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Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption Through Scripture

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The exodus stands as a pivotal event in the Old Testament—God delivering his people from slavery in Egypt. But if you listen closely to the overarching narrative of the Bible, you will hear echoes of this story of redemption across the pages of Scripture. After exploring the account of Israel's exodus from Egypt, the authors then look at precursors to the exodus in the boo The exodus stands as a pivotal event in the Old Testament—God delivering his people from slavery in Egypt. But if you listen closely to the overarching narrative of the Bible, you will hear echoes of this story of redemption across the pages of Scripture. After exploring the account of Israel's exodus from Egypt, the authors then look at precursors to the exodus in the book of Genesis, as well as echoes of the exodus throughout the rest of the Old Testament and in the New Testament—shedding light on Scripture's unified message of redemption from slavery to sin through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.


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The exodus stands as a pivotal event in the Old Testament—God delivering his people from slavery in Egypt. But if you listen closely to the overarching narrative of the Bible, you will hear echoes of this story of redemption across the pages of Scripture. After exploring the account of Israel's exodus from Egypt, the authors then look at precursors to the exodus in the boo The exodus stands as a pivotal event in the Old Testament—God delivering his people from slavery in Egypt. But if you listen closely to the overarching narrative of the Bible, you will hear echoes of this story of redemption across the pages of Scripture. After exploring the account of Israel's exodus from Egypt, the authors then look at precursors to the exodus in the book of Genesis, as well as echoes of the exodus throughout the rest of the Old Testament and in the New Testament—shedding light on Scripture's unified message of redemption from slavery to sin through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

30 review for Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption Through Scripture

