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Chiar daca lumea din jur se misca in ritm alert, nu inseamna ca si noi trebuie sa facem la fel. In acest ghid de mindfulness mai actual ca oricand, Haemin Sunim ofera sfaturi despre orice, de la cum putem depasi obstacolele la cum sa ne odihnim si ce trebuie sa facem ca sa avem relatii satisfacatoare, intr-o carte frumoasa in care invataturile sale se combina armonios cu i Chiar daca lumea din jur se misca in ritm alert, nu inseamna ca si noi trebuie sa facem la fel. In acest ghid de mindfulness mai actual ca oricand, Haemin Sunim ofera sfaturi despre orice, de la cum putem depasi obstacolele la cum sa ne odihnim si ce trebuie sa facem ca sa avem relatii satisfacatoare, intr-o carte frumoasa in care invataturile sale se combina armonios cu ilustratiile color. Mesajele simple ale autorului – scrise mai intai ca raspunsuri la intrebarile primite pe retelele de socializare – se adreseaza direct anxietatilor care au devenit parte a vietii moderne. Haemin Sunim este calugar budist. Nascut in Coreea, s-a mutat in Statele Unite pentru a studia filmul, dar s-a simtit atras de viata religioasa. Desavarsindu-si educatia la Berkeley, Harvard si Princeton, este primul calugar coreean care a predat religia la un colegiu american. Invataturile sale transcend religiile si granitele, rezonand cu oameni de toate varstele. Cu empatie si compasiune, ne indeamna sa observam ca, atunci cand incetinim, lumea incetineste odata cu noi.


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Chiar daca lumea din jur se misca in ritm alert, nu inseamna ca si noi trebuie sa facem la fel. In acest ghid de mindfulness mai actual ca oricand, Haemin Sunim ofera sfaturi despre orice, de la cum putem depasi obstacolele la cum sa ne odihnim si ce trebuie sa facem ca sa avem relatii satisfacatoare, intr-o carte frumoasa in care invataturile sale se combina armonios cu i Chiar daca lumea din jur se misca in ritm alert, nu inseamna ca si noi trebuie sa facem la fel. In acest ghid de mindfulness mai actual ca oricand, Haemin Sunim ofera sfaturi despre orice, de la cum putem depasi obstacolele la cum sa ne odihnim si ce trebuie sa facem ca sa avem relatii satisfacatoare, intr-o carte frumoasa in care invataturile sale se combina armonios cu ilustratiile color. Mesajele simple ale autorului – scrise mai intai ca raspunsuri la intrebarile primite pe retelele de socializare – se adreseaza direct anxietatilor care au devenit parte a vietii moderne. Haemin Sunim este calugar budist. Nascut in Coreea, s-a mutat in Statele Unite pentru a studia filmul, dar s-a simtit atras de viata religioasa. Desavarsindu-si educatia la Berkeley, Harvard si Princeton, este primul calugar coreean care a predat religia la un colegiu american. Invataturile sale transcend religiile si granitele, rezonand cu oameni de toate varstele. Cu empatie si compasiune, ne indeamna sa observam ca, atunci cand incetinim, lumea incetineste odata cu noi.

30 review for Oprește-te puțin și privește în jur

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Jane Brown

    I loved this book. To summarise my thoughts: this book is what you reach for when you're feeling low - it's a hug in book format. I recommend you don't read from cover to cover in one sitting - read when you need a little inspiration or pick me up. It's such a sweet and simple book - anyone could read and glean the wisdom it provides.... I recommend

  2. 5 out of 5

    Syeda Ahad

    Heart warming, soothing, simple, yet full of wisdom :) Started reading it at a difficult time and this book helped me find myself back again. I wouldn't say it is filled with extraordinary enlightenment, but that is the best part about it. There are some simple yet powerful truth which we all know deep down inside, but it is so easy to loose our connection with those when we are too wound up in our busy life. This book was a kind a gentle reminder to those truths for me. A small book, but I took Heart warming, soothing, simple, yet full of wisdom :) Started reading it at a difficult time and this book helped me find myself back again. I wouldn't say it is filled with extraordinary enlightenment, but that is the best part about it. There are some simple yet powerful truth which we all know deep down inside, but it is so easy to loose our connection with those when we are too wound up in our busy life. This book was a kind a gentle reminder to those truths for me. A small book, but I took my time reading and thinking about the lines. Will definitely read again and again. And also will recommend to anyone who is distressed with anything in their life right now. This book is a gem indeed :) !

