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Published in 1848, at a time of political upheaval in Europe, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s Manifesto for the Communist Party was at once a powerful critique of capitalism and a radical call to arms. It remains the most incisive introduction to the ideas of Communism and the most lucid explanation of its aims. Much of what it proposed continues to be at the heart of pol Published in 1848, at a time of political upheaval in Europe, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s Manifesto for the Communist Party was at once a powerful critique of capitalism and a radical call to arms. It remains the most incisive introduction to the ideas of Communism and the most lucid explanation of its aims. Much of what it proposed continues to be at the heart of political debate into the 21st century. It is no surprise, perhaps, that The Communist Manifesto (as it was later renamed) is the second bestselling book of all time, surpassed only by the Bible.   The Guardian’s editorial cartoonist Martin Rowson employs his trademark draftsmanship and wit to this lively graphic novel adaptation. Published to coincide with the 200th anniversary of Marx’s birth, The Communist Manifesto is both a timely reminder of the politics of hope and a thought-provoking guide to the most influential work of political theory ever published.  


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Published in 1848, at a time of political upheaval in Europe, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s Manifesto for the Communist Party was at once a powerful critique of capitalism and a radical call to arms. It remains the most incisive introduction to the ideas of Communism and the most lucid explanation of its aims. Much of what it proposed continues to be at the heart of pol Published in 1848, at a time of political upheaval in Europe, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s Manifesto for the Communist Party was at once a powerful critique of capitalism and a radical call to arms. It remains the most incisive introduction to the ideas of Communism and the most lucid explanation of its aims. Much of what it proposed continues to be at the heart of political debate into the 21st century. It is no surprise, perhaps, that The Communist Manifesto (as it was later renamed) is the second bestselling book of all time, surpassed only by the Bible.   The Guardian’s editorial cartoonist Martin Rowson employs his trademark draftsmanship and wit to this lively graphic novel adaptation. Published to coincide with the 200th anniversary of Marx’s birth, The Communist Manifesto is both a timely reminder of the politics of hope and a thought-provoking guide to the most influential work of political theory ever published.  

30 review for The Communist Manifesto: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kim Shively

    The text is what it is, the artwork, however, was somewhat confusing. Why did Marx look so diabolical? While the art is wild, after a while, if feels static--that is, it is wild in the same way throughout the book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joana Veríssimo

    The art that accompanies the Manifesto is so perfectly done!! It's so dark, but so poignant, and it really strikes the core of the text A really well done adaptation of this important historical and political text :) The art that accompanies the Manifesto is so perfectly done!! It's so dark, but so poignant, and it really strikes the core of the text A really well done adaptation of this important historical and political text :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    The text is what it is. I'm not reviewing that. Let's just say I'm not a fan. I will say that it is somewhat abridged here. The art, on the other hand, is gorgeous. Disgusting and disturbing, but gorgeous. Like a view of Hell, but in mostly black-and-white, with bits of red, and rarer bits of other colors. Many very detailed two-page spreads. My main quibble with the art is that two-page spreads don't work well in books that don't lay flat. Details are lost in the fold. The text is what it is. I'm not reviewing that. Let's just say I'm not a fan. I will say that it is somewhat abridged here. The art, on the other hand, is gorgeous. Disgusting and disturbing, but gorgeous. Like a view of Hell, but in mostly black-and-white, with bits of red, and rarer bits of other colors. Many very detailed two-page spreads. My main quibble with the art is that two-page spreads don't work well in books that don't lay flat. Details are lost in the fold.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Meepelous

