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A new era of exciting adventures and shocking revelations continues to unfold, as the legendary Star Wars saga sweeps forward into astonishing new territory. Civil war looms as the fledgling Galactic Alliance confronts a growing number of rebellious worlds–and the approaching war is tearing the Skywalker and Solo families apart. Han and Leia return to Han’s homeworld, Corel A new era of exciting adventures and shocking revelations continues to unfold, as the legendary Star Wars saga sweeps forward into astonishing new territory. Civil war looms as the fledgling Galactic Alliance confronts a growing number of rebellious worlds–and the approaching war is tearing the Skywalker and Solo families apart. Han and Leia return to Han’s homeworld, Corellia, the heart of the resistance. Their children, Jacen and Jaina, are soldiers in the Galactic Alliance’s campaign to crush the insurgents. Jacen, now a complete master of the Force, has his own plans to bring order to the galaxy. Guided by his Sith mentor, Lumiya, and with Luke’s young son Ben at his side, Jacen embarks on the same path that his grandfather Darth Vader once did. And while Han and Leia watch their only son become a stranger, a secret assassin entangles the couple with a dreaded name from Han’s past: Boba Fett. In the new galactic order, friends and enemies are no longer what they seem…


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A new era of exciting adventures and shocking revelations continues to unfold, as the legendary Star Wars saga sweeps forward into astonishing new territory. Civil war looms as the fledgling Galactic Alliance confronts a growing number of rebellious worlds–and the approaching war is tearing the Skywalker and Solo families apart. Han and Leia return to Han’s homeworld, Corel A new era of exciting adventures and shocking revelations continues to unfold, as the legendary Star Wars saga sweeps forward into astonishing new territory. Civil war looms as the fledgling Galactic Alliance confronts a growing number of rebellious worlds–and the approaching war is tearing the Skywalker and Solo families apart. Han and Leia return to Han’s homeworld, Corellia, the heart of the resistance. Their children, Jacen and Jaina, are soldiers in the Galactic Alliance’s campaign to crush the insurgents. Jacen, now a complete master of the Force, has his own plans to bring order to the galaxy. Guided by his Sith mentor, Lumiya, and with Luke’s young son Ben at his side, Jacen embarks on the same path that his grandfather Darth Vader once did. And while Han and Leia watch their only son become a stranger, a secret assassin entangles the couple with a dreaded name from Han’s past: Boba Fett. In the new galactic order, friends and enemies are no longer what they seem…

