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In celebration of the one-year anniversary of Women’s March, this gorgeously designed full-color book offers an unprecedented, front-row seat to one of the most galvanizing movements in American history, with exclusive interviews with Women’s March organizers, never-before-seen photographs, and essays by feminist activists. On January 21, 2017, the day after Donald J. Trump In celebration of the one-year anniversary of Women’s March, this gorgeously designed full-color book offers an unprecedented, front-row seat to one of the most galvanizing movements in American history, with exclusive interviews with Women’s March organizers, never-before-seen photographs, and essays by feminist activists. On January 21, 2017, the day after Donald J. Trump’s inauguration, more than three million marchers of all ages and walks of life took to the streets as part of the largest protest in American history. In red states and blue states, in small towns and major urban centers, from Boise to Boston, Bangkok to Buenos Aires, people from eighty-two countries—on all seven continents—rose up in solidarity to voice a common message: Hear our voice. It became the largest global protest in modern history. Compiled by Women’s March organizers, in partnership with Condé Nast and Glamour magazine Editor in Chief Cindi Leive, Together We Rise—published for the one-year anniversary of the event—is the complete chronicle of this remarkable uprising. For the first time, Women’s March organizers—including Bob Bland, Cassady Fendlay, Sarah Sophie Flicker, Janaye Ingram, Tamika Mallory, Paola Mendoza, Carmen Perez, and Linda Sarsour —tell their personal stories and reflect on their collective journey in an oral history written by Jamia Wilson, writer, activist and director of The Feminist Press. They provide an inside look at how the idea for the event originated, how it was organized, how it became a global movement that surpassed their wildest expectations, and how they are sustaining and building on the widespread outrage, passion, and determination that sparked it. Together We Rise interweaves their stories with "Voices from the March"—recollections from real women who were there, across the world—plus exclusive images by top photographers, and 20 short, thought-provoking essays by esteemed writers, celebrities and artists including Rowan Blanchard, Senator Tammy Duckworth, America Ferrera, Roxane Gay, Ilana Glazer, Ashley Judd, Valarie Kaur, David Remnick, Yara Shahidi, Jill Soloway, Jia Tolentino, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, and Elaine Welteroth. An inspirational call to action that reminds us that together, ordinary people can make a difference, Together We Rise is an unprecedented look at a day that made history—and the beginning of a resistance movement to reclaim our future.


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In celebration of the one-year anniversary of Women’s March, this gorgeously designed full-color book offers an unprecedented, front-row seat to one of the most galvanizing movements in American history, with exclusive interviews with Women’s March organizers, never-before-seen photographs, and essays by feminist activists. On January 21, 2017, the day after Donald J. Trump In celebration of the one-year anniversary of Women’s March, this gorgeously designed full-color book offers an unprecedented, front-row seat to one of the most galvanizing movements in American history, with exclusive interviews with Women’s March organizers, never-before-seen photographs, and essays by feminist activists. On January 21, 2017, the day after Donald J. Trump’s inauguration, more than three million marchers of all ages and walks of life took to the streets as part of the largest protest in American history. In red states and blue states, in small towns and major urban centers, from Boise to Boston, Bangkok to Buenos Aires, people from eighty-two countries—on all seven continents—rose up in solidarity to voice a common message: Hear our voice. It became the largest global protest in modern history. Compiled by Women’s March organizers, in partnership with Condé Nast and Glamour magazine Editor in Chief Cindi Leive, Together We Rise—published for the one-year anniversary of the event—is the complete chronicle of this remarkable uprising. For the first time, Women’s March organizers—including Bob Bland, Cassady Fendlay, Sarah Sophie Flicker, Janaye Ingram, Tamika Mallory, Paola Mendoza, Carmen Perez, and Linda Sarsour —tell their personal stories and reflect on their collective journey in an oral history written by Jamia Wilson, writer, activist and director of The Feminist Press. They provide an inside look at how the idea for the event originated, how it was organized, how it became a global movement that surpassed their wildest expectations, and how they are sustaining and building on the widespread outrage, passion, and determination that sparked it. Together We Rise interweaves their stories with "Voices from the March"—recollections from real women who were there, across the world—plus exclusive images by top photographers, and 20 short, thought-provoking essays by esteemed writers, celebrities and artists including Rowan Blanchard, Senator Tammy Duckworth, America Ferrera, Roxane Gay, Ilana Glazer, Ashley Judd, Valarie Kaur, David Remnick, Yara Shahidi, Jill Soloway, Jia Tolentino, Congresswoman Maxine Waters, and Elaine Welteroth. An inspirational call to action that reminds us that together, ordinary people can make a difference, Together We Rise is an unprecedented look at a day that made history—and the beginning of a resistance movement to reclaim our future.

30 review for Together We Rise: Behind the Scenes at the Protest Heard Around the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    BUY THIS BOOK IF: -your want some of your money to support three grassroots women-of-color nonprofits working for criminal justice reform, indigenous rights, and reproductive freedom -you want to remember the power of unity and protest, though great photos and insightful mini-essays by organizers and participants -you want the real, documented, inside scoop on the fairly miraculous way the Women's March(es) came together -you want to hear the perspectives of the organizers of the March - on how orga BUY THIS BOOK IF: -your want some of your money to support three grassroots women-of-color nonprofits working for criminal justice reform, indigenous rights, and reproductive freedom -you want to remember the power of unity and protest, though great photos and insightful mini-essays by organizers and participants -you want the real, documented, inside scoop on the fairly miraculous way the Women's March(es) came together -you want to hear the perspectives of the organizers of the March - on how organizing this amazing event involved tough conversations about privilege and race, crazy lightning fast logistics, and a spirit of collaboration and improvisation -you want to know how to turn a moment into a movement really: BUY THIS BOOK