  1. 5 out of 5

    John

    Like Alastair Roberts, I've been profoundly influenced by both James Jordan and Peter Leithart. I'm not familiar with Andrew Wilson, but this book thoroughly impressed me, and I'll be paying close attention to both in years to come. "Echoes of Exodus" is the kind of book that the contemporary church needs desperately. We need to better see the themes in Scripture so that we can better understand it. Apart from biblical theology, interpreters will (and do) flounder in understanding what the Bible Like Alastair Roberts, I've been profoundly influenced by both James Jordan and Peter Leithart. I'm not familiar with Andrew Wilson, but this book thoroughly impressed me, and I'll be paying close attention to both in years to come. "Echoes of Exodus" is the kind of book that the contemporary church needs desperately. We need to better see the themes in Scripture so that we can better understand it. Apart from biblical theology, interpreters will (and do) flounder in understanding what the Bible is actually saying. Not only that, but we gain an unhealthy confidence in our understanding of Scripture, when in fact we've scarcely scratched the surface of meaning. Without biblical theology, we become bored with Scripture because it seems flat and "contained". But in fact, the Bible is bursting with layers of meaning that we too often miss because we fail to see the themes that recur and build on one another. In the beginning of the book, the authors compare the Bible to music--where themes recur, often slightly altering and enriching the theme as the piece progresses. Scripture is like this--multi-layered, rich, and as in music, the themes help us to better understand the story. Roberts and Wilson together help show not only the theme of Exodus so pervasive throughout the Bible, but provide the tools necessary for readers to find them on their own. The authors take the reader through many key passages in the Bible, Old Testament and New, drawing out the theme of Exodus in surprising places. What reader hasn't struggled to understand Exodus 4, where God nearly kills Moses for having not circumcised his son, when his wife, Zipporah, rescues Moses by circumcising their son herself, and then touched Moses's feet with their son's foreskin? Roberts and Wilson help us see this is a type of Exodus. They write: "It is night. Moses has just been told to warn Pharaoh that his firstborn son may be killed because Israel is God's firstborn son. But Moses's own son has not been circumcised, which is the nonnegotiable mark of divine sonship for Israel. Moses has neglected God's commandment and now stands outside the mark of sonship, under the same judgment as Pharaoh. So, not for the first time, a woman comes to Moses's rescue: Zipporah circumcises their son and puts the blood on display, 'covering' Moses with it so that the Lord will not kill him. His son's foreskin becomes the Passover lamb, spread over the beams of his house at nighttime, and Moses is saved. You wonder whether one of the reasons Moses stressed obeying every detail of God's instruction on the first Passover (Exodus 12) was that, in this incident, he had seen something of what happens when you don't." p. 38-39 The book is full of lessons on things such as the "boundary-marking power of water" that we moderns almost entirely fail to comprehend "in our world of bridges and tunnels, ferries and airplanes." p. 44 They also remind us that "Escaping from Egypt is only the first half of the Exodus." p. 47 Roberts and Wilson emphasize the Bible's emphasis on freedom from the bondage of false Lords for bondage to the Only Lord--leading to the Covenant ceremonies and law-giving at Sinai. They argue that there are, "two halves of the exodus--freedom from serving Pharaoh and freedom to serve God..." p. 48 So while they tell and show the themes, they take time to instruct on what to look for ourselves, in our own study. For example, they write, "Desert prophets, associated with water, make way for land prophets associated with rescue." p. 55 They give a longer list of "clues when an exodus story is about to begin." They list "Famines, Journeys into foreign lands, women outmaneuvering powerful men, battles between gods, the oppression of the innocent, a barren woman crying out for a child... gets pregnant and bursts into song..." p. 88 They see themes of Exodus all over the Bible--Hagar (in Genesis), Naomi (in Ruth), David (in Samuel), Solomon becomes a Pharaoh (in 1 Kings), and more. Much like the emergency circumcision to save Moses's life, the unnamed "man of God" from Judah is an elusive character and episode in the Bible. This was another area where biblical theology helps us understand this otherwise cryptic passage. They write God raises up: "a mini-Moses, to judge Jeroboam...confronts the king (as Moses did), confirms his word with a miraculous sign of judgement against him (as Moses did), sees the altar split (as the tablets of stone were split), and sees its ashes poured out (as the golden calf was ground to powder and poured out). More ominously, this prophet gets distracted on his journey, disobeys God, and dies before he reaches his destination (as Moses did). But before he does, he speaks a word of judgment, which is also a word of promise... Like Moses, this man of God can see a future in which God will once again act to deliver the nation by raising up a leader who will abandon foreign gods and unite the nation." p. 102 The last five chapters are focused on the theme of Exodus in the New Testament. I won't elaborate on anything in those chapters, but suffice it to say, the whole book helps us better see this theme in the New Testament, with the authors again helping illuminate Scripture. in very instructive ways. This is, page-for-page, the best book on biblical theology that I've read. I'll be referring to this book frequently as I seek to better use these tools myself in my own reading of Scripture. I have recommended this book widely in person, and will do so again now. This is an outstanding book, and I am heartily encouraged that a "mainstream" publishing house like Crossway was courageous enough to give Roberts and Wilson a platform for bringing this message "to the masses."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tim Sandell

    Very good Bible overview that looks at the theme of exodus throughout scripture. Very short, readable chapters with discussion questions at the end of each chapter.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    A very beautiful and enriching theology book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    A number of years ago I read A House for My Name by Peter Leithart. I didn't remember everything I read (it was, for one thing, far too rich) but it greatly enriched my reading of Scripture. Not only did I now see the theme of tent and house everywhere in the Bible, but I started to notice other narrative threads on my own. This book, which has a recommendation from Leithart, does something similar. It is smaller and less academic (it never even mentions chiasms!), but it alerts the reader to one A number of years ago I read A House for My Name by Peter Leithart. I didn't remember everything I read (it was, for one thing, far too rich) but it greatly enriched my reading of Scripture. Not only did I now see the theme of tent and house everywhere in the Bible, but I started to notice other narrative threads on my own. This book, which has a recommendation from Leithart, does something similar. It is smaller and less academic (it never even mentions chiasms!), but it alerts the reader to one of the Bibles most prominent themes: Exodus. And it does so with brevity, humor, and great style. Of course, like A House for My Name, it has a few points that look stretched. But overall it is deeply convincing and thoroughly enriching. Loved it. And plan to read it again, soon.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rick Davis

