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Best-selling writer Greg Rucka (WONDER WOMAN) and acclaimed artist J.H. Williams III (SANDMAN: OVERTURE) reveal the shocking origin that set the foundation for one of the DC Universe’s most prominent lesbian characters in BATWOMAN BY GREG RUCKA AND J.H. WILLIAMS III.  Determined to continue serving others after her military career was cut short by bigotry, Kate Kane has tak Best-selling writer Greg Rucka (WONDER WOMAN) and acclaimed artist J.H. Williams III (SANDMAN: OVERTURE) reveal the shocking origin that set the foundation for one of the DC Universe’s most prominent lesbian characters in BATWOMAN BY GREG RUCKA AND J.H. WILLIAMS III.  Determined to continue serving others after her military career was cut short by bigotry, Kate Kane has taken up the identity of Batwoman, leading a one-woman war on Gotham City’s evil underbelly.  And at the heart of her investigation is the Religion of Crime, a criminal cult led by a madwoman known only as Alice. Speaking in riddles and storybook rhymes, the Lewis Carroll-inspired Alice aims to transform Gotham into her own twisted wonderland.  But is everything Alice says truly mad? Underneath her deranged theatrics, she may hold the key to understanding Batwoman’s past…  BATWOMAN BY GREG RUCKA AND J.H. WILLIAMS III is the visually stunning landmark series collected here in its entirety. Originally presented in DETECTIVE COMICS #854-863, this volume also includes the never-before-collected storyline “Cutter” with guest artist Jock (THE LOSERS).


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Best-selling writer Greg Rucka (WONDER WOMAN) and acclaimed artist J.H. Williams III (SANDMAN: OVERTURE) reveal the shocking origin that set the foundation for one of the DC Universe’s most prominent lesbian characters in BATWOMAN BY GREG RUCKA AND J.H. WILLIAMS III.  Determined to continue serving others after her military career was cut short by bigotry, Kate Kane has tak Best-selling writer Greg Rucka (WONDER WOMAN) and acclaimed artist J.H. Williams III (SANDMAN: OVERTURE) reveal the shocking origin that set the foundation for one of the DC Universe’s most prominent lesbian characters in BATWOMAN BY GREG RUCKA AND J.H. WILLIAMS III.  Determined to continue serving others after her military career was cut short by bigotry, Kate Kane has taken up the identity of Batwoman, leading a one-woman war on Gotham City’s evil underbelly.  And at the heart of her investigation is the Religion of Crime, a criminal cult led by a madwoman known only as Alice. Speaking in riddles and storybook rhymes, the Lewis Carroll-inspired Alice aims to transform Gotham into her own twisted wonderland.  But is everything Alice says truly mad? Underneath her deranged theatrics, she may hold the key to understanding Batwoman’s past…  BATWOMAN BY GREG RUCKA AND J.H. WILLIAMS III is the visually stunning landmark series collected here in its entirety. Originally presented in DETECTIVE COMICS #854-863, this volume also includes the never-before-collected storyline “Cutter” with guest artist Jock (THE LOSERS).

