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Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero - a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime! Vo Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero - a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime! Volume I includes the early novel A Study in Scarlet, which introduced the eccentric genius of Sherlock Holmes to the world. This baffling murder mystery, with the cryptic word Rache written in blood, first brought Holmes together with Dr. John Watson. Next, The Sign of Four presents Holmes’s famous “seven percent solution” and the strange puzzle of Mary Morstan in the quintessential locked - room mystery. Also included are Holmes’s feats of extraordinary detection in such famous cases as the chilling “ The Adventure of the Speckled Band,” the baffling riddle of “The Musgrave Ritual,” and the ingeniously plotted “The Five Orange Pips,” tales that bring to life a Victorian England of horse-drawn cabs, fogs, and the famous lodgings at 221B Baker Street, where Sherlock Holmes earned his undisputed reputation as the greatest fictional detective of all time. A study in scarlet -- The sign of four -- Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: A scandal in Bohemia; The red-headed league; A case of identity; The Boscombe Valley mystery; The five orange pips; The man with the twisted lip; The adventure of the blue carbuncle; The adventure of the speckled band; The adventure of the engineer's thumb; The adventure of the noble bachelor; The adventure of the beryl coronet; The adventure of the copper beeches; Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes: Silver blaze; The yellow face; The stock-broker's clerk; The "Gloria Scott"; The musgrave ritual; The Reigate puzzle; The crooked man; The resident patient; The greek interpreter; The naval treaty; The final problem; The return of Sherlock Holmes: The adventure of the empty house; The adventure of the Norwood builder; The adventure of the dancing men; The adventure of the solitary cyclist; The adventure of the priory school; The adventure of Black Peter; The adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton; The adventure of the six Napoleons; The adventure of the three students; The adventure of the golden pince-nez; The adventure of the missing three-quarter; The adventure of the abbey grange; The adventure of the second stain.


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Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero - a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime! Vo Since his first appearance in Beeton’s Christmas Annual in 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes has been one of the most beloved fictional characters ever created. Now, in two paperback volumes, Bantam presents all fifty-six short stories and four novels featuring Conan Doyle’s classic hero - a truly complete collection of Sherlock Holmes’s adventures in crime! Volume I includes the early novel A Study in Scarlet, which introduced the eccentric genius of Sherlock Holmes to the world. This baffling murder mystery, with the cryptic word Rache written in blood, first brought Holmes together with Dr. John Watson. Next, The Sign of Four presents Holmes’s famous “seven percent solution” and the strange puzzle of Mary Morstan in the quintessential locked - room mystery. Also included are Holmes’s feats of extraordinary detection in such famous cases as the chilling “ The Adventure of the Speckled Band,” the baffling riddle of “The Musgrave Ritual,” and the ingeniously plotted “The Five Orange Pips,” tales that bring to life a Victorian England of horse-drawn cabs, fogs, and the famous lodgings at 221B Baker Street, where Sherlock Holmes earned his undisputed reputation as the greatest fictional detective of all time. A study in scarlet -- The sign of four -- Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: A scandal in Bohemia; The red-headed league; A case of identity; The Boscombe Valley mystery; The five orange pips; The man with the twisted lip; The adventure of the blue carbuncle; The adventure of the speckled band; The adventure of the engineer's thumb; The adventure of the noble bachelor; The adventure of the beryl coronet; The adventure of the copper beeches; Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes: Silver blaze; The yellow face; The stock-broker's clerk; The "Gloria Scott"; The musgrave ritual; The Reigate puzzle; The crooked man; The resident patient; The greek interpreter; The naval treaty; The final problem; The return of Sherlock Holmes: The adventure of the empty house; The adventure of the Norwood builder; The adventure of the dancing men; The adventure of the solitary cyclist; The adventure of the priory school; The adventure of Black Peter; The adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton; The adventure of the six Napoleons; The adventure of the three students; The adventure of the golden pince-nez; The adventure of the missing three-quarter; The adventure of the abbey grange; The adventure of the second stain.

30 review for Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, Volume I

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    November 2011 Oh, Sherlock Holmes, where have you been all my life? "Abstinence works!" --Rick Perry Murder! Intrigue! Theft! Blackmail! Here, in two novels and 36 stories, are some of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes, as recorded by his trusty friend and sidekick Dr. John Watson, from their first fateful meeting to Holmes's apparent death and surprising return, and beyond--featuring murderous Mormons, Klansmen without Konscience, mysterious American ladies with mysterious pasts, kidnappers, waywar November 2011 Oh, Sherlock Holmes, where have you been all my life? "Abstinence works!" --Rick Perry Murder! Intrigue! Theft! Blackmail! Here, in two novels and 36 stories, are some of the adventures of Sherlock Holmes, as recorded by his trusty friend and sidekick Dr. John Watson, from their first fateful meeting to Holmes's apparent death and surprising return, and beyond--featuring murderous Mormons, Klansmen without Konscience, mysterious American ladies with mysterious pasts, kidnappers, wayward clerks, giants, hunters, bad men, good men, beasts of all natures and descriptions--oops, sorry, got carried away there. All the familiar characters are here: Irene Adler, Professor Moriarty, cocaine, Mycroft Holmes, Inspector Lestrade, cocaine! Ripping yarns and thrilling mysteries galore! What are you waiting for? Onward, to adventure! Gubner Rick Perry doesn't like to admit it, but abstinence-only programs don't work; teens and young adults will do what they like no matter how many lectures and pledges and rings are foisted on them. You can't stop it. And just as it is unrealistic to expect people to remain celibate until marriage, it is just as difficult--no, almost impossible--to approach the Sherlock Holmes stories as a complete virgin. Well, you Holmeswhores can speak for yourselves--I almost did it. Sure, I may have been diddled by Uncle Walt when I was young, and I kinda fooled around a bit with a dog named Wishbone, but hey, I was just a kid, I didn't know any better! And fine, maaaaybe I got to first or second base in high school English with "The Red-Headed League," but it doesn’t really count if we kept our pants on. It was just the one time, honest! And then I had a one-night stand with the BBC's Sherlock. Several times. First time I was hanging out with friends, second time I found it on Netflix, and the, uh, I'm sorry, I can't remember the third time. Oops. Really, though, when you think about it, it isn't easy. Sherlock Holmes has been in movies for over a hundred years--but I've seen none of them. Radio--nope. "Continuing adventures" from other writers--also nope. Television shows--well, there were a few Wishbone episodes, and the first two episodes of Sherlock, but nothing else. Detective stories "inspired" by Doyle--Nate the Great, the Encyclopedia Brown stories, Disney's The Great Mouse Detective, and I suppose House, M.D. counts too--but, like Shakespeare plays, and like the Bible, the Sherlock Holmes stories are practically universal, and yet my exposure to them, before now, was almost nil. Somehow, incredibly, I was the 24-year-old Sherlock Holmes virgin. And I am glad I waited. I picked up Bantam Classics' 2-volume set of Sherlock Holmes stories last year; Volume I includes the novels A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of the Four, plus the three collections Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and The Return of Sherlock Holmes. At over 1,000 pages it was pretty hefty, even for a mmpb, and I thought it would be wise to take my time-- starry-eyed virgin that I was, I thought I could space the stories out, spend a few months savoring the collection, read a story a day to avoid getting bored, then take a long break and pick up Vol. II sometime next year. Silly me. I devoured Scarlet in the space of two days, consumed Four not long after, swallowed the collections whole, licked my plate, and asked for seconds. (this may or may not still be a sex metaphor--you decide!) It was only with the strongest amount of willpower that I paced myself, a bit, by taking small breaks between the novels and collections--enough to take a breath, that is--and my plan to wait a few months before starting Vol II. fell apart rather quickly as I cleared my short story schedule to fit in more Holmes...which I read just as quickly, and recently finished. And what a feast! I may be stuffed to the gills (ok, this isn't a sex metaphor anymore), I may be fat and happy (ditto), but dammit, I want more Holmes! More! MORE! Looks like it's time to try those movies and tv shows and books I've been avoiding. What can I say, I'm a Sherlock slut. Finished Reviews: A Study in Scarlet (More to come!)

