counter create hit Learn Python 3 the Hard Way: A Very Simple Introduction to the Terrifyingly Beautiful World of Computers and Code (Zed Shaw's Hard Way Series) - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Learn Python 3 the Hard Way: A Very Simple Introduction to the Terrifyingly Beautiful World of Computers and Code (Zed Shaw's Hard Way Series)

Availability: Ready to download


Compare

30 review for Learn Python 3 the Hard Way: A Very Simple Introduction to the Terrifyingly Beautiful World of Computers and Code (Zed Shaw's Hard Way Series)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Xavier

    3 stars for average. I would recommend Python Crash Course by Eric Matthes over this. The biggest problems are, one, how he explains and treats OOP and Classes from ex40 onwards, and two, how he teaches packages and testing with virtual environments (which is from ex46 to ~end of book). I was ready to give this book 5 stars before encountering these major shortcomings. Additionally, his emphasis on text-based games for learning the content are extremely dull, and omits using and teaching standar 3 stars for average. I would recommend Python Crash Course by Eric Matthes over this. The biggest problems are, one, how he explains and treats OOP and Classes from ex40 onwards, and two, how he teaches packages and testing with virtual environments (which is from ex46 to ~end of book). I was ready to give this book 5 stars before encountering these major shortcomings. Additionally, his emphasis on text-based games for learning the content are extremely dull, and omits using and teaching standard python terminology in a misplaced effort to remove "jargon". The book is ok if you already know another programming language, but if you have absolutely no programming experience beforehand, I would strongly recommend Eric's Python book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jinx

    Wow, I learned some more about what this guy is actually like and now there's no way I'm ever again touching anything he wrote with a ten-foot pole. (His writing style is extremely condescending anyway.) Wow, I learned some more about what this guy is actually like and now there's no way I'm ever again touching anything he wrote with a ten-foot pole. (His writing style is extremely condescending anyway.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Much, much more my style - opinionated, joined-up, irreverent - though not my speed ("this book gives you the mental tools and attitude you need to go through most Python books and actually learn something"). Shaw is a beautiful mind in a slightly unhinged shell: Which programming language you learn and use doesn't matter. Do not get sucked into the religion surrounding programming languages as that will only blind you to their true purpose of being your tool for doing interesting things. Progr Much, much more my style - opinionated, joined-up, irreverent - though not my speed ("this book gives you the mental tools and attitude you need to go through most Python books and actually learn something"). Shaw is a beautiful mind in a slightly unhinged shell: Which programming language you learn and use doesn't matter. Do not get sucked into the religion surrounding programming languages as that will only blind you to their true purpose of being your tool for doing interesting things. Programming as an intellectual activity is the only art form that allows you to create interactive art. You can create projects that other people can play with, and you can talk to them indirectly. No other art form is quite this interactive. Movies flow to the audience in one direction. Paintings do not move. Code goes both ways. Programming as a profession is only moderately interesting. It can be a good job, but you could make about the same money and be happier running a fast food joint. You're much better off using code as your secret weapon in another profession. People who can code in the world of technology companies are a dime a dozen and get no respect. People who can code in biology, medicine, government, sociology, physics, history, and mathematics are respected and can do amazing things to advance those disciplines. A good way to spend an hour after a year away. [Free!]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence Roth

    This book is great up until the later exercises when the learning curve gets extremely difficult, and even with drilling I feel like I wasn't prepared to continue on. Nevertheless, this book did exactly what I wanted it to do: provide a good solid introduction to Python and programming in general. Plus it has a handy command line crash course at the end. I look forward to exploring other programming books that go more in depth with the language, with perhaps a better learning curve, such as Pyth This book is great up until the later exercises when the learning curve gets extremely difficult, and even with drilling I feel like I wasn't prepared to continue on. Nevertheless, this book did exactly what I wanted it to do: provide a good solid introduction to Python and programming in general. Plus it has a handy command line crash course at the end. I look forward to exploring other programming books that go more in depth with the language, with perhaps a better learning curve, such as Python Crash Course by Eric Matthes and Automate the Boring Stuff by Al Sweigart. Shoutout to Zed Shaw for giving me a better programming introduction in one book than 1.5 years of university classes. Zed also makes you use the Atom IDE, which quite frankly is the quickest, cleanest, beginner-friendly IDE I've ever used besides maybe Notepad++ which is hilarious. Highly recommend Atom! atom.io for download!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Smith