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    Nothing but love for this book. Buy it, read it, and stay in this movement.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    This retrospective of the 2017 Women's March is incredible. It explores all the complications of pulling off the largest mass protest in American history. It's inspiring and challenging and all the things it should be. I've picked up a couple photo books of the Women's March, but they don't hold a candle to this. Pictures are worth a thousand words, sure, but sometimes a few thousand words are worth a lot too. This retrospective of the 2017 Women's March is incredible. It explores all the complications of pulling off the largest mass protest in American history. It's inspiring and challenging and all the things it should be. I've picked up a couple photo books of the Women's March, but they don't hold a candle to this. Pictures are worth a thousand words, sure, but sometimes a few thousand words are worth a lot too.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Suziey

    "If it's not intersectional, then it's not feminism" - Gloria Steinem As the title suggests, this book is about the Women's March. Really gives you a background on the WOC who came together to make this happen. There are multiple essays by various people. It is a fantastic audiobook. Was equal parts enraged (because of the 56% white women/ 60 something % white men) and equal parts empowered (we marched on all 7 continents and had more people show up than at the inauguration, ha!). "If it's not intersectional, then it's not feminism" - Gloria Steinem As the title suggests, this book is about the Women's March. Really gives you a background on the WOC who came together to make this happen. There are multiple essays by various people. It is a fantastic audiobook. Was equal parts enraged (because of the 56% white women/ 60 something % white men) and equal parts empowered (we marched on all 7 continents and had more people show up than at the inauguration, ha!).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Suswati

    This is both thoughtful and inspiring. Reading about one of the largest protests in US history is truly wonderful. What makes this book so interesting is its in-depth look into the importance of intersectionality and why it has failed to be addressed for so long. The organisers of the march are open and candid about all the issues that arose while bringing this together, including permits, and lack of inclusivity - but they also speak about how they corrected these problems and learnt from it. F This is both thoughtful and inspiring. Reading about one of the largest protests in US history is truly wonderful. What makes this book so interesting is its in-depth look into the importance of intersectionality and why it has failed to be addressed for so long. The organisers of the march are open and candid about all the issues that arose while bringing this together, including permits, and lack of inclusivity - but they also speak about how they corrected these problems and learnt from it. From anecdotes of participants from Antarctica and a one-woman protest in Singapore, to important voices of our age such as Gloria Steinem and Roxane Gay - the book itself is a memento for one of the most significant moments of our time and worth going out and purchasing it on International Women's Day.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elliot Stoller

    Lots of different points of view from the organizers of the Women's March. And the book gives you a good idea of all the work that went into organizing the march. Lots of different points of view from the organizers of the Women's March. And the book gives you a good idea of all the work that went into organizing the march.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    A great look back at the 2017 Women's March on Washington. With quotes and anecdotes by organizers, speakers and attendees this book puts you there if you weren't and lets you see how and why it happened. I didn't attend a march in 2017 but I did in 2018 and even the (much) smaller march I went to was full of solidarity and strength. Some numbers from the book: 200,000 - number of people the march organizers expected in Washington 800,000-1,200,000 - estimated number of actual marchers in Washingto A great look back at the 2017 Women's March on Washington. With quotes and anecdotes by organizers, speakers and attendees this book puts you there if you weren't and lets you see how and why it happened. I didn't attend a march in 2017 but I did in 2018 and even the (much) smaller march I went to was full of solidarity and strength. Some numbers from the book: 200,000 - number of people the march organizers expected in Washington 800,000-1,200,000 - estimated number of actual marchers in Washington 653 events in the U.S. 13 - number of places that had a march of just one person 3,300,000 - number of people who marched in the United States. 5,000,000 - number of people who marched world wide. 5 - number of women who marched in a cancer ward in a Los Angeles hospital 3014 - number of participants in an inclusive onlin march organized by people facing physical limitations or chronic illness. 7 - number of continents that hosted marches (yes, even Antarctica) 76 - age difference, in years, between the oldest and youngest speaker a the Washington March - Gloria Steinem, 82 and Sophie Cruz, 6, daughter of undocumented parents. IN closing....buy this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    (a)lyss(a)

    "Sometimes you gotta preach to the choir if you want them to keep on singing." This is a great behind the scenes look at how the Women's March in DC happened. While I didn't love the interview-style format of the book there are lots of great stories from and about the organizers and how the march evolved quickly and effectively. The book covers how there was contention between white women and women of color and how the march team organized so that everyone felt included. There are really great pi "Sometimes you gotta preach to the choir if you want them to keep on singing." This is a great behind the scenes look at how the Women's March in DC happened. While I didn't love the interview-style format of the book there are lots of great stories from and about the organizers and how the march evolved quickly and effectively. The book covers how there was contention between white women and women of color and how the march team organized so that everyone felt included. There are really great pictures and anecdotes which are the highlight of the book. From a march in Antarctica to single-women marches across the US and people with disabilities turning up to share their voices there are really empowering and heartfelt stories. The pictures are amazing. More than a year later it's interesting to see how the the marches had dwindled but the Women's March shows that not only can women organize but do so efficiently and quickly - it was truly a powerful movement.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sha'Tisha Young

    I was overcome with emotion during the Women's March, and I felt overcome again reading this and seeing all of the planning that seemed so impossible and out of reach at the time. This moment in history was truly galvanizing and helped create a new generation of feminist activists- and those same new activists are running for office now or getting involved in lobbying and petitioning or what have you, and are part of the reason why we're seeing this blue wave here in 2018. I'm so amazed by what I was overcome with emotion during the Women's March, and I felt overcome again reading this and seeing all of the planning that seemed so impossible and out of reach at the time. This moment in history was truly galvanizing and helped create a new generation of feminist activists- and those same new activists are running for office now or getting involved in lobbying and petitioning or what have you, and are part of the reason why we're seeing this blue wave here in 2018. I'm so amazed by what the March did initially in terms of mobilizing, but I'm even more amazed by the continued resilience of women and femmes who haven't lost their momentum yet