    If you've read Peter Leithart's A House for My Name, then this way of reading the Old Testament won't be a stretch for you. This book was pretty short and consequently felt like a mad sprint through the Bible, but there were numerous illuminating tidbits that had never occurred to me before. It's one I'll definitely reread sometime in the future. If you've read Peter Leithart's A House for My Name, then this way of reading the Old Testament won't be a stretch for you. This book was pretty short and consequently felt like a mad sprint through the Bible, but there were numerous illuminating tidbits that had never occurred to me before. It's one I'll definitely reread sometime in the future.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Dedicated to Derek Rishmawy and Matt Anderson. Review here. Dedicated to Derek Rishmawy and Matt Anderson. Review here.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark Barnes

    9/10 (excellent): A first glance, this looks a fairly ordinary biblical theology book — a look at how the theme of the exodus keeps reoccurring through Scripture. This idea is far from new, but Roberts' and Wilson's approach is rather different from that, for example, of N.T. Wright. So there's very little on exile, nor on larger echoes of the exodus motif. Instead, Roberts and Wilson focus on small details of the biblical story that both amplify and echo the exodus story. There's so many fascin 9/10 (excellent): A first glance, this looks a fairly ordinary biblical theology book — a look at how the theme of the exodus keeps reoccurring through Scripture. This idea is far from new, but Roberts' and Wilson's approach is rather different from that, for example, of N.T. Wright. So there's very little on exile, nor on larger echoes of the exodus motif. Instead, Roberts and Wilson focus on small details of the biblical story that both amplify and echo the exodus story. There's so many fascinating snippets. Here's just one, to give you a flavour: The book of Exodus, for most of us, has an exciting half and a boring half: the blood and thunder and escape (Exodus 1–19), followed by the law and the preparation of the tabernacle (20–40). The story of David, likewise, comprises two biblical sections, one of which is vastly more dramatic than the other: the tense, intriguing plot of 1 and 2 Samuel, and the more pedestrian detail of 1 Chronicles, which largely consists of preparation for temple worship. Yet in each case, the authors conclude with the focus on the house of God rather than the fights and betrayals. Exodus ends with the glory of God filling the tabernacle. Second Samuel ends with the purchase of the land on which the temple will be built. First Chronicles ends with a financial offering for the temple, and David’s prayer of thanksgiving. It is as if the authors are saying that David and Moses saw rescue and failure, victory and loss. But more than anything else, they had a passion for the house of God. Overall, thoroughly recommended to anyone who knows their Bible well enough to know there's plenty more to be discovered.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    So much I love about this book. It is beautifully written with a forward-moving drive and cadence. Some of the specific Exodus “echoes” might be a stretch for some, but it’s clear that this redemptive theme is peppered throughout Scripture. In some ways, I felt this was too short of a book; I would’ve given the authors 100 more pages to unpack. Still, this is a devotionally rich book that will cause you to worship the God who rescues us from slavery to sin and will one day take us home to the Pr So much I love about this book. It is beautifully written with a forward-moving drive and cadence. Some of the specific Exodus “echoes” might be a stretch for some, but it’s clear that this redemptive theme is peppered throughout Scripture. In some ways, I felt this was too short of a book; I would’ve given the authors 100 more pages to unpack. Still, this is a devotionally rich book that will cause you to worship the God who rescues us from slavery to sin and will one day take us home to the Promised Land.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    Echoes of Exodus helped me see Bible in a new way, specifically through the lens of The Exodus. Alastair and Andrew highlight how themes of the Exodus run throughout all of the Bible just like musical themes. It gave me a better understanding and greater appreciation for the uniformity of scripture. Often, people in present day look at people of the past and the Bible as unsophisticated, but this book shows that mindset simply lacks imagination. The Bible contains great riches for those who sear Echoes of Exodus helped me see Bible in a new way, specifically through the lens of The Exodus. Alastair and Andrew highlight how themes of the Exodus run throughout all of the Bible just like musical themes. It gave me a better understanding and greater appreciation for the uniformity of scripture. Often, people in present day look at people of the past and the Bible as unsophisticated, but this book shows that mindset simply lacks imagination. The Bible contains great riches for those who search them out. This book is short, but it took me a long time to read because it challenged me to read large portions of Scripture to better see the connections. It is tightly packed with numerous references of passages that are related. Its format allows it to be used many ways, for individuals and groups. The chapters are short, and each ends with questions to encourage the reader to search the Bible for answers and discuss with others. I can't recommend this book enough.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Colvin

