weak to deserve it.” “He had crossed the threshold. There was no going back. He would never hesitate again. He would never doubt again.” “Victory could only come through subtlety and cunning.” “Killing without reason or gain was the petty pleasure for sadistic fools.” “Glory means nothing for the dead.” Darth Bane’s rise: ----------------- *** Motherless, bonded child laborer who dug in a mine. *** Survived a mugging by killing his attacker *** Chose flight into the Sith world over imprisonment. In short, emancipation. *** Enlisted in Sith army, repeatedly sacrificing his life to save fellow soldiers. *** Selected for Sith Lord apprenticeship *** An enthusiastic student of The Force, he mastered telekinesis in a few weeks. Sith Tenets ---------------- 1. Peace is a lie. There is only passion. 2. Through passion, I gain strength. 3. Through strength, I gain power. 4. Through power, I gain victory. 5. Through victory, my chains are broken. 6. The Force shall free me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    This book seemed like a good choice for something to read on a plane. On my previous trip I was confronted with a new peril of trying to read something challenging in a confined space: sitting next to a conversation about which Twilight was hotter. I'm used to reading in loud areas, but I have limits where my brain will shut down. And a working brain really is no requirement for a Star Wars book. While I had never read a Star Wars book before, I was actually familiar with the author's work as he This book seemed like a good choice for something to read on a plane. On my previous trip I was confronted with a new peril of trying to read something challenging in a confined space: sitting next to a conversation about which Twilight was hotter. I'm used to reading in loud areas, but I have limits where my brain will shut down. And a working brain really is no requirement for a Star Wars book. While I had never read a Star Wars book before, I was actually familiar with the author's work as he had written one of my favorite video games. This accomplishment is as poor a reason to read someone's book as you may imagine. Karpyshyn's greatest strength is to work in pastiche, twisting recognizable characters and motifs enough to keep things interesting. It's actually a pretty good skill -- when one's characters are 2D cut-outs, it's pretty easy to drop them onto any back drop and make it work. However, his choices here may have been a bit too prosaic, too easy to reach for. He combines a central motif of post-Dune space fair -- that people from hell planets grow up real tough -- and the most staid pop-psychology daddy issues as the central ideas for formulating what is supposed to be the galaxy's biggest badass. First, I doubt that either factor makes any sense for this character. They might make someone ruthless and morally empty, but they also seem likely to make that person physically broken and traumatized, stripping away the sangfroid that we so love to see in our ultimate villains. At best, being space-poor might make Bane a space-Somali pirate. And those daddy issues probably only qualify him to work as a stripper. Secondly, even if those daddy issues DID make Bane a vicious killer, I don't want to hear about it. Just skip to the vicious killing. Briefly I toyed with reading the other books in the series just to see how it all turns out, but that seemed like more effort than I could justify. Then I thought about reading the internet summaries, but those appear to be almost as long, and even more dully written. I'm left to assume that many more people die, light sabers are used, and that a hard-fought comeuppance is earned. Now if only there was some comeuppance for those 30-year-old women yammering about Twilights.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Syd (deertales)

    i finally finished! i listened to this book as a favor to my brother (you're welcomeeeee) and i still am not sure why i ever caved in. i love star wars, dont get me wrong, but i do not like the dark side. and this whole book is like dark side fan fiction. a big dark side circle jerk for the people that lovveeeee darth buttheads. and the worst part?!??! i got semi invested in this stupid darth guy! like what is happening to me. is it the best book ive ever read? oh lord no. but it definitely wasn't i finally finished! i listened to this book as a favor to my brother (you're welcomeeeee) and i still am not sure why i ever caved in. i love star wars, dont get me wrong, but i do not like the dark side. and this whole book is like dark side fan fiction. a big dark side circle jerk for the people that lovveeeee darth buttheads. and the worst part?!??! i got semi invested in this stupid darth guy! like what is happening to me. is it the best book ive ever read? oh lord no. but it definitely wasn't bad. the writing was completely average, the sound effects (!!) in the audio book were completely bizarre, and the plot was intriguing enough to rope me into finishing. overall, i think i will be leaving the brotherhood of darkness behind me. theyre all a bunch of poopy heads anyway.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Greer

