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Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - s Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - see inductive reasoning) and astute observation to solve difficult cases. He is arguably the most famous fictional detective ever created, and is one of the best known and most universally recognizable literary characters in any genre. Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories that featured Holmes. All but four stories were narrated by Holmes' friend and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson, two having been narrated by Holmes himself, and two others written in the third person. The first two stories, short novels, appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887 and Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in 1890. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the beginning of the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine in 1891; further series of short stories and two serialized novels appeared almost right up to Conan Doyle's death in 1930. The stories cover a period from around 1878 up to 1903, with a final case in 1914. in this collection you will find: Novels: • A Study in Scarlet • The Sign of the Four • The Hound of the Baskervilles • The Valley of Fear Short Story Collections: • The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes • The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes • The Return of Sherlock Holmes • His Last Bow • The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes


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Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - s Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. He is the creation of Scottish born author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A brilliant London-based detective, Holmes is famous for his intellectual prowess, and is renowned for his skillful use of deductive reasoning (somewhat mistakenly - see inductive reasoning) and astute observation to solve difficult cases. He is arguably the most famous fictional detective ever created, and is one of the best known and most universally recognizable literary characters in any genre. Conan Doyle wrote four novels and fifty-six short stories that featured Holmes. All but four stories were narrated by Holmes' friend and biographer, Dr. John H. Watson, two having been narrated by Holmes himself, and two others written in the third person. The first two stories, short novels, appeared in Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887 and Lippincott's Monthly Magazine in 1890. The character grew tremendously in popularity with the beginning of the first series of short stories in The Strand Magazine in 1891; further series of short stories and two serialized novels appeared almost right up to Conan Doyle's death in 1930. The stories cover a period from around 1878 up to 1903, with a final case in 1914. in this collection you will find: Novels: • A Study in Scarlet • The Sign of the Four • The Hound of the Baskervilles • The Valley of Fear Short Story Collections: • The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes • The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes • The Return of Sherlock Holmes • His Last Bow • The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes

30 review for Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Collection [Free Audiobook Links Included]

  1. 4 out of 5

    adam bradford

    A few of the things I learned: Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth Never theorize before you have all the evidence. It biases the judgment. Also, I now sometimes try to analyze people based on their shoes and pants when sitting on the subway. I have yet to ask anyone if I was accurate about my predictions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rowan Wiese

    Time does not change great literature This was completely entertaining and no matter how old you are it's still great to read over the ones you enjoyed the first time. Several I had not remembered reading. I bought this book at special price from here: https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Sherl... Time does not change great literature This was completely entertaining and no matter how old you are it's still great to read over the ones you enjoyed the first time. Several I had not remembered reading. I bought this book at special price from here: https://www.amazon.com/Complete-Sherl...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Meave

    My copy of this book is a wreck, I have read it so often. My dad gave it to me, I can't remember if it was a birthday or Christmas gift, but regardless it's one of the best books I've ever been given. You just have to read a couple of pages and you fall right into Holmes and Watson's world; it's wonderful.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Luffy