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    "You may shoot me with your words, you may cut me with your eyes, you may kill me with your hatefulness, but still, like air, I’ll rise." ~ Maya Angelou Wow. What a fantastic read. Great behind the scenes look at how the march was put together. The book is a collection of essays submitted by the organizers of the march and photographs. I loved hearing the accounts of the early stages of the march. So amazing the amount of work put in to this. It was the largest global protest in modern history. N "You may shoot me with your words, you may cut me with your eyes, you may kill me with your hatefulness, but still, like air, I’ll rise." ~ Maya Angelou Wow. What a fantastic read. Great behind the scenes look at how the march was put together. The book is a collection of essays submitted by the organizers of the march and photographs. I loved hearing the accounts of the early stages of the march. So amazing the amount of work put in to this. It was the largest global protest in modern history. Nevertheless, she persisted.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    The story of the women’s march is drenched with intersectional feminism, mostly because African American women and other minorities clamored for a seat in its leadership. The result was history making.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Darlene Regan

    As a a participant in the Historic Woman’s March and a proud mother of 2 daughters, I am amazed at the movement and I’m thrilled to see it captured and immortalized in stories and pictures. We are part of history and will continue our work for positive change and have our voices heard.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    Very much enjoyed this! I would have liked more stories from marches across the country.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sandi

    What the heck took me so long to read this book?! Awesome, inspiring, energizing, powerful, and worth more stars than I can give it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Adams

    This is an excellent and powerful compilation of voices sharing their personal stories about the march that made history all around the world. Highly recommend this one.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I think every single person should read this book, was OUTSTANDING!!!! The photos that are included are really phenomenal. Stay involved or get involved. My key takeaway was hope!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katrina Sark