30 review for Legacy of the Force: Bloodlines

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Brown

    After getting involved in the story in the book before, this book almost frustrated me enough to stop reading the series. I didn't like the author's writing style, which was very different from the author of "Betrayal" - the first in the series. After getting involved in the story in the book before, this book almost frustrated me enough to stop reading the series. I didn't like the author's writing style, which was very different from the author of "Betrayal" - the first in the series.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This one fails for one very simple reason. I hate the characterization of Boba Fett. I totally disagreed with Lucas's backstory of Fett being a clone, thus ruining his individuality. And now, Karen Traviss has turned the galaxy's most feared bounty hunter into an emo papa's boy. Oh dad, I loved you and Oh dad, I miss you. Pathetic and fail. Jacen Solo's transformation continues to baffle me as well. The logic is completely faulty. Jacen embraced multiple ways of using the Force during the last ma This one fails for one very simple reason. I hate the characterization of Boba Fett. I totally disagreed with Lucas's backstory of Fett being a clone, thus ruining his individuality. And now, Karen Traviss has turned the galaxy's most feared bounty hunter into an emo papa's boy. Oh dad, I loved you and Oh dad, I miss you. Pathetic and fail. Jacen Solo's transformation continues to baffle me as well. The logic is completely faulty. Jacen embraced multiple ways of using the Force during the last major story arc, refusing to commit himself to one particular path and embracing a path of moral relativism. I was inspired by his take philosophically and was intrigued by all of this mystic knowledge he had acquired. He seemed at the time to be the most powerful and objective Jedi in the Star Wars universe, wise beyond his years. In this arc, he embraces the fact that maybe Sith teachings aren't all that bad after all, and that they can be a tool to bringing order and peace to the galaxy, if used properly. I accept this premise. It fits with his nature. But, he is more and more embracing the idea that the Sith way is the way, the only way, to bring peace to the galaxy, and that somehow he must sacrifice someone he cares about if he really wants to achieve his objectives and prove that he is beyond passion and temptation. Huh?!?!? Why accept the need for sacrifice? There was no plot point where a loved one has gotten in his way. HE DOESN'T EVEN KNOW WHO THIS LOVED ONE IS, ONLY THAT HE HAS TO KILL ONE OF THEM. Why?????? Fail. I imagine Jacen toying with Sith teachings as part of his overall patchwork worldview and not how Traviss is implementing this, "Oh, I have to be dark in order to succeed. I'll be a martyr and make the tough choices and sacrifice myself" nonsense. There was also a recognition on his part that he has a "Sith Destiny," which again, doesn't mesh with his worldview. The real Jacen would say that he has his own destiny and the things he learns helps him to fulfill it. The plot points in this story also make no sense to me. There's no connective tissue between the story developments in the ongoing Corellian Crisis. It's just, "Oh, this happens. Now let's talk about something else. Oh and by the way, that last thing that happened was much more important than we first described, it's now blowing up into this situation. Why? Because I say so that's why! Thanks for asking." Just, ugh. I think plot-wise it's the poorest flow of any of the Star Wars EU stuff I've read so far. The redeeming factor in this is the characterization of Han. It's really fascinating to see what stance he takes when his son becomes a member of the gestapo. The pain it causes him, and the choices he make truly feel agonizing. Traviss also manages to get him just right. Han's a rebel by nature. He hates the establishment. He loves independence and he loathes uniformity, which is personified in this novel by Jacen. One other success: philosophically and politically, it's interesting to see how this story parallels prequel stuff. Mainly the question being tackled is how does a peace-loving democracy turn into an authoritarian state. And moreover, how do individuals who fought for their whole lives for freedom and the creation of a new and better system react once that brainchild shows signs of corruption? Do you reform from within because it's the system you created and believed in, or do you revert to your past, and fight it from the outside, tear it down and make something new? There's something cyclical about the overall arc I find appealing and fascinating and so I will continue it, but Traviss, you let me down.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    Boba Fett isn't my favorite character, but this story made for some exciting reading. Though I already know how this series ends, it'll be interesting to relive the events that led up to it. Boba Fett isn't my favorite character, but this story made for some exciting reading. Though I already know how this series ends, it'll be interesting to relive the events that led up to it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Q.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Legacy of the Force series is one of those works of literature where the quality of the writing isn't the problem (that's actually quite good) it's the subject matter. The potentially interesting premise (ripped off from the prequels it may be) of a morally gray civil war with our heroes having to make tough choices, is badly bungled here. The initial setup is the Galactic Alliance versus Corellia with no clear good guy. The problem here becomes is that this book paints them both as assholes The Legacy of the Force series is one of those works of literature where the quality of the writing isn't the problem (that's actually quite good) it's the subject matter. The potentially interesting premise (ripped off from the prequels it may be) of a morally gray civil war with our heroes having to make tough choices, is badly bungled here. The initial setup is the Galactic Alliance versus Corellia with no clear good guy. The problem here becomes is that this book paints them both as assholes. Speaking of which, Jacen still sucks as a character. He goes from killing a friend without hesitation in the last book to herding people into interment camps and torturing characters during interrogation in this one. I want to transcend the fourth wall and slap his family members for not catching onto the fact he is obviously a bad guy now. The one saving grace of this book is Boba Fett and his subplot. His characterization and interactions with other characters is spot on.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Plot: Bloodlines is the second book in the Legacy of the Force series and is just as invigorating as the first. The book opens up on Boba Fett as he is collecting a bounty when a curious question pops up: “’Why do you still do this, Fett?’” That question is probably on everyone’s mind. Boba Fett doesn’t need to do this anymore because through the years he has become the wealthiest man in the galaxy. He could retire and enjoy his life, so why does he continue? That gets Fett wondering what he sho Plot: Bloodlines is the second book in the Legacy of the Force series and is just as invigorating as the first. The book opens up on Boba Fett as he is collecting a bounty when a curious question pops up: “’Why do you still do this, Fett?’” That question is probably on everyone’s mind. Boba Fett doesn’t need to do this anymore because through the years he has become the wealthiest man in the galaxy. He could retire and enjoy his life, so why does he continue? That gets Fett wondering what he should do now as he is dying, and only has about one standard year to live. Fett wants to see his daughter again who he hasn’t seen in over fifty years. He also needs to find a way to cheat death, and in order to do this he goes off after a Kaminoan doctor, Taun We, to seek medical treatment and information. During his travels he meets Mirta Gev who is a fellow bounty hunter that says she knows Boba’s daughter. Boba decides to take her on his travels because he likes her, even though he won’t admit it, and she has information that he wants. Boba travels to a medical facility and confronts the doctor. When asked, the doctor cannot help Boba, so Boba steals information as payment. One thing that I don’t understand is how Taun We can be so heartless. She is the one who practically raised Boba. Boba does find out about another clone who is supposedly still alive even though the clone is supposed to be 140 years old because of rapid aging. Boba decides to go in search of this mystery man when everything is settled. On the other side of the galaxy you have Jacen Solo who is the leader of the Galactic Alliance Guard. He is in search of terrorists to the Galactic Alliance, and because the GA is at war with Corellia, most of the “terrorists” are Corellians living on Coruscant. Many people are mad and Jacen and disgusted with what he is doing, but most people absolutely love it. Jacen is apprenticing under Lumiya, dark lady of the Sith, to become a Sith Master. Jacen is becoming like his grandfather, Anakin Skywalker (a.k.a. Darth Vader). Jacen is doing more horrible things to the Corellian population every day. One day Jacen went after some terrorists. One of the terrorists was a bounty hunter. That bounty hunter happened to be Boba Fett’s daughter. Unknowingly, Jacen killed her. Before that Boba was hired to defend Corellia, but he had other plans. When he found out Han Solo was going to kill his cousin Thracken Sal Solo, leader of Corellia, Boba decided to help. Together the two killed Thracken along with Mirta Gev. After the killing, Han tells Boba about his daughter. When Mirta hears that she tries to kill Boba. Mirta is Boba Fett’s granddaughter, and was supposed to hand him over to his daughter for her to kill him. Han talks Mirta down, and Mirta and Boba decide to stick together because they are the only family they have left. Characterization: Throughout this book the character of Boba Fett gets revealed. In the beginning, Boba is a cold, heartless killer who cares only about himself. When Boba realized that he was dying everything started changing. Suddenly he wanted to have someone who he could pass his legacy onto. Then Boba met Mirta Gev. Unbeknownst to Boba that she was his granddaughter, Boba had an immediate liking for her because she reminded him a bit of himself. I wonder why that was. Boba started thinking about more than himself. He started sharing his feelings. All of these things are things he has never done before. It just goes to show how life changing events really do change your life. Audience: This novel would be recommended to people who have a high school reading level and have a love for Star Wars. People who also love sci fi books would enjoy this book because it describes many science fiction ideas such as space travel, aliens, and advanced technology. This book is for both genders as Star Wars is not restricted by gender. However, if you do not like death, war, or conflict, do not read this book. If you aren’t a big fan of science fiction novels do not read this book as well. Overall this is a well written book for everyone to enjoy. Personal Response: I give this book 5 out of 5 stars. I thoroughly enjoy reading about the Star Wars universe and this book is not a disappointment. I especially enjoyed reading about my favorite Star Wars character of all time: Boba Fett. It was exciting getting to know the man and what his personal life was like. This book offered everything you would want in a Star Wars novel and I would recommend it to any Star Wars fan.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I really do love the audio book implementations for Star Wars novels. It's lovely to hear all the music cues and background effects. This book wasn't amazing, though I very much enjoyed the Boba Fett portions. The stuff with Jacen feels very forced (heh). They're doing it because they want a specific set of circumstances/conflicts, but it does not feel in character or organic at all. Oh well. On to the next one! I really do love the audio book implementations for Star Wars novels. It's lovely to hear all the music cues and background effects. This book wasn't amazing, though I very much enjoyed the Boba Fett portions. The stuff with Jacen feels very forced (heh). They're doing it because they want a specific set of circumstances/conflicts, but it does not feel in character or organic at all. Oh well. On to the next one!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    This book was one of the first decent original SW series books in awhile. The story lines in it were actually quite interesting and sending things going in potentially exciting directions. Unfortunately, it suffered from two major issues: 1. The typical over-bloating of unnecessary scenes and dialogue that tend to plague the books. It could have been a great 250 page book instead of an OK 380 page book. 2. While there are intriguing characters and plot lines, too much of it originated way back e This book was one of the first decent original SW series books in awhile. The story lines in it were actually quite interesting and sending things going in potentially exciting directions. Unfortunately, it suffered from two major issues: 1. The typical over-bloating of unnecessary scenes and dialogue that tend to plague the books. It could have been a great 250 page book instead of an OK 380 page book. 2. While there are intriguing characters and plot lines, too much of it originated way back earlier in 80s comic books or YA Young Jedi books and assumed you read all of them, even though it's unlikely you had. Had pointless space battles and civil unrest scenes been replaced with purposeful flashbacks to explain the background more it would have made for a much better story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gus