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brandice

    I listened to the audiobook of The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down: Guidance on the Path to Mindfulness from a Spiritual Leader after seeing a few positive reviews for it. It’s a short audiobook (approximately 3 hours) and while worth a listen, once, it didn’t offer any groundbreaking or novel new ideas. At best, it’s a reminder to be present in the moment. For example: - Be aware of your emotions as you experience them. They are passing through. - Witness the emergence of a thought. I listened to the audiobook of The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down: Guidance on the Path to Mindfulness from a Spiritual Leader after seeing a few positive reviews for it. It’s a short audiobook (approximately 3 hours) and while worth a listen, once, it didn’t offer any groundbreaking or novel new ideas. At best, it’s a reminder to be present in the moment. For example: - Be aware of your emotions as you experience them. They are passing through. - Witness the emergence of a thought. Witness the disappearance of a thought. You can’t have the good without at least sometimes experiencing the bad. The audiobook was easy to listen to though at parts it seemed disjointed, transitioning to several (semi-related) topics in a short span of time, with extended pauses in between. Not sure what the actual book looks like and how the format of spacing and breaks are shown, but maybe that’s how this was accounted for in the audio format. A decent, fairly short listen with good reminders about the here and now, but not my favorite in this genre.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Nothing new here but I somehow felt lighter as I kept reading. Don't dwell on negative thoughts. Forgive others. Remember to treat yourself with compassion. Perspective can change any stressful situation. Choose happiness, not success. Always take time to listen. See more of my reviews: Blog // Instagram Nothing new here but I somehow felt lighter as I kept reading. Don't dwell on negative thoughts. Forgive others. Remember to treat yourself with compassion. Perspective can change any stressful situation. Choose happiness, not success. Always take time to listen. See more of my reviews: Blog // Instagram

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I was given a copy of Haemin Sunim's The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down by a dear friend after she undertook a stint of work experience at Penguin. Thoughtfully, Abbie wrote in her note that she thought this tome would be a good antidote to in-depth thesis reading, and it was. Nearly three million copies of the book have been sold worldwide since its publication in 2012, and it has been translated from its original Korean by Chi-Young Kim in collaboration with the author himself. This I was given a copy of Haemin Sunim's The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down by a dear friend after she undertook a stint of work experience at Penguin. Thoughtfully, Abbie wrote in her note that she thought this tome would be a good antidote to in-depth thesis reading, and it was. Nearly three million copies of the book have been sold worldwide since its publication in 2012, and it has been translated from its original Korean by Chi-Young Kim in collaboration with the author himself. This year, in fact, marks the publication of its first English translation. It is essentially a guide to mindfulness, of how to make the most of oneself despite outside factors sometimes wishing to throw us off course. The subtitle of The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down, 'How to Be Calm in a Busy World' will, I am sure, speak to many of us in the modern world. I am personally a very calm person, and rarely get stressed out, but I find books like this lovely to dip in and out of; they are soothing, almost. Sunim is a Buddhist monk, who lives between his native South Korea and the United States, where he lectures. Building on a large Twitter and Facebook presence, where he tweets missives and guidance, he has aimed to offer 'advice on everything from handling setbacks at work to dealing with love and relationships'. His 'simple, compassionate teachings transcend religion, borders and ages, and serve as a calming reminder of the strength and joy that come from slowing down'. This inclusivity is admirable, certainly; one thing which we dearly need in this world is a demonstration of the things which unite us, rather than divide us. The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down has been split into several sections - 'Rest', 'Mindfulness', 'Passion', 'Relationships', 'Love', 'Life', 'The Future', and 'Spirituality'. Each chapter opens with an essay, which muses upon the subject in question and how best Sunim thinks we should approach it, and is then followed by a series of short pieces, 'words of advice and wisdom'. To me, a lot of the short sections felt a little cheesy and patronising, which I'm sure was unintentional on part of the author; we are told, for example: 'Pat yourself on the back for the hard work you are doing. Then go to bed one hour earlier as a gift to your body'. I preferred the essays, which were largely thoughtful and well thought through. There are some nice pieces of advice given about how best to take notice of the world around us, and spending time with loved ones. Occasionally, though, this advice is just plain odd, and blunt in its delivery: 'A good family trip can prevent divorce'. Much of the book, as one might expect, spirals around spirituality and religion, two topics which do not particularly appeal to me as an atheist. I did find that Sunim came across as rather preachy at times, which did not endear me to him. However, he suggests meditation as a way to grasp one's own consciousness of the world and their place within it, which, I felt, was quite a nice piece of advice which could be easily worked into even a hectic day. Some of his ideas are nice, and he is clearly passionate about what he is writing about, however, so there is a nice balance to be found within. It does seem at times as though Sunim was merely working through his own insecurities whilst writing, and several of the asides seem downright obvious. On an aesthetic level, The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down has been beautifully designed, and put me in mind of the recent craze of lovely hygge hardbacks. Lovely illustrations have been included throughout, which add yet another dimension of calm to the tome. I believe that The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down will be of most use to those who suffer with anxiety disorders and depression; it is a rather light but fitting book that can be read one small part at a time, and offers useful advice for seeing positives and focusing upon things of importance to the individual. The author, in fact, recommends that it is not read all in one go, from cover to cover; rather, he says, sections should be digested and reflected upon by the reader before he or she moves on. The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down would be a very thoughtful addition to a loved one's bedside table or reading stack, to provide respite from hectic lives, stresses, and other problems.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Diana Long

