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Ramen at Home: The Easy Japanese Cookbook for Classic Ramen and Bold New Flavors

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From Tokyo to your table: Learn just how easy making real ramen can be with Ramen at Home. Every bowl of ramen is filled with warm broth, hearty noodles, and the savory taste of comfort. But between complicated recipes and hard-to-find ingredients, many ramen lovers settle for the instant alternatives to get their fix. Ramen at Home offers simple, step-by-step recipes f From Tokyo to your table: Learn just how easy making real ramen can be with Ramen at Home. Every bowl of ramen is filled with warm broth, hearty noodles, and the savory taste of comfort. But between complicated recipes and hard-to-find ingredients, many ramen lovers settle for the instant alternatives to get their fix. Ramen at Home offers simple, step-by-step recipes for authentic and creative homemade ramen. With over 100 recipes for broths, noodles, side dishes, and toppings, this cookbook makes it easy to enjoy real ramen any night of the week.Ramen at Home boils down to: Over 100 Recipes consisting of traditional ramen dishes from Japan along with creative flavor combinations from around the globe Step-by-Step Instructions making it simple to slurp homemade ramen on any weeknight Insightful Facts explaining Japanese culture and cuisine with every bite Recipes include: Green Vegetable Shio Ramen, Traditional Shoyu Ramen, Spicy Miso Ramen, Tonkotsu Ramen, Fried Noodles, Vegan Cold Chinese Noodles, and much more!Slurp up simple and savory bowls with Ramen at Home.


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From Tokyo to your table: Learn just how easy making real ramen can be with Ramen at Home. Every bowl of ramen is filled with warm broth, hearty noodles, and the savory taste of comfort. But between complicated recipes and hard-to-find ingredients, many ramen lovers settle for the instant alternatives to get their fix. Ramen at Home offers simple, step-by-step recipes f From Tokyo to your table: Learn just how easy making real ramen can be with Ramen at Home. Every bowl of ramen is filled with warm broth, hearty noodles, and the savory taste of comfort. But between complicated recipes and hard-to-find ingredients, many ramen lovers settle for the instant alternatives to get their fix. Ramen at Home offers simple, step-by-step recipes for authentic and creative homemade ramen. With over 100 recipes for broths, noodles, side dishes, and toppings, this cookbook makes it easy to enjoy real ramen any night of the week.Ramen at Home boils down to: Over 100 Recipes consisting of traditional ramen dishes from Japan along with creative flavor combinations from around the globe Step-by-Step Instructions making it simple to slurp homemade ramen on any weeknight Insightful Facts explaining Japanese culture and cuisine with every bite Recipes include: Green Vegetable Shio Ramen, Traditional Shoyu Ramen, Spicy Miso Ramen, Tonkotsu Ramen, Fried Noodles, Vegan Cold Chinese Noodles, and much more!Slurp up simple and savory bowls with Ramen at Home.

30 review for Ramen at Home: The Easy Japanese Cookbook for Classic Ramen and Bold New Flavors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Ramen At Home By Brian MacDuckston What it's all about... This book is about making ramen and all of the components that are needed to make a really great ramen. I love the way the book is organized. Definitions..items needed to make ramen...and then the actual ramen recipes. Without these explanations I would have been lost...tare, konbu, Shoyu, all of these were unfamiliar to me...other than Shoyu...soy sauce. Why I wanted to read it... Ramen is such an incredible food...both in soups and in dry noo Ramen At Home By Brian MacDuckston What it's all about... This book is about making ramen and all of the components that are needed to make a really great ramen. I love the way the book is organized. Definitions..items needed to make ramen...and then the actual ramen recipes. Without these explanations I would have been lost...tare, konbu, Shoyu, all of these were unfamiliar to me...other than Shoyu...soy sauce. Why I wanted to read it... Ramen is such an incredible food...both in soups and in dry noodle dishes. We have one ramen shop that is not convenient for us. So making ramen at home is a very pleasant thought. What made me truly enjoy this book... Again the organization of this book is key to making a great ramen. While I questioned finding some of the ingredients...my husband...who shared this book with me...was enthusiastic about where we could find them. Also..the ramen can be simplified. The author discusses premade broths or stocks...these are readily available in a low sodium and organic form...these are what I would use in the beginning. Why you should read it, too... So...ultimately...I love this book. Cold wintry days cry out for a well made bowl of ramen...filled with noodles and an egg and a yummy piece of pork or just veggies. Readers/chefs who want a clearly written book on this delightful food will enjoy reading this book. I received an advance reader’s copy from the publisher. Writing a review was my own idea.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Hobbs