    Those familiar with Peter J. Leithart and James B. Jordan will recognize the same sort of typological reading in Wilson and Roberts' survey of Exodus-motifs from Genesis to Revelation. Most of it will not be surprising to those who are used to this sort of reading, but the book does contain a few "echoes" that were new to me. For instance: “When slaves, like Israel, love their masters, they will choose lifelong service over walking away. And the fact that the process for doing this involves blood Those familiar with Peter J. Leithart and James B. Jordan will recognize the same sort of typological reading in Wilson and Roberts' survey of Exodus-motifs from Genesis to Revelation. Most of it will not be surprising to those who are used to this sort of reading, but the book does contain a few "echoes" that were new to me. For instance: “When slaves, like Israel, love their masters, they will choose lifelong service over walking away. And the fact that the process for doing this involves blood and a doorpost (21:6) cannot help but remind us of the Passover.” And again: “Like Pharaoh, Saul tries to kill the anointed leader while he is still young, but fails, ironically through the intervention of his own daughter.” As you can see from this last quotation, the echoes vary considerably in "volume", and their volume can sometimes be artificially enhanced by how Roberts and Wilson phrase the retelling. (Does the author of 1 Samuel really intend us to think of Pharaoh's daughter and the infant Moses? Is the targeted hostility of King Saul against David really to be compared with the blanket edict of extermination issued by Pharaoh against all male infants of the Israelites? Perhaps so, perhaps not.) I laughed out loud when, after surveying Exodus themes in the Pauline epistles, the authors rightly conclude that Paul's use of these themes is a confirmation that they are "there" in the OT. They then exhale: “It may be reassuring to hear that we have not just been blowing smoke in this book.” It is an admission that the identification of echoes does not admit of exact proof. In some cases, more argument would be welcome, but that isn't really this book's style: its persuasion comes from heaping up "echoes" until their cumulative weight is overwhelming. If there is a bit of chaff still in the heap of grain — an unconvincing or forced "echo" here or there — it does not much detract from the weight of the whole. Yet the lack of argumentation is surprising to me, for if Alastair Roberts is known for anything, it is his ability to reason and persuade. A discussion of the book on the Mere Fidelity podcast (Roberts and Wilson are both regular participants) reveals that it had its genesis in Alastair's attempts to persuade Andrew of this way of reading. Given that the two co-authors are quite different in their handling of the Bible at other times, and that Wilson may not embrace all of Roberts' hermeneutical assumptions, perhaps we should see the book as the fruit of their interaction, and not expect the sort of deeper argumentation that Roberts is known for providing in other writings. There is one passage of the book that most piqued my interest: “Debate often swirls as to which “model” or “image” of the atonement is most central to Paul—reconciliation, justification, victory, penal substitution, and so on—but when it is laid out like this, it is difficult to avoid concluding that the language of redemption, understood through the story of Passover and exodus, is at least as important as the others. ” Here Roberts – I feel sure it was Roberts, and not Wilson – hints at the possibility of making "Exodus" a model of atonement in Christian theology. That's a radical proposal, all the more daring because it undercuts the other models with its greater Jewishness and more obvious prominence in Paul's discourse about justification. It is the sort of observation that N.T. Wright might make, and it entails a narrative worldview. Atonement-as-Exodus is not incompatible with other models (e.g. Christus Victor or penal substitution), of course. But it may be more important than the others, and exploring it may be more productive of insights into the logic of Paul's thinking. The chapter on the Exodus in Paul was my favourite, and its suggestions would bear further investigation.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This is an odd book to review, because it somewhat falls between two stools, and I still find myself liking it. On the one hand, you can approach it as someone who has deeply imbibed James Jordan deeply, in which case you had already figured out much of what is in here, or you could approach it as someone who is unfamiliar with biblical typology, in which case it will feel stretched and thin. I would certainly hope that people would be open-minded enough to believe this book, and I think it's ac This is an odd book to review, because it somewhat falls between two stools, and I still find myself liking it. On the one hand, you can approach it as someone who has deeply imbibed James Jordan deeply, in which case you had already figured out much of what is in here, or you could approach it as someone who is unfamiliar with biblical typology, in which case it will feel stretched and thin. I would certainly hope that people would be open-minded enough to believe this book, and I think it's actually more defensible than most Biblical Horizons type explorations, but I think slow, detailed engagements with texts are the way to go for initiating people to the literary typology method. If you are already familiar with Jordan though, you may very well be refreshed anyway, as I was for long stretches of the book. I think the most valuable stuff is the first few chapters leading up to Genesis, and the chapter on Acts. I had already known that each of the patriarchs had something of a descent-re-ascent with Pharaoh, Abimelech, Laban, and Egypt more generally, but seeing it here in detail was immensely helpful, as were the "pre-Exodus" parts of Exodus. And the stuff on Acts I don't think we've really figured out, but the Ananias and Saphira as Achan parallel was powerfully persuasive, as were the other echoes of Exodus in the book. I will have to return to it soon. In many ways, choosing to limit themselves to just the Exodus was a genius move, since it allowed them to really dig in on one thing while going all over the place, but sometimes I felt like the book could be longer and could have quoted more verses. It commonly would make a list of parallels to the Exodus and then leave us to draw them, which although I appreciate the respect it renders the reader sometimes makes it feel Platonic and detached from the individuality of the texts. The stuff that was especially thin on the ground was the zoom over 1 Samuel and 1 Kings, and worst of all Isaiah and Jeremiah. There are so many little hints of Exodus in Jeremiah (and Leithart says the same of Isaiah) that I was expecting to be able to get a broader vision of the books and an idea of how they develop, but it was more along the lines of "see, it's here too!" It would have been interesting if they could have shown how Isaiah and Jeremiah were different from the other Exoduses and that brings me to my conclusion. It is unusual that we have spent so much time pondering typology and the literary connections found in Scripture, without asking the fundamental question, "Why?" Why is it that Jesus does not simply die on the cross right after Adam gets kicked out of the Garden? Why do we have all these little pictures of Jesus scattered throughout Israelite history? At times, the author allude to what is at the least a part of it and may be the whole: that God loves to remind his people and that seeing him delivering his people again and again is how He strengthens our faith. Still, I can't confess that I am a little dissatisfied, and to confide in you the reader, this brings me to a point that I'm still working through: is it possible that there is a progression in the Old Testament? Is it possible that God is putting Exodus in different keys and giving us different typologies at different moments because He is trying to develop a multi-dimensional picture of Jesus? Is it connected to the fact that there are four Gospels? Can we connect this to the maturation of Israel, as found in Galatians? That's the question I'm asking, and though this book didn't answer these questions, it did remind me that they are legitimate questions when we face such an abundance of Echoes.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Thanks Mr. Caneday for sending this book to my husband, and thanks Mike for letting me read it first! This book was so readable. The chapters are short, the writing is good, the information is all very interesting essentially making it a non-fiction-pageturner. The authors opened my eyes to all sorts of things to see and look for when reading my Bible. There are so many connections mentioned, most of which I'm sure I would never see on my own. I loved the music analogy laid out in the introduction Thanks Mr. Caneday for sending this book to my husband, and thanks Mike for letting me read it first! This book was so readable. The chapters are short, the writing is good, the information is all very interesting essentially making it a non-fiction-pageturner. The authors opened my eyes to all sorts of things to see and look for when reading my Bible. There are so many connections mentioned, most of which I'm sure I would never see on my own. I loved the music analogy laid out in the introduction and carried throughout. It seems very fitting to think about the Bible in this way: listening to a piece of music and listening for recurring themes throughout the piece. I loved this book! Are there more like it somewhere?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    Excellent. Will revisit this one for family devotions.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    A thorough review of the exilic patterns from Genesis onward. I thought I knew most of them, but the book pointed out even more. A very enjoyable and eye-opening read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Josh Wong