    Preface: p.11 – Where were you on January 21, 2017? If you were like five million women from Washington DC, to Dar es Salaam to Seoul, you marched in towns large and small, on state capitols. You rode buses, took trains, carpooled with others, scraped together cash to pay the fare. You made signs, held your children in one hand and a sign in the other. You stood up to tyranny. You raised your voice. You began to change the world. The Women’s Marches held around the globe that day constitute the s Preface: p.11 – Where were you on January 21, 2017? If you were like five million women from Washington DC, to Dar es Salaam to Seoul, you marched in towns large and small, on state capitols. You rode buses, took trains, carpooled with others, scraped together cash to pay the fare. You made signs, held your children in one hand and a sign in the other. You stood up to tyranny. You raised your voice. You began to change the world. The Women’s Marches held around the globe that day constitute the single largest protest in world history. Let that sink in: the single largest protest in world history. Jamila Wilson (ED and publisher of Feminist Press), Introduction p.14 – “One reason to preserve this history of the march is that its lessons can help us continue to work for a better future.” Nov.8-9, 2016 – Election Night and Its Aftermath p.27 – “I think we should march.” – On the night of November 8, 2016, while processing the outcome of the presidential race, Teresa Shook, a retired attorney in Hawaii, posted those five simple words on a private Facebook group page before she went to bed. By the time she awoke the next morning, 10,000 women had heeded her call to action, signing on to march. And around the country, other women were plotting. Nov. 9-11, 2016 – What’s in a Name? Everything. p.35 – The Women’s March faced one of its earliest challenges when a wave of online criticism about the appropriation of the name “million-woman march” threatened to put an end to the participation of African American women. Nov. 11-14, 2016 – The team Expands p.52 – Grace Dolan-Sandrino (student advocate): Pink pussy hats are a bit problematic for trans girls and women and girls of color – I wanted to take people aside and explain that having a vagina and a uterus are not the only things that define us as women and girls. We are women no matter cis or trans, no matter vagina or not, uterus or not, breasts or not. We all walk in different ways, but what unites us is our love and our compassion and our determination to stand up for our rights and the rights of all women. But those hats did serve as a vision that showed unity for that day. Nov. 19-Dec.15, 2016 – Plans, Permits, Drama p.65 – “One of us can be dismissed. Two of us can be ignored. But together we are a movement and we are unstoppable.” (Cecile Richards, President of Planned Parenthood Federation of America) Ai-Jen Poo (Director of National Domestic Workers Alliance), “A Woman’s Work is Never Done (in a Democracy)” p.70 – As part of every major social movement though the generations, women have been at the heart of bringing our democracy forward, closer to the dream of equality and opportunity for all. A women’s work is never done when our democracy is at stake. Since the march, many have asked whether the moment has been lost. But look more closely and you will see that women are the ones continuing to show up for one another, at town hall meetings, at the airports, after a life was lost near a white supremacists’ rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Women continue to be the first respondents to crises in our democracy. Now imagine women voters electing thousands of women and pro-gender-equity candidates to office in 2018, building toward a moment of truth in 2020 when we make this administration a tiny blip in the arc of history. It is our generational responsibility to step forward and make this moment one that is remembered as a correction in favor of our democracy. And the Women’s March carries important lessons for us about how we win. Dec. 16-28, 2016 – Backers Join. The Bench Grows. p.75 – As December progressed, civil and human rights organizations including Planned Parenthood, Natural Resources Defense Council, Amnesty International, and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People came on as official march partners. Their endorsements gave further legitimacy to the march for organizations, donors, and individuals who were still deciding whether to get involved. p.76 – “Whenever you feel in doubt, whenever you want to give up, you must always remember to choose freedom over fear.” (Janelle Monáe) p.79 – Sarah Sophie Flicker (Women’s March Strategic Adviser and Organizer): “A nation of women leaders has been created out of this election, and the ability to take women’s leadership seriously, I feel like, is starting to sink in.” Jose Antonio Vargas (journalist and filmmaker), “How to Be an Ally” p.91 – The uncomfortable but necessary truth is there are no movements without allies. Allyship forces you to look outside of yourself, to claim your rightful place with dignity while realizing that you’re not the only person in the room. You never are. You never will be. p.92 – To me, being an ally to the movement for women’s rights and gender equality means knowing when and how to step back, listen, and learn. Being a male feminist means putting women first in a society that rarely does. Women carry the immigrant rights movement on their individual and collective backs, insisting that we face the many facets of the issue. Immigration is an economic issue. Immigration is an environmental justice issue. Immigration is an LGBTQ issue. Immigration is a women’s rights issue. Immigration has been and will always be about families, with immigrant women front and center. p.93 – Angela Davis, a constant conscience of our country, connected the dots: “This is a country anchored in slavery and colonialism, which means for better or for worse the very history of the United States is a history of immigration and enslavement.” Davis ended her remarks by saying there would be “resistance on the ground, resistance in the classrooms, resistance on the job, resistance in our art and in our music.” Women, as ever, will lead the resistance, and men must be their allies. Dec 2016 – Daring Discussions p.97 – “Sometimes we must put our bodies where our beliefs are. Sometimes pressing send is not enough.” (Gloria Steinem) p.103 – De’Ara Balenger (Women’s March Strategic Adviser and Organizer) “I wanted to show the organizers what I had learned from Hillary about leadership and collaboration. It started with listening, then asking the question “How can I help?” and ended with getting it done, whatever the “it” was. No ego, no drama, just a selflessness that comes when women work together.” Jan. 12, 2017 – Why We March: The Unity Principles p.107 – As the diverse list of partners expanded, the organizers needed to clarify the goals of the march. They unveiled their policy platform, four weeks in the making. Called the Unity Principles, the platform was rooted in the idea that “my liberation is bound in yours,” a phrase made popular by Aboriginal activist Lilla Watson. It was shaped by input from more than 20 leaders from various movements. There are eight Unity Principles: 1. Ending violence 2. Reproductive rights 3. LGBTQIA rights 4. Workers’ rights 5. Civil rights 6. Disability rights 7. Immigrant rights 8. Environmental Justice p.109 – “Prejudice never has and never will set the people free.” (Ashley Harrington, Black Lives Matter) Mrinalini Chakroborty (national field director and organizer) p.113 – We all have a certain level of privilege that we are entering movement work with. I see it as my job to harness whatever privilege I do have and use that to do good. When activism is led by the most impacted people, that is when it is the strongest. Jan 16-20, 2017 – The Watergate: Preparing for March Day p.127 – In the days before the march, the organizers worked from the infamous Watergate Hotel. The national team travelled to Washington to join Janaye Ingram and her team of organizers and volunteers. Overseeing logistics and operations in the district of Columbia. As the activists dove into their last days of planning, they shared tense elevator rides with enthusiastic Trump inauguration attendees, dealt with online harassment, and faced critiques within their coalition. p.130 – At the Watergate Hotel, the organizers kept running into Trump supporters in red hats and many Russians. The hotel staff asked the organizers of Women’s March not to tell anyone they were staying there because they didn’t want to endanger their business with the Trump supporters. The March Jan 21, 2017 – March Day: Breaking Records, Making History p.188 – Gloria Steinem: “Of course, I knew the march was contagious, but definitely not that I would stretch coast-to-coast, from big cities to small towns, and become the biggest march in this nation’s history. Or that it would spread to other countries on every continent. This only began to dawn on me as I got emails during the march from, say, a small town in Oklahoma, or a big city in Germany, Kenya, or India. I was especially moved by people gathering at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, where the Berlin Wall had so tragically divided Germany. They knew about Trump’s threat to build a wall against Mexico, and they said, “Tell Americans that walls don’t work!” I did convey their message when I spoke at the march. The Women’s March by the Numbers p.215-218 – 200,000 – people march organizers expected to attend in Washington DC 800,000-1,200,000 – estimated number of actual marchers in Washington 653 – events in US 2,200 – permit applications for buses bound for Washington 3,300,000 – people who marched in the US 5,000,000 – people marched worldwide 109,527 – marchers in the UK, which had the most marchers outside the US 76 – age difference in years between the oldest and the youngest speaker at the Washington March (Gloria Steinem was 82, and Sophie Cruz, the daughter of undocumented parents was 6) 7 – continents that hosted marches (there was a march in Antarctica) Jan.21, 2017 – Owning the Night p.229 – “I am my ancestors’ dream. They fought for me to be able to stand up here in the cold-ass snow in front of a bunch of white people wearing Uggs.” (Jessica Williams) Jan. 28, 2017 – From March to Movement p.244 – Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm, “My Own March” – As one of the signs held during the march in Vancouver said: “Feminism without intersectionality is just white supremacy.” Spring 2017 – Can Social Media Change the World? p.272 – “We need to put the active into our activism.” (Christine Lahti) p.275 – Senator Tammy Duckworth, “Do Something” – As I travel my state, I make the same ask: Do something! Run for office or for student council. Join the boars of a non-profit or become a member of a local Women’s March chapter. Try to mentor women in other parts of the state where there aren’t Women’s March organizations. p.276 – Since the march, I’ve noticed how people are more willing to step up and fight for what’s right without being asked. Fall 2017 – Reclaiming Our Time p.279 – Congresswoman Maxine Waters made the phrase “Reclaiming my time” famous as she repeatedly invokes it when her questions were dodged at a House Committee Meeting. The Women’s March team would incorporate her words (with her blessing) as an official theme for their Women’s Convention in Detroit in late October. The goal: to bring thousands of new activists together to tap into the power of women as a force for change. On the eve of the convention, women’s march organizers reflected on the impact of the march and how they were moving forward. p.283 – Carmen Perez (Co-Chair and National Organizer): “The fact that the Women’s March was a catalyst for so many is a testament. I feel women will change not only the political landscape but the cultural landscape of this country.” Now What? You Felt How Powerful Women Are When We Rise Up. Keep Rising. p.297 – It’s time to get involved and stay involved. Pledge to dedicate a minimum of one day a month to taking action. Then join up with one or more of the organizations. Black Lives Matter Network – www.blacklivesmatter.com American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) – www.aclu.org National LGBTQ Task Force – www.thetaskforce.org Planned Parenthood – www.plannedparenthood.org American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) – www.aapd.com Disability Visibility Project (DVP) – www.disabilityvisibilityproject.com United We Dream – www.unitedwedream.org National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (NNIRR) – www.nnirr.org Mijente – www.mijente.net Movement Generation Justice & Equality Project – www.movementgeneration.org Greenpeace – www.greenpeace.org Momsrising – www.momsrising.org