    Lore, lore and a bit more lore! Quite a fun book. Obviously a dark lord is going to have some interesting tales, and this book delivers. The audiobook is nicely done and helps the flow move along. It was nice to get some of the (unofficial) history of this character who shaped much of what the Sith became after him.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andre Lazar

    This book is a great example of the Star Wars extended universe. By this I mean that it reads more like a poor fantasy novel with a Star Wars coat of paint (really? the Brotherhood of Darkness vs the Army of Light?). The main character is an edge lord whose brilliant realizations are boiled down to: the ancient Sith had it right with the "rule of two", and the current Sith are basically the Jedi but slightly edgier. The book is full of dumb tropes like the seductive ex-Jedi who attempts to manip This book is a great example of the Star Wars extended universe. By this I mean that it reads more like a poor fantasy novel with a Star Wars coat of paint (really? the Brotherhood of Darkness vs the Army of Light?). The main character is an edge lord whose brilliant realizations are boiled down to: the ancient Sith had it right with the "rule of two", and the current Sith are basically the Jedi but slightly edgier. The book is full of dumb tropes like the seductive ex-Jedi who attempts to manipulate Bane, ends up having feelings for him, and discovering how much she underestimated him. I spent a good amount of time while reading this book just thinking about the teen edgelords and MRA hacks who probably read this and jerked off. The story is pretty simplistic and lacks the nuance and originality of other EU books, but the writing is fairly well done and the story and pacing are engaging. Despite all my criticisms, I'm probably going to read the sequels to this book, because I love Star Wars and want to know what happens next. I also will keep eating junk food, not because I like it, but because it's simple and addicting.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Dagenais

    This book was excellent. It contained all the evilness that I can hope for in a book (and that I rarely get). I also love when the characters don't have it easy. I will surely read the others in the series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    I typically try to avoid books spun off movies or shows. They typically feel cheap or like a cash grab. This was good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Even though this is the first book in the Darth Bane trilogy, it is actually the last one I listened to. I didn't really care for this one, even though I kind of liked Dez and that he had some kind of vision to carry to the end. That idea was developed and provided a solid understanding of who he was and why he was good at what he did. The problem was this: there were many other characters that weren't defined. They were like cardboard cutouts that the MC had to dodge and dance around. The secon Even though this is the first book in the Darth Bane trilogy, it is actually the last one I listened to. I didn't really care for this one, even though I kind of liked Dez and that he had some kind of vision to carry to the end. That idea was developed and provided a solid understanding of who he was and why he was good at what he did. The problem was this: there were many other characters that weren't defined. They were like cardboard cutouts that the MC had to dodge and dance around. The second problem is somewhat connected to the first. None of the characters, even Dez, weren't characters that I felt I could stand behind and root for. They were single minded in that they wanted to kill everything and everyone, including each other. I need more than that. This was all about the one thing. I need some connection with the characters and I didn't find that. This was just okay for me. 2 stars

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chad Josimar

    Wow!!!!! Just wow!! The more books I read from the old EU the more I see why people loved it so much. I want to say I am a fan of Bane but hot damn he scares the poop out of me! Amazing book!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kingtchalla83

