counter create hit Chinese Soul Food: A Friendly Guide for Homemade Dumplings, Stir-Fries, Soups, and More - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Chinese Soul Food: A Friendly Guide for Homemade Dumplings, Stir-Fries, Soups, and More

Availability: Ready to download

Chinese food is more popular than any other cuisine and yet it often intimidates North American home cooks. Chinese Soul Food draws cooks into the kitchen with recipes that include sizzling potstickers, stir-fries that are unbelievably easy to make, saucy braises, and soups that bring comfort with a sip. These are dishes that feed the belly and speak the universal language Chinese food is more popular than any other cuisine and yet it often intimidates North American home cooks. Chinese Soul Food draws cooks into the kitchen with recipes that include sizzling potstickers, stir-fries that are unbelievably easy to make, saucy braises, and soups that bring comfort with a sip. These are dishes that feed the belly and speak the universal language of "mmm!" You'll find approachable recipes and plenty of tips for favorite homestyle Chinese dishes, such as red-braised pork belly, dry-fried green beans, braised-beef noodle soup, green onion pancakes, garlic eggplant, and the author's famous potstickers, which consistently sell out her cooking classes in Seattle. You will also find helpful tips and techniques, such as caring for and using a wok and how to cook rice properly, as well as a basic Chinese pantry list that also includes acceptable substitutions, making it even simpler for the busiest among us to cook their favorite Chinese dishes at home. Recipes are streamlined to minimize the fear factor of unfamiliar ingredients and techniques, and home cooks are gently guided toward becoming comfortable cooking satisfying Chinese meals. Any kitchen can be a Chinese kitchen!


Compare
Ads Banner

Chinese food is more popular than any other cuisine and yet it often intimidates North American home cooks. Chinese Soul Food draws cooks into the kitchen with recipes that include sizzling potstickers, stir-fries that are unbelievably easy to make, saucy braises, and soups that bring comfort with a sip. These are dishes that feed the belly and speak the universal language Chinese food is more popular than any other cuisine and yet it often intimidates North American home cooks. Chinese Soul Food draws cooks into the kitchen with recipes that include sizzling potstickers, stir-fries that are unbelievably easy to make, saucy braises, and soups that bring comfort with a sip. These are dishes that feed the belly and speak the universal language of "mmm!" You'll find approachable recipes and plenty of tips for favorite homestyle Chinese dishes, such as red-braised pork belly, dry-fried green beans, braised-beef noodle soup, green onion pancakes, garlic eggplant, and the author's famous potstickers, which consistently sell out her cooking classes in Seattle. You will also find helpful tips and techniques, such as caring for and using a wok and how to cook rice properly, as well as a basic Chinese pantry list that also includes acceptable substitutions, making it even simpler for the busiest among us to cook their favorite Chinese dishes at home. Recipes are streamlined to minimize the fear factor of unfamiliar ingredients and techniques, and home cooks are gently guided toward becoming comfortable cooking satisfying Chinese meals. Any kitchen can be a Chinese kitchen!

30 review for Chinese Soul Food: A Friendly Guide for Homemade Dumplings, Stir-Fries, Soups, and More

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Chinese Soul Food is a book you'll actually cook from, not just look at the pretty pictures. I've had the good fortune to attend one of Hsiao-Ching Chou's dumpling classes at Hot Stove Society in Seattle, so I was really looking forward to this book. I've cooked about a half a dozen dishes from it. (Pics on Instagram @dailywaffle). The verdict so far: Chinese Soul Food is worth for it the stir-fry section alone. The Beef and Asparagus is great, the Chicken with Snow Peas, the Rice Cakes with Chick Chinese Soul Food is a book you'll actually cook from, not just look at the pretty pictures. I've had the good fortune to attend one of Hsiao-Ching Chou's dumpling classes at Hot Stove Society in Seattle, so I was really looking forward to this book. I've cooked about a half a dozen dishes from it. (Pics on Instagram @dailywaffle). The verdict so far: Chinese Soul Food is worth for it the stir-fry section alone. The Beef and Asparagus is great, the Chicken with Snow Peas, the Rice Cakes with Chicken and Shiitakes. They're simple, delicious, and great for weeknight meals. I'm an avid home cook (but far from pro) and I've had an Americanized chicken stir-fry in my rotation for years. Chinese Soul Food provided a few small lessons that led to huge breakthroughs. In the past, I wasn't getting stir-fries done in 15 minutes or less. The directions are clear and well-written. I'm confident I'll get good results with other recipes as I cook through the book. The one area it could use more on is how to fold the dumplings. There are a few photos, but a video would be a huge help if you haven't done it before. I used store bought wrappers, so I can at least tell you the Pork and Chinese Cabbage filling tastes great. Finally, if what you're looking for are the Chinese-American style dishes you grew up with, like Cashew Chicken, Mongolian Beef, General Tso's Chicken, Chinese Soul Food has those, too. The Guilty Pleasures chapter offers recipes based on many of the dishes served in her family's restaurant in Columbia, Missouri.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Accessible Chinese food for the uninitiated home cook. Luckily for me my daughter made the dumplings, there were enough to freeze and enjoy a few different times. All delicious.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alisa Wilhelm