    Studying theology should be delightful. It is sometimes regarded as boring, daunting, intimidating, but really it should be delightful. Echoes of Exodus is a book that will push you towards rediscovering the delight of biblical theology. This quick review will cover 3 aspects/highlights of the book which contribute towards that. Reading Scripture musically The book introduces the concept of reading the entirety of Scripture as a musical piece. As the title suggests, Roberts & Wilson (the authors) Studying theology should be delightful. It is sometimes regarded as boring, daunting, intimidating, but really it should be delightful. Echoes of Exodus is a book that will push you towards rediscovering the delight of biblical theology. This quick review will cover 3 aspects/highlights of the book which contribute towards that. Reading Scripture musically The book introduces the concept of reading the entirety of Scripture as a musical piece. As the title suggests, Roberts & Wilson (the authors) demonstrate that echoes of Exodus can be seen throughout the Bible, both pre and post Exodus. The use of echo is deliberate, the book deliberately uses musical metaphors to describe Scripture. References are made to the gospels written in different keys, identify different books with specific themes/genres, identify recurring themes, rhythms and echoes that build to a crescendo, and even identifies a clash as a discordant note. The resulting analysis can be quite abstract at first, but as somebody with a musical background (albeit not that great), it is fascinating to see the different parallels unfold. The story and themes in Exodus that re-appear throughout the rest of the Bible no longer seem like mere coincidences or reaches. Suddenly when taking into account the harmony of God’s Word and plan, it makes sense that we see everything building up towards the coming of the Messiah and His eventual return. I see Exodus and Joshua differently, I see Daniel and David differently, I see Samson differently. This book has challenged me to think back on how it relates to Exodus, and how it ultimately relates to Christ. That’s exactly what good biblical theology should drive us and challenge us to do. Exodus from, and exodus towards This is just one of the many themes and narratives that are expounded in the book, but I chose this one to give a preview and highlight what goodness you can expect. Roberts & Wilson correctly identify that most of how we read Exodus is focused on the first part: the exodus from. We see how Israel has been freed from Egypt and the forces of darkness. But we often neglect that equally as important, if not more important, is that God leads us from darkness so that we can be lead towards Him. It is the same reasoning as Paul when he describes himself as a slave to Christ, because the alternative would be a slave to sin. This is important because we need to identify that we are not just freed from sin, but we are then free to worship and submit to God in His fullness. Echoes of Exodus does a great job hammering home this point throughout, and it does this by showing the failure of God’s people to do that. Yes, Israel was brought out of Egypt, but they failed to do so in their worship of the golden calf. Yet this story and lesson constantly resurfaces throughout the Bible, despite God’s faithfulness. The reminder therefore rings heavy for us today not only in the corporate church’s life, but our personal lives. It’s a short book The book length is 178 pages, although in reality it’s probably around 140 ish with its blank pages and index. It is split into 4 “movements” over 22 chapters, with each chapter only spanning around 5-7 pages. Brevity and conciseness isn’t a bad thing, but you might perhaps be wanting something more substantive, longer and more detailed. This is not meant to be a book that goes into detailed exegesis of each book to show the links to Exodus. Rather it is meant to be a “hey, did you miss this reference when reading the Gospels?” type thing. That might be a consideration before you purchase. Each chapter also comes with review and study questions, so it is possible to use this for a group or Bible study, although I note that you would have to do your own self-study to do this, the book alone I don’t think is sufficient. Overall, this is a book that I am happy to recommend, and I plan on revisiting it again with greater scrutiny to really identify and study closer on the finer details of the exodus themes throughout Scripture. Note: I am aware that there is another book also entitled Echoes of Exodus: Tracing a Biblical Motif by Bryan Estelle. I have not read this so I can’t compare with that, although it seems that one looks longer at 384 pages. I was provided with this complimentary copy of Echoes of Exodus as part of the Crossway Blog Review Program to review. Feel free to check them out to learn more!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily Jane