    This book is a very exciting read. The book flashes it point of view to that of Boba Fett, a bounty hunter known throughout the galaxy. After escaping the Sarlacc Pit, he learns that because he is a clone he is slowly dying from age acceleration. His only hope of surviving is to find Ko Sai, a Kaminoan cloner who may have the solution to his age acceleration. As his journey begins he meets a young bounty hunter named Mirta Gev. She tells Fett that she is completing a bounty for Fett's daughter a This book is a very exciting read. The book flashes it point of view to that of Boba Fett, a bounty hunter known throughout the galaxy. After escaping the Sarlacc Pit, he learns that because he is a clone he is slowly dying from age acceleration. His only hope of surviving is to find Ko Sai, a Kaminoan cloner who may have the solution to his age acceleration. As his journey begins he meets a young bounty hunter named Mirta Gev. She tells Fett that she is completing a bounty for Fett's daughter and that she can take him to her if he wants. The last time Fett saw his daughter, Ailyn, she tried to kill him and took his ship. With the looming fact that he might die, Fett agrees but is unaware that Mirta is his granddaughter. Mirta is sent by Ailyn to lure Fett into a trap and kill him. Meanwhile, Jacen is the head of the Galactic Alliance Guard, a task force created to get rid of Corellian terrorists who are protesting on Coruscant. The cause of the terrorism was the attack on Centerpoint and the assassination of Corellia's former Prime Minister. With the assassination of Corellia's Prime Minister, Thrackan is voted into office and starts urging Corellia and her fellow systems to leave the Galactic Alliance. This causes a lot of conflict between the Galactic Alliance and the Solo family. Jacen starts to lead raids in Coruscant to deport Corellians back to Corellia. This angers Luke as he slowly feels Jacen slowly going to the dark side. It also angers him because Jacen is taking Ben on these raids. Luke soon realizes that Lumiya is behind it although he doesn't know that she is working through Jacen. Han soon teams up with Fett to assassinate Thrackan in hopes that it will end the looming war between Corellia and the Galactic Alliance. During the raids back on Coruscant, Ailyn is captured and killed during interrogation by Jacen. This upsets Boba but it brings his relationship with Mirta closer and they head out together to find a cure. This book was very angering to see Jacen's character transition into something dark and evil. It is very frustrating to see Jacen's character be so swayed by Lumiya to the dark side. It seems as though soon Jacen will be to the point where he may start to hurt the people that he loves. He may do this with no remorse or regret. This book is very good for any Star Wars fan. The book leaves the reader sitting at the edge of their seat with the flip of each page. A good age group for the readers would be from middle school and up. I don't recommend this book if you haven't read the first one in the series of if you aren't familiar with the Star Wars franchise.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Priya

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow. I guess there aren't a lot of things I can say about this book other then I am not a huge fan of Karen Traviss. First of all, the woman cannot write Luke or Mara or Han or Leia for that matter. Thier conversations just seemed so out of charachter. And then there were the idiotic thought processes of Mara (really would she really not see the darkness surrounding her own nephew?) Not to mention the relationship between L and M and Ben. That being said the hardest parts of this last bit of the Wow. I guess there aren't a lot of things I can say about this book other then I am not a huge fan of Karen Traviss. First of all, the woman cannot write Luke or Mara or Han or Leia for that matter. Thier conversations just seemed so out of charachter. And then there were the idiotic thought processes of Mara (really would she really not see the darkness surrounding her own nephew?) Not to mention the relationship between L and M and Ben. That being said the hardest parts of this last bit of the book: "Poor Grandfather: gifted, exceptional, dismissed, barely tolerated, largely untrained, abandoned. No wonder he resorted to crazed, desperate violence... I'm the second chance. The Jedi Council dropped the ball. And they paid for it. Jacen had accepted his Sith destiny, but now he understood not only that it had to happen, but why. Everything in his life had led to this point because Anakin Skywalker's destiny had been subverted and warped by well-meaning but blind Masters, sending him off on a tangent to do a flawed Palpatine's bidding instead of realizing his own full power. I am more powerful than any of you." (Jacen after Forcewalking back in time to see how the Council refused Anakin his title of Master) Ridiculous, I think the part when he admits he is prepared to kill Tenel Ka and Allana is where I decided I wanted to hurl. Though I will say that the most realistic moment of Han's was this quotation: I don't know who you are, but you aren't my son anymore. My Jacen would never do the kind of stuff you do. Get out. I don't want to know any more." --Han. There are tons of gripes, but maybe its my dissatisfaction with the larger storyline: Omas, internment, secret police, Luke saying he 'isn't a student of history' when his whole life has been determined by the past. Anyway. I wasn't happy, but at the very least I've heard the series picks up with the next book..so stay tuned. (So I lied, I did have a lot to say)

  10. 4 out of 5

    William

    I never thought I would see the day that Boba Fett & Han solo would work together, but Karen Traviss delivers us just that situation in book 2 of the Legacy of the Force series, Bloodlines. Traviss is a hit and miss writer in my opinion, and this book lands somewhere in the middle. I liked the Boba Fett scenes and situations as he hunted for both bounties and personal answers to personal questions concerning family, being Mandalore and his own life. However, it seems like Jacen's turn to the dark I never thought I would see the day that Boba Fett & Han solo would work together, but Karen Traviss delivers us just that situation in book 2 of the Legacy of the Force series, Bloodlines. Traviss is a hit and miss writer in my opinion, and this book lands somewhere in the middle. I liked the Boba Fett scenes and situations as he hunted for both bounties and personal answers to personal questions concerning family, being Mandalore and his own life. However, it seems like Jacen's turn to the dark side is flying by without anyone willing to do anything. Clearly, his twin sister, Jaina, and uncle Luke can sense that he is turning, but do little more than offer words like :"how are you doing?" or "you're different", and the young Jedi keeps getting darker and darker. I know Jacen is very powerful, and able to conceal his emotions from his family, but it seems like this whole situation is a bit, pardon the pun, "Forced".