    It's great that we got Hound of the Baskervilles right before Return of Sherlock Holmes, because, after that, the knighted author would prove to be on autopilot. I'm afraid that the test of time has not been overly kind to the canon Sherlock lore. It was a chore sometimes, to read through these short stories that have outstayed their welcome. Maybe the detective ought to have stayed dead. But vox populi, vox Dei. Now that the work of Doyle is in Public Domain, many more new stories keep popping up It's great that we got Hound of the Baskervilles right before Return of Sherlock Holmes, because, after that, the knighted author would prove to be on autopilot. I'm afraid that the test of time has not been overly kind to the canon Sherlock lore. It was a chore sometimes, to read through these short stories that have outstayed their welcome. Maybe the detective ought to have stayed dead. But vox populi, vox Dei. Now that the work of Doyle is in Public Domain, many more new stories keep popping up. Incredibly, I've read only one such book. That must be remedied ASAP.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. Holmes was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues and clearing up those mysteries which had been aba Holmes, who loathed every form of society with his whole Bohemian soul, remained in our lodgings in Baker Street, buried among his old books, and alternating from week to week between cocaine and ambition, the drowsiness of the drug and the fierce energy of his own keen nature. Holmes was still, as ever, deeply attracted by the study of crime, and occupied his immense faculties and extraordinary powers of observation in following out those clues and clearing up those mysteries which had been abandoned as hopeless by the official police. --“A Scandal in Bohemia” Watson's not wasting any time here. So we learn, in two sentences, that Holmes is: not fond of other people, ridiculously smart, kind of a drug addict, working unofficially to fight crime and, as if I couldn’t say it enough -- ridiculously smart! Arthur Conan Doyle emphasizes Holmes' magnificent brain in many ways: he uses Watson's admiration to reinforce the reader's own; he gives Holmes lots of foils, including incompetent cops and the criminals he's hunting; and perhaps the best trick of all, Holmes frequently gets to show off his smarts by wowing his clients with how much he can guess about them just by looking at their outward appearances. So it’s obvious that Sherlock Holmes is beyond intelligent, but I find this other side of him more interesting: That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it. “You appear to be astonished,” he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. “Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it.” -- “A Study in Scarlet” Holmes is, in a nutshell, single-minded in his detection. In that respect, it makes sense that all emotions, particularly love, are abhorrent to his cold, precise, but admirably balanced mind. He's basically an instrument for finding out criminal stuff. I actually appreciated this, since Doyle didn't risk all the soap opera-ish entanglements that make long-running serials hard to follow without a map. He conceived each of his stories as both united by Holmes' character, and yet still potentially interesting to people who had never read any other of his stories. As a private detective, Holmes totally uses his powers for good. Everyone in Victorian London, from the lowliest governess to the highest nobleman, eventually comes to see him when they need help. It's reassuring to read about a guy who just goes around making sure that life is fair for the little guy. Sure, he may be in his business of private detective work mostly for the intellectual work rather than the moral judgment -- but for me, reading each of his stories is like reading “Chicken Soup for the Nerdy Soul”! He's so sure, and so good at getting things right, that reading his stories leaves you with a comfortable glow. John Watson, the narrator, is definitely a main character in these stories. He is telling his own story, sure, but only in so far as that story relates to Mr. Sherlock Holmes. The thing is though, he is awesome in his own right. He was an army doctor in Afghanistan, he's the one who always carries the gun in his and Holmes's most dangerous encounters,and what's more -- he is actually able to sustain a job and engage in healthy human relationships with more than one person. By also making Watson a strong character, with both medical and literary proficiency, Doyle makes Watson's admiration of Holmes' intelligence even more meaningful. He fills in gaps that Holmes lack: he provides medical assistance that Holmes can't handle and he's the one who adds human interest to Holmes' stories. Above all, he makes cold, calculating Holmes…human. Sure, he keeps mentioning that Holmes despises feelings and what-not but at the same time, the clear bromance that ties the two guys together -- their mutual friendship and respect --really speaks well of both of them as sympathetic, cool human beings. Watson also manages to bring out the passionate side of Holmes' supremely intellectual work. Watson provides a frame for each story: an introductory series of paragraphs sketching some dialogue with Holmes, or setting the scene of the investigation. His narration doesn't wander off into passages of thick description very often, which makes their impact all the more powerful when he does. The focus of each story is on solving a central problem, and that means there's suspense, and there's resolution. So, it's probably not a shock to many of you that detective stories usually end with, you know, the solution to a mystery. That's part of the pleasure of reading them in the first place! Something that's kind of interesting about Doyle's endings though, is that the solution is not always accompanied by legal punishment. Like, a satisfying conclusion to a “Bones” episode would be an arrest, right? Or “Law and Order” and its spinoffs are all about convicting the criminals they track down. Holmes though, is a private detective above all, and because he is not part of an official police force, he gets some choice in how things are handled once he's solved a case. He's more interested in fairness than in observing bureaucratic technicalities. As our parents have told us time and time again, “life isn't fair.” But, by the end of a good Holmes story, you feel like it can be. The good are rewarded, the bad punished and each man gets what he deserves. If these are somehow not enough to convince you that Sherlock Holmes is worth caring about, let me add that the bromance is top notch in these stories! “Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it. ” --The Hound of the Baskervilles Sherlock and John restored my faith in (platonic) love. I hope I will be as excited to spend time with my friends fifteen years down the line as these two seem to be during their later adventures. The guys may not be romantic partners in the least, but they are life partners --and I must admit, reading about their adventures left me a little choked up!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Arah-Lynda

    I have no idea how I let myself get so long in the tooth before finally settling down and reading this collection.  Suffice to say I am glad I finally came to my senses. It is all here, every Sherlock Holmes story ever penned by Arthur Conan Doyle.  There are four complete novels and five books of case studies.  Relax I am not going to even attempt to review every one of these.  That would be tedious for me as well as you. There is no doubt that my hands down favourite of the entire collection was I have no idea how I let myself get so long in the tooth before finally settling down and reading this collection.  Suffice to say I am glad I finally came to my senses. It is all here, every Sherlock Holmes story ever penned by Arthur Conan Doyle.  There are four complete novels and five books of case studies.  Relax I am not going to even attempt to review every one of these.  That would be tedious for me as well as you. There is no doubt that my hands down favourite of the entire collection was The Hound of the Baskervilles, but make no mistake I loved it all. According to Goodreads I started reading this collection on June 23 of this year and I am just now able to close off my review.  With the exception of the novels which I read straight through once I had started them, the balance of the case files I read in between other books.  I must say I truly enjoyed this approach and looked forward to dropping in to see what Sherlock was up to every now and again.   Sadly all good things must come to an end.  It was however an experience I shall never forget and I shall certainly miss Watson and Holmes.  I may have to go back and pay them a visit again sometime.  

