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Abortion is illegal in almost every circumstance in Ireland, making it the only democracy in the western world to have such a constitutional ban. This anthology, a national bestseller, is the definitive collection of the writing and art inspired by the most pressing debate in contemporary Ireland, and beyond. · Between 1980 and 2015, at least 165,438 Irish women and girls a Abortion is illegal in almost every circumstance in Ireland, making it the only democracy in the western world to have such a constitutional ban. This anthology, a national bestseller, is the definitive collection of the writing and art inspired by the most pressing debate in contemporary Ireland, and beyond. · Between 1980 and 2015, at least 165,438 Irish women and girls accessed UK abortion services. In 2016, the figure was 3,265. · Any woman or girl who procures an abortion, or anyone who assists a woman to procure an abortion in Ireland can be criminalised and imprisoned for up to fourteen years. · A woman may not procure an abortion in Ireland if she is pregnant due to incest or rape, or to prevent inevitable miscarriage and fatal foetal abnormality. The movement to repeal the Eighth Amendment and make abortion legal in Ireland has grown massively over the last few years. This book shares the literature, personal stories, opinions, photography, art and design produced by the movement that catalysed 2018’s momentous referendum: it features prize-winning novelists, critically acclaimed poets, cutting-edge artists and journalists on the front line. Contributors include Lisa McInerney, Anne Enright, Louise O’Neill, Caitlin Moran, Tara Flynn, Aisling Bea, Sinead Gleeson and Emmet Kiran.


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Abortion is illegal in almost every circumstance in Ireland, making it the only democracy in the western world to have such a constitutional ban. This anthology, a national bestseller, is the definitive collection of the writing and art inspired by the most pressing debate in contemporary Ireland, and beyond. · Between 1980 and 2015, at least 165,438 Irish women and girls a Abortion is illegal in almost every circumstance in Ireland, making it the only democracy in the western world to have such a constitutional ban. This anthology, a national bestseller, is the definitive collection of the writing and art inspired by the most pressing debate in contemporary Ireland, and beyond. · Between 1980 and 2015, at least 165,438 Irish women and girls accessed UK abortion services. In 2016, the figure was 3,265. · Any woman or girl who procures an abortion, or anyone who assists a woman to procure an abortion in Ireland can be criminalised and imprisoned for up to fourteen years. · A woman may not procure an abortion in Ireland if she is pregnant due to incest or rape, or to prevent inevitable miscarriage and fatal foetal abnormality. The movement to repeal the Eighth Amendment and make abortion legal in Ireland has grown massively over the last few years. This book shares the literature, personal stories, opinions, photography, art and design produced by the movement that catalysed 2018’s momentous referendum: it features prize-winning novelists, critically acclaimed poets, cutting-edge artists and journalists on the front line. Contributors include Lisa McInerney, Anne Enright, Louise O’Neill, Caitlin Moran, Tara Flynn, Aisling Bea, Sinead Gleeson and Emmet Kiran.

30 review for Repeal the 8th

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emma Flanagan

    Encapsulating the art associated with a movement

  2. 5 out of 5

    Medb O'Gorman

    A book that shouldn’t have needed to be written but was. I’m so in awe of and have so much respect for the women who shared their personal stories and of course for all the others who gave their views on abortion. REPEAL the 8th.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Very good, very important collection on the Repeal the 8th movement. Captures the focus and spirit of the movement while acknowledging some of the gaps. If you're unfamiliar with the battle in Ireland for women to have access to abortions, or keen to learn more about the movement, absolutely read this. Very good, very important collection on the Repeal the 8th movement. Captures the focus and spirit of the movement while acknowledging some of the gaps. If you're unfamiliar with the battle in Ireland for women to have access to abortions, or keen to learn more about the movement, absolutely read this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    J.C

    In the midst of an extremely sensitive referendum campaign (in ROI at the moment) this collection of pieces edited by Una Mullally is essential. If you have any doubt on whether you should vote yes or not, just read this book. It's heart-wrenching, at moments humorous, and at all times too relatable. Can I give this 6 stars out of 5? In the midst of an extremely sensitive referendum campaign (in ROI at the moment) this collection of pieces edited by Una Mullally is essential. If you have any doubt on whether you should vote yes or not, just read this book. It's heart-wrenching, at moments humorous, and at all times too relatable. Can I give this 6 stars out of 5?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eoghan Rua