    Haven’t made anything form it yet, but it reads well. My only complaint is that many of the recipes are the same words over and over, it could have been simplified a bit with a common method page.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    When I lived in Hakata on Kyushu in Japan, we ate tonkotsu ramen from myriad little shops where a bowl was quite inexpensive. The broth or stock was creamy white, not from the addition of dairy but rather because pork bones were simmered for hours to extract their collagen which turned the broth creamy white. When I was stationed in Korea, we ate "ramyun" which was similar but with a clear, hot-pepper stock and a raw egg cracked on top of the noodles. It tasted good and cured hangovers. And when When I lived in Hakata on Kyushu in Japan, we ate tonkotsu ramen from myriad little shops where a bowl was quite inexpensive. The broth or stock was creamy white, not from the addition of dairy but rather because pork bones were simmered for hours to extract their collagen which turned the broth creamy white. When I was stationed in Korea, we ate "ramyun" which was similar but with a clear, hot-pepper stock and a raw egg cracked on top of the noodles. It tasted good and cured hangovers. And when we returned to the United States (in 1973), Top Ramen had only just been introduced in supermarkets and was not yet the subsistence diet of college students. Brian MacDuckson has written a book which compares to a swimming pool which has graduated depths from the kiddie-splash shallows to the depth into which one may dive from a board. He invites Americans to make ramen at home and offers them ways to make this process as simple or as complex as one might like. You may slow-cook pork bones to make tonkotsu stock or you may buy it prepared. You may make your own ramen noodles or you may buy them fresh or dried. You may make your own dashi broth from shaved dried bonito tuna, konbu seaweed and dried mushrooms or you may buy a packet of the instant powder. You may compound your own "tare" (flavouring sauce) or you may use seasoned soy sauce. You may make your own chili oil from dried chilis and sesame oil or you may buy tiny bottles of la-yu oil. You may roast your own chashu rolled pork or buy it from specialty shops. Don't make your own miso; nobody makes their own miso. There are numerous ways to prepare, serve and eat ramen. All of them are good. I can attest to this from a vast knowledge, acquired over fifty years of sincere and dedicated research at eating the stuff. This is a good book because it allows the reader to fit in where they are on the foodie continuum.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

    I had a lot of ramen bowls in my relatively short life, but never thought seriously about the possibility of preparing my own ramen, from step 0 onwards. After all, I suppose that exactly as creating your pasta requires more than cooking skills but also a deep knowledge of texture and combinations of ingredients, for a non-Asian like me, homemade ramen is only worth a try without a guarantee of originality. Ramen at Home by Brian MacDuckston is written for someone like me, keeping up with the 'r I had a lot of ramen bowls in my relatively short life, but never thought seriously about the possibility of preparing my own ramen, from step 0 onwards. After all, I suppose that exactly as creating your pasta requires more than cooking skills but also a deep knowledge of texture and combinations of ingredients, for a non-Asian like me, homemade ramen is only worth a try without a guarantee of originality. Ramen at Home by Brian MacDuckston is written for someone like me, keeping up with the 'real thing' recipes, but keeping in mind the Westerners. If you are living outside Japan, at the end of the book there is a long list of online resources that helps to source the right ingredients. Very often in Japan, the popular saying goes often that many unpleasant things - like strong winds or cold or rains - are coming from China. But there are still some things that are actually pleasant and delicious too, like ramen, which are in fact Chinese noodles whose widespred consumption started only around 1870, during the period when Japan decided to end up its centuries old isolation. It took another century almost until the ramen style actually entered the food fashion. Generally, those noodles are made with wheat flour, water and kansui which is an alkaline salt which binds the ingredients together until the usual chevy texture is produced. 'A good bowl of ramen is something personal. Some people like a lot of big, in-your-face flavors, while others want subtle elegance. Some people want huge amounts of fat; the more oil the better. Some bowls can be spicy, some mild. Some people want their ramen to resemble a pizza tomato sauce with a side of anchovies. Nothing is off the table. Good ramen is good ramen'. However, experts like Brian MacDuckston - whose culinary encounters can be read on his blog Ramen Adventures - consider that there are two main flavor components of ramen: the impact - usually created by the dried fish spices - and the after taste - the smooth, umami full taste. Last but not least, the tares - the sauce - is the main player in this story, as it can bring the taste or destroy completely the bowl harmony. Yeah, it seems things are getting more and more complicated... But after reading the book - once, twice, as often and many times you need it to figure out what all the fuss about ramen is all about - you can easily risk a recipe or two. The directions are relatively simple, the recipes are very well organised and even if you fail at least you can slurp your pathetic ramen while looking at the beautiful photos of the real thing. It also helps to offer information about how to match different ingredients or what the recommended side dishes are - pickled cucumber, mayo, friend gyoza, among others. Although I am not sure if I will be brave enough in the near future to make my own ramen, at least I am sure will taste my bowl using a completely different angle of (ramen) critical thinking. This is how good cookbooks operate to the foodie brain, probably. Disclaimer: Book offered by the publisher in exchange for an honest review