  7. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Le Petit Prince (14) versus The Complete Sherlock Holmes (19) It was some time during the summer of 19__ that I received an urgent telegram from Holmes. Arriving at 221B, Baker Street, I was struck by how little he had changed. He was older, to be sure; but his eye was as keen as ever, and his enthusiasm not one whit abated by the passage of the years. "I trust you have brought your passport, Watson?" he said, in lieu of greeting. "We depart for Alg For the Celebrity Death Match Review Tournament, Le Petit Prince (14) versus The Complete Sherlock Holmes (19) It was some time during the summer of 19__ that I received an urgent telegram from Holmes. Arriving at 221B, Baker Street, I was struck by how little he had changed. He was older, to be sure; but his eye was as keen as ever, and his enthusiasm not one whit abated by the passage of the years. "I trust you have brought your passport, Watson?" he said, in lieu of greeting. "We depart for Algeria this evening. The cab will be here momentarily." "But Holmes!" I protested, as he hurried me down the stairs. "What -" "We can discuss that once we are on the train," replied Holmes firmly. And, true to his word, he said no more until we were comfortably ensconced in the First Class carriage of the Dover Express. "Now, Watson," said Holmes, after he had carefully packed and lit his pipe, "I wonder if you have heard of a young Frenchman called Saint-E_____. An author and aviator." The rest of this review is available elsewhere (the location cannot be given for Goodreads policy reasons)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hasham Rasool

    Most people in the world know who is Sherlock Holmes as the matter of fact, he is one of the most popular fictional characters. 'The Complete stories of Sherlock Holmes with original illustrations the 'strand' magazine'. 4 novels: 'A Study in Scarlet' 'The Sign of the Four' 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' 'The Valley of Fear' 5 books of 56 short stories: 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes': 'A Scandal in Bohenia' 'The Red-Headed League' 'A Case of Identity' 'The Boscombe Valley Mystery' 'The Five Orange Pip Most people in the world know who is Sherlock Holmes as the matter of fact, he is one of the most popular fictional characters. 'The Complete stories of Sherlock Holmes with original illustrations the 'strand' magazine'. 4 novels: 'A Study in Scarlet' 'The Sign of the Four' 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' 'The Valley of Fear' 5 books of 56 short stories: 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes': 'A Scandal in Bohenia' 'The Red-Headed League' 'A Case of Identity' 'The Boscombe Valley Mystery' 'The Five Orange Pips' 'The Man with the Twisted Lip' 'The Blue Carbunde' 'The Speckled Band' 'The Engineer's Thumb' 'The Noble Bachelor' 'The Beryl Coronet' 'The Copper Beeches' 'The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes': 'Silver Blaze' 'The Yellow Face' 'The Stockbroker's Clerk' 'The Gloria Scott' 'The Reigate Squires' 'The Crooked Man' 'The Resident Patient' 'The Greek Interpreter' 'The Naval Treaty' 'The Final Problem' 'The Return of Sherlock Holmes': 'The Empty House' 'The Norwood Builder' 'The Dancing Men' 'The Solitary Cyclist' 'The Priory School' 'Black Peter' 'Charles Augustus Milverton' 'The Six Napoleons' 'The Three Students' 'The Golden Pince-Nez' 'The Missing Three-Quarter' 'The Abbey Grange' 'The Second Stain' 'His Last Bow': 'Wisteria Lodge' 'The Cardboard Box' 'The Red Circle' 'The Bruce-Partington Plans' 'The Dying Detective' 'The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax' 'The Devil's Foot' 'His Last Bow' 'The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes': 'The Mazarin Stone' 'The Problem of Thor Bridge' 'The Creeping Man' 'The Sussex Vampire' 'The Three Garridebs' 'The Illustrious Client' 'The Three Gables' 'The Blanched Soldier' 'The Lion Mane' 'The Retired Colourman' 'The Veiled Lodger' 'Shoscombe Old Place' 31st August-1st September 2015 'A Study in Scarlet' I love this story. There are lots of twists. Alhamdulillah! 11 October-18 October 2015 'The Sign of the Four' It is a very good story. Alhamdulillah! 22 October-25 October 2015 'The Hound of the Baskervilles' It is a stupendous story! Alhamdulillah! I thought 'The Hound of Baskervilles' is spooky story. 12 November-22 November 2015 'The Valley of Fear' It is a brilliant story Alhamdulillah! 5th December 2015-4 March 2016 'The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' I have taken a long break from reading this story. AlhamdulIllah, I love it! These twelve short stories are awesome! 7th March 2016-9th March 2016 'The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes' Alhamdulillah! These stories were atupendous stories I love it! 13th March 2016-17th March 2016 'The Return of Sherlock Holmes' These stories are awesome! Alhamdulillah! 8th April 2016-9th April 2016 'His Last Bow' These stories are fantastic stories! Alhamdulillah! 9th April 2016-10 April 'The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes' These stories are very good. Alhamdulillah! in the conclusion, It has taken me to finish read this book between seven and eight months. All of the novels and short stories of The Complete of Sherlock Holmes are stupendous Alhamdulillah! I am really enjoyed reading this book. My name is Sherlock Holmes and the address is 221B Baker Street.