    Yum yum drool. As claimed, this is a user friendly guide to preparing your own delicious Chinese meals at home. I would love to own this as a reference or base for many standard recipes that Americans are familiar with. Raise your hand if you have to go digging around on the internet every time you have a hankering for kung pao chicken. But like the majority of Chinese restaurants in America, the popular dishes in this book come from southern provinces. This in itself has an interesting history, Yum yum drool. As claimed, this is a user friendly guide to preparing your own delicious Chinese meals at home. I would love to own this as a reference or base for many standard recipes that Americans are familiar with. Raise your hand if you have to go digging around on the internet every time you have a hankering for kung pao chicken. But like the majority of Chinese restaurants in America, the popular dishes in this book come from southern provinces. This in itself has an interesting history, and is related to why people in Chinatowns around the US, as well as Chinese families who have been in the US for 3+ generations, speak Cantonese and not Mandarin. Anyways, my experience in China was in northern provinces and some regional favorites are not present in this book. Nevertheless, this one is a goodie!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This was an ok book I did not love or hate it. It is just something that works better for someone who is already familiar with this cooking technique. This is not for the novice cook. There are not very many pictures in the book either so that is another negative. This would only be good for someone who makes this kind of food all of the time. The only positive thing was the step by step instructions on how to make dumplings. That was good.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Danielle T

    Once again, I read a cookbook without actually making anything in it... (this time mostly because it's due and I need to return it), but I do want to get my own copy at some point. Recipes were written clearly and it seems like they'll be easy to follow. A fair amount of things used recipes from elsewhere in the book, which makes sense (why not repurpose something into other dishes?)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Simpson

    Kind of a ragtag mix of recipes, ranging from the "authentic" (as much as I hate that word in relation to food/recipes...) to the very definitely Americanized. Instructions are easy to follow and the recipes are okay, but just okay. Nothing "oh my god, that's amazing" here.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Leila

    A great reference book if you're looking to start making homemade Chinese dishes! The story of how the author was introduced to cooking, experience working in her family restaurant and how she discovered her passion for cooking is also interesting background info.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Easy to follow instructions and some recipes that can be made without investing a lot in special tools, spices, condiments, and other foods. Can't wait to try some of the recipes. I think Smashed Cucumbers will be the first one I try.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Olga

    Really good step by step instructions. Most of the recipes are fairly easy if followed diligently. This book is for someone who wants a home-cooked Chinese takeout. I've tried 2 recipes so far and both were on point.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian TramueL

    I got at least 10 great recipes. I grabbed it because I love consuming dumplings/ pot stickers & this tells me how to make them. I was a mighty Asian King in a former life or I could have been the King's cook. I got at least 10 great recipes. I grabbed it because I love consuming dumplings/ pot stickers & this tells me how to make them. I was a mighty Asian King in a former life or I could have been the King's cook.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paul T

    Modern recipes, excellent cook, good range.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi Smith

    i'm now keeping a pot of the Master Sauce in my fridge and i now know what to do with rice cakes that Hannah keeps storing in my fridge ... (not that Paul likes them)

  13. 4 out of 5

    T

    Former food writer for one of the local newspapers and a product of a restaurant family, Hsiao-Ching Chou provides recipes and explanation of a more home-style nature.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sufen Fong

    I only used 2-3 recipes. The rest of the recipes required special ingredients and techniques that I wasn't familiar with. An enjoyable read about Chinese cooking, nevertheless.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Riegs

    Very accessible.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Clivemichael

    Instructive, well laid out, easy to follow with personable commentary.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Recipes that I am excited to try out and branch out with different types of stir fry and other delicious meals.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Georgie

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

  20. 5 out of 5

    J J

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kate

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  23. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex Can Read

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matteo

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  29. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Rehm

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tina

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.