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alix

    I enjoyed “Star Wars Bloodlines” by Haren Traviss, because it deals with science fiction and outer space. This book also talks about the forces of good and evil. There are a lot of different characters views and how it all plays out in the story line. The book is told in first person. It’s tells how Luke Skywalker’s nephew is going to the dark side. Luke is also worried about his son being Jacen’s apprentice, because Luke doesn't want Ben to follow Jacen. “Star Wars Bloodline” takes place in Ou I enjoyed “Star Wars Bloodlines” by Haren Traviss, because it deals with science fiction and outer space. This book also talks about the forces of good and evil. There are a lot of different characters views and how it all plays out in the story line. The book is told in first person. It’s tells how Luke Skywalker’s nephew is going to the dark side. Luke is also worried about his son being Jacen’s apprentice, because Luke doesn't want Ben to follow Jacen. “Star Wars Bloodline” takes place in Outer Space at Corellia and Corusant. In the future of time. The theme is mainly telling right from wrong, not letting people influence you to do wrong. I would recommend this book to anybody that likes science fiction. Seventh grade and up would be able to read this series. If you like watching the Star Wars movies you will like these books. Most of the characters in this book are also in the movies. You will be able to identify with the characters.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matt Nielsen

    This is book 2 of the series and as you can probably guess by the cover it features Boba Fett very prominently throughout in his own storyline. At first it seemed a little out of place, but by the end the author had me hooked on his story as much as Jacen's story. Basically Boba Fett is dying because of a genetic defect inherent in clones. So he goes in search of the original Kaminoan cloning doc to help him live. But at the same time Jacen's crackdown on dissenters and trouble-makers on Coruscan This is book 2 of the series and as you can probably guess by the cover it features Boba Fett very prominently throughout in his own storyline. At first it seemed a little out of place, but by the end the author had me hooked on his story as much as Jacen's story. Basically Boba Fett is dying because of a genetic defect inherent in clones. So he goes in search of the original Kaminoan cloning doc to help him live. But at the same time Jacen's crackdown on dissenters and trouble-makers on Coruscant leads him to accidently kill a mandolorian bounty hunter during interrogation, not realizing it was Boba's daughter... He just made another enemy he really doesn't want...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Omega Khaos

    2nd book in the Legacy of the Force series....Bloodlines was really-really amazing book for me....I enjoyed reading it so much....my favorite moments were when Jacen Solo flow-walked back in time to see the past of Anakin Skywalker....I didn,t actually expect this book to be so good....I was a little skeptical of Karen Traviss as an author....she definitely suprised me with this....I definitely suggest this book and the whole Legacy of the Force series to any Star Wars EU fan....

  14. 5 out of 5

    Zombie_Phreak

    I was hoping to like this book and I gave it every chance to impress me and re-kindle my old love of Star Wars. Karen Traviss is one of my favorite Star Wars authors, she was awesome with her Star Wars Commando novels and she did more for the mythos of the Mandolorians than any author before her could ever dream of doing. I don't blame her for this book being as horrible as it was, I really don't. I can tell that she was given the second book in this storyline and that it was editorially mandated I was hoping to like this book and I gave it every chance to impress me and re-kindle my old love of Star Wars. Karen Traviss is one of my favorite Star Wars authors, she was awesome with her Star Wars Commando novels and she did more for the mythos of the Mandolorians than any author before her could ever dream of doing. I don't blame her for this book being as horrible as it was, I really don't. I can tell that she was given the second book in this storyline and that it was editorially mandated as to what was supposed to happen and Traviss did the best she could with the material she was given, but even she couldn't save this horrible story line. Let's just hit a few of the highlights of how bad this was: On page 38 Jacen thinks to himself, "The Sith way was neither evil nor dangerous." Ummm, Jacen, did you pay attention at all for the past like 30 years as Luke was teaching you about the Force and the history of it's users that fell to the Dark Side? Darth Revan? Darth Bane? Darth Sidious? Do any of these power hungry, psychologically unstable, meglomaniacal mass murderers ring any bells? Did he totally forget about when he and his sister were kidnapped from their parents and taken to the Shadow Academy? Did he totally forget that the people running that academy tried to brain wash them and turn them against their parents? Any of this ringing a bell Jacen? Plus Jacen spends too much time brooding and thinking and not enough time doing things. Why can't this formerly intelligent character realize when he's being lied to and manipulated? Why can't he realize that Dark Side = Bad? Hell he travels back in time and witnesses Anakin Skywalker slaughter 20 children in cold blood. I don't care how you rationalize that or try to justify it, any idea or concept tells you it's a good idea to kill a bunch of scared little kids is just plain WRONG. Han is always whining about how "No one messes with my family!" or "I have to protect my family!" Ummm, Han, your kids are in their 30's, both Jedi Knights, they both survived the Vong war, killed hundreds, if not thousands of Vong in hand to hand combat and ship to ship combat. Your wife is in her 60's and has killed more Storm Troopers, Kilik warriors, Vong warriors and various bad guys than I can count, plus she's also a Jedi Knight who's constantly saving your butt from things you can't handle. I'm pretty sure your family can take care of themselves! Also, what happened to Mara Jade? She used to be strong, powerful, opinionated, resourceful, determined, willing to do anything that needed to be done in order to take care of her friends and family and to get the job done. In these "Legacy of the Force" novels, she's just kinda there and crying about losing her baby as he grows up rather than doing something. I mean she's just kinda there in the background and every once in a while she pipes up with something like, "I'm losing my baby!" What is going on with Ben Skywalker? Look, I know he's 13 and the son of the greatest Jedi that ever lived and he's very powerful, but what parent in his right mind lets a 13 yr old child lead raids against terrorists and puts him on the front lines of a war that is about to break out? Also at one point it's stated that "he's grown up in these past few days." I don't care that this is Luke Skywalker's son, I don't care about the Force, and I don't care that we're in a galaxy far far away. No 13 yr old ANYWHERE grows up in "a few days." 13 yr olds are full of angst and are brooding and moody and rebellious. That doesn't all just go away in a few days and get replaced by maturity and responsibility because the kid's been in a few combat situations. Plus, you mean to tell me that Luke Skywalker has killed Storm Troopers, Dark Troopers, Vong, Kilik, Tusken Raiders, terrorists, and dozens of other types of enemies over the years. Not to mention the 100's of thousands of people he killed when he blew up the first Death Star, and he never once had second thoughts about whether he was doing the right thing? It never crossed his mind in the 40 years he's been using the Force until his 13 yr old son made an off-handed comment about it? The only really good parts of this book are the parts that are Karen Traviss' specialties, Boba Fett, the black ops missions and raids, plus the ship to ship combat reads pretty well. I loved how well this author developed Boba Fett's character and helped to re-establish his commitment to the Mandalorians and their way of life. Everything else is just crap. If I wanted to watch a bunch of people blowing minor terrorist acts out of proportion, blaming each other for the nation's current state of affairs, pointing fingers, throw the words "terrorism" and "terrorists"around in every other sentence, yelling at one another and flinging mud rather than sitting down and actually trying to rationally solve problems that affect millions of lives, I'd watch Fox News. In closing, Karen Traviss, I love your work, and I can tell you didn't want to write this and that this was editorially mandated. I will always read your work, and I may give Star Wars another chance someday, but I am done with this story arc. These books are just fluff and garbage that are trying to cash in on the Star Wars name that have no real story behind them other than trying to re-hash the Empire's rise to power. 2 Stars is my final verdict.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Lamoree

    Once I got over my shock that Boba Fett had survived the Pit of Saarlac, I enjoyed the book more than I thought. Fett was not one of my favorite characters but at least here is more interesting than previously thought. The story and characterizations move right along. I was mightily peeved when my local bookstores did not have the next book in stock!