  2. 4 out of 5

    kwesi 章英狮

    Sherlock Holmes become popular for decades and most of his adventures had been adapted to movies, graphic novels, animation and books related to him. But who's this guy who created the best detective of all time? Arthur Conan Doyle, a Scottish physician and a writer, created one of the best classic detectives. He was born weak when he was young and become alone most of his life but writing is never a hindrance on his part. He was inspired to write Sherlock Holmes when he practice his medicine in Sherlock Holmes become popular for decades and most of his adventures had been adapted to movies, graphic novels, animation and books related to him. But who's this guy who created the best detective of all time? Arthur Conan Doyle, a Scottish physician and a writer, created one of the best classic detectives. He was born weak when he was young and become alone most of his life but writing is never a hindrance on his part. He was inspired to write Sherlock Holmes when he practice his medicine in Portsmouth, because of his unsuccessful practice for many years he wrote his first novel The Narrative of John Smith, but it was published until 2011. He become aware of his talent as a writer and he proved it to everyone after writing The Study in Scarlet which was first published in Beeton's Christmas Annual for 1887. After that success again, he continue writing. The first volume of the book composes of 2 novels (The Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four) and 3 compilation of short stories and mini adventures of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson (Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Memoir of Sherlock Holmes and The Return of Sherlock Holmes). This very thick book won't stop you from reading it but I suggest, as the reader, that you don't have to read it consecutively not because you'll bored to death but to enjoy his writing faithfully. Another problem with his stories is that he only uses the same formula from the first novel until the last story. I think most of you guys already read his stories and I think most of you manage to find the similarities if each story but still the fun of reading it never ends because of Arthur Conan Doyle's surprises in the end of each story. So far, I only enjoyed one story or novel in the book; The Story in Scarlet - This is the first published work of Arthur Conan Doyle and I loved it! The story first introduced the narrator, the doctor from the war, Dr. John Watson, came upon this idea to be with Sherlock Holmes after a crisis to pay his rent. After that unexpected meeting, he becomes aware of the presence of the mad scientist and they become one of the greatest superheroes without powers in their own generation. What I love about the novel is that he uses science (of course, because he is a doctor) and common sense to solve the cases. It was simple but how he delivered the story made it more powerful and surprising. One thing he usually do is to make the killer hidden in the first few chapter and will only appear in the end of the story. That is the reason why, if you are looking for a good guess-the-murderer-book please don't read this. And the others... Well, they have all the same formula and I don't have further comments about them or had this urge to discuss further from it. Some are interesting but some are totally duplicated by each other and a little make-up and everything is okay. I don't know where my cat goes and I'll try to find help from Sherlock Holmes later but first, I want to remind you guys that your life is at stake! Review posted on Old-Fashioned Reader . Rating: Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories, Volume 1 by Arthur Conan Doyle, 3 Sweets Challenges: Book #269 for 2011 Book #131 for Off the Shelf!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    You wanna know why I love Sherlock Holmes so much? Really? And why I've read every novel and story Arthur Conan Doyle ever wrote concerning the character, as well as many of the modern adventures and nearly all the film and TV adaptations? Because Sherlock Holmes is a magnificent a--hole. Seriously; because he's brilliant, and haughty, and doesn't affect a false modesty to appease any of the dimwitted swarm around him, and is actually rewarded for this in Conan Doyle's Victorian London world, in You wanna know why I love Sherlock Holmes so much? Really? And why I've read every novel and story Arthur Conan Doyle ever wrote concerning the character, as well as many of the modern adventures and nearly all the film and TV adaptations? Because Sherlock Holmes is a magnificent a--hole. Seriously; because he's brilliant, and haughty, and doesn't affect a false modesty to appease any of the dimwitted swarm around him, and is actually rewarded for this in Conan Doyle's Victorian London world, instead of being punished for it as most brilliant disturbed geniuses are throughout history. And this I'm sure is what keeps the master detective so continually popular among even the most contemporary of audiences, even with the BBC filming yet another new version the year before I'm wrote this review (or 2006, that is), even as so many of the popular characters from Victorian fantastical literature are right now permanently turning towards obscurity, even others invented by Conan Doyle as well. (A little Professor Challenger, anyone? Hello?) A perfect read this day and age for anyone who enjoys a tightly-plotted story concerning a deeply complex character.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Selkie ✦ Queen