    And today we are taking a look at the graphic novel edition of the Communist Manifesto, organized and illustrated by Martin Rowson. Before diving in, my final note is that I will probably keep political analysis and critique to a minimum. Personally, I identify as an Anarchist, but I currently also find many different kinds of Marxist thoughts and commentaries to be interesting. So, particularly in this format, I found this historical document to be not only interesting but also pretty edifying. And today we are taking a look at the graphic novel edition of the Communist Manifesto, organized and illustrated by Martin Rowson. Before diving in, my final note is that I will probably keep political analysis and critique to a minimum. Personally, I identify as an Anarchist, but I currently also find many different kinds of Marxist thoughts and commentaries to be interesting. So, particularly in this format, I found this historical document to be not only interesting but also pretty edifying. Going back to the details of the book. This particular edition of The Communist Manifesto was published on June 5th 2018 by SelfMadeHero. I initially read this book shortly thereafter because I was keeping close tabs on my library's new graphic novel section. I also dragged myself out of my homebody routine and went to a talk by Martin Rowson at the library that fall which was cool. I've read it again at least once since then, but procrastinated on reviewing because it's so IMPORTANT, but here we go. According to his somewhat illegible personal website welcome screen: Martin Rowson is a multi-award winning cartoonist, illustrator, writer, graphic novelist, broadcaster, ranter and poet. Passing over all the periodical publications he has contributed to, books that he wanted to highlight his contributions to included Scenes From The Lives of the Great Socialists (1983), Lower Than Vermin: An Anatomy of Thatcher’s Britain (1986), The Nodland Express (with Anna Clarke, 1994), Fuck: The Human Odyssey (2007), The Dog Allusion: Gods, Pets and How to be Human (2008), four volumes of The Limerickiad (2011-2016), a series of comic book adaptations, including T.S.Eliot’s The Waste Land (1990), The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1996), and Gulliver’s Travels (2011). In 2001 Rowson was appointed Cartoonist Laureate for London by Mayor Ken Livingstone... He’s also chairman of the British Cartoonists’ Association... In a full-page editorial in 2017, in response to one of his Guardian cartoons, The Daily Mail denounced him and his work as “disgusting, deranged... sick and offensive.” And because he doesn't really mention it outright, I will add that he's is an Englishman and that, as someone who has done a lot of work in the political cartoon world, I did appreciate his going on a tangent about the importance of punching down and, assuming I'm remembering this correctly, several examples of what he meant by that. Not only because it makes me feel a bit better about recommending his work but also because he was talking to a group that might be tempted to ignore the ways other people might be oppressed in ways in addition to class. Besides Martin, there's of course the contributions of those Marx and Engles dudes. What about them? To quickly summerize the life stories of these two men that you've likely never heard of lol. Karl Marx was born in Trier, Kingdom of Prussia in 1818, became stateless, and died in 1883 in London, England. Descended from a long line of rabbis, his father converted to Protestantism shortly before Karl's birth. Karl studied law and philosophy at university and married Jenny von Westphalen in 1843. The similarly heavily bearded Friedrich Engels, was born in Barmen, King of Prussia in 1820 and also died in London, England but in 1895. His family owned a large cotton-textile mills, and his father did pressure him to become a businessman as he came into adolescence. While they never married, Engles found himself in a 20 year relationships with Mary Burns, a "fierce young Irish woman with radical opinions who worked in the Engels factory" according to Wikipedia. Like Johanna Bertha Julie Jenny Edle von Westphalen, Mary deserves more credit then they have received historically for their contribution to the work published by their more "notable" male partners. In describing The Communist Manifesto I would like to start by stressing how short it is. Obvious to some, I guess my subconscious brain had combined Das Capital and the Communist Manifesto and convinced me that it was FAR TOO LONG. This was not true. It can still be hard to get around to reading short books, but I figured I would point that out in case anyone else was suffering under that particular misunderstanding. Pulling from Wikipedia "Commissioned by the Communist League and originally published in London just as the Revolutions of 1848 began to erupt, the Manifesto was later recognised as one of the world's most influential political documents. It presents an analytical approach to the class struggle (historical and then-present) and the conflicts of capitalism and the capitalist mode of production, rather than a prediction of communism's potential future forms. The Communist Manifesto summarises Marx and Engels' theories concerning the nature of society and politics, namely that in their own words "[t]he history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles". It also briefly features their ideas for how the capitalist society of the time would eventually be replaced by socialism. In the last paragraph of the Manifesto, the authors call for a "forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions", which served as a call for communist revolutions around the world." Moving onto the art, this was a really big selling point with me for this particular edition. Dark, dramatic and full of interesting, funny, and witty details. Combined with the ways in which Rowson breaks up the text into dialog bubbles, it was very nice to be able to jump back and forth between the text (and there is a substantial amount of text) to study different aspects of the illustrations that visually represent different elements being explored in the text. This also provides different ways to remember what is being said in the manifesto and makes the text more accessible. As a pamphlet, the Communist Manifesto, is a product of its time and the ongoing emphasis on class as a point of oppression. There are some good things said about the exploitation of women as wives that their husbands basically own. Diverse sexuality and gender are not unsurprisingly not really brought up. Similarly, as continues even to the present day, communism often focuses exclusively on the politics of production in such a way that can seem to be leaving out people cannot work as much as the "average" person - sometimes intentionally, sometimes not. Reviewing my filmed flip through, because I sadly can't get my hands on this book at the present moment, I would say that the crowd scenes appear to have some representation from seemingly both male and female presenting people, which is nice. It appears that most people are very British looking caricatures of people who appear to be white. Especially since we are dealing with a black white and red colour scheme, which would leave us completely at the mercy of physical cliches to communicate ideas of difference in race, I would say that this lack of diversity is really for the best. That said, I guess there's a thing to be said about the ways the corruption, in this style of art, is denoted by "ugliness" which, while I still have a lot to consider and learn about in this area, is certainly less then ideal. So, overall, if you have ever found herself interested in The Communist Manifesto, I would highly recommend this particular edition. I think it exemplifies many of the ways I feel like comics are a superior medium then simply the written word.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris May