30 review for Batwoman by Greg Rucka and J.H. Williams (Detective Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Expands on Batwoman: Elegy by giving us an additional 3 issues drawn by Jock that apparently haven't been collected before. It's a standalone story told in parallel with Batman and Batwoman both searching for missing women. I liked it quite a bit even if it doesn't really expand Batwoman's story. The main story by Rucka and J.H. Williams III is just stunning. Williams has an incredible sense of design and makes each panel a work of art. I could just sit and look at these pages again and again wit Expands on Batwoman: Elegy by giving us an additional 3 issues drawn by Jock that apparently haven't been collected before. It's a standalone story told in parallel with Batman and Batwoman both searching for missing women. I liked it quite a bit even if it doesn't really expand Batwoman's story. The main story by Rucka and J.H. Williams III is just stunning. Williams has an incredible sense of design and makes each panel a work of art. I could just sit and look at these pages again and again without even reading the story. Spinning out of 52, the Religion of Crime is back with a new leader, Alice. She's nuts and only speaks in dialogue from Lewis Carroll books. The latter part of the story tells of Batwoman's origin and I have to say it's one of the better ones in modern comics. Kate is the top cadet in her class at West Point when she's brought up on charges for being gay. She's asked to follow the "Don't ask, don't tell" policy but refuses to lie because that is also part of the Army creed. All she's wanted to do is protect people by serving her country like her father and is lost for a long time once she's separated from the military. After seeing Batman in action, she's once again inspired on how to help people.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Batwoman by Greg Rucka and JH Williams collects the Batwoman stories from Detective Comics #854-863. Up until now, my only exposure to Batwoman was in 52 when she went up against the Church of Crime and got stabbed through the heart. I don't know what made me pick this up but I'm glad I did. In this volume, the story of Kate Kane becoming Batwoman is revealed, along with a battle with the new leader of the Religion of Crime and a serial mutilator known as The Cutter. The origin of Batwoman is an in Batwoman by Greg Rucka and JH Williams collects the Batwoman stories from Detective Comics #854-863. Up until now, my only exposure to Batwoman was in 52 when she went up against the Church of Crime and got stabbed through the heart. I don't know what made me pick this up but I'm glad I did. In this volume, the story of Kate Kane becoming Batwoman is revealed, along with a battle with the new leader of the Religion of Crime and a serial mutilator known as The Cutter. The origin of Batwoman is an intriguing one, getting ejected from West Point for being gay and meandering through life until a chance encounter with Batman sent her down the superhero path. There are other aspects to her origin that I don't want to spoil. I like Batwoman for the same reason I liked Bronze Age Huntress: The stories feel like Batman stories without 80 years of baggage. They're gritty tales with a lot of action and Kate often takes a beating and/or stabbing in the course of sorting things out. JH Williams and Jock do a fantastic job on art, though I have to admit I like the flat colors in JH William's flashback scenes more than I do the computer colored pages of the current tale. Batwoman by Greg Rucka and J.H. Williams III is a good read and a great intro into Batwoman. Four out of five stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Delirious Disquisitions

    Not really a Batwoman fan, but damn these covers are killing it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    fer

    YASSSS THE POWER OF LESBIANS!!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    True rating: 4.5 stars. I knew nothing about Batwoman prior to buying this trade paperback, but after reading the collection of issues within, I have a solid understanding of her character and her origins. The first arc included (6 issues) is of 5 star quality, art and story both. The plot is absorbing and some of the page layouts are mind-blowing! The second arc (3 issues) falters a little, primarily because the story is as much about Batman and Bette as it is about Batwoman. However, it's still True rating: 4.5 stars. I knew nothing about Batwoman prior to buying this trade paperback, but after reading the collection of issues within, I have a solid understanding of her character and her origins. The first arc included (6 issues) is of 5 star quality, art and story both. The plot is absorbing and some of the page layouts are mind-blowing! The second arc (3 issues) falters a little, primarily because the story is as much about Batman and Bette as it is about Batwoman. However, it's still entertaining and provides what I'm sure is pertinent background information about Bette. Overall, an excellent introduction to a complicated superheroine, with stimulating writing and challenging (a good thing!) artwork.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    mostly a re-read with the exception of the last 3 issues which I had never read( The cutter story).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Sometimes something is technically very good but doesn't really resonate. I loved the art in this! Idk! It was good! Sometimes something is technically very good but doesn't really resonate. I loved the art in this! Idk! It was good!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Danny

    J.H. William's III is perhaps the best artist in modern comics. And his pencils come in full force in this series. I cannot even find the words to explain how much I adore his lines and his inks. His panels are some of the most unique you will find in any superhero book. Greg Rucka has a fun time letting William's tell his crime fighter story of Batwoman. He opens with what seems like a routine villain with a dastardly plot but slowly works into the book Batwomans origin. Like all superheroes it J.H. William's III is perhaps the best artist in modern comics. And his pencils come in full force in this series. I cannot even find the words to explain how much I adore his lines and his inks. His panels are some of the most unique you will find in any superhero book. Greg Rucka has a fun time letting William's tell his crime fighter story of Batwoman. He opens with what seems like a routine villain with a dastardly plot but slowly works into the book Batwomans origin. Like all superheroes it is a gloomy one. One that has social commentary of the military lifestyle as well as the "don't ask don't tell policy. It was never preachy but it was emotional. The series also leads to a 3 issue series, drawn by another favorite artist Jock, that shows the parallels between Batwoman and Batman. Fun stuff. My problems were that on occasion, William's panel progression became hard to follow especially during splash pages. He makes his pages look like tapestries. Beautiful yes. Hard to follow...kinda. Also the book becomes a bit convoluted with Ruckas interweaving stories but overall I was impressed they gave an LGBTQ character real genuine pathos that felt both unique yet streamlined.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Steven Bell