  9. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    So, I'm now done with reading this whole 2-volume 1,796-page Sherlock Holmes canon. I spent 10 months reading all the 4 novels and 56 short stories contained herein. I really liked the experience and I am proud of this accomplishment. My first time to read a canon. Before reading this, I thought that the word canon only applied to biblical works. Well, that was the first thing I learned upon adding this book in my currently-reading folder. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote in a classy classic manner a So, I'm now done with reading this whole 2-volume 1,796-page Sherlock Holmes canon. I spent 10 months reading all the 4 novels and 56 short stories contained herein. I really liked the experience and I am proud of this accomplishment. My first time to read a canon. Before reading this, I thought that the word canon only applied to biblical works. Well, that was the first thing I learned upon adding this book in my currently-reading folder. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote in a classy classic manner and even if his settings were not familiar to me as a Filipino, I appreciated his stories because of the universal messages in them: love of a husband to a wife, a son to a father, a father to his child, etc; the evil in greed especially when it comes to riches and money; that men can be truly friends without homosexuality getting in-between; that we have to respect the people we work with; always be wary of the people around you; and that, if used in moderation, cocaine and morphine can actually make you sharper. I cringed while typing the last one. So, what are my takeaways from Sherlock Holmes? There are three:1. Logical reasoning. He is a keen observer. In almost every company I joined with, there is a safety program and one of the things they teach in the training is to stop and closely look up, down, left, right, front, back for every thing that we see that can cause an accident. I think that if all of us in the company will have that power of keen observation, all factories will have zero unsafe incidents. Not only that, because Holmes has that keen observation, he uses those things that he sees to link them to his hypotheses and when he applies his knowledge in forensics (having a background on medicine), to the things he observes, it results to his power of deduction. 2. Ability to disguise. I am still to see any Sherlock Holmes television episodes or movies but this one makes the story unbelievable for a middle age man like me but interesting enough to engage me while reading. Sherlock Holmes can be anybody: a pheasant, a woman, an old man, a soldier, a dead person, etc. Not only that, some of his characters put disguises too. This fantasy element in the story is entertaining in my mind but it is the least in terms of the practical application of what I learned from Sherlock Holmes. For one, I could not freaking imagine myself dressed like a woman. 3. Forensic skills. From the first few pages of the A Study in Scarlet when the very young Sherlock Holmes told Dr. Watson how to detect blood from the scene, I was mesmerized. Oh, I thought I knew it from my medical technology readings way back 3 decades ago. However, I am not practicing that profession so at times I already forget what I learned before. Sir Conan Doyle really puts his passion into each novel and short story because he incorporated what he learned from medical books but even history, travel and other sciences such as anthropology, handwriting analysis, weaponry, zoology and botany (I still remember the giant jellyfish). He must have been a very well-read gentlemen.My favorite novel of course is The Hound of the Baskervilles followed by The Sign of Four. My top 10 favorite stories are below. Interestingly, while typing this, I checked a website and all, except #1, of my choices are not among the Top 12 Sherlockians' choices haha.1.The Final Problem (Memoirs) - 5 stars 2. His Last Bow (Last Bow) - 5 stars 3. The Adventure of the Retired Colourman (Case Book) - 5 stars 4. The Five Orange Pips (Adventures) - 4 stars 5. The Copper Beeches (Adventures) - 4 stars 6. The Naval Treaty (Memoirs) - 4 stars 7. The Adventure of the Empty House (Return) - 4 stars 8. The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton (Return) - 4 stars 9. The Adventure of the Three Students (Return) - 4 stars 10. The Adventure of the Devil's Foot (Last Bow) - 4 starsMaybe I am just strange but I always enjoy stories that either "speak" to me or at least "surprise" me. Anyway, I will definitely miss Sherlock Holmes. But I have to move on to Samuel Beckett.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    I was so sad when I finished this book. Nothing new to read ever again about Sherlock Holmes ... hmmmm *sigh*