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    I went to my library Overdrive page to put a book on hold. And like the book addict pusher they are, the library recommend this audiobook as available if I wanted to listen while I waited for my hold. Having participated in the Seattle Women’s March, I thought I would love to learn the behind the scenes organization. It was such a huge, worldwide march (even Antarctic had one) that I’m sure it was a huge undertaking! And it was! It makes me tired for these women! But listening to the audiobook, I went to my library Overdrive page to put a book on hold. And like the book addict pusher they are, the library recommend this audiobook as available if I wanted to listen while I waited for my hold. Having participated in the Seattle Women’s March, I thought I would love to learn the behind the scenes organization. It was such a huge, worldwide march (even Antarctic had one) that I’m sure it was a huge undertaking! And it was! It makes me tired for these women! But listening to the audiobook, I could see that this was probably a visual story as well, so went back to the library to see if I could borrow the ebook as well. It was available. And the book was full of pictures... including pictures from the march in Antarctic. And the story about how it came to unfold. In fact, Antarctic was mention so much I laughed when it came up over and over. In addition to the organizers, you would hear from Gloria Steinem, Roxane Gay, Congresswoman Maxine Waters and male allies. You also heard from individual women and there experiences at their own marches in US cities and around the world! Reading this book now, I can’t help but compare the Women’s March in DC to the Toxic Masculinity MAGA March on the Capitol in January 2021. Women’s March Organizers underwent crazy hurdles... like “Oh... do these women have a permit to do that?” It became quite the story. Oh... they don’t have a permit. Oh... they *finally* got one. Organizers also had rules for signs... no signs on 2x4s because it can be used as a weapon. Only clear backpacks allowed. (Here in Seattle, I remember not bringing a bag at all... choosing to only travel with a cellphone, cash, credit card, ID and small sign with no sticks.) Yet, the MAGA March stormed the Capitol with weapons, out for blood! And that very night I read about the Women’s March permit controversy, the New York Times reported that the “Stop the Steal” event in DC *did not* have a permit to march to the Capitol, when Trump ordered the crowd to march to the Capitol and fight. And now Republicans tell us to move on. Double standard, much? Incredible book and audiobook!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Jones