    After finding Capital hard going it was either the traditional manifesto or this and, well, this one has pictures. Really nice pictures. Well, not nice pictures but grotesque backdrops which are nonetheless nice to look at, especially as they support the terrifying, electrifying, optimistic words of Marx.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mariasilvia Santi

    Good adaptation of the Communist Manifesto. Absolutely enjoyed how Rowson's illustrations capture Marx's message in a thought-provoking way. Good adaptation of the Communist Manifesto. Absolutely enjoyed how Rowson's illustrations capture Marx's message in a thought-provoking way.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nick Phillips

    The Communist Manifesto is one of my favourite pieces of writing despite coming to it at the rather old age of seventeen (Martin Rowson and everyone else appears to have read it as sixteen year olds and there is a strong case to be made that it should be given to everyone on their 16th birthday) and Rowson’s illustrated edition only serves to enhance its message. As Rowson admits, there have been (and still are) some truly awful people who have hidden behind the guise of Marxism and there have be The Communist Manifesto is one of my favourite pieces of writing despite coming to it at the rather old age of seventeen (Martin Rowson and everyone else appears to have read it as sixteen year olds and there is a strong case to be made that it should be given to everyone on their 16th birthday) and Rowson’s illustrated edition only serves to enhance its message. As Rowson admits, there have been (and still are) some truly awful people who have hidden behind the guise of Marxism and there have been numerous societies which have professed to being Marxist but which, when judged against the original manifesto all fall far short. At the same time many of Marx’s predictions have failed to come true or have done so in ways that he never foresaw. Having said that when one holds the manifesto up against the light of contemporary global politics the case for communism has never shone brighter. There are two lines in particular which stand out; the first being his description of the proletariat as “a class of labourers who live only as long as they find work, and find work as long as their labour increases capital.” While this was undoubtedly relevant 170 years ago it is increasingly the case today. Up until the end of the 20th century employers needed workers to produce goods and services and to then spend their wages to purchase those goods and services and the recessions of the 1930s and 80s notwithstanding there was generally a parity between the number of workers required and the number in existence. 20 years of white hot technological advances later and suddenly we find ourselves in the position of having far more workers than are required in order to produce today’s goods and services with employers still finding ways to pursuade people to buy them while at the same time demonising those who are unable to find employment because the jobs no longer exist. This brings us on nicely to the second notable line: “The lower strata of the middle class and the small tradespeople, shopkeepers, handicraftsmen and peasants, all these sink gradually into the proletariat, swamped in the competition with the large capitalist or their specialised skill rendered worthless by new methods of production. Thus the proletariat is recruited from all classes of the population.” Marx saw the capitalist class as consisting of around 10% of the population with the implication being that as it used up resources it would and slowly shrink thereafter, something which in these days of the one-percenters is increasingly coming to pass. If you’ve not read The Communist Manifesto you really should, even if you are no longer sixteen.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Birss