    A philosophy of promoting peace and tranquility into our lives regardless of religious beliefs. The author is a Buddist Monk from Korea and yet he is comfortable quoting favorite passages from the Bible or making references to Kalil Gibran. Enlightening and Inspirational.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    Chicken Soup for the Fortune Cookie. Home cooked homilies with an Eastern flavor. Slow down and you'll not see anything new here.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hákon Gunnarsson

    It’s a nice book, with some interesting insights into mindfulness, but I thought it was slightly repetitive. In the beginning the author, Haemin Sunim, says that it’s best read slowly to get the most out of it, but I read it pretty quickly. Maybe that’s why I found it a little repetative. Anyway, I liked it for most parts.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Curie

    This is a lovely and sweet collection of aphorisms and essays phrased by a Buddhist monk and teacher. It is essentially a guide to mindfulness, comprising spiritual advice on dealing with anything from relationships to stress and a book that is easy to dip in and out of. It is divided in eight chapters, each focussing on a different topic: Rest, Mindfulness, Passion, Relationships, Love, Life, The Future, Spirituality. Each part starts with a short personal story by Sunim before moving on to a c This is a lovely and sweet collection of aphorisms and essays phrased by a Buddhist monk and teacher. It is essentially a guide to mindfulness, comprising spiritual advice on dealing with anything from relationships to stress and a book that is easy to dip in and out of. It is divided in eight chapters, each focussing on a different topic: Rest, Mindfulness, Passion, Relationships, Love, Life, The Future, Spirituality. Each part starts with a short personal story by Sunim before moving on to a collection of advices and occasionally relevant quotes from other influential people. I guess it is one of the books that make the most sense if you refer to it whenever you find yourself in a situation of needing some words of wisdom on something specific, as it just quite dense with information and sometimes too specific to gain from if there is no relevance. I personally found especially the chapters on Rest and Mindfulness interesting, but in general Sunim advocates being a gentler, empathic and more perceptive person. There was one passage that I particularly enjoyed, which made me think about how similar every humans experience of being human ultimately is, despite how different all of our lives may seem: "[N]o matter how many wonderful accomplishments one has had, we all have our share of setbacks, heartbreak, and loss. We have to face challenges we have no control over. Loneliness and the fear of death will accompany us to our final days. Everyone is on the same treacherous journey of life's tainted glory." All in all, this is a genuinely kind collection to refer to sometimes and that might provide comfort to some in times of need for a voice of both reason and heart.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Shultz

    A book that is meant to read slowly. I found reading a few pages before bed, upon rising or in the bath to be a good time. It helped me to ground and balance.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lana

    soothing and heart-warming, this is the book young people can seek for in search of understanding, healing and warmth ~