    Growing up with books, I used to read my father's collection of medical and legal thrillers when I was ten, and then he bought me the Harry Potter series, and I realized that I could fall in love with books after all. Though J.K Rowling may be the author that introduced me to that possibility, it was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's timeless creation Sherlock Holmes who won my heart when I was twelve and his grip hasn't let up since. The Sherlock Holmes stories were the source of modern crime-solving ad Growing up with books, I used to read my father's collection of medical and legal thrillers when I was ten, and then he bought me the Harry Potter series, and I realized that I could fall in love with books after all. Though J.K Rowling may be the author that introduced me to that possibility, it was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's timeless creation Sherlock Holmes who won my heart when I was twelve and his grip hasn't let up since. The Sherlock Holmes stories were the source of modern crime-solving adaptations that we now experience in television, and Doyle's tales of mystery and adventure were often audacious, insightful and clever. The real draw of his stories is the process of crime detection ("deductive reasoning") that Doyle allows the readers to understand, experience and apply themselves alongside Watson as Holmes investigates the cases. The Complete Sherlock Holmes volumes 1 and 2 by Bantam publishing co. had never changed its price from the first time I bought it back in 2003 until the present. They're affordable and therefore anyone who is interested in the Great Detective will have an easy access. With the modern adaptations of Holmes lately (from the Guy Ritchie films to BBC's Sherlock), a new reader may be surprised to find out that Doyle's stories are more self-contained as opposed to the James-Bond tone and setting of the modern interpretations mentioned (in fact, the American adaptation Elementary is a lot more faithful to the original structure of the narrative). Nevertheless, the Doyle canon (composed of 56 short stories classified into the Adventures, Memoirs, Return, His Last Bow and Casebook; and four novels) are more engrossing and intimate to read as Watson's accounts manages to illuminate Holmes' methods as well as humanize the often callous, razor-sharp and unfeeling sleuth. Volume 1 encompasses The Adventures, The Memoirs and the novels A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. A Scarlet in Scarlet has an unusual structure; the first part was the formulaic detective exposition with the introduction of the characters, the presentation of the crime, and the roster of suspects. The second part was entirely a flashback that reveals the history of the criminal himself which is quite a perplexing plot device and Doyle had definitely experimented the first time around but has since learned to contain his cases with more creative restraint. The Sign of Four, my personal favorite, was about as close as to romance as a Holmes story could get, possibly because of Watson's relationship with his wife-to-be Mary Morstan and the struggles she faced pertaining to her heirloom. The next set of short stories, Adventures and Memoirs, are each composed of twelve cases and some of them are most unforgettable because of the blend of absurdity and horror (such as the Musgrave Ritual, Five Orange Pips, Red-Headed league and Speckled Band). The Final Problem marks the death of Sherlock Holmes which the public vehemently protested so Doyle was forced to revive his sleuth and hence the second volume of the canon. Volume 2 contains the ever-popular The Hound of Baskervilles and the chilling novel A Valley of Fear. The short stories are divided into The Return, The Casebook and His Last Bow. My favorites include The Problem of Thor Bridge, Devil's Foot, The Dying Detective, The Illustrious Client, and His Last Bow. Holmes himself got to write his own accounts of the cases in The Blanched Solider and The Lion's Mane (which are both odd tales and here it is revealed once and for all that Watson's narrative voice is a lot more beguiling than Holmes' dry and scientific approach of storytelling). It is worth noting that when Holmes returned from the grave, Doyle has completely added more ambiguous layers to his personality and characterization which is why the second volume is the most enjoyable for its gray shades of morality and scope of justice and punishment. It has been ages since I read this collection and I plan to pick it up again soon. For instant gratification, the Granada series starring Jeremy Brett is the closest adaptation to the original source material. You may want to check that out once you've finished or while you are reading Doyle. RECOMMENDED: 10/10 * Doyle revitalized detective fiction and wrote a character he did not like himself but whose very existence still captures the imagination and hearts of many readers across generations.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carson

    Whether it is the introduction of Holmes and Watson from "The Study in Scarlet," the intriguing "The Sign of Four," or the infamous encounters with Irene Adler and Professor Moriarty, these stories are rich, engaging, well-scripted and thoroughly enjoyable. The format of many short stories in rapid succession keeps things fresh while continuing to present Holmes' uncanny abilities and tales one after another. The writing still feels fresh, the vocabulary extraordinary and the banter and mysteries Whether it is the introduction of Holmes and Watson from "The Study in Scarlet," the intriguing "The Sign of Four," or the infamous encounters with Irene Adler and Professor Moriarty, these stories are rich, engaging, well-scripted and thoroughly enjoyable. The format of many short stories in rapid succession keeps things fresh while continuing to present Holmes' uncanny abilities and tales one after another. The writing still feels fresh, the vocabulary extraordinary and the banter and mysteries just as relevant and exciting now as I'd imagine they were in the 19th century. 5 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Despite this taking me one year to finish, I loved it and I didn't realize I was going to love it as much as I did. Any of the Sherlock novels are worth your time, they are delightful.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ruchita

    I first devoured these stories and novels at the age of fourteen, curled up in my room on winter nights. It was a long winter, I remember. It was also quite a long book. Few points in my life have had circumstances come together and arrange themselves in such an agreeable manner so as to make a reading experience as memorable as this one. Like most readers, I entered the world of Sherlock Holmes - at once stretching between the streets of London with in all its vividness, to the deeper, richer wo I first devoured these stories and novels at the age of fourteen, curled up in my room on winter nights. It was a long winter, I remember. It was also quite a long book. Few points in my life have had circumstances come together and arrange themselves in such an agreeable manner so as to make a reading experience as memorable as this one. Like most readers, I entered the world of Sherlock Holmes - at once stretching between the streets of London with in all its vividness, to the deeper, richer world beyond - into the mind of the man whose name this novel bears - with A Study In Scarlet. And from then on, there was no turning back. Sherlock Holmes stories are interesting and endlessly entertaining. I still remember the initial scepticism (much like our dear Dr. Watson) and then the increasing awe and astonishment with which I read Holmes' descriptions of Dr. Watson without first having seen or heard of the man. (The awe and amazement that I speak of were provoked, of course, when Holmes explained how he deducted his findings. The findings were first greeted with scepticism when first pronounced in his typical, Holmes manner. 'Every thing is simple once it's explained,' Holmes once famously complained.) To this day I remain in awe of Holmes intellect, his passion for rigorous mental athletics, his laid back approach, his suaveness and his style. If there's one man to have come out of the Victorian era who had style - encompassing both his intellectual rigour and individual eccentricity - it's this beloved fictional detective who has entertained countless generations of readers for decades, and will for years to come. I will always look back on the December of 2005 with fond recollections of the wonder, thrill, fear and 'aha!' that I felt at various times, often simultaneously, and even after re-reads, while reading these stories. There are few ways as good to spend long winter nights than escaping - for an escape is what these delicious stories offer us readers - into the adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Here's to Holmes and Watson!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn

    I did it, finished this book before the end of the month. I really stayed with it because the stories were that good. Doyle is brilliant in his writings and engaged me throughout this very long book. In the memoirs section, I passed by 2 stories - Silver Blaze and The Gloria Scott, the story did not catch me quickly. In the Return of Sherlock section, I passed by The Adventures of Black Peter for the same reason. Also, my question this evening what happened to Watson's wife? At the beginning of I did it, finished this book before the end of the month. I really stayed with it because the stories were that good. Doyle is brilliant in his writings and engaged me throughout this very long book. In the memoirs section, I passed by 2 stories - Silver Blaze and The Gloria Scott, the story did not catch me quickly. In the Return of Sherlock section, I passed by The Adventures of Black Peter for the same reason. Also, my question this evening what happened to Watson's wife? At the beginning of the Return of Sherlock section in the story The Adventure of the Norwood Builder, Watson mentions he has sold his medical practice and moved back to Baker Street with Holmes. Volume 2 of this will remain on my tbr list for awhile though. FYI, never have I watched any of the TV series on PBS either. My favourite line is on pg. 241 "As a rule," said Holmes "the more bizarre a thing is the less mysterious it proves to be. It is your commonplace, feature-less crimes which are really puzzling, just as a commonplace face is the most difficult to identify."