    Book review Set 1,032 years before "A New Hope" there is no Luke, Leia, Yoda or Clone Wars. The events that transpire in "Dath Bane: Path of Destruction" will reverberate throughout the galaxy for years to come. There is a reason the Sith operate in the shadows. Bane is that reason! 📖 📖 📖 Yes, these books are not considered canon and have been relegated to "legend" status, but guess what I don't care! 📖 📖 📖 Dessel, Darth Bane, is a miner on Apatros, a backwater Outer Rim Colony, with no discernible futu Book review Set 1,032 years before "A New Hope" there is no Luke, Leia, Yoda or Clone Wars. The events that transpire in "Dath Bane: Path of Destruction" will reverberate throughout the galaxy for years to come. There is a reason the Sith operate in the shadows. Bane is that reason! 📖 📖 📖 Yes, these books are not considered canon and have been relegated to "legend" status, but guess what I don't care! 📖 📖 📖 Dessel, Darth Bane, is a miner on Apatros, a backwater Outer Rim Colony, with no discernible future that doesn't include the drudgery of mining. Dessel is fueled by a cold hatred of The Republic, his father and life in general. He's force sensitive and it manifests in the form of premonitions, but has no clue about his full potential. A series of unfortunate events lands Bane on Korriban, a planet, at a Sith Academy where his descent into darkness starts. His trainning in the Dark Side is an introduction to: deception, lightsaber combat, ancient Sith lore, and out right murder. His transformation is slow created by an confluence of events and interactions with others at the academy. 📖 📖 📖 My only complaint is the last 80%. The battle dragged on with redundancy and unnecessary dialogue. I kept thinking get on with it already! When the scene finally did "get on with it" the result was anticlimactic. The latter half of the book left much to be deserved. For this reason, I dropped a star. 📖 📖 ⭐⭐⭐⭐ 4 stars

  27. 5 out of 5

    Reece

    Holy shit what an amazing book

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Excerpt: Once the Sith order teemed with followers. But their rivalries divided them in endless battles for supremacy. Until one dark lord at last united the Sith in the quest to enslave the galaxy–and exterminate the Jedi. Yet it would fall to another, far more powerful than the entire Brotherhood of Darkness, to ultimately realize the full potential of the Sith, and wield the awesome power of the dark side as never before. Since childhood, Dessel has known only the abuse of his hateful father an Excerpt: Once the Sith order teemed with followers. But their rivalries divided them in endless battles for supremacy. Until one dark lord at last united the Sith in the quest to enslave the galaxy–and exterminate the Jedi. Yet it would fall to another, far more powerful than the entire Brotherhood of Darkness, to ultimately realize the full potential of the Sith, and wield the awesome power of the dark side as never before. Since childhood, Dessel has known only the abuse of his hateful father and the dangerous, soul-crushing labor of a cortosis miner. Deep in the tunnels of the desolate planet Apatros, endlessly excavating the rare mineral valued throughout the galaxy, Dessel dreams of the day he can escape–a day he fears may never come. But when a high-stakes card game ends in deadly violence, Dessel suddenly finds himself a wanted man. On the run from vengeful Republic forces, Dessel vanishes into the ranks of the Sith army, and ships out to join the bloody war against the Republic and its Jedi champions. There, Dessel’s brutality, cunning, and exceptional command of the Force swiftly win him renown as a warrior. But in the eyes of his watchful masters, he is destined for a far greater role in the ultimate Sith plan for the galaxy–if he can prove himself truly worthy. As an acolyte in the Sith academy, studying the secrets and skills of the dark side at the feet of its greatest masters, Dessel embraces his new Sith identity: Bane. However the true test is yet to come. In order to gain acceptance into the Brotherhood of Darkness one must fully surrender to the dark side through a trial by fire that Bane, for all his unquenchable fury and lust for power, may not be strong enough to endure . . . especially since deception, treachery, and murder run rampant among the Sith disciples, and utter ruthlessness alone is the key to survival. Only by defying the most sacred traditions, rejecting all he has been taught, and drawing upon the long-forgotten wisdom of the very first Sith can Bane hope to triumph–and forge from the ashes of that which he must destroy a new era of absolute dark power. REVIEW: Wow. That was my initial reaction when i finished reading the book. It's been so long since i've read a 5 star book that i've almost forgotten what one was. Seriously, if your a scifi fan this book had everything. Now before reading this book my favorite sith of all time was Darth Vader with Darth Maul following close behind. After this book it's Darth Bane all the way. Darth Bane would look at Vader. laugh. And then proceed to force choke the life out of him. Afterwards he would take a walk by the pond causally sipping corellian whiskey acting like nothing happened. The dude is that bad ass. Seriously i love the jedi. Always have and always will, but in this book i was rooting for the sith. I really applaud the author in expanding on the sith from just "their evil dark side users". Karpyshyn really devolves into their Psyche and their reasons for doing things. You also get their view on things. Bane starts out the book as poor miner with no hope of getting of the mining planet Apatros. Luck comes his way and along with a dead republic officer he gets off the planet and joins the sith army. In his squad the "Gloom Walkers" he quickly distinguishes himself. After a particularly hard battle he gets invited by Dark Lord Kopecz to become a sith apprentice at the top academy on Korriban. There he goes through a series of trials and starts to become disillusioned with the "Brotherhood of the Sith". Eventually leaving to go find answers from the "true sith". He goes Lehon, the lost planet of the sith, and discovers a sith holocron from Darth Revan. From it he becomes the ultimate bad ass. And i was squealing like only a fan girl could from it. I'm not going to give away the ending since it was so good you have to read it for yourself. It just leads you thinking thinking "wow". Another thing i have to point out before i close is that this book really gives you another perspective on the jedi. We're so used to seeing them as good and righteous, but in this book you get to see them as a bit pompous and arrogant as the sith. Seriously the jedi changed a lot from the days of the sith. Jedi Master Farfalla in the book wears golded armor encrusted with rubies. The jedi masters also go by "Lord". A long way from the plain brown cloth jedi of the prequels and sequels. Final rating: 5 star. Awesome characters, amazing and gripping storyline, new insights to character groups, and all around general enjoyment. ^^

