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Moondragon in the Mosque Garden

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Tajalli, Mujtaba, and Aasiya just want a break from adult conversations. They go to check out the old garden in their new mosque building, and end up making a new friend and learning an important lesson about caring for the earth.


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Tajalli, Mujtaba, and Aasiya just want a break from adult conversations. They go to check out the old garden in their new mosque building, and end up making a new friend and learning an important lesson about caring for the earth.

34 review for Moondragon in the Mosque Garden

  1. 4 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    This includes kids who have two dads, but that's incidental to the story. Tajalli, Mujtaba, and Aasiya are playing in the mosque garden, kicking around bottles, holding up wrappers until the wind takes them, whacking at the grass with sticks, when Moondragona sparkly purple dragon--emerges from the fountain to scold them for not listening to their aunt's sermon about taking care of the earth. He shrinks them to the size of the bees and ants, to see how they work in concert with nature, and how This includes kids who have two dads, but that's incidental to the story. Tajalli, Mujtaba, and Aasiya are playing in the mosque garden, kicking around bottles, holding up wrappers until the wind takes them, whacking at the grass with sticks, when Moondragon—a sparkly purple dragon--emerges from the fountain to scold them for not listening to their aunt's sermon about taking care of the earth. He shrinks them to the size of the bees and ants, to see how they work in concert with nature, and how big a caramel wrapper looks to them! They clean up the mosque garden, and when their parents see how beautiful it looks now, they forget about how dirty the kids' Eid's outfits have gotten. The patterns on some of the pages are a little overwhelming--each outfit has its own intricate pattern, but that's also my favourite part of the illustrations. Cute story, with a classic moral!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This is one of the only Flamingo Rampant books where the queer content seemed really tangential to the story -- a bunch of kids are at Edi al-Fitr and go outside where they encounter a moondragon (and learn a lesson about environmentalism). 47,000 Beads had a glossary, so I was disappointed that this didn't.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rabea

  4. 5 out of 5

    Keriann's Picture Book Library

  5. 5 out of 5

    Florence

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aneeq

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lo

  10. 5 out of 5

    Audrey's Picture Books

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

  12. 5 out of 5

    Suzi

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brandie Hesse

  15. 4 out of 5

    Korah

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jack

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Maya

  20. 4 out of 5

    Meg Oliver

  21. 4 out of 5

    Palanaki Lina

  22. 5 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karla

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joy Bechtold

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pam Crow

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amber Hunnicutt

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Wiwchar

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Lauderdale

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lindy

  31. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  32. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

  33. 5 out of 5

    Laia

  34. 5 out of 5

    Noor

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