  9. 5 out of 5

    Zoe Artemis Spencer Reid

    Second time read and still love it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ṣafā

    This is the most beautiful, sensational, adorable book ever. As ever, I fell in love with London, Victorian London, all over again, because this is what happens with Classics, like by Dickens, they just show you their London, and you can't stop yourself from loving it, over and over again. It's funny that my journey with Arthur Conan Doyle's Holmes began back in like 2013 probably when I found the whole giant novel Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories in my university's library where This is the most beautiful, sensational, adorable book ever. As ever, I fell in love with London, Victorian London, all over again, because this is what happens with Classics, like by Dickens, they just show you their London, and you can't stop yourself from loving it, over and over again. It's funny that my journey with Arthur Conan Doyle's Holmes began back in like 2013 probably when I found the whole giant novel Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Novels and Stories in my university's library where I had just enrolled in. It was so enormous I was actually daunted by the task and intimidated by the pages themselves which by the way had two columns. The book had barely been issued to 2 or 3 people and it began by me taking and returning the novel until 4 years later I was graduating and if it hadn't been for a well wishing classmate and my general lack of cunning I would've almost stolen the book from the library because I knew I couldn't find one just like it. Thank God I didn't because then I got to come by this wonderful and un-intimidating edition and was happier for it, not to mention no ink on my hands. And, here I am, 5 years later, still left with half the Holmes, which, you know, I'm excited for, more to look forward to. I got to see Doyle's chivalrous Holmes, his London and though I did try, I couldn't help comparing Holmes and Sherlock and the funny thing, I still can't decide which I like best because both are the best in their own right, I like them both just the same which is just so so beautiful and says much about the respective writers. This was a beautiful delightful experience though I must advise reading it in shorter parts, because this being the Vol I was like half the Sherlock Holmes so it became drudgery by the end and I had to leave the littlest portion and try a few other books. The book is not dull or abstruse at all, it's rather easy to read, it has the perfect flow but you get tired of the mystery after mystery if you decide to read like all the Holmes that's out there once and for all. It's rather lovely for crime and mystery. It's one of those books that you must read once in a lifetime, and then maybe a time again.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John

    While not exactly what I would call compelling reading, this is a nice collection of stories that are probably best enjoyed over breakfast, or perhaps on the subway ride to work. I know it's sacrilege, but I find Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories to be a bit underwhelming, though completely readable. They are expertly written, but very dry (after the British style of the day) and the setting up of each mystery usually takes about three times as long as the subsequent investigation and rendering of While not exactly what I would call compelling reading, this is a nice collection of stories that are probably best enjoyed over breakfast, or perhaps on the subway ride to work. I know it's sacrilege, but I find Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories to be a bit underwhelming, though completely readable. They are expertly written, but very dry (after the British style of the day) and the setting up of each mystery usually takes about three times as long as the subsequent investigation and rendering of the solution. Doyle comes up with some really incredible characters here, but he generally just lets them gather dust somewhere off in the background. I mean, only one story featuring the infamous Professor Moriarty? And just a single story featuring Holmes' brilliant-but-lazy brother, Mycroft? Somehow that makes me feel cheated just a little bit. Give me the movie versions featuring Robert Downey Jr., Matt Frewer, or James D'Arcy any day of the week. Or the TV serials with Ronald Howard or Benedict Cumberbatch (sorry, not a big fan of the Basil Rathbone or Jeremy Brett series). As you can see by these preferences, I differ greatly in opinion from those who would likely refer to themselves as being "true" Sherlock Holmes fans. But overall I did enjoy this collection of mysteries, and it was nice to see Watson portrayed the way he was originally meant to be--and not as a buffoon constantly used for cheap comic relief, as, unfortunately, he was in so many of the TV series. Still, one or two of these stories a week is about all I can read without quickly growing tired of them.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Hackney

    The actual edition that I read was: The Complete Sherlock Holmes, Volume I (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) by Arthur Conan Doyle, Kyle Freeman (Editor) I am unable to locate that edition on the Goodreads search engine. The Holmes canon is one of my lifetime favorites. I read and re-read my thick compilation of the stories and novels many times as a child. This was my first return to them since then. In the meantime, I grew up (some), and wrote a few books. Being a writer, I take a different view The actual edition that I read was: The Complete Sherlock Holmes, Volume I (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) by Arthur Conan Doyle, Kyle Freeman (Editor) I am unable to locate that edition on the Goodreads search engine. The Holmes canon is one of my lifetime favorites. I read and re-read my thick compilation of the stories and novels many times as a child. This was my first return to them since then. In the meantime, I grew up (some), and wrote a few books. Being a writer, I take a different view on the stories now than I did then. I also have a different perspective, having learned a bit about Doyle himself and his disdain for this work. All of that enables me to see the tell-tale signs of rushed conclusions, sloppy writing (the wandering war wound of Watson, for instance) and repetitive plots. Nonetheless, I still came away very satisfied from my reading of this entire two-volume collection. I still very much love the characters. I still very much love Doyle's patient teaching of the methods of deduction and observation. I still very much love this peek into London's people, places and things of that era. Even with its shortcomings, this body of work is truly timeless, and remains highly recommended reading for all ages. PS - This annotated version adds so much to the reading experience, especially in an electronic edition where you can bounce quickly between the notes and the text. Obscure and obsolete words and phrases that I simply skipped over as a child are now quickly and easily explained.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    Despite the fact that I was able to sort of predict the outcomes of the mysteries by the end of the book (after fifty-some stories, you can't help noticing patterns), I really enjoyed each of them. The book contains two short novels and thirty five short stories, and they're all pretty interesting. I liked the short stories a lot because each of them was a complete mystery, but I could finish one in about fifteen minutes. Looking forward to reading volume two! Best quote in the entire novel: "'Li Despite the fact that I was able to sort of predict the outcomes of the mysteries by the end of the book (after fifty-some stories, you can't help noticing patterns), I really enjoyed each of them. The book contains two short novels and thirty five short stories, and they're all pretty interesting. I liked the short stories a lot because each of them was a complete mystery, but I could finish one in about fifteen minutes. Looking forward to reading volume two! Best quote in the entire novel: "'Lie number one,' said the old man; 'I never saw either of them until two months ago, and I have never been in Africa in my life, so you can put that in your pipe and smoke it, Mr. Busybody Holmes!'"