  11. 4 out of 5

    aPriL does feral sometimes

    I can't remember how often I've read and reread this book collection. More than 20 times since elementary school. Literally the only book that never quit on me, and it was a used book I picked up for 10 cents. Sherlock was my first crush I guess. Even now I simply cannot be objective on any level in regards to this character. It's probably a good thing I moved on to the Man From U.N.C.L.E. Well, maybe not.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Archit

    One sentence until I turn up with a more powerful review : One sentence until I turn up with a more powerful review :

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    I don't know if anyone else does this, but in times of stress or when I have exceptional trouble falling asleep, I find myself re-reading a favorite book. One of these used to be my complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series but alas, it *is* in fact possible to read those books too many times. Lately this book has been the Complete Sherlock Holmes. What amazes me the most about these stories is that, despite having read through the entire collection a number of times, I seem to find someth I don't know if anyone else does this, but in times of stress or when I have exceptional trouble falling asleep, I find myself re-reading a favorite book. One of these used to be my complete Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series but alas, it *is* in fact possible to read those books too many times. Lately this book has been the Complete Sherlock Holmes. What amazes me the most about these stories is that, despite having read through the entire collection a number of times, I seem to find something new each time I read it. Knowing the solution to the mysteries, doesn't seem to diminish the excitement at getting to Holmes' big reveal each time. The characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson become character studies, making you long for the little tidbits that provide more insight into their inner workings. This time around I took the time to look up some of the odder Victorian words and thereby expanded my vocabulary with words like shaw (a small wood or thicket), chandler (a retailer of provisions) and extravasate (to force out from the proper vessels, as blood, so as to diffuse through the surrounding tissues). There are other details that seem impossible to not notice: the fact that, despite Holmes and Watson being clearly hetersexual, their relationship is nevertheless odd, that Holmes was a high-functioning autistic (Asperger's, my guess), and that Watson was a terrible doctor, seeing as how he treated every patient with brandy regardless of their ailment. But it is indeed these quirks that make the characters seem more real, and make the tales and deductions that much more enjoyable.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rebina Tess

    I'm a fantasy girl. I never liked detective stories. Until I got Sherlocked.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

    *My overall rating is 4.5 stars for the entire bind up. I do list each story and my rating individually, as well as my average rating for each collection.* A Study in Scarlet : 4 stars The Sign of the Four : 4.5 stars The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes : 3.9 stars -"A Scandal in Bohemia": 4 stars -"The Red-Headed League": 3.5 stars -"A Case of Identity": 4.5 stars -"The Boscombe Valley Mystery": 5 stars -"The Five Orange Pips": 4 stars -"The Man with the Twisted Lip": 3.75 stars -"The Blue Carbunc *My overall rating is 4.5 stars for the entire bind up. I do list each story and my rating individually, as well as my average rating for each collection.* A Study in Scarlet : 4 stars The Sign of the Four : 4.5 stars The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes : 3.9 stars -"A Scandal in Bohemia": 4 stars -"The Red-Headed League": 3.5 stars -"A Case of Identity": 4.5 stars -"The Boscombe Valley Mystery": 5 stars -"The Five Orange Pips": 4 stars -"The Man with the Twisted Lip": 3.75 stars -"The Blue Carbuncle": 3.5 stars -"The Speckled Band": 3 stars -"The Engineer's Thumb": 4 stars -"The Noble Bachelor": 4.5 stars -"The Beryl Coronet": 3.5 stars -"The Copper Beeches": 4 stars The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes : 3.6 stars -"Silver Blaze": 3 stars -"The Yellow Face": 3.5 stars -"The Stockbroker's Clerk": 3.5 stars -"The Gloria Scott": 3 stars -"The Musgrave Ritual": 4.5 stars -"The Reigate Squire": 3 stars -"The Crooked Man": 3 stars -"The Resident Patient": 4 stars -"The Greek Interpreter": 4.5 stars -"The Naval Treaty": 4 stars -"The Final Problem": 4 stars The Return of Sherlock Holmes : 3.2 stars -"The Empty House": 3 stars -"The Norwood Builder": 3 stars -"The Dancing Men": 4 stars -"The Solitary Cyclist": 3.5 stars -"The Priory School": 4.25 stars -"Black Peter": 3.75 stars -"Charles Augustus Milverton": 3.5 stars -"The Six Napoleons": 3.75 stars -"The Three Students": 3.25 stars -"The Golden Pince-Nez": 3 stars -"The Missing Three-Quarter": 3.25 stars -"The Abbey Grange": 3.5 stars -"The Second Stain": 3.25 stars The Hound of the Baskervilles : 4.5 stars The Valley of Fear : 3.5 stars His Last Bow : 3.6 stars -"Wisteria Lodge": 3.75 stars -"The Cardboard Box": 4 stars -"The Red Circle": 3.75 stars -"The Bruce-Partington Plans": 3.25 stars -"The Dying Detective": 3 stars -"The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax": 3 stars -"The Devil's Foot": 3.5 stars -"His Last Bow": 4.25 stars The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes : 3.9 stars -"The Illustrious Client": 3.75 stars -"The Blanched Soldier": 3.75 stars -"The Mazarin Stones": 4 stars -"The Three Gables": 3.75 stars -"The Sussex Vampire": 4.5 stars -"The Three Garridebs": 3.75 stars -"Thor Bridge": 4.25 stars -"The Creeping Man": 3.75 stars -"The Lion's Mane": 3.75 stars -"The Veiled Lodger": 4 stars -"Shoscombe Old Place": 3.75 stars -"The Retired Colourman": 3.5 stars Average Rating Overall: 4.3 stars - rounded up to a 4.5 stars This was a great collection of short stories and novels (novellas?). It had its ups and downs, but overall I really enjoyed my time reading this massive bind up of the entire series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Hall