    This book is very good! If you want to teach yourself Python from a very basic level, this book is the way to start. There are others out there, but they probably won't be as simple and pedagogically thorough. This book is NOT a "theory, theory, theory, then practice" book. This is a "Just do this; okay, now in detail, what did you do? If that was fun, do these other things..." book. It works very well! If you ever have a month where you have a couple hours everyday, you will be done with this i This book is very good! If you want to teach yourself Python from a very basic level, this book is the way to start. There are others out there, but they probably won't be as simple and pedagogically thorough. This book is NOT a "theory, theory, theory, then practice" book. This is a "Just do this; okay, now in detail, what did you do? If that was fun, do these other things..." book. It works very well! If you ever have a month where you have a couple hours everyday, you will be done with this in no time, and feel much better for it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sabin

    A funny and informative introduction for complete beginners in Python, or even complete beginners in programming. The exercises can get tedious at times; I knew most of the stuff explained in here, it consists mostly of good practices and programming concepts, and they're exemplified using Python. The issue I had with the book was that at times things are not thoroughly explained, probably because the target audience consists of beginners and the author wanted to keep it as simple as possible. S A funny and informative introduction for complete beginners in Python, or even complete beginners in programming. The exercises can get tedious at times; I knew most of the stuff explained in here, it consists mostly of good practices and programming concepts, and they're exemplified using Python. The issue I had with the book was that at times things are not thoroughly explained, probably because the target audience consists of beginners and the author wanted to keep it as simple as possible. Still, I learned a few (basic) things about OOP reading this, it was fun. I'm looking forward to the next book in the series. Recommended for complete beginners, but be prepared to learn some extra stuff, like CLI. Oh, and I loved that Zed hates IDEs, like most good programmers do.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Phthalo Gray "I ain't finna read that"

    I had to consult other texts in order to understand why I didn't understand it, which may have been the point. I had to consult other texts in order to understand why I didn't understand it, which may have been the point.

  8. 4 out of 5

    علي الصباح

    Highly practical, there is more coding than reading. And good job at explaining a lot of programming concepts in a simple way.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Geoffrey

    It did for me what I wanted. I learned the language sufficiently to get me started. Suffering through Shaw's humor and attitude was a bonus. I have previous experience with 5 other programming languages and OOP design but zero Python experience. I wanted a series of exercises to walk me through syntax and usage. I was able to complete them in a couple of weeks worth of free time, skipping some of the sections that focus on design, and feel confident that I can move on to utilizing Python in my ow It did for me what I wanted. I learned the language sufficiently to get me started. Suffering through Shaw's humor and attitude was a bonus. I have previous experience with 5 other programming languages and OOP design but zero Python experience. I wanted a series of exercises to walk me through syntax and usage. I was able to complete them in a couple of weeks worth of free time, skipping some of the sections that focus on design, and feel confident that I can move on to utilizing Python in my own projects. I could have easily finished this course in a long day of work if that's what I was looking to do. Shaw gives repeated warning against using an IDE and instructs the user to do all the exercises with a simple text editor and using a shell terminal. I had no problem completing and running all exercises in my preferred IDE, however I have previous experience and think it is good advice for beginners to learn to write and handle code without extra complexities.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gaudencio Guedes

    OK book. I wouldn’t recommend it as a first reading. In my opinion, there are better books out there that do a better job to introduce you to Python. Python for everybody as an example. As for the book, it’s basically split in two speeds: very slow and very fast. You very slowly and briefly go over the main topics in Python and then, on the last third of the book, you better fasten your seatbelt. At the end of the book there are concepts and new material that will just land on you. The answer fou OK book. I wouldn’t recommend it as a first reading. In my opinion, there are better books out there that do a better job to introduce you to Python. Python for everybody as an example. As for the book, it’s basically split in two speeds: very slow and very fast. You very slowly and briefly go over the main topics in Python and then, on the last third of the book, you better fasten your seatbelt. At the end of the book there are concepts and new material that will just land on you. The answer found by the author to help you digest all this information (and most of the material in the book), is to tell you to look it online, which brings me to the least favourite in this book. I wasn’t really keen on how the book was written, but this is simply a matter of personal taste. Being told, almost in every page, to look online for something on the chapter that I might not understand, makes me wonder why was I reading the book in the first place. I totally understand the author’s idea, but I think it was overdosed. Plus, I’d leave all the coaching and less positive opinions to a different type of book. The text is full of these depreciating opinions from the author that, in my opinion do not add any value to the learning experience. In summary, I’ve learned a few new things and I’m glad this wasn’t my first book on the subject, otherwise I’d have removed a star from the rating.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Summers-Stay