    This collection really contains 3 different stories and I want to address them separately: First up is Elegy with art by J.H. Williams III. The story for Elegy didn't blow me away but the art is gorgeous. The second story is Go, also with art by J.H. Williams III. It's an origin story and the strongest part of the collection. The third story features art by Jock, which was fine but definitely a huge step down over the beautiful art from the first two stories. The third story frankly wasn't that s This collection really contains 3 different stories and I want to address them separately: First up is Elegy with art by J.H. Williams III. The story for Elegy didn't blow me away but the art is gorgeous. The second story is Go, also with art by J.H. Williams III. It's an origin story and the strongest part of the collection. The third story features art by Jock, which was fine but definitely a huge step down over the beautiful art from the first two stories. The third story frankly wasn't that strong, art aside. While, paralleling Kate's case with Batman's is an interesting enough idea I didn't feel the execution really did it for me. On the whole I would recommend this to anyone with an interest in the character, but be prepared the third story to not live up to the first two.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jarrah

    This collection includes the "Elegy" and "Go" arcs, as well as a short arc that juxtaposes stories of Batman and Batwoman searching for missing women. Greg Rucka's writing gives incredible depth to Kate Kane very quickly. He imbues her with strongly-held values, pathos, a sense of humour and a big chip on her shoulder, as well as badass fighting skills. The art by J.H. Williams III makes a big impression, full of rich colour and detail, though sometimes it felt like maybe too much was going on i This collection includes the "Elegy" and "Go" arcs, as well as a short arc that juxtaposes stories of Batman and Batwoman searching for missing women. Greg Rucka's writing gives incredible depth to Kate Kane very quickly. He imbues her with strongly-held values, pathos, a sense of humour and a big chip on her shoulder, as well as badass fighting skills. The art by J.H. Williams III makes a big impression, full of rich colour and detail, though sometimes it felt like maybe too much was going on in some of the two-page spreads.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Lima

    This was great! The art was astonishing (i thought Michael Lark was drawing on the Cutter arc, but it is awesome to see how Williams can adapt to the writing). Rucka is some of the writers that i most trust to read something and i was right again! Haha! It's a must for any super hero readers. Kate is not just another bat-family character. Rucka gives her a really nice background, a great personality and a great origin. I think she's really high at my not so important super hero ranking. Anyway, y This was great! The art was astonishing (i thought Michael Lark was drawing on the Cutter arc, but it is awesome to see how Williams can adapt to the writing). Rucka is some of the writers that i most trust to read something and i was right again! Haha! It's a must for any super hero readers. Kate is not just another bat-family character. Rucka gives her a really nice background, a great personality and a great origin. I think she's really high at my not so important super hero ranking. Anyway, you have to read this!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maddy

    This is my review of Elegy: 4.5 stars. A bit of the cult stuff was hard to follow, but it was a beautiful book and the backstory was so well done. And this is for Batwoman: The extra 3 issues that weren't in Elegy, the cutter storyline, weren't as good as the other issues. Alone I'd probably give them 3 stars but the rest of the book was great, so it's still 4 stars from me. This is my review of Elegy: 4.5 stars. A bit of the cult stuff was hard to follow, but it was a beautiful book and the backstory was so well done. And this is for Batwoman: The extra 3 issues that weren't in Elegy, the cutter storyline, weren't as good as the other issues. Alone I'd probably give them 3 stars but the rest of the book was great, so it's still 4 stars from me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Thibaut Nicodème

    Finally took the time to read this what with the new show. Pretty solid run (i mean, it's greg rucka), I love this take on Alice even if it's obviously impossible to keep up for more than a few issues. Also the "Cutter" story they included was brilliantly crafted. Finally took the time to read this what with the new show. Pretty solid run (i mean, it's greg rucka), I love this take on Alice even if it's obviously impossible to keep up for more than a few issues. Also the "Cutter" story they included was brilliantly crafted.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A nice introduction for people who are not familiar with Kate/Batwoman's story. A nice introduction for people who are not familiar with Kate/Batwoman's story.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Candice Jones

    A dark and twisted tale about service, identity and filled with suspense. The flashbacks allow the shadows that haunt Kate Kane to have weight and connect to her present with new newest villain, the new High Madame, Alice, is revealed. Tying everything together is the honour and rule of Batman, but it doesn't necessarily make Kate Kane derivative or a genderbent Batman. Instead, she stands on her own and feels more rooted in reality with her military career and civilain life compared to the glam A dark and twisted tale about service, identity and filled with suspense. The flashbacks allow the shadows that haunt Kate Kane to have weight and connect to her present with new newest villain, the new High Madame, Alice, is revealed. Tying everything together is the honour and rule of Batman, but it doesn't necessarily make Kate Kane derivative or a genderbent Batman. Instead, she stands on her own and feels more rooted in reality with her military career and civilain life compared to the glamour and fractured darkness of Bruce Wayne. Overall, a story I'd recommend to any fan of Batman and the Bat family.

