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Lady of the Court: Book Two of The Three Graces Trilogy

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Cousins to the King of Navarre, the Cleves sisters witness the glamour and danger of the French royal court firsthand. Middle sister, Henriette, sits at the apex of the royal court, wife to one of King Henri III's most trusted advisors In a country torn apart by religious war, things can change in an instant, and no one in France is safe. Henriette is desperate to hold onto Cousins to the King of Navarre, the Cleves sisters witness the glamour and danger of the French royal court firsthand. Middle sister, Henriette, sits at the apex of the royal court, wife to one of King Henri III's most trusted advisors In a country torn apart by religious war, things can change in an instant, and no one in France is safe. Henriette is desperate to hold onto her life, and hand it on to the next generation. To do so, she must have an heir, something that she has so far failed to do. Based on a true story The Cleves sisters' story starts with Marie, the youngest sister introduces you to the world of court politics in France of the 1500s. Like most great noble families of the period, the web of intermarriages and alliances made enemies out of blood relatives. It also meant that the stories of the people who served the Valois monarchs were as intertwined and as complicated as their marriages. Led by the ever-vigilant Catherine de Medici, Queen Mother of France and a force of nature, the members of the court shaped the political and religious future of France of the Sixteenth Century. In upcoming novels, you'll meet the often- derided Charlotte, Madame de Sauve, and enough royal mistresses to satisfy your need for scandal. ˃˃˃ Don't miss out! Henriette has to fight to hold onto everything that she holds dear, but war can sweep up even the most innocent. Step into all of the danger and splendor of Renaissance France!


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Cousins to the King of Navarre, the Cleves sisters witness the glamour and danger of the French royal court firsthand. Middle sister, Henriette, sits at the apex of the royal court, wife to one of King Henri III's most trusted advisors In a country torn apart by religious war, things can change in an instant, and no one in France is safe. Henriette is desperate to hold onto Cousins to the King of Navarre, the Cleves sisters witness the glamour and danger of the French royal court firsthand. Middle sister, Henriette, sits at the apex of the royal court, wife to one of King Henri III's most trusted advisors In a country torn apart by religious war, things can change in an instant, and no one in France is safe. Henriette is desperate to hold onto her life, and hand it on to the next generation. To do so, she must have an heir, something that she has so far failed to do. Based on a true story The Cleves sisters' story starts with Marie, the youngest sister introduces you to the world of court politics in France of the 1500s. Like most great noble families of the period, the web of intermarriages and alliances made enemies out of blood relatives. It also meant that the stories of the people who served the Valois monarchs were as intertwined and as complicated as their marriages. Led by the ever-vigilant Catherine de Medici, Queen Mother of France and a force of nature, the members of the court shaped the political and religious future of France of the Sixteenth Century. In upcoming novels, you'll meet the often- derided Charlotte, Madame de Sauve, and enough royal mistresses to satisfy your need for scandal. ˃˃˃ Don't miss out! Henriette has to fight to hold onto everything that she holds dear, but war can sweep up even the most innocent. Step into all of the danger and splendor of Renaissance France!

30 review for Lady of the Court: Book Two of The Three Graces Trilogy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    .... Eh. Look, this wasn't necessarily a bad book, but there were just lots of things that, when tallied up, out-weighed the good for me. If you have no prior knowledge of the French court at this period of time, I'm sure you'll think it's great. But I am not one of those people. ✖️Format and editing - I think all the problems of the first book were down to the format on kindle, rather than anything to do with Du Pre herself. But there are still extra full-stops in places they shouldn't be, and s .... Eh. Look, this wasn't necessarily a bad book, but there were just lots of things that, when tallied up, out-weighed the good for me. If you have no prior knowledge of the French court at this period of time, I'm sure you'll think it's great. But I am not one of those people. ✖️Format and editing - I think all the problems of the first book were down to the format on kindle, rather than anything to do with Du Pre herself. But there are still extra full-stops in places they shouldn't be, and sentences that need tweaking in regards to how the dialogue was set up - commas in places that should have had full-stops, etc. ✖️Repetition - Though told from the perspective of Henriette, duchess of Nevers, there's still all of the same events that happen in the last half of the previous novel (‘Almost a Queen’) that are experienced again. I didn't really care that it was a different perspective, and a different insight offered. I was re-reading about things I already knew about, and I was bored - at least until we finally moved past Marie's unfortunate death and entered new territory. There were also another couple of instances where Du Pre repeated herself within the same paragraph. One example springs to mind, where Henrietta informs the reader that Margot (Queen Marguerite of Navarre) couldn't understand the pain of losing a child because she wasn't a mother yet. Two sentences later, we’re once more told in a superfluous sentence that Margot is yet to have a child. Whoops, something obviously slipped through the editor’s gaze. ✖️Characters - It was nice to see that Du Pre had sorted out the confusion of the previous novel, and was using titles to distinguish between her characters that shared the same name - including the Catherines, whom I’d had the most trouble with. Catherine de Medici was referred to as the Queen Mother, which added some nice clarity, but it was with Henriette herself that I had the most problems with. Previously, from Marie’s perspective (‘Almost a Queen’), the reader is led to believe that Henriette, the older sister who has lived at court for many years and is experienced in its ways and behaviour, has had many lovers and flirtations. I don’t know enough about Henriette to say whether or not this portrayal is true, but suddenly, in ‘Lady of Court’, Henriette would have you believe that she is not the flirtatious, carefree woman previously depicted. Suddenly she is a bit more ‘innocent’ with her experience with affairs, and I’m confused as to which portrayal I should believe. A bit of consistency would be nice. I also took issue with the fact that Henriette meets Coconnas maybe twice, and then starts talking about the intensity of her ‘passion’ for her ‘lover’. I know it’s a ~120 paged novella, but girl, you need to slow down right there. You barely even know this guy. ✖️Accurate titles - Probably my biggest peeve in the entire novella was that the Duke of Alençon, the younger son of Catherine de Medici, is referred to the entire time as the Duke of ‘Alceon’. Wtf. Any Google search will easily tell you that it is ‘Alençon’, and I’m sorry, but if you’re going to write a story with a particular historical character in it, make sure you not only get his title right, but spelt. The. Correct. Damn. Way. Ugh. Combined with all of this, the plot felt like it meandered way too much and had no apparent purpose, and the writing - while not awful - was not anything that really drew me in or made me excited. I was hardcore skimming by the last half of the story. So unfortunately, I think it’s time to quit while I’m ahead. The prospect of the final novella (about the third sister Catherine, Duchess of Guise), just doesn’t entice me, and I can’t take another disappointing read full of mistakes that could easily be avoided - no matter how short it is.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cheryle