    I read this book as part of a study group at church. Overall it brought new links and insights of the biblical narrative of the exodus for members of the group and the questions were sometimes helpful for discussion. A few members were quite vocal about disliking the book. They felt that it over-stretched the theme of exodus where the meaning of the passages/books could become overlooked in attempts to fit an interpretation into a previous agenda. On a similar note, rather than enabling the reve I read this book as part of a study group at church. Overall it brought new links and insights of the biblical narrative of the exodus for members of the group and the questions were sometimes helpful for discussion. A few members were quite vocal about disliking the book. They felt that it over-stretched the theme of exodus where the meaning of the passages/books could become overlooked in attempts to fit an interpretation into a previous agenda. On a similar note, rather than enabling the revelation of Jesus to interpret the exodus, it limited Jesus to this particular interpretation. The brief and short chapters turned the book into more of a check-list of what is mirrored in Exodus and other books, rather than taking time to explore these in more depth. For that reason, grand and sweeping statements were sometimes made without explanation and many chapters simply listed parallel references without taking the thought any further. However this is a good book if this way of reading the Bible is new to you and makes some important points about the importance of the figure of Moses and the exodus story, which are often overlooked in traditions I have been a part of that favour a telling of the Biblical story exclusively through Paul's rendition of the gospel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sonny