    My impression of what a Sherlock Holmes' story is actually like. I came down to breakfast one morning to find my dear friend, Sherlock Holmes disembowelling a gerbil with a teaspoon. "My dear Holmes," said I, "is that really necessary?" Barely glancing up from his gruesome task, he told me that it was. "You see, Watson," he continued, "there is matter that I believe may soon become illuminated not only to you but the whole of London society." "Good God, Holmes!" I cried. "Whatever is this?" "Have pat My impression of what a Sherlock Holmes' story is actually like. I came down to breakfast one morning to find my dear friend, Sherlock Holmes disembowelling a gerbil with a teaspoon. "My dear Holmes," said I, "is that really necessary?" Barely glancing up from his gruesome task, he told me that it was. "You see, Watson," he continued, "there is matter that I believe may soon become illuminated not only to you but the whole of London society." "Good God, Holmes!" I cried. "Whatever is this?" "Have patience, Watson," returned he. "You will understand directly." Two days later, I came down to breakfast to discover my dear friend, Sherlock Holmes, dressed as a goldfish. "Ah Watson," he greeted me. "You remember the matter we spoke of the other day?" "I do, Holmes, I do!" "Well, it is even darker and more disturbing than even I at first realised." The next day, I came down to breakfast to discover my friend lying disconsolately among the bacon. "Are you quite well, Holmes?" I enquired. "I have solved the case, Watson." He sat up, brushing a fried egg from the lapel of his dressing gown. "Allow me to elucidate." By which I mean, everything happens very statically and in a quintessentially Victorian way. Holmes is a prick and Watson is a sycophant. The theory of deductive is bobbins and I feel genuinely sorry for Lestrade. However ... this is motherfucking Sherlock Holmes. And I enjoy the hell out of it. Maybe precisely because it is completely stupid.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    Most of the stories are similar to one another, but it was nice to read about old England. In my opinion the novels are better than the shorts since Doyle had the opportunity to expand the story into other areas which gave depth and breadth to the stories.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elle (ellexamines)

    oh my god but this thing is so thick. and I’ve only read one part of it. help. A Study in Scarlet - TBR The Sign of the Four - TBR The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (collection) - ★★★★★ Review to come here. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (collection) - TBR The Return of Sherlock Holmes (collection) - TBR The Hound of the Baskerville - TBR The Valley of Fear - TBR His Last Bow (collection) - TBR The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes (collection) - TBR Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Spotify | About | oh my god but this thing is so thick. and I’ve only read one part of it. help. A Study in Scarlet - TBR The Sign of the Four - TBR The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (collection) - ★★★★★ Review to come here. The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (collection) - TBR The Return of Sherlock Holmes (collection) - TBR The Hound of the Baskerville - TBR The Valley of Fear - TBR His Last Bow (collection) - TBR The Case Book of Sherlock Holmes (collection) - TBR Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Spotify | About |

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    I love, LOVE the sherlock Holmes books. Re-read several times. Including characters like Mycroft, Dr Watson, inpector Mr Lestrad and Moriarty.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jaro

    Phew… I finished this whole thing in twelve days (except for The Hound of the Baskervilles which I had read before). I was in a very restless mood while reading and couldn’t stop. The focus, precision and energy of the stories kept me alert throughout and I never tired. As soon as I finished a story I was immediately hungry for more. I think the stories actually gained something by being consumed in succession in a short time. It made me aware of the structure of the stories, about similarities Phew… I finished this whole thing in twelve days (except for The Hound of the Baskervilles which I had read before). I was in a very restless mood while reading and couldn’t stop. The focus, precision and energy of the stories kept me alert throughout and I never tired. As soon as I finished a story I was immediately hungry for more. I think the stories actually gained something by being consumed in succession in a short time. It made me aware of the structure of the stories, about similarities and patterns, and also about the relation between the original stories and the multitude of adaptations out there. Inevitably you come to these stories with a lot of preconceptions. What struck me the most was how close many of the adaptations are to the original stories. Even those that turn them into adventure stories aren’t that far off the mark. After all, Holmes has some real swashbuckling potential as both an able fencer and a boxer, this is contradicted, though, by his view of himself as a brain, the rest being mere appendix.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard

    I DID IT! I FUCKING DID IT! I FINISHED THIS BEAST!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Trish Isiderio

    This book is nothing short of brilliant. Arthur Conan Doyle is a master writer; there never was a dull moment in every story, and there are only a handful of characters that I would love as dearly as I love Sherlock and Watson.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    I love Sherlock, and it was great to finally read the collection all the way through. : )

  24. 5 out of 5

    Edalma

    This book is very very amazing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jan Rice

    Jan. 15, 2013: I received this as a gift when I was 20 years old. I had already read it but I must have read again, because the cover wore off. I tucked the front and back piece of the cover in the back of the book, and that's how I know it was this edition. I loved Sherlock Holmes. I own a Sherlock Holmes sweatshirt at this very time. I also liked Arthur & George by Julian Barnes, which was about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Added after I saw one of my friends was going to read Sherlock Holmes. I see G Jan. 15, 2013: I received this as a gift when I was 20 years old. I had already read it but I must have read again, because the cover wore off. I tucked the front and back piece of the cover in the back of the book, and that's how I know it was this edition. I loved Sherlock Holmes. I own a Sherlock Holmes sweatshirt at this very time. I also liked Arthur & George by Julian Barnes, which was about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Added after I saw one of my friends was going to read Sherlock Holmes. I see Goodreads is showing an ISBN for this edition. It must have been added later. Aug. 14, 2014 update: There had been ongoing problems dealing with the Conan Doyle estate, now resolved. Who knew? More info at http://free-sherlock.com/ Aug. 20, 2014 update: In reading Steven Pinker about the romanticized and favorable views of war that prevailed for most of history, I discovered that even the fictional Sherlock Holmes was part of the culturally accepted insanity of the WWI era re war's being necessary and desirable. His creator had him say, "It will be cold and bitter, Watson, and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared" (The Last Bow).

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Bailey

    What first got me hooked on reading. [That sounds corny, like 'Hooked on Phonics' or something...] Either way, I found a seriously abridged and illustrated version of a few stories when I was in 3rd grade. And I've never looked back. Hands down my favorite reads ever.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sahaj

    A Scandal in Bohemia: Chapter I. A dialogue I liked. A scene at 221/B, Baker Street, London Sherlock is sitting in his armchair in his usual manner, his eyes closed. In front of him is Count Von Kramm, a Bohemian nobleman, wearing a mask. (Who he was kidding? He was in front of the great SH!) And so in front of him actually is Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Grand Duke of Cassel Felstein, and hereditary King of Bohemia. by this time SH has opened his eyes and had an impatient look at A Scandal in Bohemia: Chapter I. A dialogue I liked. A scene at 221/B, Baker Street, London Sherlock is sitting in his armchair in his usual manner, his eyes closed. In front of him is Count Von Kramm, a Bohemian nobleman, wearing a mask. (Who he was kidding? He was in front of the great SH!) And so in front of him actually is Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Grand Duke of Cassel Felstein, and hereditary King of Bohemia. by this time SH has opened his eyes and had an impatient look at his client. The man now agrees and starts to build his case. “Kindly look her up in my index, Doctor" says SH to Dr. Watson asking him to look up for an Irene Adler. Doctor gives the biography to SH and here it goes. “Let me see!” said Holmes. “Hum! Born in New Jersey in the year 1858. Contralto—hum! La Scala, hum! Prima donna Imperial Opera of Warsaw—yes! Retired from operatic stage—ha! Living in London—quite so! Your Majesty, as I understand, became entangled with this young person, wrote her some compromising letters, and is now desirous of getting those letters back.” “Precisely so. But how—” “Was there a secret marriage?” “None.” “No legal papers or certificates?” “None.” “Then I fail to follow your Majesty. If this young person should produce her letters for blackmailing or other purposes, how is she to prove their authenticity?” “There is the writing.” “Pooh, pooh! Forgery.” “My private note-paper.” “Stolen.” “My own seal.” “Imitated.” “My photograph.” “Bought.” “We were both in the photograph.” “Oh, dear! That is very bad! Your Majesty has indeed committed an indiscretion.” It goes on and ends with a promise that SH will have some good news the next day.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michael Perkins