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    The stories in this collection are truly timeless. I admire Doyle's spare and precise way of moving a story forward, at the same time as allowing Watson to humanize the scientific narrative. I can say that these stories are required reading for all mystery readers and are not in the least overrated. Thoroughly readable, quick and and elegant.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rituraj

    Lucky are the people who are yet to read the tales of Mr Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time! Even though I remember reading some of the stories long back, the crisp writing and elaborate scene-setting of Sir Doyle always does the charm. Some of the explanations may challenge the logician inside you, but the writer inside you will keep on turning the pages. This was the first collection of stories in which I shifted to its audiobook for some of the tales. Even if you are not a fan of audioboo Lucky are the people who are yet to read the tales of Mr Holmes and Dr Watson for the first time! Even though I remember reading some of the stories long back, the crisp writing and elaborate scene-setting of Sir Doyle always does the charm. Some of the explanations may challenge the logician inside you, but the writer inside you will keep on turning the pages. This was the first collection of stories in which I shifted to its audiobook for some of the tales. Even if you are not a fan of audiobooks, try listening to some of the stories (especially 'Sign of Four') in Audible. Nothing compensates the boring house chores better than these stories told by Stephen Fry.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kaye

    “It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.” - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Fast-paced even with thorough storytelling. Simple yet baffling mysteries. These are just few of the reasons that will keep you flipping through this book to find answers, mysteries or sort of both. Considered as a great milestone in crime fiction, the Sherlock Holmes stories will surely have your thinking caps on. This book was written at a time when science was not yet prominently “It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.” - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Fast-paced even with thorough storytelling. Simple yet baffling mysteries. These are just few of the reasons that will keep you flipping through this book to find answers, mysteries or sort of both. Considered as a great milestone in crime fiction, the Sherlock Holmes stories will surely have your thinking caps on. This book was written at a time when science was not yet prominently used in criminal investigations that some of Holmes' methods of deduction may seem common sense now. Nevertheless, the storytelling was perfectly done that it preserved the story's elegant air of mystery until modern times. Read the full review at my blog :) Until next bookdragons, K.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    It was a long read but worth every moment. I love the variety of stories and I am looking forward to reading the second volume.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anne El-Kasrawi

    It's going to be sometime before I crack in with the second volume. I know classics read differently to modern literature.. but dare I say the movie/series adaptation of this franchise far surpasses the writing. The stories are interesting, the cases ingenious... The style of narration takes all the excitement out of the story. I understand why Sir Arthur hated Sherlock.. and I appreciate whoever read all these only to sprinkle little references in BBC's adaption of this narrative 😃

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heather Elroy

    This is a collection of the Sherlock Holmes stories in order. My summation: I like it. It's classic literature. It's enjoyable to read not just for the stories contained within, but because of the tone and way its written. Watson narrates the goings on of Sherlock Holmes from his own perspective and it very much gives off that sort of feel. It's his perspective so we see what HE sees, and not necessarily what Sherlock sees... or rather... deduces. Its always a fun time trying to see if you can f This is a collection of the Sherlock Holmes stories in order. My summation: I like it. It's classic literature. It's enjoyable to read not just for the stories contained within, but because of the tone and way its written. Watson narrates the goings on of Sherlock Holmes from his own perspective and it very much gives off that sort of feel. It's his perspective so we see what HE sees, and not necessarily what Sherlock sees... or rather... deduces. Its always a fun time trying to see if you can figure out what sort of conclusions Sherlock Holmes is going to draw from the stories. Sometimes they're kind of easy and other times they are most difficult. Sometimes I think he's a bit lucky that he was right as some things that he sees could have been made by some mere coincidence and aren't tell tale signs of what's going on at all! I thought it was quite funny that Sherlock Holmes is prone to using Cocaine when his mind isn't adequately stimulated. Watson of course objects to this, but Sherlock will do what Sherlock will do. I have enjoyed the trip back in time and I have enjoyed reading about the characters. The one setback I find in all of this is that it gets to be kind of redundant after a while. The new scenarios are enough to keep me coming back to see what happens, but the manner in which things occur are usually about the same. The good news is that since this is a chronicle of short stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, is that at the end of one I can easily put it down and read something else for a while and then come back later refreshed and ready for a new case!

  20. 4 out of 5

    JY

    Not a review but notes written for the sole enjoyment of Dr. Snort: 1. Read both Volume I and II in one sitting, which severely diminished my reading pleasure. Nobody to blame but myself, but I was determined to finish every single story because I was afraid I'd abandon it if I took a break to read something else. 2. Sherlock Holmes is easily one of the most enigmatic characters to exist in literature. I see why many rational adults worship him. 3. But Sir Arthur Conan Doyle belongs to the "tell, Not a review but notes written for the sole enjoyment of Dr. Snort: 1. Read both Volume I and II in one sitting, which severely diminished my reading pleasure. Nobody to blame but myself, but I was determined to finish every single story because I was afraid I'd abandon it if I took a break to read something else. 2. Sherlock Holmes is easily one of the most enigmatic characters to exist in literature. I see why many rational adults worship him. 3. But Sir Arthur Conan Doyle belongs to the "tell, don't show" category of writers. Descriptions of characters practically cartoonish. 4. I found it difficult to ignore the ethnocentrism that permeates these stories, though as an Enid Blyton veteran, I wasn't too bothered by them. Uncertain about the relevance, and even the importance of these stories in the 21st century and beyond. We need a new Sherlock Holmes for the 21st century; surly, laconic Scandinavian/Scottish detectives battling inner demons need not apply. 5. Moby Dick next?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    It's a little weird that I'm 25 years old, have read for pleasure my whole life and I'm only now reading Sherlock Holmes. Previously I had only known the pop culture version of Sherlock (and I'm still feeling bitter about that 'Elementary my dear Watson' thing Wishbone). And how Professor Moriarty and Irene Adler only show up in one story each or how Inspector Lestrade existed pretty much to take the credit for Sherlock's accomplishments. And it's sort of amusing how Doyle (view spoiler)[tried to It's a little weird that I'm 25 years old, have read for pleasure my whole life and I'm only now reading Sherlock Holmes. Previously I had only known the pop culture version of Sherlock (and I'm still feeling bitter about that 'Elementary my dear Watson' thing Wishbone). And how Professor Moriarty and Irene Adler only show up in one story each or how Inspector Lestrade existed pretty much to take the credit for Sherlock's accomplishments. And it's sort of amusing how Doyle (view spoiler)[tried to kill off Sherlock (hide spoiler)] but it didn't take. To be fair to Doyle's reading public that story was incredibly unsatisfying. And since 'Hound of the Baskervilles' wasn't in this one I'll have to add volume 2 to my shopping list. Pretty sneaky Bantam Classics, pretty sneaky indeed.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rakhi