    ~~~ No one who can read hasan excuse to have not read The Communist Manifesto. It's short. It's available in almost any language. It's in the public domain, and very easy to acquire. It's a foundationally important document to many of the most important cultural and political movements internationally for the last seventy years. That said, the illustrations in this book are marvellous. They are haunting and terrifying, deeply affecting and rich with meaning. The reader can examine every page and c ~~~ No one who can read hasan excuse to have not read The Communist Manifesto. It's short. It's available in almost any language. It's in the public domain, and very easy to acquire. It's a foundationally important document to many of the most important cultural and political movements internationally for the last seventy years. That said, the illustrations in this book are marvellous. They are haunting and terrifying, deeply affecting and rich with meaning. The reader can examine every page and continue to find details of story and image that illuminate the text in every millimetre of the page. The artist painted most pages on grey, painting almost exclusively in black, white and red. Blood and gore flow from the bodies of the proletariat in the literal machines of the bourgeoisie, as their bodies, souls, and hearts are variously exploited and abused beyond recognition. It's visceral, unbending, and entirely appropriate to the text. I absolutely recommend this book to anyone interested in a further commentary and interpretation of this historic text. I recommend it to anyone approaching this text for the first time. I hope it is quickly translated into as many languages as the original. This is the version I will share with my children. ☠ The Communist Manifesto (Graphic Novel) Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels Adapted by Martin Rowson Trade Paperback Self Made Hero, January 2018 Five Stars November 7-8, 2018 ☠

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robert Hudder

    Before I started reading this short graphic novel, which is the text of the communist manifesto with pictures, I was sure I hadn't read it. I mean, in university, the stuff was everywhere as Marxian analysis was big and post Marxist thought and ... and... and... I was content to review this as a drunken tirade late one night at the local pub (true story, BTW) but then I read it. I have read this one before. It is some gripe filled work that has some truth and a ten thousand feet view. It is a ca Before I started reading this short graphic novel, which is the text of the communist manifesto with pictures, I was sure I hadn't read it. I mean, in university, the stuff was everywhere as Marxian analysis was big and post Marxist thought and ... and... and... I was content to review this as a drunken tirade late one night at the local pub (true story, BTW) but then I read it. I have read this one before. It is some gripe filled work that has some truth and a ten thousand feet view. It is a call to action before last call. It is both most true and most desperate. It is also the reason that I don't care for most Marxian analysis. They ignore the more basic parts like booze and real work. Academics talking about work and against the petty bourgeoisie seems a little rich. I get that these are intoxicating thoughts to the middle class who, I sometimes think, believe that when they help their worker brothers rise up, will be left to lead are totally mistaken. I guess for me, the idea that the downtrodden will rise up and revolt is a bit of a duh moment. I mean those who aren't downtrodden rarely have to rise up and overthrow their own system. Except for palace intrigues. So, maybe this tract is more about human nature than anything else. I am being glib. There is value in this approach. But too many times, it goes off the rails. And this book makes that point too. No, it can't all be blamed on Marx. Some lies at the feet of those that followed and of those who made hay from exploitation of these feelings of change. I would definitely recommend this to anarchists, communists and socialists of any stripe. It is a fairly honest look at the communist manifesto. Sure, it is a little forward and the text with some graphics but it doesn't shy away from the editorializing and failures of communism as enacted without still staying true to the spirit. Loads of fun.

  10. 4 out of 5

    PvOberstein

    If what you’re missing in your life is a fantastically-illustrated adaptation of The Communist Manifesto, then Martin Rowson has something for you. This short little work adapts Marx and Engel’s original pamphlet for graphic novel form, and I got around to reading it before reading the original, so as a tool of outreach I guess it works. The most interesting thing in this work (not counting the Hegelian dialecticism of Marx & Co.) is the artwork, which is done in the contemporary style of 19th ce If what you’re missing in your life is a fantastically-illustrated adaptation of The Communist Manifesto, then Martin Rowson has something for you. This short little work adapts Marx and Engel’s original pamphlet for graphic novel form, and I got around to reading it before reading the original, so as a tool of outreach I guess it works. The most interesting thing in this work (not counting the Hegelian dialecticism of Marx & Co.) is the artwork, which is done in the contemporary style of 19th century science fiction; to me it feels like a cross between steampunk and Henrique Alvim Corréa’s illustrations for The War of the Worlds, with a splash of Victorian political cartoons. There’re a lot of neat little bits of artwork which really drive home some of the points of the Manifesto, though I think they’re mostly there to keep the reader engaged. There’s a brief forward on Marx by the author, who seems sympathetic to Marx’s ideas (particularly in the context of early industrialization), but a little scornful of some of Marx’s simplifications and rather disillusioned by the history of 20th century Communism, what with its tendency to create police states (something aptly critiqued towards the end of the book). If you want to get the gist of what the Manifesto was about, then you could certainly do worse.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    This was quite the wild ride. I'd never actually read "The Communist Manifesto" so this was my first introduction to the text...and it was a surreal one filled with Pink Floyd-like pigs and half-humanoid, half-machine creatures everywhere to be seen. The art was very Bosch-like, but a bit more hellish like, without all the little grotesque visual surprises that make Bosch fascinating. It was honestly, a hard book to read due to sensory issues: one, because of its visuals - some very extreme and dar This was quite the wild ride. I'd never actually read "The Communist Manifesto" so this was my first introduction to the text...and it was a surreal one filled with Pink Floyd-like pigs and half-humanoid, half-machine creatures everywhere to be seen. The art was very Bosch-like, but a bit more hellish like, without all the little grotesque visual surprises that make Bosch fascinating. It was honestly, a hard book to read due to sensory issues: one, because of its visuals - some very extreme and dark images done in a very severe style; and two, it assaulted my nose every time I turned a page. The inks used for the art had a very strong chemical smell to them, so I ended up almost holding my breath while I was reading it. This is obviously through no fault of the author, but I do wish that less odorous materials could be used for such prints. All in all, a good introduction to some material that's influenced the lives of pretty much every person on the planet in some way or another. Just try to read this edition in a well ventilated area ;o)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Peter Harrison