    An exploration in post-Celtic Tiger petit-bourgeois narcissism, which is supposed to be taken by the reading public as inspiring, profound, etc. There is not really much to glean here, selfishness and vanity is presented as tales of bravery and heroism as Ireland is "standardised" into the neoliberal order. The Manure Republic, indeed. An exploration in post-Celtic Tiger petit-bourgeois narcissism, which is supposed to be taken by the reading public as inspiring, profound, etc. There is not really much to glean here, selfishness and vanity is presented as tales of bravery and heroism as Ireland is "standardised" into the neoliberal order. The Manure Republic, indeed.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cellena Cm

    This should be required reading for every single person in Ireland.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Niamh

    Let me just preface this review by saying that I am whole-heartedly pro-choice and have watched the campaign to Repeal the 8th with great support. The 8th Amendment to the Irish constitution was defeated last year and abortion is now legal across the Republic of Ireland. However. This collection of essays about abortion and the history of abortion in Ireland struggles to differentiate each piece from the one before it. Some were stand out and excellently written. I would highly recommend reading Let me just preface this review by saying that I am whole-heartedly pro-choice and have watched the campaign to Repeal the 8th with great support. The 8th Amendment to the Irish constitution was defeated last year and abortion is now legal across the Republic of Ireland. However. This collection of essays about abortion and the history of abortion in Ireland struggles to differentiate each piece from the one before it. Some were stand out and excellently written. I would highly recommend reading comedienne Aisling Bea's short piece about 'womenfolk', the various collections of poetry that interludes some of the essays, and Louise O'Neill's powerful vignette about marching in one of the many protests about Repeal the 8th that took place in Dublin. But these essays aren't designed to inspire or persuade. They are full of emotion that seeps from the page. In some cases, they're beautiful. In others, they're hammering a point home that has already been adequately written about in previous essays. I enjoyed reading this collection, but I only wish that there had been a little bit more variety in the topics written about. There are lots of aspects to abortion, particularly in a country like Ireland, and I'd love to have read more about those. But a good collection, nonetheless.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Morrissey

    On Friday of this week we vote to Repeal the 8th. On Saturday the votes will be counted and, I hope, the 8th Amendment will be consigned to history. I was proud to contribute in my small way to the crowdfunded publication of this book. It's an important documentation of a time in our history. For me as a reader, the personal narratives and the more literary pieces are the strongest elements of the book. The more overtly political ones are less successful, but for a really encouraging reason - th On Friday of this week we vote to Repeal the 8th. On Saturday the votes will be counted and, I hope, the 8th Amendment will be consigned to history. I was proud to contribute in my small way to the crowdfunded publication of this book. It's an important documentation of a time in our history. For me as a reader, the personal narratives and the more literary pieces are the strongest elements of the book. The more overtly political ones are less successful, but for a really encouraging reason - they already feel out of date. The pieces in this anthology were written at a time when we were still campaigning to get a referendum, when we didn't know what exactly we would be asked to vote on, when the personal testimonies were still a trickle and not the outpouring of experiences they have become. No matter what way things go on Friday, the genie is not going back in the bottle. Ireland has been changed by this campaign. The culture of silence and shame that persisted for so long has been swept away. We ask for the land over the water. Home over trial. Choice over none. Stand in Awe of All Mná #Repealth8th

  9. 5 out of 5

    Goldfishing

    essential and some very good reading. really liked lisa mcinerney's chapter. the one on NI was eye-opening and a good reminder about inclusion - looking further than the "orange vs. green". anne enright's chapter made me laugh because it will probably piss off a lot of 'pregnancy is beautiful and sacred and ultimate womanhood' people. also: Laundry My grandfather sent everything to the nuns for a thorough cleaning, including my mother, fervently they washed away every stain. Hold us up to the light, an essential and some very good reading. really liked lisa mcinerney's chapter. the one on NI was eye-opening and a good reminder about inclusion - looking further than the "orange vs. green". anne enright's chapter made me laugh because it will probably piss off a lot of 'pregnancy is beautiful and sacred and ultimate womanhood' people. also: Laundry My grandfather sent everything to the nuns for a thorough cleaning, including my mother, fervently they washed away every stain. Hold us up to the light, and there is hardly a trace of me left in her, or her left in me. Things are forever getting seperated in the wash, a fawn silk stocking, a tiny pink sock with no matcher, the price to be paid for getting your laundry done. - Mary Coll