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gearóid

    Very nice little book. Full of good advise and common sense.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Milan

    This is a small book of practical thoughts from a Buddhist monk. Haemin Sunim's book should be read slowly. I had to keep the book aside many times and think about how I behave in certain situations. The book is divided into eight sections: Rest, Mindfulness, Passion, Relationships, Love, Life, The Future and Spirituality and any topic can be read first. The wisdom contained in this book cannot be absorbed in one reading. It should be read multiple times. “We know the world only through the wind This is a small book of practical thoughts from a Buddhist monk. Haemin Sunim's book should be read slowly. I had to keep the book aside many times and think about how I behave in certain situations. The book is divided into eight sections: Rest, Mindfulness, Passion, Relationships, Love, Life, The Future and Spirituality and any topic can be read first. The wisdom contained in this book cannot be absorbed in one reading. It should be read multiple times. “We know the world only through the window of our mind. When our mind is noisy, the world is as well. And when our mind is peaceful, the world is, too. Knowing our minds is just as important as trying to change the world.”

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Sarrat-O'Connell

    Good things come in small packages. This is one!! ✌

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marina

    ** Books 68 - 2019 ** 3,8 of 5 stars! “The more grateful we feel, the happier we become. This is because gratitude helps us realize we are all connected. Nobody feels like an island when feeling grateful. Gratitude awakens us to the truth of our interdependent nature.” I dunno why but i think the situation is around me is not getting better (especially my working place) and i just need some books that lighten and enriching my minds. so thats why reading this pieces is makes me more grateful in ju ** Books 68 - 2019 ** 3,8 of 5 stars! “The more grateful we feel, the happier we become. This is because gratitude helps us realize we are all connected. Nobody feels like an island when feeling grateful. Gratitude awakens us to the truth of our interdependent nature.” I dunno why but i think the situation is around me is not getting better (especially my working place) and i just need some books that lighten and enriching my minds. so thats why reading this pieces is makes me more grateful in just a small things. I try to be more happier than before with such a small stuff (Winning over Rock-paper-scissors) or even i got chance reviewed an ARC Books can give me a small butterflies in my stomach I try to not really care about what people think of me. I just wanna to be myself. I know what things that makes me happy. I wanna spread more kindness since i dunno why but i think somehow i get the kindness in others form without i am notice. I realize i just happy with a small things that happen around me. It can be i am more into to get an simple life? yes life is already giving me such a hardships and i just wanna to stay away for an complicated stuff. This books is really help me to get more peaceful minds. I recommend this books to you if you have an foul moods and needs to be reminds how to be more grateful in your life for a small things :) Thankyou Bookmate!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Myrthe

    Alright, so this really disappointed me to be very honest. However, I don't think that's the book's fault, but rather my own: I went in with very wrong expectations. You see, I actually thought that this book would be full of things that you would see only when you slowed down: I was thinking things such as the way the moon reflects in the water on evening walks, or something. That's definitely not what this is: it's a book full of tiny quotes (or guideposts) on how to be happy. If you want to r Alright, so this really disappointed me to be very honest. However, I don't think that's the book's fault, but rather my own: I went in with very wrong expectations. You see, I actually thought that this book would be full of things that you would see only when you slowed down: I was thinking things such as the way the moon reflects in the water on evening walks, or something. That's definitely not what this is: it's a book full of tiny quotes (or guideposts) on how to be happy. If you want to read this, please make sure you know that that is what you're gonna get! 1 star for enjoyment, but with an extra star because I know full well it's my own fault.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Viv JM

    3.5 stars This is really quite a sweet little book. Each chapter contains a very short essay, followed by an illustration and then some short soundbites to ponder on (kind of in the style of the Dhammapada, perhaps). It's not breaking new ground and there are other more comprehensive guides to mindfulness, but it's nevertheless a nice book to have and dip into for subjects for meditative thought. I particularly liked the author's open-minded attitude to other religions and beliefs. The illustrati 3.5 stars This is really quite a sweet little book. Each chapter contains a very short essay, followed by an illustration and then some short soundbites to ponder on (kind of in the style of the Dhammapada, perhaps). It's not breaking new ground and there are other more comprehensive guides to mindfulness, but it's nevertheless a nice book to have and dip into for subjects for meditative thought. I particularly liked the author's open-minded attitude to other religions and beliefs. The illustrations are rather lovely too.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I had a three hour drive and decided to listen to this one since it clocks in at that time and it was fantastic. I'm going to need to pick up a hard copy, though, to underline and note some of the real great insights and thoughts. I was especially smitten with how Sunim reminds readers that all spiritual leaders would, because of their belief in a bigger spirit of whatever form, get along and respect that other people's paths are as valid and worthy as their own.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Iqra M.