    I've picked up Python from here and there, but it has become my programming language of choice as it is easier to work with than C++ and also has a lot of libraries. (Although I still like Matlab for a lot of things). Anyway, I have some big gaps in my knowledge so I thought I would try to fill them in, and this happened to be the book I came across. It did a good job of explaining how class inheritance works, and had some useful information about how to create web pages programatically. It's ec I've picked up Python from here and there, but it has become my programming language of choice as it is easier to work with than C++ and also has a lot of libraries. (Although I still like Matlab for a lot of things). Anyway, I have some big gaps in my knowledge so I thought I would try to fill them in, and this happened to be the book I came across. It did a good job of explaining how class inheritance works, and had some useful information about how to create web pages programatically. It's eclectic though: the author puts a lot of attitude into what he thinks is important and what he thinks is stupid, so it's kind of like having your big brother explain how to program to you-- you're getting one particular point of view. And there are several things I wanted to know about that he didn't touch on at all, like why = sometimes behaves one way and sometimes another, or when to use _ or * in front or after a variable name. I already knew almost everything in the first half of the book, so there was a lot of skimming.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mehdi

    After completing all the lessons in this book you'll definitely have strong basis on Python. You'll also explore a lot of features of Python and you'll see the large capabilities that Python offers. However, you'll need to be patient. This book is not straightforward. The exercices are really repetitive and I don't blame the author for this because he already warned us about the nature of this book by the title! Repetition is good to memorize the different instructions. However, I do believe tha After completing all the lessons in this book you'll definitely have strong basis on Python. You'll also explore a lot of features of Python and you'll see the large capabilities that Python offers. However, you'll need to be patient. This book is not straightforward. The exercices are really repetitive and I don't blame the author for this because he already warned us about the nature of this book by the title! Repetition is good to memorize the different instructions. However, I do believe that certain parts could have been made more concise. The author's learning method is also a bit too steering and I wish he encouraged more his readers to use their freedom and imagination to create code. Use this book smartly, don't feel forced to do exactly what the authors asks or recommends. Identify your weaknesses on Python and use this book to work on this weaknesses. Most importantly, use your gained knowledge to create your own code and have fun! This is the best way, in my opinion, to improve your coding skills.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This started out promising as a source of learning that puts more emphasis on you going out and getting your hands dirty by basically teaching yourself. However, as the book moves on, the balance definitely shifts away from being useful as the lessons basically turn into "Go teach yourself x,y,z, then we'll revisit it and I'll give you a brief summary". This is what the book has promised in the forward/intro but it falls flat when difficult concepts need to be followed by closer instruction. Aga This started out promising as a source of learning that puts more emphasis on you going out and getting your hands dirty by basically teaching yourself. However, as the book moves on, the balance definitely shifts away from being useful as the lessons basically turn into "Go teach yourself x,y,z, then we'll revisit it and I'll give you a brief summary". This is what the book has promised in the forward/intro but it falls flat when difficult concepts need to be followed by closer instruction. Again, it's one good lesson to teach the mindset of a programmer (plan, look at documentation, implement, debug, rinse & repeat), but then at some point you should then actually teach programming and not just a light glossing over. If anything, the effort should be doubled in being as explicit as possible even if you wanted to separate lesson to a bit later. Basically, there is a balance but this book does not find it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tung Nguyen

    A great book for serious learners. As an introduction by the publisher: “You bring the discipline, commitment, and persistence; the author supplies everything else.” It provides you with a framework to help you build programming thinking, problem-solving skills, memorization, and debugging skills. It also introduces essential programming tools like command line interface, virtual Python environment, test-driven development (TDD) techniques. It is great for those who are new to programming. For exp A great book for serious learners. As an introduction by the publisher: “You bring the discipline, commitment, and persistence; the author supplies everything else.” It provides you with a framework to help you build programming thinking, problem-solving skills, memorization, and debugging skills. It also introduces essential programming tools like command line interface, virtual Python environment, test-driven development (TDD) techniques. It is great for those who are new to programming. For experienced programmers starting to learn Python, this book can also help you quickly master the basics of Python.