    I have got the book of the same front cover which takes you back in old times. Also, this was my first ever novel that I had bought. This book takes you from relaxing in your house to chilling spine in old London time. This book is already famous and what's more to say about it !!! Love, thriller, and despair. This book gives you everything that a reader would ever want.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Such great stories. The characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson slowly come alive as each case opens and closes. The longer more detaile cases keep you hanging on until the last page! Excellent!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow. Wow. I have to write a review about a book that contains no less than 1059 pages of Holmes-y goodness. What do I do? Where do I even start? Should I quote the "brain-attic" line from A Study In Scarlet? Or tell you, in case you don't know, that Watson is amazing too? Or rant about how no movie is ever going to get the true character of Holmes across to you, you're just going to have to read these books and see for yourself? Well, first I think I'll tell you how I got the book. Always a good Wow. Wow. I have to write a review about a book that contains no less than 1059 pages of Holmes-y goodness. What do I do? Where do I even start? Should I quote the "brain-attic" line from A Study In Scarlet? Or tell you, in case you don't know, that Watson is amazing too? Or rant about how no movie is ever going to get the true character of Holmes across to you, you're just going to have to read these books and see for yourself? Well, first I think I'll tell you how I got the book. Always a good start. My mom read The Hound of the Baskervilles and loved it, loved it so much that on our next bookstore run she bought both paperback volumes of The Complete Sherlock Holmes and read them every chance she got. Needless to say, I had to keep up. I loved Holmes too, even though I'd only read the first two novels and the odd short story. So I just picked it up and started it from the beginning. I read everything in order…or so I thought, because Sherlock Holmes is a hard thing to read in order. Watson, our loyal storyteller, jumps back and forth constantly using a basic timeline of "before my marriage/after my marriage". (His marriage happens directly after the events of the second novel, before all the short stories even take place, so needless to say there's a lot of skipping around.) Not to mention that the book packagers make things confusing for a purist by putting the individual volumes slightly out of their publishing order at times (more about that when I review Volume II--anyway, it's not something you'd even notice if you didn't read the publication dates.) Well, first of all I think A Study In Scarlet is the best beginning ever written. It starts off Holmes with a bang (and an amazing title: "Why not use a little art jargon," says Holmes.) He's apparently been detecting for a long time at this point, but we don't see anything until our set of eyes--in the form of Dr. John Watson--move into 221B Baker Street with him. Not to say that Watson is merely the reader himself. If you're used to thinking of him as a stodgy straight man who lives to make Holmes look cooler by comparison, you might be slightly jarred by the first two pages, which tell us all about all the heart-pounding experiences he's gone through in the war before he even encounters Sherlock Holmes. It's exactly the kind of thing a screenwriter would have invented for the new movie just to let the viewers know that Watson is Different from How You Thought He Was (and he's handy with a gun, too). There's a lot of irony going on when Watson and Holmes agree to move in together and split the rent, especially when Watson, as the narrator, expresses his relief that he can finally settle down and live a nice, quiet existence. Um, Watson? Your life of adventure's barely even happened yet, dude. Volume I has 1059 pages, and you're on, what, page seven? But still subtler and more delicious is the moment when the guy who sets Holmes and Watson up (he only makes that one appearance, but he's probably one of the most important characters in all of literature) tells Watson that this might not be a good idea. After all, Holmes is creepy. He knows things he's not supposed to know, he studies dead bodies and nobody knows why, and he'd probably feed a friend poison just to see what would happen. Watson responds by saying that, no, actually, this is great, because I love a good mystery. He spends the whole second chapter playing detective, trying to figure out who and what this mysterious Sherlock Holmes is (the list he makes entitled "Sherlock Holmes - His Limits" is not to be missed). And in the modern world, we all know already that Holmes is the one who's the detective--the greatest detective of all time, no less. That bit of irony ripened with age. There's so much greatness in that one first book--the humanity of Watson contrasted with the near-inhumanity of Holmes for the first time, Sherlock Holmes just being Sherlock Holmes (if you've never actually read the stories you'll probably find yourself gaping like Watson too), the billions of potshots taken at the "official" detectives Gregson and Lestrade, the fact that the book can even manage to drift away from its characters for five chapter's worth of the murderer's backstory without losing an ounce of suspense…well, my mother said it best: "He [Arthur Conan Doyle] was already on the top of his game." And, contrary to what some critics will tell you (the self-same critics who diss Watson as a dull straight man, no doubt), he never came down from it. Maybe not every single short story is my favorite, but bottom line, Arthur Conan Doyle picked up that scarlet thread of mystery from the first book and dragged it, spun it out over story after story, with Holmes and Watson hot after it like "a pair of old hounds", as Holmes refers to the two of them, years later when they've grown comfortable and natural and Watson no longer tries to politely leave the room when Holmes' clients walk in. (Holmes always insists that he stay around and never scorns his intelligence for a second, even if he does mock Watson's writing at times, his main problem with it being that it should be less romantic and more like "a series of lectures". Watson, for his part, insists that the romance and the facts are part and parcel and there's no way to separate them, and I'm sure that the author agreed.) Another interesting thing about these stories is that, behind the thick layer of amazing characterizations and brilliantly thought-out mysteries, the author isn't hard to see. Arthur Conan Doyle--who seems to have based Watson largely on himself, having served in the army and later been a doctor who ditched his practice to write down the stories--had trouble keeping up sometimes with the demand for Holmes, and frequently tried to wrap everything up, to no avail. People wanted more, and during his periods of writing they could read his short stories as they were published in The Strand magazine. Why so short, and so many? Well, my mom realized it herself after reading them all--they're just like a TV series before TV. Each mystery is its own episode, but there was only one writer, and when they wanted more episodes he just had to make more of them, that was all. Standout episodes include A Scandal in Bohemia (the only appearance of Irene Adler--and no, she's not Holmes' love interest, but she's far more awesome than she'll ever be in a movie), The Adventure of the Speckled Band (Arthur Conan Doyle's favorite episode), The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle (the Christmas special!), The Yellow Face (the touching story with Watson as a deeply moved witness), The Gloria Scott and The Musgrave Ritual (a kind of two-parter exploring Holmes' pre-Watson days), The Final Problem (the series finale…or is it?), The Adventure of the Empty House (yes, another season!) The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton (which would have been amazing and chilling even if the plot hadn't involved Holmes and Watson playing criminal--for a good cause, of course), The Adventure of the Abbey Grange (wherein Holmes utters his famous line, "The game is afoot") and The Adventure of the Second Stain (Holmes' greatest case of all, and Watson insists that he isn't allowed to write any more, but I'll say it again--hang on, Watson, this is only Volume I!) For a devoted fan, this volume and the one after it are just like a nice set of "Complete Series" DVDs. Honestly, I should have stopped and read the mysteries more slowly, but I'll have plenty of time to do that when Volume II is finished and I'm craving Holmes again. I read the stories dreading the awful moment when I'd know that Arthur Conan Doyle was getting sick of his character, but I never got that feeling. Honestly, I think he loved to write about Holmes--you can't help but feel the joy bubbling up from his pen, even and especially in some of the later stories. Perhaps he was just worried that he'd lose his ability to write a good mystery, which he never did. You can see his planning at work--after he's run out of plausible excuses to have Watson somehow get involved in mysteries with Holmes, he starts flashing back to the mysteries that happened before Watson got married, and when he brings Holmes back after his "death" at Reichenbacher there's just the whisper of a hint that Watson suffered a real "bereavement" as well. From thereon in, Watson's living back in the rooms on Baker Street. Blink and you'll miss it, but if you have "a genius for minutae" you might figure out what it's supposed to mean--Watson's beloved wife is dead. It's heartbreaking for Watson, but for the author it's a convenient plot device. From here, the stories can flow thick and fast. Well, it's getting late, and I've got to wrap this up and go to the opera in a hansom cab (just kidding--I wish!) so I'll just write one last observation. This DVD in book form also contains a featurette, the introduction, "On the Significance of Boswells." (Holmes once affectionately referred to Watson as 'my Boswell,' in reference to a well-known biographer of the time.) In a wonderfully tongue-in-cheek and brilliant way, it points out that the stories would be nothing without Watson, but it's full of spoilers, so it's probably best to save it for after you've downed both volumes, or at least the stories mentioned. I'll just interject a little of my own opinion. Those who see Watson as a commoner, someone who Holmes is a critique of, are missing the point. Watson is a critique of Holmes. Holmes may be the perfect mystery-solving machine, but Watson can love, he can lead a life outside of these mysteries and, unlike Holmes, he doesn't have to sit around injecting himself with cocaine during periods of low criminal activity just because the boredom is eating him alive. Holmes is an insane genius, but he's flawed, and Watson is a perfectly normal, intelligent, complete person. I'm not saying that either character is better. They're equally brilliant characters, and if I went all literary-critic and started insulting one of them the other would surely rise up to defend him. As the introduction most rightly says, "Literature never introduced a more symbiotic relationship, or a warmer and more timeless friendship."