    This was such a lovely read and an aesthetically pleasing book. I enjoyed the format and writing style. What's more, throughout the whole book, there are plenty of beautiful illustrations. It's important to read this book gradually to devour and absorb the beautiful words of advice by Haemin Sunim. However, I find some of the quotes quite repetitive and vague. Maybe the beauty of the words somehow got lost in translation? Nevertheless, an insightful book on the world of mindfulness.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Zarina

    The Things You Can Only See When You Slow Down comprises of a series of inspiring essays by Zen Buddhist teacher and author Haemin Sunim, interspersed with thought provoking quotes by him and other influential people in the world of mindfulness. Alongside these there is also stunning art by Youngcheol Lee, which not only beautifully compliments the writing but provides a serene backdrop for contemplation in its own right. Divided in eight distinctive chapters – rest, mindfulness, passion, relati The Things You Can Only See When You Slow Down comprises of a series of inspiring essays by Zen Buddhist teacher and author Haemin Sunim, interspersed with thought provoking quotes by him and other influential people in the world of mindfulness. Alongside these there is also stunning art by Youngcheol Lee, which not only beautifully compliments the writing but provides a serene backdrop for contemplation in its own right. Divided in eight distinctive chapters – rest, mindfulness, passion, relationships, love, life, future and spirituality – this is a book that can be read back to front (like I did to be able to review it), but I would advise instead to dip in and out of relevant chapters depending on your own current needs. That way you can soak up the inspiring words much better and apply the teachings and ideas within your own life, rather than all of the advice and 'aha' moments blending together. I'll definitely be returning to a few of the chapters that are particularly poignant to my own life right now to be able to get more value out of the wise words captured within. I personally found the essays more interesting than the individual snippets of advice blended in through the medium of short quotes, just because there were so many of them and it did become difficult to distinguish one from the other after a while. They would work great as individual quote cards or posters, but within the book there were just too many together on the same page. There were a few that particularly stood out, but I had to write them down separately to remember them. One that I especially loved and try to stand still by more now is: "Those who work in a playful, relaxed manner tend to work efficiently and creatively, those who work nonstop, driven only by stress, work without joy." The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down is a very inspiring read, filled with poignant advise and calming art work. But to get the most value out of each of the chapters, I definitely recommend consuming them in bite-sized chunks rather than all in one go.

  21. 4 out of 5

    ArkarAung

    At least, you can feel calmness and tranquility during reading it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aligermaa Tse

    I picked this book up, somehow thinking the author was a woman. I am glad for the mistake though because I loved it from the beginning till the end. Oftentimes I found myself nodding and thinking of similar experiences. In the prologue, he suggests readers to contemplate after each chapter, rather than skimming through the book. What a great advice. That way, more of his teachings and ideas remained afterwards. Based on the title of the book, I was expecting something banal like “stop doing what I picked this book up, somehow thinking the author was a woman. I am glad for the mistake though because I loved it from the beginning till the end. Oftentimes I found myself nodding and thinking of similar experiences. In the prologue, he suggests readers to contemplate after each chapter, rather than skimming through the book. What a great advice. That way, more of his teachings and ideas remained afterwards. Based on the title of the book, I was expecting something banal like “stop doing whatever you are doing and smell the flowers”. But, thankfully, it was actually more down to earth and close to life. His teachings were practical, easy to understand and appreciate. This is one of those books I would reread whenever I can. Definitely recommend it!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    This is something that I like to listen to (a chapter each time) before I go to bed. I will probably keep it on my phone to listen to fairly regularly. It helps me slow down and focus on my breathing and just receive. The reader does a pretty good job and I feel like I can drift off after listening to a chapter.