    I've always enjoyed Martin Rowson's work for the Guardian, I was bought this book as a gift and it's fabulous. The characterisation of Marx (and his ubiquitous cigar) is very well done - I particularly like the image of him pissing on the statue of other forms of 'socialism'. The book keeps the broad structure of the Communist Manifesto and the sections of text included make sense and give the feel of the original. The illustrations are suitably apocalyptic. I especially enjoyed the final charge I've always enjoyed Martin Rowson's work for the Guardian, I was bought this book as a gift and it's fabulous. The characterisation of Marx (and his ubiquitous cigar) is very well done - I particularly like the image of him pissing on the statue of other forms of 'socialism'. The book keeps the broad structure of the Communist Manifesto and the sections of text included make sense and give the feel of the original. The illustrations are suitably apocalyptic. I especially enjoyed the final charge across the barricade and the "aftermath" where Rowson depicts the subsequent history of communism and how it now feels more relevant than it has done for a while. A fantastic quirky read for those familiar with Marx, and hopefully something that might tweak the interest of those who aren't. Superb.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex Meeks

    I've gained a great deal from reading the Communist Manifesto over the years, but I'm here to review the art, interpretation, and presentation of this particular edition of the Manifesto rather than the text itself. Rowson abridged the text a little, added speakers here in there for effect, and I think he did so artfully. The artwork is beautiful and terrifying, which is fitting for the urgent tone of the Manifesto itself. The "Socialist Statue Park" section of the book speaks and unbelievable am I've gained a great deal from reading the Communist Manifesto over the years, but I'm here to review the art, interpretation, and presentation of this particular edition of the Manifesto rather than the text itself. Rowson abridged the text a little, added speakers here in there for effect, and I think he did so artfully. The artwork is beautiful and terrifying, which is fitting for the urgent tone of the Manifesto itself. The "Socialist Statue Park" section of the book speaks and unbelievable amount for having so few words... I spent as much time wandering the park as I did in the sections where Marx and Engels were actually speaking. I'm glad I read this as my first book of 2019, and I look forward to reading more of Martin Rowson's books!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Macabre. But then, Marx's view of the capitalist society is also pretty macabre. I don't know that I gained anything in reading this. I feel like Rowson overly relied on Marx's work, and it ultimately got bogged down by text. It felt clunky, and I felt a disconnect between text and image. That being said, the art was worth it. It was detailed and nuanced and pretty grim altogether. I enjoyed that aspect of it. Big takeaway is that it felt disjointed--images merely captioned with Marx quotes. I'm n Macabre. But then, Marx's view of the capitalist society is also pretty macabre. I don't know that I gained anything in reading this. I feel like Rowson overly relied on Marx's work, and it ultimately got bogged down by text. It felt clunky, and I felt a disconnect between text and image. That being said, the art was worth it. It was detailed and nuanced and pretty grim altogether. I enjoyed that aspect of it. Big takeaway is that it felt disjointed--images merely captioned with Marx quotes. I'm not sure that there's a real concept of narrative there, no concept of plot. The graphic novel just kind of is.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nigel McFarlane