    I’ve read the Holmes stories many times over the years and watched all the Jeremy Brett adaptations several times, as well. Unfortunately because of Brett’s ill health, he was less and less present in the last adaptations and his death prevented him from finishing the Holmes canon I became curious which of the Holmes stories did not get adapted and found a list at the bottom of the Wikipedia entry below. I proceeded to read all of the unadapted stories and did not remember a one of them and found I’ve read the Holmes stories many times over the years and watched all the Jeremy Brett adaptations several times, as well. Unfortunately because of Brett’s ill health, he was less and less present in the last adaptations and his death prevented him from finishing the Holmes canon I became curious which of the Holmes stories did not get adapted and found a list at the bottom of the Wikipedia entry below. I proceeded to read all of the unadapted stories and did not remember a one of them and found some of them quite terrible. I can say, unreservedly, nothing was lost in not adapting them. Looking more closely, except for the novellas, A Study in Scarlet and The Valley of Fear, the unadapted, weaker episodes could be found in the last three volumes of the Holmes’ books. This is no surprise given that in volume 3 of the Holmes stories, “The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes” author Doyle killed off his main character in a story titled “The Final Problem,” where Holmes and his arch nemesis, Professor Morality, fall to their deaths while fighting at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. Arthur Conan Doyle was sick of Holmes and wanted that to be the last of him. But a prolonged hue and cry from the reading public, and some financial need of Doyle's, brought back Holmes some 11 years later . And while Doyle’s final three volumes have many excellent adventures in them, some of which have been adapted to the screen, it’s also no surprise that these volumes have all of his worse tales. Doyle’s heart was not always in it. Although Doyle had written other adventure series, Professor Challenger and Brigadier Gerard, he considered his true calling to be an author of Medieval Romances, with knights and so forth. I read some of them and they are quite wordy and pretty bad. The short story was Doyle’s true métier. And I say, without hesitation, if not for Holmes, Doyle would now be forgotten. ============== The best of these short stories have had amazing staying power. They're concise and action-packed, full of romance and mystery in a setting at once old and modern. But they don't carry the baggage of Victorian verbiage that make lit from that era tough for modern readers. They're wonderfully escapist when the brain needs a rest or perhaps if you're fighting the flu. "We must begin in Baker Street; and best of all, if possible, let it be a stormy winter morning when Holmes routs Watson out of bed in haste. The doctor wakes to see that tall, ascetic figure by the bedside with a candle. "Come, Watson, come! The game is afoot!" (Christopher Morley) ============= “I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.” "the grand thing is to be able to reason backwards. That is a very useful accomplishment, and a very easy one, but people do not practise it much. In the every-day affairs of life it is more useful to reason forwards, and so the other comes to be neglected. There are fifty who can reason synthetically for one who can reason analytically.” ========= The perfect duo.... https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-x... ========= Adapted and unadapted stories per Jeremy Brett.... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael O'Brien

    This was one of the longest books I've ever read, but well worth the read. Enjoyed it thoroughly. After reading this, it is clear that Sherlock Holmes is very well the inspiration behind most of the detective/ mystery genre we have today. I remember reading a while back, for example, that the TV show "House" was intended to be a medical version of Sherlock Holmes. I especially enjoyed reading such tales as "The Hound of the Baskervilles". One of the things that stands out about Sherlock Holmes i This was one of the longest books I've ever read, but well worth the read. Enjoyed it thoroughly. After reading this, it is clear that Sherlock Holmes is very well the inspiration behind most of the detective/ mystery genre we have today. I remember reading a while back, for example, that the TV show "House" was intended to be a medical version of Sherlock Holmes. I especially enjoyed reading such tales as "The Hound of the Baskervilles". One of the things that stands out about Sherlock Holmes is that he is a hero who uses the power of his mind, logic, and deduction to accomplish great feats that most other authors would try to add in action, violence, or feats of strength. Truly a tour de force in English literature.

  30. 5 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    The Complete Sherlock Holmes...I happened to finish Dan Simmons's The Fifth Heart recently, and was a little put out about how he treated Sherlock in some spots. Having now finished the complete stories and novels - okay, yeah. Lots of inconsistencies, many stories a long stone's throw from fair, repetitive plotlines, and those stupid stories that are Sherlock intro, Sherlock epilogue...and a mass of adventure from America that I couldn't care less about. Sherlock is a heartless bastard, all rig The Complete Sherlock Holmes...I happened to finish Dan Simmons's The Fifth Heart recently, and was a little put out about how he treated Sherlock in some spots. Having now finished the complete stories and novels - okay, yeah. Lots of inconsistencies, many stories a long stone's throw from fair, repetitive plotlines, and those stupid stories that are Sherlock intro, Sherlock epilogue...and a mass of adventure from America that I couldn't care less about. Sherlock is a heartless bastard, all right, maybe not as catastrophically hopeless as a human being as in The Fifth Heart, but definitely not a nice guy. Lots of brilliance here, of course - but lots of stories that don't ring even remotely true.

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