  16. 4 out of 5

    John

    Continuation of the LotF storyline, this inexplicably brings back Boba Fett - someone who has died more times than a redshirt on Star Trek - but there's a twist. He has a family. That's right, sports fans - our favorite evil bounty hunter has an ex-wife, a daughter and a granddaughter. But its supposedly OK - he's still moody and introspective. Please. Continuation of the LotF storyline, this inexplicably brings back Boba Fett - someone who has died more times than a redshirt on Star Trek - but there's a twist. He has a family. That's right, sports fans - our favorite evil bounty hunter has an ex-wife, a daughter and a granddaughter. But its supposedly OK - he's still moody and introspective. Please.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    4 stars to boba fett fans, not so many to all the people who think he should have stayed dead after Return of the Jedi. Half the story follows Fett the other follows Ben Skywalker and Jacen Solo. Travis does a great job tying the two halves together.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Okay... this was not a bad book... but I really didn't get too much into it. There were some good parts - just about anything with Boba Fett was good. But there was a lot of filler where I just got bored. In all, not bad, but not great either. Okay... this was not a bad book... but I really didn't get too much into it. There were some good parts - just about anything with Boba Fett was good. But there was a lot of filler where I just got bored. In all, not bad, but not great either.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    After years of not reading Star Wars books, I bought this (without noticing that it was #2 in a series) because it had Boba Fett on the cover and I knew it had been mentioned on Penny Arcade.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Barnes

    One of the books that got me likeing Star Wars Novels

  21. 5 out of 5

    Megara Ryan

    I was going to try to drag my way through this series but...gosh I couldn't force myself to do it. Mainly, this is because the more I read about Jacen Solo the more I dislike him. I MEAN: There was literally no reason for him to become a Sith. None. At all. He had parents, siblings, an aunt, an uncle, and a cousin who loved and supported him and were there for him. He had a girlfriend and a daughter. He was a Jedi, something that he chose to be. Now it's true that Anakin had all of this as well, but I was going to try to drag my way through this series but...gosh I couldn't force myself to do it. Mainly, this is because the more I read about Jacen Solo the more I dislike him. I MEAN: There was literally no reason for him to become a Sith. None. At all. He had parents, siblings, an aunt, an uncle, and a cousin who loved and supported him and were there for him. He had a girlfriend and a daughter. He was a Jedi, something that he chose to be. Now it's true that Anakin had all of this as well, but only on the surface, Jacen was part of a much more welcoming and lenient Jedi Order. And Anakin was keeping secrets from and deceiving everyone he knew. Although Jacen IS keeping ONE secret. A 4-year-old secret that for some reason is never mentioned at any point (like, IDK, when he's contemplating becoming a Sith, or his mother's pestering him about kids, maybe?) in book 1. Jacen Solo had a daughter with Tenel Ka Djo, and this fact is dropped on the reader about 6% into this (SECOND!) book when, after a confusing scene in which Luke wonders what's bugging his nephew and Mara goes, "Duh he's in love," Jacen starts randomly pining for them. And... Just... WHAT THE HECK WHY IS SHE SECRET* I DON"T UNDERSTAND And that's NOT the reason he initially decides to turn, because, as I said before, not even the slightest allusion is made to either of them in book 1. (this is what happens when you have multiple people doing a series and they each write their own chapter individually instead of doing the whole thing together. Yes, Sequel Trilogy, I am looking at you) No, the defining reason that Jacen Solo starts on the path to Sith Lord-dom is, as far as I can tell, because some random (Sith, former Emperor's Hand) woman tells him if he doesn't then in the future he's going to kill his uncle. ..... Um... Okay... Well...that's a solid reason, I guess....Anakin turned to save Padme, sooo.... But Anakin also had other reasons...feeling like he couldn't share things with any of the people in his life, the stress of war, the suffocation of the Jedi Order, the weight of being the Chosen One, PALPATINE..... Jacen just doesn't want to kill his uncle. (Also he gives off some weird vibes in book 1 but I refuse to even acknowledge the Some-People-Are-Just-Born-To-Be-Evil idea because it's lazy and bad and there are books about him as a perfectly normal child.) But what I don't get about THAT is that about 2 books later (this information is coming from Wookieepedia) he kills his aunt because apparently to become a Sith Lord you have to kill someone you love. Know who he considered murdering before that? TENEL KA AND ALLANA. Listen I love Luke as much as the next person, but IS HIS LIFE REALLY MORE IMPORTANT THAN YOUR TODDLER'S, JACEN?!?! Also, he is doing this consciously. He's not Anakin, making impulsive decisions and then realizing he's in too deep. When I stopped reading this book he was sitting in his quarters after HAVING A NORMAL INTERACTION WITH HIS FAMILY just casually thinking about becoming a Sith Lord and being amused about how much he has in common with his grandfather---- And that was the last straw. I absolutely refuse to listen to another freaking Solo child emulate their grandfather while said grandfather who can appear as a freaking force ghost to say "Um how about we DON"T do this?" stands by and watches ESPECIALLY because this Solo had not a single, actual, plausible motivation for going evil and the only reason that I can think of for why he becomes Darth Caedus and kills a ton of people, including his FORMER STUDENT, (Nelani deserved so much better) his AUNT, and his DAUGHTER'S GRANDFATHER, before being stopped when his TWIN! SISTER! runs him through with a lightsaber while he is distracted warning Tenel Ka that their daughter is in danger (so much for redemption and fairytale endings) is because the authors obviously needed a big, cool, familiar plot, and, you know, these Skywalkers have been happy for a few years so it's time for them to suffer some more. Because, again: space fairytale. 🙃 *to be fair maybe if I had continued reading they would have explained this, but still....they should have fleshed it out in book 1, and as far as I can tell from the atmosphere of the Order and Jacen's family, there's literally no reason to keep this from them.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pagan