  10. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Fitzmaurice

    This is the most powerful collection of writing I’ve ever read. The women of Ireland need bodily autonomy. It is our right. #Repeal #TrustWomen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura Anderson

    Amazing. I've been so ignorant to this issue and I am ashamed. I'll be encouraging my friends to read this to create a stronger voice and support our sisters across the water ❤️ Amazing. I've been so ignorant to this issue and I am ashamed. I'll be encouraging my friends to read this to create a stronger voice and support our sisters across the water ❤️

  12. 5 out of 5

    Holly Davies

    An incredibly important and powerful read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Richardzimmermann86

    Eye-opening and profound collection of essays stories and poetry inspired or affected by abortion, the upcoming referendum.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachael Smith

    A compelling and thought provoking collection of different genres and art forms, all focused on the Repeal movement.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jasmin Cramon

    Truly, truly heartbreaking and beautiful. To think of how many people with a uterus have suffered and still suffer in so many places. It is a bittersweet read for so many reasons; first of all the result of the referendum on the 8th amendment, but as the collection highlights (though it was published before the result of the referendum), there are so many places - Northern Ireland included - that do not have sufficient - if any - access to abortion. It makes me so angry that people had to suffer Truly, truly heartbreaking and beautiful. To think of how many people with a uterus have suffered and still suffer in so many places. It is a bittersweet read for so many reasons; first of all the result of the referendum on the 8th amendment, but as the collection highlights (though it was published before the result of the referendum), there are so many places - Northern Ireland included - that do not have sufficient - if any - access to abortion. It makes me so angry that people had to suffer for so long and continue to suffer, because we are being denied bodily autonomy and not being recognized and respected as human beings with rights. However, I find some comfort in the resilience of the people that have lived through these experiences and the people that fight and have fought for reproductive rights as well as women's rights and trans' rights, and how the two intersect with reproductive rights. It's scary to live in a world where some places are moving back in time, taking away the rights of the people they are supposed to protect. A very informative and moving read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    SadieReadsAgain

    I heard about it in the days leading up to the Irish abortion referendum and couldn't not read it. It's a collection of essays, fiction, poems and personal stories inspired by the horrible abortion restrictions placed on women in Ireland, and the fight to repeal the problematic (misogynistic, barbaric, etc) 8th Amendment. The referendum was last week, and the Republic of Ireland did the right thing. I reserve celebration until actual change occurs, but that's a pretty awesome thing. This book wa I heard about it in the days leading up to the Irish abortion referendum and couldn't not read it. It's a collection of essays, fiction, poems and personal stories inspired by the horrible abortion restrictions placed on women in Ireland, and the fight to repeal the problematic (misogynistic, barbaric, etc) 8th Amendment. The referendum was last week, and the Republic of Ireland did the right thing. I reserve celebration until actual change occurs, but that's a pretty awesome thing. This book was a great primer for someone like me who is fairly ignorant not just about Irish women's rights, but about Ireland in general. It was definitely a stirring battle cry, and a reminder that though the referendum in the Republic has been won, there is still a long way to go (especially for the women of Northern Ireland, who are not covered by the result of the vote). It was also really informative about the political position of reproductive rights more generally. On a bookish level, like many collections it had some standout pieces and some which didn't really grab me, but it was a short read and kept my attention all the way through.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Anne