  24. 5 out of 5

    VC Gan

    What an uplifting book. TImeless wisdom and beautiful artwork. A must-read for everyone.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Surya

    Good, relaxing, soothing and comforting, easy to read and could be understood and related by many. A good read indeed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Liza Fireman

    Well, I am torn. I have learned to appreciate more spiritual attitudes with me growing up into a grown-up people's age. I learn to appreciate smelling the flowers, and giving time to body and soul. But I still am the same energetic, not-so-very-patient soul inside I guess, so I can't turn 180 degrees from where I started and still have some very hard time with very very spiritual books or methods. So for example I liked this paragraph: We know the world only through the window of our mind. When our Well, I am torn. I have learned to appreciate more spiritual attitudes with me growing up into a grown-up people's age. I learn to appreciate smelling the flowers, and giving time to body and soul. But I still am the same energetic, not-so-very-patient soul inside I guess, so I can't turn 180 degrees from where I started and still have some very hard time with very very spiritual books or methods. So for example I liked this paragraph: We know the world only through the window of our mind. When our mind is noisy, the world is as well. And when our mind is peaceful, the world is, too. Knowing our minds is just as important as trying to change the world. But I wasn't sure if I should lough or cry reading this one: Tsunamis are frightening not just because of the water, but also because of the objects hurled at us by the water. Tornadoes are terrifying not just because of the wind, but also because of the objects uprooted and thrown by the wind. Overall, the book is full of short clauses, all are quite spiritual. Many thoughts are being brought to the readers as little poems. The sentences are very short, few lines lessons. And they are all not very new, quite well known I would say. So please, don't watch too much television: A very modern dilemma: There are countless television channels but nothing interesting to watch. Too many choices make people unhappy. And also know that your memories are your thoughts, think about being grateful, have love in your heart, love yourself despite your imperfections, and try to relax. All of these are awesome, but I guess they are not revolutionary or new. And maybe that's okay, but it depends what you are trying to get out of books. Good for reminders, getting good thoughts, and feeling spiritual. For me it was about 2.5 stars. Maybe in a few years it will go higher on my list.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Petar Ivanov

    Amazing book with so much wisdom from the East. All the quotes and essays hide a lot of food for thought which thrilled and made me think a lot. It helped me to additionally improve and boost my new thinking about the universe and life.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Acordul Fin

    Beautifully designed and highly quotable. Not exactly life-changing but still enjoyable.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matthias

    A book you can only appreciate when you slow down to read and reread it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    There’s a theory that we become what engulfs our senses, so if you read or hear something it becomes you, at least temporarily; that’s why we prefer different situations and people to surround ourselves with. This book engulfed me with wisdom and had the transformative effect of heightening my self-awareness and centring me. I found myself in situations where I was experiencing an emotion and I was able to observe it from a detached distance before I selected how to respond. It’s an odd feeling There’s a theory that we become what engulfs our senses, so if you read or hear something it becomes you, at least temporarily; that’s why we prefer different situations and people to surround ourselves with. This book engulfed me with wisdom and had the transformative effect of heightening my self-awareness and centring me. I found myself in situations where I was experiencing an emotion and I was able to observe it from a detached distance before I selected how to respond. It’s an odd feeling to separate emotion and thought almost instantaneously and realise that emotion is not logical and to treat it like your inner child; the child does not understand why it has to do something for its own good. My inner gnawing to analytically decode my emotions was replaced with calm acceptance and they floated away like clouds in the breeze. I’m at a point in my life where I deeply and regularly consider the concepts that were discussed such as acceptance of what is and relinquishing control; being very self-sufficient and independent this is something I’ve had to work hard on over the years, something as simple as letting someone help me feels alien to me and takes conscious effort. It also made me consider ‘pouring time’ on something and allowing the universe to deliver its lessons; you’re always sent something to help you grow, it’s how you respond to that which proves its effectiveness. Furthermore, Sunmin reminded me of ego and how, even in the plight to separate its tar-like embrace from our existence, it still clings with icy fingers. Even our language is framed in ‘I’ and our perception of the world is centred from ‘me’ making it difficult to view others before yourself. We all share the same essence and it’s our ego that creates friction and walls.

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