    Rating: 6.5/10 Slow Seduction to the Darkside...But In This Instance I'm Not Sure That's A Good Thing Warning: This review may contain spoilers. I will never understand why the Legacy of the Force series has so many authors. In my opinion, and no disrespect to any of the authors work, but it can be jarring jumping from one author to another from book to book within the same series, especially all leading towards a major plot point. Despite that being a major downside of the series, that's not to di Rating: 6.5/10 Slow Seduction to the Darkside...But In This Instance I'm Not Sure That's A Good Thing Warning: This review may contain spoilers. I will never understand why the Legacy of the Force series has so many authors. In my opinion, and no disrespect to any of the authors work, but it can be jarring jumping from one author to another from book to book within the same series, especially all leading towards a major plot point. Despite that being a major downside of the series, that's not to discount any of the work of Bloodlines by Karen Traviss or its counterparts. The character arc of Jacen Solo is still too slow for me. Despite a large shift to the darkside due to the brutal murder and torture of Boba Fett's daughter during an "interrogation", Jacen Solo ends Bloodlines in the same place that he ended in the first novel Betrayal. He has a lean towards the darkside, but by the end of the novel I feel he is yet again stuck in no mans land. Neither sith nor jedi, and not really anything in between. I wish this story would develop faster. I also wish Jacen would make a decision, rather than pander to his new "Master" Lumiya - to take Ben Skywalker as his Sith Apprentice or to let him go and be protected from the darkside. Again there is too much jumping from one to another, with nothing truly decided. I guess its a little frustrating after how easily manipulated he was by Lumiya to the darkside, which is hard for me to understand, two books later nothing has really happened in the grand scheme of either of their planning. One of the things that both worked against and for the novel was the inclusion of Boba Fett. I think the story worked really well as a seperate story, but nowhere during the novel did I feel it was part of the novel. To elaborate, it felt like I was reading another novel, with the Jacen Solo and Boba Fett's daughter a bridging story between it and this novel. It just felt like an excuse to use Boba Fett, or bring him back into canon but it lacked the smooth finesse that made it feel like it was all part of the one novel. Perhaps this goes back to the point of the shifting authors, and a chopping of writing styles. Also how did he survive the Pit of Sarlaac? o_O I guess another way to look at this, is that perhaps it felt like a filler portion of the novel. I am curious how the distance between Jacen and his family has esculated this far, between the last series and the start of this series, especially his twin Jaina. After the events that occur in Bloodline, I wonder why there wasn't more of a push from Jaina to try and "reach out" to her twin brother. The highlight of this novel was Ben Skywalker, and his journey as he is being forced by Jacen Solo to become an adult despite his age, and try to find his place in the world, muddling through the ways of the Jedi and the ways of the dark side that Jacen and Lumiya are trying to unknowingly manipulate him into embracing. That being said I'm excited for the next novel and hoping it picks up progress, especially between now and book five (as I know what happens, I just never have actually had a chance to read the books), which should make for some action and "dark" scenes in the next two-three books.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark Oppenlander

    Although I'm still not sold on the entire Legacy of the Force story arc, for Bloodlines I was happy to be back in the capable hands of Karen Traviss, whose Republic Commando novels have been such a fun read. Those books, focused on the clone troopers, include many references to Mandalorian culture. Here, she finally gets to spend some time writing about the most famous Mandalorian character of all, Boba Fett. Bloodlines picks up almost immediately after Betrayal ends. Jacen and Ben return to Coru Although I'm still not sold on the entire Legacy of the Force story arc, for Bloodlines I was happy to be back in the capable hands of Karen Traviss, whose Republic Commando novels have been such a fun read. Those books, focused on the clone troopers, include many references to Mandalorian culture. Here, she finally gets to spend some time writing about the most famous Mandalorian character of all, Boba Fett. Bloodlines picks up almost immediately after Betrayal ends. Jacen and Ben return to Coruscant, where terrorism has picked up. Jacen agrees to lead a special secret police unit, the Galactic Alliance Guard (GAG), to quash the unrest. This helps further his path to the Dark Side of the Force, with Lumiya lingering in the shadows to point the way. Meanwhile, Leia and Han discover that Thrackan Sal-Solo has a contract out on Han's life, despite the fact that they have chosen Corellia's side in the civil conflict. In another part of the galaxy, Boba Fett finds that he has only a limited time left to live unless he can find one of the Kaminoan cloners who holds the secret to his prematurely aging cells. Luke and Mara barely appear in this book; the other three story lines predominate. Traviss does a decent job of bouncing back and forth between the three major character groupings. Jacen held a "you have to break a few eggs to make an omelette" approach to his work in the previous book; the evolution of that political pragmatism in this story is chilling. Han and Leia's story barely registers emotionally though; it involves more political backstabbing on Corellia with characters we've met only briefly, and I found it hard to care about it, despite the stakes being a galactic war. The thing that will keep you reading here is Fett, the character whose picture graces the cover. From Traviss, we learn even more about Mandalorian culture, and Fett's place in it. The enigmatic bounty hunter appears in nearly half of the scenes here and these incidents serve to help us understand what really motivates this complex person. Traviss does more with this character in half a book than the entire Bounty Hunter Wars series did in three novels. And the true joy of the novel comes in the last third, when Han Solo and Boba Fett find that they must work together to achieve their goals. The whole things plays like an Odd Couple in space, with the hotheaded Solo balanced against the seemingly dispassionate Fett. That section alone makes the book worth the price of admission. I am pleased that Traviss wrote two more books in this series, as it will give me something to which I can look forward.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    I read some the comments on this book and some of the backlash of Boba Fett being this old man and boo hoo on him, but I guess they told the story of him and his family and how it involved the Galactic Alliance and the Corellias. I didn't really have a problem with the Fett story as some others did. Maybe it sets up him and the Manadores (sorry for the spelling mistake) later in the series or something. About the book though, which takes place soon after Betrayal the Corellias want to become inde I read some the comments on this book and some of the backlash of Boba Fett being this old man and boo hoo on him, but I guess they told the story of him and his family and how it involved the Galactic Alliance and the Corellias. I didn't really have a problem with the Fett story as some others did. Maybe it sets up him and the Manadores (sorry for the spelling mistake) later in the series or something. About the book though, which takes place soon after Betrayal the Corellias want to become independent of the GA. They feel like they are doing more than their share with money, weapons, soldiers, trades, ect. My problem is that I don't see the problem with that, but the GA won't have any of that. On the Corellia's side are Han, Leia and Wedge. On the GA side of things are the Jedi and everyone else not the Corellias. There were a few fights, but not much. Jacen has become the head of some sort of secret police force that is rounding up terrorists on Consurant (sorry for the spelling) with his apprentice Ben. Well Jacen is continuing his trip in being a Sith and thinking he is the only hope for a peaceful solution. Likes, well I am not sure...how about the current story of Boba Fett? Dislikes, the backstory of Boba Fett. It seem replayed a lot in the book and wasn't a huge fan of them talking about him as a clone as a kid. How everyone believed Jacen was turning to the dark side, but not doing anything about it. How Luke and Mara are staying on the sidelines allowing their son Ben be right next to Jacen. I am come on seriously? Then Han and Leia seeing Jacen after he did something bad and basically was like what, really I am mad at you type of things and just walking away from him not trying to be a parent, even though he is like 26-28 or something. Ummm Karen, I think when you become a parent you don't just stop being a parent if your kids get older... Some of her writing style wasn't the best. I know what your thinking...Joe why did you give it 3 stars if there was more dislikes than likes... Well good question... It is more of a 2.5 star, but I can see where this story is going and that is OK. Plus having Boba Fett on the cover moves it up to 3.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katrin von Martin