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Daley

    I've read this book many, many times and I still enjoy it. It gives the perfect Star Wars feeling, and introduces a character that you honestly want to win. What I love about Bane is that one of his defining characteristics isn't his prodigious physical strength, but his sharp mind. He understands, and then uses betrayal in a manner that is very satisfying. Basically, this is one of the best Star Wars books written, and I would recommend it to anyone.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Iset

    After hearing Darth Bane mentioned several times as one of the seminal members of the Sith Order, it was interesting to finally read his story. Bane isn’t an instantly likable character, and of course he gets more and more evil throughout, but somehow he grows on you, perhaps because the reader is looking over his shoulder through it all. But it’s easy to see where Bane goes wrong, even from the beginning of the book. There’s something slightly off about Dessel’s attitude, even making allowances After hearing Darth Bane mentioned several times as one of the seminal members of the Sith Order, it was interesting to finally read his story. Bane isn’t an instantly likable character, and of course he gets more and more evil throughout, but somehow he grows on you, perhaps because the reader is looking over his shoulder through it all. But it’s easy to see where Bane goes wrong, even from the beginning of the book. There’s something slightly off about Dessel’s attitude, even making allowances for his awful environment and appalling upbringing, hints of the dark side show through. Thus, Bane’s fall doesn’t come as much of a surprise. Then again, I already knew he was going to be a Sith before picking up the book, so maybe that contributed to the lack of surprise when Bane finally falls. One of the most interesting things about the book is undoubtedly its Sith perspective and the chance to learn so much more about them. Even the Jedi Order still has many aspects left to explore, and they are usually the protagonists. I was anticipating this book revealing more about the Jedi Order’s opposite, the culture surrounding this Order, their beliefs and codes, the techniques they use in contrast to the Jedi way of approaching the Force. Sadly, Bane conveniently exists in a time where the traditional way of the Sith has been distorted and abandoned, and where he must patch the pieces together himself to restore the old ways, and very little of what Bane finds in his Holocrons and ancient library texts is revealed to us, the readers. One of the surprising elements was Bane’s struggles to connect with the dark side. According to Jedi lore, the dark side of the easy path, but Bane’s spirit begins to violently reject it partway through his training. Seems the dark side path isn’t that easy after all. Bane’s progression and development feels natural, his level of power doesn’t feel contrived. I've never been a big fan of the "Sith alchemy" stuff though, and there were a couple of continuity bloopers afoot in this one. The character of Dessel/Bane, with his fall and his forceful personality definitely carries the day here. 8 out of 10.

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