  15. 5 out of 5

    ج ــ

    a nice introduction for those who doesn't have any previous knowledge in python programming language. Generally, the book is good, I like the way (method) that he used in his exercises, more practical than copy/paste the code. I recommend it as an introduction to get the basics (still reading it now) a nice introduction for those who doesn't have any previous knowledge in python programming language. Generally, the book is good, I like the way (method) that he used in his exercises, more practical than copy/paste the code. I recommend it as an introduction to get the basics (still reading it now)

  16. 5 out of 5

    André

    I really like the just do it approach the books takes to getting started. It gets you typing and executing code without a deep understanding of the aspects, but then later tries to fill in the gaps. The author uses games as example to practice major concepts like classes. He also gives you the programming tips such as using Atom text editor, etc.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Edmond

    I am disappointed with this book. Zed Shaw takes a very arrogant approach. He should have copied all the programs, so we could have run them, copied them as-is. Not having that kind of irritated me. It turned me off the book. The content was good, but he went from intro to advanced in 1 chapter. Not a good book for someone who is a beginner, and not a good book for advanced programmers.

  18. 4 out of 5

    DAVIN KORSTJENS

    Solid first book for getting into programming with Python. It follows an approach where you read an explanation for a programming concept and then write the code character by character. For me it was good for getting started but I wasn't actually able to write any useful programs on my own after reading the book. Solid first book for getting into programming with Python. It follows an approach where you read an explanation for a programming concept and then write the code character by character. For me it was good for getting started but I wasn't actually able to write any useful programs on my own after reading the book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vilas

    Good read, if you are absolutely novice. He has a way of compelling you to put strain on and train your brain to think about Python and getting used to it. But that's about it. For the price hardcopy of it is available in India, please don't go for it, instead go for other better, pocket friendly options out there. Good read, if you are absolutely novice. He has a way of compelling you to put strain on and train your brain to think about Python and getting used to it. But that's about it. For the price hardcopy of it is available in India, please don't go for it, instead go for other better, pocket friendly options out there.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Avinash K

    Many years ago had read his "Learn Python the Hard way" and really enjoyed it, so when I stumbled on this decided to give it a go. It's really nice and fun. Highly recommended for beginners and for all levels who don't really follow coding hygiene. :) Somehow comforting with the bratty tone but makes you do the grind. Ah! Exercising during CoVid times... :D :D :D Many years ago had read his "Learn Python the Hard way" and really enjoyed it, so when I stumbled on this decided to give it a go. It's really nice and fun. Highly recommended for beginners and for all levels who don't really follow coding hygiene. :) Somehow comforting with the bratty tone but makes you do the grind. Ah! Exercising during CoVid times... :D :D :D

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fuad Athamnah

    I've seen a lot of online tutorials and full courses, I can easily say this book is better than any online course, nothing deep in Python it's for total beginners with the same basic concepts, but it's the best way to tart with Python, easy to follow. I've seen a lot of online tutorials and full courses, I can easily say this book is better than any online course, nothing deep in Python it's for total beginners with the same basic concepts, but it's the best way to tart with Python, easy to follow.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Best book I've read on where to start with Python. Its approach is to show you some code, then explain how it worked. If anything, it's a little long. Near the end, the book gets away from things that everyone needs to know into some more specifics. Best book I've read on where to start with Python. Its approach is to show you some code, then explain how it worked. If anything, it's a little long. Near the end, the book gets away from things that everyone needs to know into some more specifics.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Coming from C++, I wanted to learn some Python, and I think this book helped me get into the syntax and the mindset of a Python developer, but I don't feel like I understand the nuances of the language. Good for an introduction. Coming from C++, I wanted to learn some Python, and I think this book helped me get into the syntax and the mindset of a Python developer, but I don't feel like I understand the nuances of the language. Good for an introduction.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Reading this while already knowing python was a great reminder that I need to get back to reading fiction 😂️. Like, what was I even doing with this book? It wasn't bad though. Learned a few things I missed while learning python a while ago. Reading this while already knowing python was a great reminder that I need to get back to reading fiction 😂️. Like, what was I even doing with this book? It wasn't bad though. Learned a few things I missed while learning python a while ago.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Garret Macko

    This was a great introduction for a complete newbie to Python such as myself. For this same reason, I don’t have a very wide base of knowledge for judging books on the subject or gauging whether it was effectively comprehensive or optimally introductory, but for me, it worked great.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sally Ragab

    An amazing introduction to a beautiful language

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pallav

    Right book to start your Python Journey

  28. 4 out of 5

    Arquero

    A nice intro.

  29. 5 out of 5

    B. Mulenga Sindala

    Teaches Python Programming language the best way possible so far.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Qi Cai

    An indeed good and simple introduction. Should skip this book if you have basic skills of any other programming language.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.