    This is the second installment of the nine-book Legacy of the Force series and was, in my view, better than the first book (Betrayal). Karen Traviss is a wonderful writer who knows the characters well and successfully adds her own elements to the plot as well as forwarding the ideas that have already been laid forth. However, as great as Traviss and her book were, there are still a few minor problems (that, while do not prove to be too distracting from the novel itself, still linger in the back This is the second installment of the nine-book Legacy of the Force series and was, in my view, better than the first book (Betrayal). Karen Traviss is a wonderful writer who knows the characters well and successfully adds her own elements to the plot as well as forwarding the ideas that have already been laid forth. However, as great as Traviss and her book were, there are still a few minor problems (that, while do not prove to be too distracting from the novel itself, still linger in the back of the reader's mind). Spoilers follow. Most of Bloodlines is spent on character development and, in some cases, catching up with characters that have been largely absent from the more recent books. There aren't really a lot of hard-core action scenes or space battles, but Traviss writes the characters and their various inner struggles so well that the lack of action that is normally present in Star Wars novels is hardly noticed. The book moves smoothly through its 380-some pages, fully enveloping the reader in the story. A large part of the book is devoted to, as the cover suggests, Boba Fett and the Mandalorians. With the exception of a brief guest appearance in the final New Jedi Order novel (The Unifying Force), neither our favourite bounty hunter nor the Mandalorians have been present in the recent novels. Traviss is clearly an expert on both the Mandalorian culture (even going as far as to create a language for them) and the character of Boba Fett. In this book, we learn that Boba Fett, now over seventy years old, is dying from a seemingly incurable cause. He spends a good part of his time contemplating his mortality and his life, reflecting on the various things he regrets, one of which plays another significant role in the novel: his family. In his search to discover both a possibly cure for his ailment and the fate of his wife and daughter, he teams up with Mirta Gev, his fellow Mandalorians, and Han Solo, and becomes caught up in the Galactic Alliance-Corellia civil war. As a big fan of Boba Fett and the Mandalorians, I was pleased to see them play a large role in Bloodlines and hope that they will continue to have a place in the Legacy of the Force series. Fett's new attitude towards life and his more family-oriented personality took a bit of getting used to (seeing as I was expecting the old, rough and uncaring, always ready for action Fett), but as the book progressed, his attitude seemed to fit his relatively new position in the galaxy. It was nice to see that there's a chance that the entire plot of this new series won't be completely devoted to those with Force capabilities and that the average, non Force inclined beings will also play a part. I hope the Mandalorian/Fett plotline will continue to make an appearance in this trilogy. However, as much as I enjoyed seeing Fett and his people again, I can't help but think that their insertion into the overall plot seems a bit random (for lack of a better term). I mean, most of this was Fett's personal mission that eventually linked with the big conflict...it almost came off as Traviss wanting to insert her pet project into the big series. It was certainly interesting, to be sure, but I get the feeling that this will dominate only Traviss's LotF books without really connecting to the rest of the series. Nevertheless, it was great to see the largely absent Fett make an appearance. The other large storyline is that of Jacen Solo and Ben Skywalker. Jacen continues to travel down the path to the Dark Side, now inserting himself in the government as leader of the Galactic Alliance Guard (GAG for short), an elite force that specializes in raiding Corellian neighbourhoods, eliminating threats to the alliance (in the form of the Corellians), and interrogating prisoners (to an extreme, in Jacen's case). Ben is still his ever-willing apprentice (much to his parents' chagrin) and is constantly battling his conflicting feelings over Jacen's teachings and actions. Traviss really wrote Ben well, taking him from a whiney teen whose only significance was being the son of Luke Skywalker to a young adult being forced to mature much faster than he wants to. His story was fascinating to read about and his inner struggles felt very realistic given what he was facing. He knows that what his cousin is doing is wrong on some level, but refuses to end his unofficial apprenticeship with Jacen because he feels he can still learn a lot from his cousin. I'm sure this will continue to play a pivotal role in the series and I hope the other authors progress upon the character that Traviss has established. Jacen, on the other hand, was almost a little over the top with his actions. It was nice (and realistic) to see him still battling internally to fulfill his role as the new Chosen One while, at the same time, being unable to sever his connections to his family and friends. However, some of his actions just seemed a bit much (his interrogation of Ailyn or his decision to deport or imprison Corellians, for example), given what we've already seen of him in novels past. His turn to the Dark Side is plausible, but his actions in doing so come off as a bit too fast and overdone. I fear this will only continue as the series progresses. Han and Leia also make an appearance, but not a particularly large one. They continue to be forced to choose between loyalty to friends (and in Leia's case, the Jedi Order) and Han's loyalty too his home-planet. Most of their part is spent trying to live anonymously in Corellia and figuring out how they can remove Thracken Sal-Solo from his leading position in the Corellian government. Later, they become the connector that ties Fett's story in with the overall plot. I have few complaints here. Both Hand and Leia were kept in character and were enjoyable to read about. Luke, Mara, Jaina, and Zekk all make minor appearances. Jaina seems to have been written into obscurity at this point with Zekk merely as a sidekick (and on a side note, this Jaina/Zekk thing really needs to end...it has just become an annoyance at this point that doesn't do anything for either character) and only plays the role of demonstrating Jacen's willingness to sever his family ties. Luke and Mara have become rather spineless, spending more time arguing amongst themselves than really doing anything (which doesn't really bother me, as I'm not really a Mara fan). We also don't get any big insight to why this is all happening...why has the Galactic Alliance become more like the Empire?...why has Corellia suddenly decided to rebel?...what exactly happened between the Dark Nest trilogy and this series? Overall, despite some minor issues (and they really are minor), Bloodlines proved to be a highly enjoyable book that put great emphasis on character development, something that is sometimes severely overlooked. A few characters that have been largely absent reentered the fray and well established characters were further fleshed out to fit this new plot. It's better than the first book, in my opinion...so, 4.5 stars. This review is also posted on Amazon.com.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Darryl Dobbs