  16. 5 out of 5

    joel croyle

    One of the best comics I've read in over 20 years Especially considering it's of the superhero genre. Batwoman is bad-ass and has a great story. Not to mention written to perfection by Rucka. One of the best comics I've read in over 20 years Especially considering it's of the superhero genre. Batwoman is bad-ass and has a great story. Not to mention written to perfection by Rucka.

  17. 5 out of 5

    RavenT

    I caved and treated myself to the hardcover deluxe edition of this comic in 2020. No regrets. Love it. The artwork is even better in this format. (I usually buy TPBs due to not wanting to deal with fragile paper of individuall issues. The hardcover is even better. So pretty.)

  18. 5 out of 5

    James

    Batwoman Not a big fan of Bat woman, yet. Watch the show, and now that I've read the comic with the complete origin of Batsman, I like her. Can't wait to read the next set of books. Batwoman Not a big fan of Bat woman, yet. Watch the show, and now that I've read the comic with the complete origin of Batsman, I like her. Can't wait to read the next set of books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    F. Lugo

    I found it incredibly fascinating and uplifting in a way.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ho Reviews

    Arenson's writing, could be compared to many authors in the dccomics genre. Arenson's writing, could be compared to many authors in the dccomics genre.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sophism

    I enjoyed the characters and the dynamic between the primarys.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kiarra

    Current story line and strong characters make Batwoman interesting and thought provoking.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vizzi

    The plot has some very interesting possibilities.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Clagon

    If you read dccomics, then you will love this splendid novel.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Artemis

    A classic 'Batwoman' comic, with beautiful artwork and queer representation. Kate Kane is such a strong and complex character and heroine; human and fully realised. If only 'Elegy' were longer and had more of Alice! I want to see her more! The ending story of this collection is brilliant as well - without revealing anything (you must experience it for yourself), I'll say that it really shows how far Batwoman has come, and that she succeeds Batman in a lot of ways. Open paths for queer woman super A classic 'Batwoman' comic, with beautiful artwork and queer representation. Kate Kane is such a strong and complex character and heroine; human and fully realised. If only 'Elegy' were longer and had more of Alice! I want to see her more! The ending story of this collection is brilliant as well - without revealing anything (you must experience it for yourself), I'll say that it really shows how far Batwoman has come, and that she succeeds Batman in a lot of ways. Open paths for queer woman superheroes! For new, updated, positive rep! Read my review of another 'Batwoman' comic for more of my thoughts on this unique member of the Bat Family. Final Score: 4/5