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Woof, this took me a long time, but I did it! I don't know if my review will feel completely fair. Sherlock Holmes definitely has a charm, but the charm fades a bit when you've been reading almost 1000 pages over a month. The stories can feel repetitive and tedious after a while. But there's still a spark at the center that makes it fun to read. Sherlock Holmes starts with Watson. Watson is an ex-army doctor living in London. Because of financial issues, he ends up rooming with Sherlock Holmes. A Woof, this took me a long time, but I did it! I don't know if my review will feel completely fair. Sherlock Holmes definitely has a charm, but the charm fades a bit when you've been reading almost 1000 pages over a month. The stories can feel repetitive and tedious after a while. But there's still a spark at the center that makes it fun to read. Sherlock Holmes starts with Watson. Watson is an ex-army doctor living in London. Because of financial issues, he ends up rooming with Sherlock Holmes. After a little bit, he discovers that Sherlock Holmes is an almost wizard-like detective. He uses logical inference to come to fantastic, and fantastically accurate, conclusions. For example, by looking at a person he can figure out their job, how they arrived at his apartment, and their habits. He does this by observing minute details about people, like the tread of their shoes, the calluses on their hands, or the lines on their face. He uses these observational skills to solve crimes, and he ends up being better at solving crimes than the police (who often come to Holmes for advice). This volume contains several Sherlock Holmes stories. First, there are two novellas: A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. Then there are three volumes of short stories - totaling over thirty short stories. The stories are included mostly in the order they were published (mostly because I believe The Hound of the Baskervilles was published before some of the last short stories). As such, you see a slight progression in overall plot. The mysteries are often fun to puzzle over. Each story usually presents a case (not always a crime) with confusing elements. At first, it seems impossible to solve. But Holmes (and sometimes the police) are able to dig up some details that start to make the case take some form. Often, though, there is still not enough information for the reader to completely solve the mystery. Finally, Holmes gives a flourish and reveals the details of the crime. It can be a fun and surprising journey, if somewhat formulaic. The formula is part of what makes the stories enjoyable, but part of what saps your enjoyment when you read thirty of them. It's just the same thing again and again. It gets dull. It's worse because there is often very little outside the cases in each story. There is no strong development of the characters of Holmes or Watson, nor of their friendship. Much like a sitcom, it often feels like each story starts from the exact same place. I suppose it's just a serial, which some enjoy, but I feel tired of in this case. The writing is rather thick and difficult to connect to. It's logical but doesn't really flow or always keep you engaged. I found it a rather difficult read. My mind would wander in between the stages of the investigation when there is mostly just description. On the whole, I enjoyed pieces of the book, but I didn't love it or enjoy all of it. So that's where three stars are coming from. One complaint that I've noticed in several books: the introduction. I have yet to read a book where the introduction should actually serve as an introduction. Almost all of them should be at the end of the book! They talk about the details of what happens in the book! This one talks about the whole progression of the viewing of the character of Watson, and defends the fictional character of Watson against his critics. But we haven't yet read a page of Watson! What is the point of this dumb introduction?! This is not the only book with this problem, I just have refrained from complaining about it in previous reviews because I'm not sure the best time to criticize the odd appendages attached to classic books. Anyway, Sherlock Holmes can be an engaging read. I wouldn't really recommend reading the entire collection of Holmes stories without a break, though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