    "We ask for the land over the water. Home over trial. Choice over none. For our fore mothers, ourselves, the generation yet to come. Witches or women-these are our bodies, which shall not be given up." -Sarah Maria Griffin A fantastic collection of poems, essays, stories about the Repeal the Eighth movement. My only issue is I would have loved to read a chapter about trans issues. Nonetheless, this is an important book. Essential reading for anyone looking to understand the campaign for bodily aut "We ask for the land over the water. Home over trial. Choice over none. For our fore mothers, ourselves, the generation yet to come. Witches or women-these are our bodies, which shall not be given up." -Sarah Maria Griffin A fantastic collection of poems, essays, stories about the Repeal the Eighth movement. My only issue is I would have loved to read a chapter about trans issues. Nonetheless, this is an important book. Essential reading for anyone looking to understand the campaign for bodily autonomy in Ireland, north and south.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rai

    I'm glad I read this anthology, and I'm glad I read it the week I did: the week of the referendum to repeal the 8th amendment from the Irish constitution. This book has now become a piece of history. Like any anthology collection it's quite hit and miss in its content - some essays spoke to me, some moved me and there were some I disliked, not in subject matter but in writing style, but nevertheless all are extremely important. A must read for anyone interested in or involved in Ireland's Repeal I'm glad I read this anthology, and I'm glad I read it the week I did: the week of the referendum to repeal the 8th amendment from the Irish constitution. This book has now become a piece of history. Like any anthology collection it's quite hit and miss in its content - some essays spoke to me, some moved me and there were some I disliked, not in subject matter but in writing style, but nevertheless all are extremely important. A must read for anyone interested in or involved in Ireland's Repeal the 8th movement. Ní saoirse go saoirse na mBan. 4 / 5

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

    This book is important. It provides a fascinating history of the fight for abortion rights in the Republic of Ireland as well as some beautiful creative writing and personal accounts of experiences of abortion. I feel privileged to have been able to share in these women’s experiences. The 8th was repealed in May 2018 but this book is still an important account of how that was achieved and how far we still have to go.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Louise Omer

    Super current anthology of women writing about abortion in Ireland. Must read for anyone seeking cultural context for the Irish referendum (May 25 2018) to repeal the right amendment which outlaws, for the most part, abortion, and completely denies reproductive rights in a fucking Western first world country.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mairead

    "We'll be in Dublin Castle, On another sunny day Screaming go on Ireland Go on the Us's This is our time, tonight, today. " "We'll be in Dublin Castle, On another sunny day Screaming go on Ireland Go on the Us's This is our time, tonight, today. "

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meagan

    This is unexplainably powerful, necessary and important. #RepealThe8th

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    One of the most important books I've ever read 5* One of the most important books I've ever read 5*

  24. 5 out of 5

    Róisín M

    Intense. Really powerful collection of stories, art and poetry inspired by the fight to Repeal the 8th Amendment in Ireland.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julianna

    V good and important stuff! I like how it has such a variety of genres; though I would often drag reading the more essay-like pieces, then fly through poems and more story-centric pieces.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    Important and inspiring.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maggie

    Fantastic collection of voices and pieces that together is not just a flowing piece of work, but something that captures the energy and feeling of a movement and a moment in time.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Beth Ormrod

    Eye opening. A must read to understand how far we still have to go.

  29. 4 out of 5

    steph

    an anthology of deeply emotional, visceral, and enlightening stories, essays, poetry and art relating to the repeal the 8th movement - reading this now, post repeal does not lessen the wrenching honesty and passion of this collection. the passage on northern ireland reminds me that even after recent decriminalisation, those seeking an abortion in NI will have to travel outside the country to receive basic healthcare until april this year — but huge strides forward have been made, and this book i an anthology of deeply emotional, visceral, and enlightening stories, essays, poetry and art relating to the repeal the 8th movement - reading this now, post repeal does not lessen the wrenching honesty and passion of this collection. the passage on northern ireland reminds me that even after recent decriminalisation, those seeking an abortion in NI will have to travel outside the country to receive basic healthcare until april this year — but huge strides forward have been made, and this book is a testament to the relentless activism of the women (and others) who set things in motion. i particularly loved “laundry” by mary coll and kitty holland’s nuanced essay “abortion, regret and choice”. to quote sarah maria griffin’s “we face this land”: these are out bodies which shall not be given up

  30. 4 out of 5

    Faye

    People who don’t have uteruses and can vote should read this.

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