    This is perfect for curious readers like me who would never dream of reading the original! Thank you, Martin Rowson, for putting it in such digestible form. Amidst grotesque imagery of dark satanic mills, we are guided through the guiding principles of communism as laid down by Marx himself. Curiosity satisfied, this has not made me a fan of Marx: his observations of the way workers are exploited are brilliant, and as true now as they were then, but his solution leaves a lot to be desired.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Char

    Really didn't like the art style. It was so dark and busy that it was extremely difficult to tell just, like, what each drawing was trying to depict. "Spectre of communism" taken to its apparent macabre, steampunk, horror logical conclusions. There was a real opportunity to provide illustrations to help demonstrate some of the manifesto's more complex thoughts, but the art ended up obfuscating the text more than anything else. Overall pretty disappointing. Really didn't like the art style. It was so dark and busy that it was extremely difficult to tell just, like, what each drawing was trying to depict. "Spectre of communism" taken to its apparent macabre, steampunk, horror logical conclusions. There was a real opportunity to provide illustrations to help demonstrate some of the manifesto's more complex thoughts, but the art ended up obfuscating the text more than anything else. Overall pretty disappointing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vittorio Viegas

    This one really makes you think, especially since it is a reflex of the time it was written. Sure this is an adaptation but even so I think it can still send an overall message. About the art, it's gorgeous. For me it wasn't always easy to understand what the pictures had to say by themselves but they are certainly one of a kind. This one really makes you think, especially since it is a reflex of the time it was written. Sure this is an adaptation but even so I think it can still send an overall message. About the art, it's gorgeous. For me it wasn't always easy to understand what the pictures had to say by themselves but they are certainly one of a kind.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    A disturbing read, that would have been far more turgid if I’d read Marx and Engel’s original work. The quality of the artwork is superb but I wonder why Marx is portrayed wearing a James Bond villain’s smile throughout? The pervading atmosphere by the time you’ve finished the book is reminiscent of cold war Russia, but at least you’ll have the basics of communism drummed into you by the end.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Calleigh

    As someone who often hears of Marx in social science theory classes, and who was daunted by the idea of reading the whole manifesto (I'm not a huge fan for dense old school theory) having visuals with the text was very helpful! Maybe one day I'll pick up the original and give it a read, but this was a really great primer to have visuals to go with the texts. As someone who often hears of Marx in social science theory classes, and who was daunted by the idea of reading the whole manifesto (I'm not a huge fan for dense old school theory) having visuals with the text was very helpful! Maybe one day I'll pick up the original and give it a read, but this was a really great primer to have visuals to go with the texts.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Simsian

    Absolutely loved how the art was able to capture the timelessness of the Manifesto while maintaining a view on the specific greivances of the day, rooting the work in it's historical moment and offering up fruit anew for those watching the haunting spectre. Absolutely loved how the art was able to capture the timelessness of the Manifesto while maintaining a view on the specific greivances of the day, rooting the work in it's historical moment and offering up fruit anew for those watching the haunting spectre.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hugh

    My score is a compromise between 3 stars for the ever relevant, but extremely messy, original manifesto, and 5 stars for the clever, thoughtful and creative dimension Martin Rowson's illustrations give it. Bonus points for the "Preface" and "Aftermath" sections. My score is a compromise between 3 stars for the ever relevant, but extremely messy, original manifesto, and 5 stars for the clever, thoughtful and creative dimension Martin Rowson's illustrations give it. Bonus points for the "Preface" and "Aftermath" sections.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Santi

    Great adaptation of The Communist Manifesto. I really enjoyed the second part, with the monologue approach, and the last part, using the allegory of the statue for representing the circle on the social evolution.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steve Mitchell

    The words of Marx and Engels along with the amazing artwork of one of my favourite political cartoonists was a joy to read. A must for anyone with left-leaning politics even if you have spotted the flaws in Marx’s big idea

  24. 5 out of 5

    Olli

    Illustrated version of Karl Marx classic. Hilarious.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janet Savill

    Loved the imagery to accompany the text. Humourous and thoughtful with a great introduction to the work from the artist.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Juan Manuel

    How had I not read this before? Fortunately that has been fixed now. Required reading for understanding life and society. You have nothing to lose but your chains. You have a world to win.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    A really, really brilliant and funny thing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laura 📚

    Stunning illustration.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ezra

    A little short but good on him for condensing the Manifesto to this length. Great artwork, reminds me a little bit of 19th Century political cartoons combined with some Sergio Aragones.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ellie (ermreading)

    Actually a 4.5 stars

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