    I enjoyed Karen Traviss' Republic/Imperial Commando series very much, as well as the culture it created in that it was a mix of Empire/Clone/Mandalorian. It was only natural that she brought Boba Fett into the Legacy story-line. I enjoyed the half of Bloodlines involving Fett and Han Solo (actually working together). And while I didn't overly enjoy the Jacen Solo angle in which he gets so easily played by Lumiya and heads down the path of the dark side, I bought into it. Often in the SWU you need I enjoyed Karen Traviss' Republic/Imperial Commando series very much, as well as the culture it created in that it was a mix of Empire/Clone/Mandalorian. It was only natural that she brought Boba Fett into the Legacy story-line. I enjoyed the half of Bloodlines involving Fett and Han Solo (actually working together). And while I didn't overly enjoy the Jacen Solo angle in which he gets so easily played by Lumiya and heads down the path of the dark side, I bought into it. Often in the SWU you need to take a leap of faith. When Anakin Skywalker showed spates of immaturity and temper tantrums, we found it over-the-top and silly, but we accepted it because he had to become Darth Vader somehow. And I felt that Jacen's path to the dark side was more believable: the desire to learn all sides of the Force and use it to restore order to the galaxy. And although he is getting played a little too easily by Lumiya (out of his character), I was hanging in there. The ending wasn't necessary. He was moving down the path just fine. His "final test" was ludicrous, not at all based on logic, and forces the character to completely deviate from the reasoning that had been carefully woven throughout the past dozen novels. I didn't like it. It felt forced. And it left a bad taste in my mouth about the entire story. We'll see if the next book can salvage things, but I don't have high hopes.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This second installment of the Legacy of the Force series was better than the first, but it had some quirks that make it just odd enough to keep it from being among my favorite Star Wars EU books. Karen Traviss is known for her Mandalorian stories and she weaves in the Mandalorians and Boba Fett here, but one never really understands what they have to do with the bigger story arc. Their relevance to the larger story only becomes clear near the end of the book and it seems forced. I feel like I s This second installment of the Legacy of the Force series was better than the first, but it had some quirks that make it just odd enough to keep it from being among my favorite Star Wars EU books. Karen Traviss is known for her Mandalorian stories and she weaves in the Mandalorians and Boba Fett here, but one never really understands what they have to do with the bigger story arc. Their relevance to the larger story only becomes clear near the end of the book and it seems forced. I feel like I spent half of the book in Boba Fett’s head, and that’s just not what I was interested in. Nevertheless, Boba Fett does experience some excellent character growth, so that will be satisfying for fans of his. Jaina played a bit part in this book. The story is poorer for it. Luke and Mara are done well, as is Ben. I felt the motivations of Han and Jacen were explained in a more straight forward way in this book as well (as compared to the first book). It was very satisfying for one of the Star Wars Expanded Universe villains to finally get what they deserved. Overall, this book is better than the first, but the focus on Boba Fett was excessive and did not serve the story arc.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Koan

    I'll be honest, for the first 200 pages, I didn't care for Boba Fett's involvement in this book. Traviss could have taken him out of the book and it would have been just fine with me. But those last 180ish pages. WHOO. I was so invested into Fett's story that I had to keep on reading. I won't talk more to avoid spoilers. The rest of the story was amazing. The portions with Jacen turning dark and Ben following him were incredibly aggrivating. This was one time I was angry that I knew more than the I'll be honest, for the first 200 pages, I didn't care for Boba Fett's involvement in this book. Traviss could have taken him out of the book and it would have been just fine with me. But those last 180ish pages. WHOO. I was so invested into Fett's story that I had to keep on reading. I won't talk more to avoid spoilers. The rest of the story was amazing. The portions with Jacen turning dark and Ben following him were incredibly aggrivating. This was one time I was angry that I knew more than the other characters. However, Traviss and the rest of the Del Rey team wrote this story so well that I just HAVE to keep on reading because I am invested. The book carries on from Betrayal enough that it fits, but because of Fett, Traviss is able to make it her own story. I'm interested to see if Troy Denning keeps up this tradition in "Tempest" The writing of Luke, Mara, Han, Leia, and Jaina was great, and I really felt for all of them(despite the fact that I am cheering for Luke and Jaina's point of view to prevail). Overall, solid book. Better than Betrayal by a little bit, but both are amazing. 8.8 out of 10! Great Work Traviss.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cayleigh Sorella

    This was surprisingly good. I only picked it up because it had Boba on the cover, and the back sparked something familiar in my childhood Legends brain. Had I known it was the second in a nine-part series, I probably wouldn't have bought it. Now, I kind of want to read the first and then the rest. Star Wars Legends books are always harder to get into. They require more paying attention to than the new canon material. I love it though. I love meeting characters I've known my entire life, reading t This was surprisingly good. I only picked it up because it had Boba on the cover, and the back sparked something familiar in my childhood Legends brain. Had I known it was the second in a nine-part series, I probably wouldn't have bought it. Now, I kind of want to read the first and then the rest. Star Wars Legends books are always harder to get into. They require more paying attention to than the new canon material. I love it though. I love meeting characters I've known my entire life, reading the arcs I've played out in Lego in the youth. This is the Star Wars I know and love. Han and Leia always hold the fort down for me when reading Legends. Their relationship helping me pull through some of the tougher parts - Jacen complaining about becoming a Sith, mainly. It was nice to see the family relationship between the Skywalker and Solo clans, how comfortable they all are with each other. I love this Luke, and respect his decisions, understand his actions and choices. Ben is a breath of fresh air too. Boba stole the show and had me coming back for more. Tempted to hunt down the rest and devour the entire series.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really enjoy Karen's Star Wars novels. I've been in the military for 14 years now and her writing feels familiar to me. Boba Fett had always been my favorite character ever since I watched ESB for the first time back in 1988. I love the mystery of this "man behind the mask", his utter professionalism. he always had a plan, he his enemies and his competition very well. Dengar once asked Fett if he had a face under that helmet. Fett said "This is my face." Now I know with E2 injecting Jango int I really enjoy Karen's Star Wars novels. I've been in the military for 14 years now and her writing feels familiar to me. Boba Fett had always been my favorite character ever since I watched ESB for the first time back in 1988. I love the mystery of this "man behind the mask", his utter professionalism. he always had a plan, he his enemies and his competition very well. Dengar once asked Fett if he had a face under that helmet. Fett said "This is my face." Now I know with E2 injecting Jango into the story kind of made it obvious but I loved not knowing what this man looked like. I have read several hundred Star Wars novels and this is the first that Fett has removed his helmet. It felt weird. I still give it 4 starts because it's a good book, I just feel like the prequels threw a wrench into great story and now our favorite authors are having to wire around it. All in all great book, I can't imagine what it must have been like to be the author to write that description. To me it's akin to killing an iconic character.

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