    I picked this up on audiobook from my library because I wanted to learn more about the Women's March and this monumental moment in our history. Listening on audiobook made it all the more enjoyable because each section was distinct. It was interesting to read about the organisation that goes into a march of this scale, and the first hand accounts of people who took part in the marches around the world. It was great to see that, although this was written by the organisers themselves, it wasn't all I picked this up on audiobook from my library because I wanted to learn more about the Women's March and this monumental moment in our history. Listening on audiobook made it all the more enjoyable because each section was distinct. It was interesting to read about the organisation that goes into a march of this scale, and the first hand accounts of people who took part in the marches around the world. It was great to see that, although this was written by the organisers themselves, it wasn't all positive; problems formed at different stages of the process and the book doesn't shy away from that. I think that this is a great book to read (or listen to) if you want to know more about the Women's March and its importance, what it stood for, and how we can move the conversation forwards. The only problem I had with it is that because each person was voicing their own version of events and it is an 'in the moment' style of narrative, and also because it is very recent history, there wasn't much reflection about the marches and their impact. That will come with time when we see how activism and action shapes the US political landscape going forward. I felt myself tearing up throughout this book just thinking about the struggles being faced by women around the world, and the bravery and tenacity that it takes to stand up for your rights and the rights of those less fortunate. I would definitely recommend this book and this that people should take more time to learn about movements like this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Excellent chronicle of the planning and execution of The Women's March. The women who marched describe "their march". Hearing what each says about her own experience gives a wider understanding of what the march meant to women of different backgrounds and circumstances. It woke me. Excellent chronicle of the planning and execution of The Women's March. The women who marched describe "their march". Hearing what each says about her own experience gives a wider understanding of what the march meant to women of different backgrounds and circumstances. It woke me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Having attended the WMW on 01-21-17, I was once again inspired, this time to read of the thoughts, prep, and many considerations made by the Women's March Organizers to develop such an impressive event. Truly, an unforgettable day relived as I read this book. NOTES: On January 21, 2017, five million women (and their allies) took to the streets around the world to stand up for their rights. On that unseasonably sunny Saturday morning in Washington, D.C., we came together under banners devoted to th Having attended the WMW on 01-21-17, I was once again inspired, this time to read of the thoughts, prep, and many considerations made by the Women's March Organizers to develop such an impressive event. Truly, an unforgettable day relived as I read this book. NOTES: On January 21, 2017, five million women (and their allies) took to the streets around the world to stand up for their rights. On that unseasonably sunny Saturday morning in Washington, D.C., we came together under banners devoted to the protection and uplift of our communities and on behalf of voices that too often remain unheard. Together, the millions of souls who marched proved to the world that liberation comes not from a gilded tower, bombastic tweets, or a reality-TV empire, but instead from the energetic hope of true patriots (both documented and undocumented) who understand that we are all, as our sister marcher Gloria Steinem says, “linked, not ranked.” I truly believe those closest to the pain are closest to the solution, and black women will lead us to the solutions and to justice. While many people associate women’s work with caring and cleaning, if we look a little closer at the history of this nation, we see that defending and expanding democracy is, and always has been, women’s work. As part of every major social movement through the generations, women have been at the heart of bringing our democracy forward, closer to the dream of equality and opportunity for all. The march was multigenerational and multiracial. People who marched were kind toward one another. Marchers carried signs across a broad spectrum of issues, everything from health care and abortion access to good jobs and higher wages. From criminal justice reform and immigrant rights to peace and climate change. From child care and education to elder care and housing. There was room for it all. There was no need to choose what you were most in favor of. No hierarchy of human value. No one and no issue didn’t belong. Racism is a part of our culture. We have to acknowledge this in order to overcome it. This march may have started with Trump, but history teaches us that it’s not just about him—he is just one individual, a symptom of a much deeper malady within our society. A nation of women leaders has been created out of this election, and the ability to take women’s leadership seriously is starting to sink in. What it comes down to at the end of the day is love. We must resist out of a place of love—not anger, not revenge, not fear, but out of love for our communities, love for our democracy, love for our freedom. The uncomfortable but necessary truth is there are no movements without allies. Allyship forces you to look outside of yourself, to claim your rightful place with dignity while realizing that you’re not the only person in the room. I’m a Muslim woman from a directly impacted community. I am Palestinian American. I’m an outspoken activist and a Brooklynite who is a little rough around the edges. For some women within the Women’s March, speaking with me was the first meaningful conversation they’d had with a Muslim woman or a Palestinian, and my approach of directly speaking the truth isn’t always comfortable. I truly believe in people wearing their principles on their sleeve, and there were many conversations that needed to happen to understand where everyone came from and why they were here now. Many white women wanted to talk about “unity,” but without acknowledging our privilege; that erodes trust and then it all falls apart. Women of color had to learn to trust white women, because we felt stabbed in the back by the white community. Our communities are under attack because their demographic had voted for Trump. To me, there is no doubt that the Women’s March was sparked because of the fact that the most qualified candidate in history to ever run for the presidency, who also happened to be the first woman to secure a major-party nomination, lost because we are still living in a sexist society. We’ve created a space where I, as a Jewish woman, can sit down with Tamika and say, “Let’s really talk about antiblackness in Jewish communities, and let’s talk about anti-Semitism in black communities.” That sums up for me what the Women’s March is about—agreeing to be brave together. Daring discussions helped inspire me to push the envelope, to introduce our vast audience to ideas they hadn’t considered before, to encourage white women in particular to confront white supremacy. I’ll be honest and admit that terms like “intersectional,” “white privilege,” and “racial justice” were sadly not part of my daily lexicon. But they should have been. We all must start on the path from where we are. When Tamika started explaining why we must center Black Lives Matter and criminal justice reform in our Women’s March platform, my life forever changed. Looking back, I can see that the systems of oppression and white supremacy in this country depend on people like me remaining ignorant. THERE ARE EIGHT UNITY PRINCIPLES: ENDING VIOLENCE, REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS, LGBTQIA RIGHTS, WORKERS’ RIGHTS, CIVIL RIGHTS, DISABILITY RIGHTS, IMMIGRANT RIGHTS, AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE. Speaking at the march was a way for me to remind people of all ages that if you lose teenagers, you lose the next voting generation. We saw that a lot of people didn’t vote in this election because they didn’t think their one vote would make a difference. We tracked and coordinated the 2,200 buses that headed to D.C. for January 21. The universe felt bound together by people willing to work for a friendly planet—by speaking out over and over again, and not just on the issues we call our own. At the root of it all was a sense of community. Everyone was high on an intoxicating combination of urgency and love. Community is something we lack in our culture these days. It’s rare that we show up and stand with people, get in the same room together. I can’t overemphasize how transformative it was to be in that crowd with so many other people who shared the same sense of passion and purpose. It became very important to me to continue building community after the march. Our culture works against being able to sit in a room with people whose experiences are different from our own but whose hopes and dreams for the future are shared. LATER THAT DAY THEY WATCHED AS THE CROWD, WHICH THEY HAD INITIALLY THOUGHT MIGHT BE 200,000, BALLOONED TO AN ESTIMATED 800,000 TO 1.2 MILLION PEOPLE. You looked out at this sea of pink hats everywhere, it really was an incredible way to unify a super-diverse and disparate crowd of women and men marching. That it was a woman offering up a pattern, and that all of these people had made them by hand all across the country—that was very cool. I laid out for him that we were going to use our marshals to direct people to the side streets and have everyone march from Constitution Avenue to Pennsylvania Avenue. An hour or so passed before a member of the mayor of Washington, D.C.’s staff said there were concerns about us marching. We learned that since our last conversation, people had overwhelmed all of the side streets that we were planning to use. We debated whether it was safe to march. Taina Asili’s song “War Cry” is when the whole thing came together... when her song hit, the energy of the stage elevated and everyone started firing on all cylinders and everything started to move really well. Trump had masterfully built this Make America Great Again brand, stirring up racial and gender anxiety in this country and making white men in particular feel like they’d been left behind. On that amazing Saturday, the Women’s March succeeded in telling a different story about America, about how women are leaders and women are resilient. The march showed us that women are persistent, and that women will show up and rise above an election where we saw and heard the most nasty, misogynistic, sexist, vicious views and attacks on women that we’ve ever seen in a presidential election. In just one month, we had gone from 20 cities to 200, with marches happening on every continent. This was about women standing up for their rights from every corner of the world. I was especially moved by people gathering at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, where the Berlin Wall had so tragically divided Germany. They knew about Trump’s threat to build a wall against Mexico, and they said, “Tell Americans that walls don’t work!” It’s crucial to understand that a person’s intersecting identities determine access to power and resources, and that systems deny access based on identity. Reproductive justice seeks to identify, name, and dismantle these systems of oppression. Too often, I’ve felt alienated in white, female-centered spaces—the lone black woman left to explain why hashtagging “all lives matter” is indefensible or why asking to touch my hair is triggering. I had underestimated the power of peaceful demonstrations at a time like this. Displays of solidarity go a long way in a world that’s become as fractured as ours. The Women’s March remains, for me, a moment when I could exhale, because I saw that I’m not alone, that American Indians are not alone. At Standing Rock, we derived strength from continuing on the path our ancestors began. At the high point, 10,000 of us were bound together by a common belief in the power of prayer, our values, and being organized. Coming together showed the world we were willing to do whatever it took to protect Mother Earth and the sacred, not just for ourselves but for all of the people on the planet. There is now a battle between the culture of love, reciprocity, and compassion and the culture of division, hate, and fear. My love and belief in this nation drives me to fight for my vision: that no nation is inherently great; its people have to be committed to a continuous struggle to make it a little bit better each day than it was the day before. After what happened at Standing Rock, no one should be surprised by what took place in Charlottesville. Coming from a family of activists, I have seen firsthand the infinite power that “We the people” possess to inspire true change. Protest can rattle established ideas and unnerve existing structures. It can inspire solidarity in the protesters and provoke ideas far beyond the field of demonstration. Protest can thrust forward heroic leaders who articulate and embody models of rhetoric, valor, and endurance. In the face of injustice, protest is the assertion of humanity and will, a demonstration that there is a point at which a woman or a man will not concede, will not bow down.” We all realized we had been taking science and fact for granted and that even these things necessitated our explicit support. These days I keep returning to Martin Luther King Jr.’s polite excoriation, in “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” of the white moderate who “prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice.” He wrote, “Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will.” -Jia Tolentino The tricky thing about interdependence is that people with power can deny it indefinitely and whenever they want. Every marginalized group in America knows that its fate is bound up with the political positions of white people, but—to understate things—it does not come as easily to white people to grasp that their fate is bound up with others. I have started to feel that white people have to be responsbile for our country’s necessary revolution. I’m very happy to go on record saying that Trump’s tweeting a typo, “covfefe,” one night in May was the shining moment of the resistance for me. My response tweet, “Cause Only Very Fragile Egos Fear Equality,... Perhaps, instead of marching, white women should have had frank conversations with each other about what a vote for Donald Trump truly meant for so many marginalized people—the working class, the LGBTQ community, people of color, immigrants, the Muslim community, people with disabilities, undocumented Americans—people whose lives suddenly became infinitely more precarious on November 9, 2016. Historically, the labor of love has been confined to the domestic sphere. Yet spiritual geniuses from Buddha to Jesus, Muhammad to Guru Nanak, called us to practice love beyond family and tribe. Social justice leaders from Gandhi to King to Day grounded their movements in love to free the oppressed without hating the oppressor. Such love disrupts the status quo, confronts injustice, and shifts collective consciousness. The Women’s March was a declaration of love. Today our movement is rightly focused on solidarity with others, but if we are cruel to our opponents or to ourselves along the way, we will burn out. Worse, we will become what we are resisting.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