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brandt

    So if there is one thing I am sick to death of in comics is everyone freaking out when a character is gay. I am pretty certain that we all know someone who is gay, and hopefully those folks are openly gay and you are accepting of them. And you don't make a big deal out of it. Human sexuality doesn't contain binaries and being straight is no better or worse than being gay (I learned a while ago that when we say that someone is "born gay" we are still applying heterosexual norms to that person's s So if there is one thing I am sick to death of in comics is everyone freaking out when a character is gay. I am pretty certain that we all know someone who is gay, and hopefully those folks are openly gay and you are accepting of them. And you don't make a big deal out of it. Human sexuality doesn't contain binaries and being straight is no better or worse than being gay (I learned a while ago that when we say that someone is "born gay" we are still applying heterosexual norms to that person's sexuality and that's just wrong) and ultimately we shouldn't be applying value judgments to someone's sexuality anyway--sexuality is only one part what makes a person a person. So when everybody had to just talk about Batwoman being gay, it was the same old tired shit on a different day. When DC published Battle for the Cowl in the wake of Grant Morrison "killing off" Batman at the end of Final Crisis, DC editorial decided that it was a good time to bring back the Batwoman character, who had been written out of existence at the end Crisis on Infinite Earths (no matter what I seem to do, almost every review of a DC trade paperback brings me back to the goddamned Crisis) In interviews Greg Rucka admitted that DC had sat on Batwoman for a few years, but now with Batman "dead," they needed something to fill in the pages of Detective Comics. Hence, Batwoman. Now let me tell you that I am glad there is a Batwoman. I've learned in recent years that calling a woman a girl is problematic, because the semantic choice, consciously or subconsciously is an attempt to diminish the target. I think recent takes on Batgirl are pretty damned good, but still she's called Batgirl. In a perfect world, Barbara Gordon would have been Batwoman, but there was too much water under the bridge. That's why we get a (shockingly to I guess the whole stupid world) gay Batwoman. Personally, I think the way Rucka and artist J.H. Williams III deal with reintroducing Batwoman into DC continuity is pretty well done. I actually find the "Elegy" story arc to be the weakest of the three arcs in this collection. The later origin arc and the "Cutter" arc are far better in my eyes, just because of the convenience of who the big bad in "Elegy" actually is. And as for the furor over Kate Kane being gay--it's really much ado about nothing. Yes, Kate's sexuality matters (and her admission to being gay while at West Point ultimately leads to her becoming Batwoman) but it is not all that drives Kate's desire to be a hero. In addition, there are moments when Rucka is able to mock some of the hyper-sexualized stereotypical views of super-heroines. When first putting her costume together, Kate's father gives her heeled boots, which Kate immediately questions the absurdity of. She uses the boots on her first mission, but later has boots with a more work(wo)man-like quality to them--the better to kick the shit out of lowlifes with. Rucka also addresses a problem that I have with most of the Bat "family" and that is getting out from under the shadow of Batman himself. The quality of these initial Batwoman arcs speak for themselves--they were able to fill the Batman spaced gap in Detective Comics for almost a year, but Kate's father justifies her existence as the Batwoman--he hands her her own bat symbol and tells her to wear it to show whose side she is on. Yes--now she is a member of the Bat "family" but it is on her terms and that is exactly how it should be.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I read Batwoman so far slightly out of order (the first three volumes of New 52 before the Elegy storyline; oops), so this collection fills in some blanks for me. I was aware of some of the major plot points here, but not all of them and not the story details. Overall, the writing here was good. I like Kate as a character, her backstory is well fleshed out, her flaws are matter of fact (they're there, but they're understandable, not insurmountable, and not blamed on extraneous factors), and her I read Batwoman so far slightly out of order (the first three volumes of New 52 before the Elegy storyline; oops), so this collection fills in some blanks for me. I was aware of some of the major plot points here, but not all of them and not the story details. Overall, the writing here was good. I like Kate as a character, her backstory is well fleshed out, her flaws are matter of fact (they're there, but they're understandable, not insurmountable, and not blamed on extraneous factors), and her introduction as Batwoman was very well done. My only real complaint about the writing is that there's some stuff going on that I had no idea about. The Religion of Crime and its warring sects? And this involves a werewolf and other 'monsters' somehow, even though batbooks usually don't deal with magic or supernatural storylines? I realize that there's probably explanation for this somewhere in the previous fifty-ish issues of Detective Comics, but that doesn't help me while reading this collection. In some other trade paperbacks that excerpt individual story arcs from larger works, there is a paragraph or so overview given to orient to the reader and explain parts of the story that might otherwise cause someone to scratch their head and wonder what the hell is going on. The actual New 52 Batwoman series has this, giving an overview of Kate's kidnapping and why she is Batwoman, so why not include something similar here? Regarding the art, I go back and forth. There are some scenes that saved as a screenshot because I thought they were gorgeous, but most of the art was just sort of 'meh.' But that is my personal preference, though, and I have a similar view of the artwork for all of the Batwoman books I've read so far. I do intend to continue reading Batwoman, mostly because I have heard really great things about the character and I've seen her in other media - specifically, the DCAU - and liked her. I also plan on at least giving the live action TV series a try despite the fact that live action isn't really my thing, and I plan to continue reading the comics. This collection, especially with the Cutter story, is a good jumping off point and I'm happy to have read it. The few gripes I have with the book aren't enough for me to dock it any stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    it's been 6 years coming and change, but I finally read this. it's been awhile since I was reading all the new 52 I could get my hands on and afford to pay for trying to figure out comics, but Batwoman was one that I always wanted to read her back story on, especially since Greg Rucka was and Still Remains one of my favorite comic authors. Really good back story here. I need to catch up on the current Batwoman run, but her back story here, so clearly defined by getting kicked out of the military it's been 6 years coming and change, but I finally read this. it's been awhile since I was reading all the new 52 I could get my hands on and afford to pay for trying to figure out comics, but Batwoman was one that I always wanted to read her back story on, especially since Greg Rucka was and Still Remains one of my favorite comic authors. Really good back story here. I need to catch up on the current Batwoman run, but her back story here, so clearly defined by getting kicked out of the military for Don't Ask, Don't Tell, makes me curious how they'll continue to define her going forward. Kate Kane was clearly stamped by being a soldier who could no longer serve, to being so tied to her family stamp (not a fan of the shit they pulled in Detective Comics vol. 1 Rebirth). Anyway, I'm not a big fan of the magics stuff in the book, with Alice and the Underdark, but it certainly wasn't helped by JHWIII's layouts. The man is good at art, but the layouts here were so messy that I found myself setting the book down instead of trying to figure out how the order was supposed to go. It all improved when it got to Jock's section. I love his art: good, clean lines, crisp panels, bold figures. The last story here was my favorite, too. Something so fun about a clear detective story with outlandish vigilantes and villains. I'll take that any day over werewolves. anyway, goodreads seems to be broken and this book isn't showing up in my challenge, so i deleted this and posted it again.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Henry Blackwood