    When we hear the word “exodus”, we usually think of Moses and Pharaoh, Egypt and slavery, plagues and Passover, and crossing the Red Sea. But if you think the exodus as simply a story in the Pentateuch, think again. In their book, “Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption through Scripture”, Roberts and Wilson make a persuasive argument that the exodus is a pervasive pattern that runs through Scripture. The authors have chosen to explore auditory metaphors in what they call a “musical read When we hear the word “exodus”, we usually think of Moses and Pharaoh, Egypt and slavery, plagues and Passover, and crossing the Red Sea. But if you think the exodus as simply a story in the Pentateuch, think again. In their book, “Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption through Scripture”, Roberts and Wilson make a persuasive argument that the exodus is a pervasive pattern that runs through Scripture. The authors have chosen to explore auditory metaphors in what they call a “musical reading of Scripture.” They believe that reading Scripture is like taking in a symphony; every note is important and contributes to the whole. Moreover, they believe that there is a common tune—the exodus—that recurs throughout the Scriptures for those who have ears to hear. This musical reading structures the entire book. The chapters are organized into five parts: an “overture” followed by four “movements.” “Echoes of Exodus” is full of valuable insights and demonstrates the importance of exodus motifs for biblical interpretation. The prose is often beautiful. Nevertheless, a small degree of criticism is warranted. Roberts and Wilson have written a shorter work (159 pages) aimed at a popular audience; the book might have benefited from being a little longer and more technical, something suited for higher-level study. The proposed connections are at times strained, stretching the limits of your credulity. But more often I was stunned at the textual connections they were making. Even if you hear only half the echoes of exodus they want you to, you’ll likely be hearing twice as many as you do now. So, prepare to be challenged and hopefully transformed.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I loved the exuberance of this book. It creates a great apologetic for learning to read the Bible well. You can tell these guys love their Bibles. In the grand sweeps, I think their reading of the exodus theme through the Bible is helpful. . . . However, there is so much speculation and statement without adequate groundwork, that it gets harder and harder to "trust" their readings as the book progresses. There are many places where you simply think, "huh? where did they get that?" But then there I loved the exuberance of this book. It creates a great apologetic for learning to read the Bible well. You can tell these guys love their Bibles. In the grand sweeps, I think their reading of the exodus theme through the Bible is helpful. . . . However, there is so much speculation and statement without adequate groundwork, that it gets harder and harder to "trust" their readings as the book progresses. There are many places where you simply think, "huh? where did they get that?" But then there aren't adequate references to the text or explanation to show how they got to the observation. In their defense, they do say in the introduction that they are going to lean away from "caution," but I think this undermines the project if they can't adequately show how they are doing their work.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hin-Tai