    The current political sphere has been utterly disheartening, but reading this book about the Women's March that happened in January 2016 gave me hope. It tells about how the march started as a whim on Facebook that grew and grew. It mentions how the white women who started it wanted to make sure that everyone was represented, so they brought in women from all backgrounds so they could have their voices heard during this event. It touches on how to get involved within your community and gives link The current political sphere has been utterly disheartening, but reading this book about the Women's March that happened in January 2016 gave me hope. It tells about how the march started as a whim on Facebook that grew and grew. It mentions how the white women who started it wanted to make sure that everyone was represented, so they brought in women from all backgrounds so they could have their voices heard during this event. It touches on how to get involved within your community and gives links to websites and organizations. The last page was especially uplifting. "It is in the natural order of things that, as change rattles the cages of oppression, an inevitable pushback will occur. We must continue to rattle those cages and push back with equal force that is grounded in love, clarity, and intention. Will you tire? Yes, of course you will. We have also been tired. Will you burn out because the injustice is too great? Because the patriarchy is too strong? Because the racism is too ingrained? Please do not--we cannot lose you. When you are the precipice, about to turn back, dig into love. When you organize out of a place of love--love for your community, love for democracy, love for freedom--you cannot burn too bright. This time of love is infinite. In this love you will find the endurance to organize, to resist, to fight, and to envision a better world. Let love feed you and inspire you. Love is your strongest tool against oppression."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    **Disclaimer: I won this book from the publisher through a Goodreads giveaway** Where do I start? This book is beautiful. The layout. The photography. The graphic design. All were phenomenally done and I would like to give a well-deserved kudos to the art & creative design team responsible for this book. Reading through the book gave me the chills. I didn't get to go to any marches on that day for one reason or another, but this book made me feel like I was there. Marching with men, women, childr **Disclaimer: I won this book from the publisher through a Goodreads giveaway** Where do I start? This book is beautiful. The layout. The photography. The graphic design. All were phenomenally done and I would like to give a well-deserved kudos to the art & creative design team responsible for this book. Reading through the book gave me the chills. I didn't get to go to any marches on that day for one reason or another, but this book made me feel like I was there. Marching with men, women, children --and even dogs! --- who believe that women's rights need to be given more focus in this highly patriarchal society. I loved reading about how the march came to be born and all the work that came with it. I loved the commentaries of people from different walks of life. I loved reading about why they marched, what they felt while they marched and how it changed their life. It was inspiring and gratifying and filled my heart with warmth. I've cried many wonderful tears while reading this book and I couldn't be more grateful to have received it. This book is a must-buy and well-worth your money.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachel A. Dawson