    I would honestly give this 4.5 stars if it was an option. It is not a collection that I would generally recommend reading all at once, and while I read a lot of it recently, I did break it up a bit. One of the things to love about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's writing is the collection of interesting names! Another is the phrase (in one of the books): "the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime..." you may know to what that references. : ) His writing is well worth the time to enjoy! ~*~ My collect I would honestly give this 4.5 stars if it was an option. It is not a collection that I would generally recommend reading all at once, and while I read a lot of it recently, I did break it up a bit. One of the things to love about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's writing is the collection of interesting names! Another is the phrase (in one of the books): "the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime..." you may know to what that references. : ) His writing is well worth the time to enjoy! ~*~ My collection included the following Novels and Short Stories: A Study in Scarlet ... a bit gruesome and certainly more so than most of his work. The Sign of the Four The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes including the following short stories: >A Scandal in Bohemia >The Red-Headed League >A Case of Identity >The Boscombe Valley Mystery >The Five Orange Pips >The Man with the Twisted Lip >The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle >The Adventure of the Speckled Band >The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb >The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor >The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet >The Adventure of the Copper Beeches The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes including another collection of short stories: >Silver Blaze >The Yellow Face >The Stock-Broker’s Clerk >The “Gloria Scott” >The Musgrave Ritual >The Reigate Puzzle >The Crooked Man >The Resident Patient >The Greek Interpreter >The Naval Treaty >The Final Problem The Return of Sherlock Holmes >The Adventure of the Empty House >The Adventure of the Norwood Builder >The Adventure of the Dancing Men >The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist >The Adventure of the Priory School >The Adventure of Black Peter >The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton >The Adventure of the Six Napoleons >The Adventure of the Three Students >The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez >The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter >The Adventure of the Abbey Grange >The Adventure of the Second Stain The Hound of the Baskervilles

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bobbie

    This review is also found on my blog: A Poised Quill! :) -- It took me a few months to finish this, but I pushed on. It took a few pages to get used to. The late 19th century writing style is something I was previously unaccustomed to, hence the slow pace, but soon enough it grew on me. The gothic and gloomy vibe laced each novel and short story with deliciously dark undertones distinctive of Victorian England. I soon learned to love the long-winded and detailed narrations, all with the purpose This review is also found on my blog: A Poised Quill! :) -- It took me a few months to finish this, but I pushed on. It took a few pages to get used to. The late 19th century writing style is something I was previously unaccustomed to, hence the slow pace, but soon enough it grew on me. The gothic and gloomy vibe laced each novel and short story with deliciously dark undertones distinctive of Victorian England. I soon learned to love the long-winded and detailed narrations, all with the purpose of building up the feeling of suspense and anticipation of the big reveal. What is it that I loved about Sherlock Holmes? Obviously, his practical application of logic is a gift I am entirely in awe of. But his sheer eccentricity amplifies that which he is best known for: his undeniable powers of observation and deduction. His relationship with the other characters in the novel provides his character with layers. I have yet to meet and read a more interesting sleuth as he. No disrespect to Christie's Poirot who remains one of the first detectives I've loved and is as formidable as Holmes, but Doyle's detective proves more layered and flawed in personality. One which I am more drawn to and makes an interesting read. Sherlock Holmes will remain as my favorite fictional detective. A few of my favorites were The Final Problem and the stories under The Return of Sherlock Holmes. I will definitely be continuing with Volume II, but I need a bit of rest and space from Sherlock. I need a change of scene for a while before I accompany him and Watson again on their adventures.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Took me five years to finish it, but I did! Based on my vague five-year-ago memories, I don't think I was a huge fan of the first two novels included (A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four) and I think that's what contributed to me taking so long to read it. However, the short stories are fabulous. Each are about 20-30 pages and give you just enough detail into a crime or problem for you to start making your own opinions and then Sherlock solves the case. While I was able to guess some or at l Took me five years to finish it, but I did! Based on my vague five-year-ago memories, I don't think I was a huge fan of the first two novels included (A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four) and I think that's what contributed to me taking so long to read it. However, the short stories are fabulous. Each are about 20-30 pages and give you just enough detail into a crime or problem for you to start making your own opinions and then Sherlock solves the case. While I was able to guess some or at least be on the right track, his discoveries were surprising enough most of the time. In addition to that, the writing itself is very good, with a good balance of detail and description to dialogue. I really feel like I got a sense for old London. I also really liked that as you read more stories, you slowly get to put together this picture in your mind of who Holmes and Watson are and what their lives and relationship is like. Although each short story only has so many pages, there are usually a few details about the characters introduced in each one, so that a picture of them slowly builds in your mind. Really enjoyed it and hopefully it doesn't take me another 5 years to get to volume 2!

  29. 4 out of 5

    MS

    5 sherlockian starz for this classic masterpiece of the mystery genre. I was a bit worried about the way in which ACD's writing has withstood the test time, but I would say that about 95% of this book's content is as fresh now as it was then and Sherlock Holmes as an original character seems as wickedly intelligent now as he did more than 100 years ago. The world that he inhabits reminds us, in its colourful depiction, of our contemporary times, as crime has been and (presumably) shall be a const 5 sherlockian starz for this classic masterpiece of the mystery genre. I was a bit worried about the way in which ACD's writing has withstood the test time, but I would say that about 95% of this book's content is as fresh now as it was then and Sherlock Holmes as an original character seems as wickedly intelligent now as he did more than 100 years ago. The world that he inhabits reminds us, in its colourful depiction, of our contemporary times, as crime has been and (presumably) shall be a constant of human society. In those days SH's freedom of action was little bridled by the police, who depended on his astuteness to solve the most bizarre cases. I love how ACD places SH so close to being an antihero by emphasizing the fact that SH would have made a great criminal himself, had he not chosen the side of justice :D And sometimes, H imparts his own kind of justice, one that is closer to the common sense idea of a "just world" than to the law system. Amazed by his brilliance, criminals are always ready and willing to confess to him (but often they are telling him nothing new, as he has already deducted the course of events from infinitesimally small clues). As for Watson... is he really necessary in this equation? He narrates the story and allows SH to manifest himself as the genius that he is, by listening to his reasoning and supporting him when necessary (also by weaning him off coke :D). So yes, Holmes without Watson would be an incomplete recipe :) I will take a break before vol. 2, but I will surely read it, as there are so many other seminal cases in that one too.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I certainly have nothing new to say about Conan Doyle, Holmes and Watson. Hard to criticize one of the most famous creations in all literature. This is volume one of Vintage Classics brand new 2-volume set. I had to have them even though I have had many copies of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Four short novels and 56 short stories in the set. Of the novels, Hound of the Baskervilles is the masterpiece. The other three, although good, tend to be a little slow, and if there is a fault, it is that H I certainly have nothing new to say about Conan Doyle, Holmes and Watson. Hard to criticize one of the most famous creations in all literature. This is volume one of Vintage Classics brand new 2-volume set. I had to have them even though I have had many copies of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Four short novels and 56 short stories in the set. Of the novels, Hound of the Baskervilles is the masterpiece. The other three, although good, tend to be a little slow, and if there is a fault, it is that Holmes is missing from the action for far too long, leaving great holes in otherwise terrific stories. When Sherlock Holmes is one of your characters, keep him on stage! The short stories are where Conan Doyle really shines, and this new set deserves a reading, regardless of how familiar you are with the World's Greatest Detective. Thanks K.

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