    A great survey of Exodus themes across the entire Bible. Very encouraging in seeing the depth of literary allusions and intertextuality of Scripture and some beautiful writing in places too. I would, however, have loved reading a lot more discussion on the why; what is the significance of the repetition of Exodus themes? How do they develop? How do these repetitions inform our understandings of slavery, liberation, freedom, the mountaintop, encountering God, law, God's Spirit, conquest, idolatry A great survey of Exodus themes across the entire Bible. Very encouraging in seeing the depth of literary allusions and intertextuality of Scripture and some beautiful writing in places too. I would, however, have loved reading a lot more discussion on the why; what is the significance of the repetition of Exodus themes? How do they develop? How do these repetitions inform our understandings of slavery, liberation, freedom, the mountaintop, encountering God, law, God's Spirit, conquest, idolatry, sin, God's people? These questions were raised, but at points, it felt a bit light in its development and examiantion, and the authors seemed content to simply point out the existence similarities and recapitulations. Still, highly recommended.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    I really enjoyed this book. The authors draw parallels between Israel's exodus from Egypt into the Promised Land, and a lot of other stories from the Bible, both from the Old and New Testaments. My favorite part of the book was that they used music as an analogy for Scripture, and used musical terms to talk about it, e.g., prophets are different instruments in the orchestra, the silence between the testaments is a rest, seemingly contradictory statements are dissonances, etc. I really enjoyed this book. The authors draw parallels between Israel's exodus from Egypt into the Promised Land, and a lot of other stories from the Bible, both from the Old and New Testaments. My favorite part of the book was that they used music as an analogy for Scripture, and used musical terms to talk about it, e.g., prophets are different instruments in the orchestra, the silence between the testaments is a rest, seemingly contradictory statements are dissonances, etc.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sam Strickland

    This reads as a really excellent little gem of biblical theology. Roberts and Wilson use the metaphor of musical reading to examine the continued resonance of an Old Testament narrative throughout scripture. It’s also refreshing to see a biblical theology written for a popular audience that doesn’t fall into a cliche framework (ie Christocentrism).

  22. 5 out of 5

    John Funnell

    This is a fantastic little read that has given me several golden nuggets. The Exodus is one of many holistic themes that unite the cannon. Superbly argued in bite-sized chapters that are perfect for daily devotionals. Chapters 15 & 20 were particularly special for me. Would like to see a series in similar vein.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    “Scripture is music.” And this outstanding book will help you hear it as such! Biblical theology (the discipline) at its finest. “Scripture is music.” And this outstanding book will help you hear it as such! Biblical theology (the discipline) at its finest.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ian Rees

    A superb summary of the way that the pattern of the Exodus appears right across the whole of Scripture. There are some thrilling summaries and cross-references, all showing how the Exodus defines how God saves throughout history. Highly readable and highly recommended!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    This books adds a rich and beautiful layer to the depth of the Bible. It gives life to the importance of the exodus story and shows how it continues throughout the entire scripture. I really enjoyed the read and will reference this book often.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laurent Dv

    My favourite (particularly for a first reading of biblical theology) book for getting a strong overview of the Bible (biblical theology). A huge number of insights, each chapter very short and very understandable, and strongly devotionnal (with questions at the end of each chapter).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Drew Bennett

    This really is a fabulous book. It is short. Readable. Packed with Biblical Theology.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Brady

    Best Christian book I've read in a long time. Can see myself revisiting it for years to come. Best Christian book I've read in a long time. Can see myself revisiting it for years to come.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dave Betts

    Outrageously good. Wonderful insight, brilliant pace - I can’t wait to recommend this to anyone I can!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Zack Clemmons

    Biblical theology at its homiletic finest.

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