    The Women's March has always fascinated me and inspired me (even though I admittedly—and regretfully— didn’t march) and this book was incredible. So much history told from such a wide variety of perspectives from all women and men involved in the coordinating, planning, and production of the massive worldwide event, and I was hooked on every word. The images are beautiful and so powerful! This one is more of a coffee table book, but it’s one I would love to have in my collection to revisit whene The Women's March has always fascinated me and inspired me (even though I admittedly—and regretfully— didn’t march) and this book was incredible. So much history told from such a wide variety of perspectives from all women and men involved in the coordinating, planning, and production of the massive worldwide event, and I was hooked on every word. The images are beautiful and so powerful! This one is more of a coffee table book, but it’s one I would love to have in my collection to revisit whenever I need a dose of hope and a reminder that women are unstoppable.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Insightful for anyone who does not understand (or just wants to re-appreciate) how much work and cooperation went into such a massive event, and the thought process behind each decision that was made by the organizers. A good mix of the Women's March timeline (before, during, after), interviews with those involved in planning, stories from individuals on their various experiences during various stages of the March, different perspectives/lenses, etc etc. Representative of the wide array of those Insightful for anyone who does not understand (or just wants to re-appreciate) how much work and cooperation went into such a massive event, and the thought process behind each decision that was made by the organizers. A good mix of the Women's March timeline (before, during, after), interviews with those involved in planning, stories from individuals on their various experiences during various stages of the March, different perspectives/lenses, etc etc. Representative of the wide array of those who were involved, from the planners to individuals participating outside of D.C., as a world-wide movement. It's tone also, as a footnote, dispels any criticisms about the purpose of the march, which was from start to finish defined as a chance to unite people (any) of different backgrounds AND causes into one group of love, progress, and democracy. Would recommend, as a condensed history lesson and even just as a momento.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Szuszkiewicz

    Together We Rise was a truly powerful and inspiring read, that had me in tears throughout reading. I was so thoroughly engrossed and read the whole thing in one sitting. It captures this flashpoint in time for future generations to savor and be inspired by and shows that even when times are bleak, and it seems as if the chips are stacked against us, when we can still band together we can rise above and build a massive resistance to authoritarianism. I am incredibly grateful for the work these wo Together We Rise was a truly powerful and inspiring read, that had me in tears throughout reading. I was so thoroughly engrossed and read the whole thing in one sitting. It captures this flashpoint in time for future generations to savor and be inspired by and shows that even when times are bleak, and it seems as if the chips are stacked against us, when we can still band together we can rise above and build a massive resistance to authoritarianism. I am incredibly grateful for the work these women have done and continue to do. I am also appreciative of the diverse range of voices captured in this book, from women who were unsure of the Women’s March, to women who marched alone or online, to the myriad of intersectional feminist voices included. This book offers hope in dark times. Read it, savor it, and let it lift you up.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hina

    The Women's March, held around the world on January 21, 2017, was the single largest protest in world history, and I am so proud to have taken part in it. This book gives a behind-the-scenes look at how it got started and the powerful minds who birthed this incredible idea. I got this book from the library, but, now that I'm done, I know that I want to buy this book and have it forever. The Women's March occurred on a single day, but the effects of it reach far and wide. Reading this book makes The Women's March, held around the world on January 21, 2017, was the single largest protest in world history, and I am so proud to have taken part in it. This book gives a behind-the-scenes look at how it got started and the powerful minds who birthed this incredible idea. I got this book from the library, but, now that I'm done, I know that I want to buy this book and have it forever. The Women's March occurred on a single day, but the effects of it reach far and wide. Reading this book makes me truly appreciate not just all the work that has gone into this movement, but all the ways that I and everyone else can continue to be impactful to make a better society for everyone.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This book was really done in taking a critical look at the development of the Women's March and how it became a movement. I especially appreciated the fact that they included essayists from several different marginalized groups who were critical of the march at points and were able to explain the issues inherent in the movement while still be supportive of the direction the march organizers were trying to move. It was just a really great look at how to create and work with a truly intersectional This book was really done in taking a critical look at the development of the Women's March and how it became a movement. I especially appreciated the fact that they included essayists from several different marginalized groups who were critical of the march at points and were able to explain the issues inherent in the movement while still be supportive of the direction the march organizers were trying to move. It was just a really great look at how to create and work with a truly intersectional movement, and it has me re-inspired to do more.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Hanson

    Yeah, so I basically cried through this entire book. It was so nice to hear disheartened voices that also rose up, that also found strength in the march. I loved the frank discussions of attempting to avoid white feminism, of the challenges, of the surprises and successes. I loved everything about this. And the audiobook was SO well done. The variety of voices was wonderful. If you're feeling terrible about what's going on in the world and you were part of the Women's March in January 2017 in an Yeah, so I basically cried through this entire book. It was so nice to hear disheartened voices that also rose up, that also found strength in the march. I loved the frank discussions of attempting to avoid white feminism, of the challenges, of the surprises and successes. I loved everything about this. And the audiobook was SO well done. The variety of voices was wonderful. If you're feeling terrible about what's going on in the world and you were part of the Women's March in January 2017 in any way, you should read this one.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    Some of the testimonies were really moving, and it was fascinating to see how a group of people who didn't really know each other came together and pulled this off. I loved the honesty from the women of colour organisers about their misgivings at the start and their continuing lack of faith in white women to turn up for them. I think this book will continue the important work of making more of us intersectional feminists. Some of the testimonies were really moving, and it was fascinating to see how a group of people who didn't really know each other came together and pulled this off. I loved the honesty from the women of colour organisers about their misgivings at the start and their continuing lack of faith in white women to turn up for them. I think this book will continue the important work of making more of us intersectional feminists.

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