    So I’ve got a lot of thoughts about this, most stem from my dislike of Batwoman and Kate Kane as a character. Greg Rucka, for the most part, tells a really awesome story here. Especially when we get into the history of Kate Kane. Im not a fan of her character at all and never have been. which is not to say that I don’t like female characters because Montoya and even Cpt. Sawyer from GC are some of my favourite characters and when they appeared in this I was very interested in what was happening. So I’ve got a lot of thoughts about this, most stem from my dislike of Batwoman and Kate Kane as a character. Greg Rucka, for the most part, tells a really awesome story here. Especially when we get into the history of Kate Kane. Im not a fan of her character at all and never have been. which is not to say that I don’t like female characters because Montoya and even Cpt. Sawyer from GC are some of my favourite characters and when they appeared in this I was very interested in what was happening. I just think Kate Kane and Batwoman in general is a boring, uninspired, one dimensional character and the last 3 issues of this trade typifies this. Those issues are well written, the story is as very interesting but all it achieved was making Batwoman a b grade knockoff version of Batman. And I think Kate Kane can be used better as that, but she NEVER is. It’s usually comparing how bad ass she is compared to batman but never adding any depth whatsoever to her already painfully thin personality. Now the first 2 thirds of this trade was a pretty great story that did what I wanted, it showed us Kate’s backstory in a really interesting way (flashbacks) while something was happening in the present time. The big issue I had with that was for some reason Greg decided to use an Alice in wonderland schtick like it hasn’t been used before by another villain in Gotham. I don’t want to see another Lewis Carroll inspired villain it fuckin SUCKS. That’s what was so disappointing about it too, it could’ve been awesome but you decided to use Alice. Why. Fuck me why.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Thirty37Seven

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "...I've found my way to serve." I know absolutely nothing about Batwoman so I had to read this because I wanted to know what Batwoman was actually like. I got the feeling that the show wasn't the best representation of her character and reading this confirmed that for me. God, that show is so fucking bad and it's a shame because I think Kate is actually a good character, she deserves better than that horrendous shit. It's CW though, I don't know what I expected. I don't think they've ever made a "...I've found my way to serve." I know absolutely nothing about Batwoman so I had to read this because I wanted to know what Batwoman was actually like. I got the feeling that the show wasn't the best representation of her character and reading this confirmed that for me. God, that show is so fucking bad and it's a shame because I think Kate is actually a good character, she deserves better than that horrendous shit. It's CW though, I don't know what I expected. I don't think they've ever made anything good in the duration of my lifetime. The part where Alice reveals who she is to Kate is unintentionally funny to me. Alice, looking right at Kate's face, says: "You have our father's eyes." We then pan to Kate's shocked face...as she's wearing a mask that doesn't reveal her eyes. Now I know Alice would obviously know Kate's eye color since they're twins and she's saying it to fuck with her before she falls but in the context of that moment it doesn't make any sense because Alice can't see Kate's face. I was wondering "How the fuck can you tell, man?" when I first read it. I love the complaints about how pale she is. Taking a glance at the sketchbook notes in the back shows that was the intent. "Her skin is literally vampire white porcelain, very little color at all."

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