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    I don't often read a cook book cover to cover, but this one I did. Not only does it provide background on different types of ramen and side items eaten with ramen, it has a mix and match approach with plenty of recipes to show how that mixing and matching is done. The book is divided into sections on soups (broth), tare (seasoning mixed separately and added to the soup), noodles, toppings, types of ramen (where the mixing and maxing is in the recipe - fortunately a lot can be prepared before act I don't often read a cook book cover to cover, but this one I did. Not only does it provide background on different types of ramen and side items eaten with ramen, it has a mix and match approach with plenty of recipes to show how that mixing and matching is done. The book is divided into sections on soups (broth), tare (seasoning mixed separately and added to the soup), noodles, toppings, types of ramen (where the mixing and maxing is in the recipe - fortunately a lot can be prepared before actually assembling the ramen for serving), and side dishes. If one doesn't want to read the entire cook book, I'd recommend definitely reading the sections before the actual ramen recipes. Understanding increases appreciation for the recipes. One of the appeals (besides its tastiness) is the mindfulness that goes into fresh ramen (as opposed to the packages one buys in the store of instant ramen). I'm looking forward to trying the recipes but need to put together my shopping list first. Fortunately there are some large Asian markets in my area. For those with more limited options, some on line sites are suggested (although Asian Food Grocer always seems to be out of stock of many items) as well as grocery store substitutes on making the soup and some other items.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angelika Fuller

    This book certainly makes Ramen more approachable to the home cook. There are a lot of steps involved for authentic Ramen!! I've made miso Ramen so far. My biggest issue is the author not explaining steps exactly. Having never cooked with Seaweed before, I was having a lot of issues without explicit instructions, almost to the point of giving up! I'm glad I stuck with it, but I'm adding my own notes to the recipes so I don't repeat mistakes. I will definitely be making more Ramen :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Clift

    Very clearly laid out, with a thorough and precise detail of what equipment and ingredients you need to make ramen at home. I like the details on japanese culture and how you should eat your noodles, the author is clear and engaging. Lots of good vegetarian options, and alternatives to make from scratch or with store bought ingredients. Very interesting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Wallace

    This book has great details on ramen. What I was most disappointed in is one recipe caveat. In each recipe for ramen, the author tosses in a way to make quick store bought stock from dashi bouillon and chicken stock. Why hide this? I want to make both the hard and the easy ramen. It's unclear and confusing. So I think I'll try some recipes for tare and such, but skip the super detailed broth.

  9. 5 out of 5

    IKE K HONG

    Ramen & More Ramen Lot of recipes of ramen & other stuff go with making a great ramen...it is all about great broth if you ask me. Anyway, give a try if you want to make restaurant quality ramen at home. Ramen & More Ramen Lot of recipes of ramen & other stuff go with making a great ramen...it is all about great broth if you ask me. Anyway, give a try if you want to make restaurant quality ramen at home.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ashani Hettige

    There are two ramen books that needed to be in the home library. This book and Ivan Orkin's biography narrative story now he got to Ramen. But I love this book being a complete crash course if you want to make ramen at home ! Its helpful,resourceful and inviting as well!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robin Speidel

    Plenty of Ramen This book really gives a great insight into how many different types of ramen there are and how popular it is

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tonia

    Really cool, informative and creative cookbook! I can't wait to try some of the recipes!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Can’t wait to make ramen at home! The recipes look delicious. Can’t wait to try a bunch of them at home! Thank you for this delightful read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Yummy yummy yummy I have love (aka ramen) in my belly!!!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kara Scanlon

    Quick Useful Read It is a great start to understanding how to make ramen! The resources at the back of the book are invaluable, too!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Koral

  17. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Rush

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shanyn

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rani

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bookwyrm

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lilli

  22. 4 out of 5

    Glenda O'Neill

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Taylor

    First, I love the organization this book offers. You pick your "Tare". Next, you pick your noodles. Then you pick your toppings. However, for those like me that wish for more guidance, it's also loaded with recipes. Many recipes offer a vegetarian option, too. The author thoughtfully included a difficulty rating for each recipe and a spiciness guide. He also lets you know whether it's appropriate for a quick weeknight meal - or if it may need longer time and is better served as a weekend project First, I love the organization this book offers. You pick your "Tare". Next, you pick your noodles. Then you pick your toppings. However, for those like me that wish for more guidance, it's also loaded with recipes. Many recipes offer a vegetarian option, too. The author thoughtfully included a difficulty rating for each recipe and a spiciness guide. He also lets you know whether it's appropriate for a quick weeknight meal - or if it may need longer time and is better served as a weekend project. Many recipes include a "Did you know" "Tips" or "From the store" section which includes information to speed things along, interesting tidbits, or preparation tips. The recipes are complete, well organized, and easy to follow. Additionally, he offers information on sourcing hard-to-find ingredients. I live in the boonies and found this information valuable. While photos do not accompany the recipes, each chapter heading begins with gorgeous, full-color photos. It's visually obvious that someone put a lot of time and effort into this cookbook.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Monk

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steph

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carla

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie Kersten

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael Belli

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

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