    French court intrigue in late 1500's France If you enjoy the Three Musketeers, you will enjoy this novel of infighting among the French nobility in the latter decades of the 16th century which was concurrent with The later years of The reign of Elizabeth I in England. The women's contribution was as important as their husbands' as alliances are firmed by female participation. Henriette de Nevers held her title to a duchy as the eldest of three daughters with no surviving brothers. By edict of the French court intrigue in late 1500's France If you enjoy the Three Musketeers, you will enjoy this novel of infighting among the French nobility in the latter decades of the 16th century which was concurrent with The later years of The reign of Elizabeth I in England. The women's contribution was as important as their husbands' as alliances are firmed by female participation. Henriette de Nevers held her title to a duchy as the eldest of three daughters with no surviving brothers. By edict of the king, she inherited the duchy and passed the title of Duke of Nevers on to her husband, and they consulted as a team to maneuver through perilous times. I read this book through Kindle Unlimited.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linz Bassett

    I enjoyed Lady of the Court quite a bit, and I'm once again impressed with Laura Du Pre's ability to tell such an intriguing story in so few pages. My main regret is that I read Almost a Queen a while ago, so I spent a lot of time trying to remember who was who when reading Lady of the Court. As other's have said already, I think this trilogy could have been turned into one book. Lady of the Court overlaps with Almost a Queen, and from what I've read of the third book that overlaps as well. So f I enjoyed Lady of the Court quite a bit, and I'm once again impressed with Laura Du Pre's ability to tell such an intriguing story in so few pages. My main regret is that I read Almost a Queen a while ago, so I spent a lot of time trying to remember who was who when reading Lady of the Court. As other's have said already, I think this trilogy could have been turned into one book. Lady of the Court overlaps with Almost a Queen, and from what I've read of the third book that overlaps as well. So far, I'm enjoying reading the different points of views of the sisters. For my complete review check out http://linzthebookworm.blogspot.com/2...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I did not finish this book. I got it on my kindle editing was the worst I've ever seen. Usually I can just ignore bad editing this was the first time I couldn't. You would turn a page and wouldn't understand what was going on cause entire sentences were missing. You would turn a page and reread what you just read on the previous page and when you turned the page again thinking it would pick up where the same 2 pages left off it didn't there whole parts of the story missing. A shame cause I liked I did not finish this book. I got it on my kindle editing was the worst I've ever seen. Usually I can just ignore bad editing this was the first time I couldn't. You would turn a page and wouldn't understand what was going on cause entire sentences were missing. You would turn a page and reread what you just read on the previous page and when you turned the page again thinking it would pick up where the same 2 pages left off it didn't there whole parts of the story missing. A shame cause I liked the first book and was looking forward to reading this one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Not bad... I didn’t enjoy this book as much as the first in the series but it was an interesting story. This seemed to be more about court intrigue and general history than Henriette’s life but it was still a worthwhile read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    I enjoyed the first two books in this trilogy. However, I would have preferred one book, with each sister alternating chapters. I am enjoying reading about people who aren’t usually the main characters of a book. Nicely done.

  7. 4 out of 5

    irina vatrenko

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

  9. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Corrow

  10. 5 out of 5

    Renne' Church

  11. 4 out of 5

    George LaBine

  12. 4 out of 5

    Destinee Deely

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kizzy Vasquez

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vicki Hartman

  15. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine Larouche

  16. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sara Perkins

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alice Molnarova

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patsy Birdwell

    As an avid reader of historical novels, this ranks way up on my list. The religious battle carried out in France with all the treason, betrayal within families, executions, made this a page turner, as was book 1.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lilly Kilcrease

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn Klucar

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  23. 4 out of 5

    S.E.Weigert

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Studebaker

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary Richards

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kim Tustin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carol Luckert

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Johnson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Diane L. Perez

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sue

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