counter create hit A Study in Emerald - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

A Study in Emerald

Availability: Ready to download

This supernatural mystery set in the world of Sherlock Holmes and Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos features a brilliant detective and his partner as they try to solve a horrific murder. The complex investigation takes the Baker Street investigators from the slums of Whitechapel all the way to the Queen's Palace as they attempt to find the answers to this bizarre murder of cosmic This supernatural mystery set in the world of Sherlock Holmes and Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos features a brilliant detective and his partner as they try to solve a horrific murder. The complex investigation takes the Baker Street investigators from the slums of Whitechapel all the way to the Queen's Palace as they attempt to find the answers to this bizarre murder of cosmic horror! From the Hugo, Bram Stoker, Locus, World Fantasy, Nebula award-winning, and New York Times bestselling writer Neil Gaiman comes this graphic novel adaptation with art by Eisner award winning artist Rafael Albuquerque!


Compare
Ads Banner

This supernatural mystery set in the world of Sherlock Holmes and Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos features a brilliant detective and his partner as they try to solve a horrific murder. The complex investigation takes the Baker Street investigators from the slums of Whitechapel all the way to the Queen's Palace as they attempt to find the answers to this bizarre murder of cosmic This supernatural mystery set in the world of Sherlock Holmes and Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos features a brilliant detective and his partner as they try to solve a horrific murder. The complex investigation takes the Baker Street investigators from the slums of Whitechapel all the way to the Queen's Palace as they attempt to find the answers to this bizarre murder of cosmic horror! From the Hugo, Bram Stoker, Locus, World Fantasy, Nebula award-winning, and New York Times bestselling writer Neil Gaiman comes this graphic novel adaptation with art by Eisner award winning artist Rafael Albuquerque!

30 review for A Study in Emerald

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Sherlock + Cthulhu = A Study in Emerald. I went into it knowing that it was some sort of Doyle/Lovecraft mash-up, but that was about it. I had no idea what Gaiman was trying to pull off as far as plot goes, and I'm glad I didn't. Because while this was exactly what it purported to be, it was also quite a bit different than I was expecting. A detective with uncanny skills and his war hero roommate set out to solve a royal murder in London. Yeah, that sounds like a Sherlock Holmes story, right? But Sherlock + Cthulhu = A Study in Emerald. I went into it knowing that it was some sort of Doyle/Lovecraft mash-up, but that was about it. I had no idea what Gaiman was trying to pull off as far as plot goes, and I'm glad I didn't. Because while this was exactly what it purported to be, it was also quite a bit different than I was expecting. A detective with uncanny skills and his war hero roommate set out to solve a royal murder in London. Yeah, that sounds like a Sherlock Holmes story, right? But these royals? They, um, bleed green. To say the least, this is a very interesting alternate history. And that's not even the twist . I have a tumultuous relationship with Gaiman's writing. He's got all the talent in the world and I love his stories, but I wish they were a tad less rambling and drawn out. So, the forced compaction that naturally happens in graphic novelizations really worked for me here. Recommended for anyone looking for a bit of something different.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Forget Pokémon—it’s my mission in life to catch all Holmesian graphic novels, particularly those that are not adaptations of canonical stories, but rather additions to it (bonus points if the art is so stellar that I can get completely immersed in Victorian London or if there are supernatural overtones (or even just a hint of the supernatural, a la Hound of the Baskervilles)). (Another reason to say forget Pokémon? Squirtle. I mean, come on—someone was either intentionally trying to coin a term Forget Pokémon—it’s my mission in life to catch all Holmesian graphic novels, particularly those that are not adaptations of canonical stories, but rather additions to it (bonus points if the art is so stellar that I can get completely immersed in Victorian London or if there are supernatural overtones (or even just a hint of the supernatural, a la Hound of the Baskervilles)). (Another reason to say forget Pokémon? Squirtle. I mean, come on—someone was either intentionally trying to coin a term to describe a particularly tricky (and aqueous) sex act or completely clueless; my money is on the former.) Enter Gaiman, adapting his 2004 award-winning short story of the same name, an intriguing mashup of the world of Holmes and the twisted oeuvre of H.P. Lovecraft. The artwork is solid, the pacing brisk, and the tentacles ubiquitous. And, the concluding twist would makes the kiwi in Lisa Turtle’s favorite beverage* look like a sapsucker. If you’re a traditionalist, it’s a little out there, but if you’re open to a little bit of weird with your Victorian sleuthing, it’s well worth checking out. *That is an INCREDIBLY obscure Saved by the Bell reference, and I award eleventy-billion points to anyone who picks up on it. Also, we should be best friends.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I'm a big fan of the original Sherlock Holmes stories and Neil Gaiman, so “A Study in Emerald” was an exciting discovery for me! It’s a spooky, strange, and very exciting take on a Holmes story. Probably about what you would expect from Neil Gaiman in terms of the weirdness -- and I mean this in the best and most adoring way possible! Roughly following the plot of “A Study in Scarlet”, the novel is narrated by a British soldier newly returned home after being injured in a war in Afghanistan. Thr I'm a big fan of the original Sherlock Holmes stories and Neil Gaiman, so “A Study in Emerald” was an exciting discovery for me! It’s a spooky, strange, and very exciting take on a Holmes story. Probably about what you would expect from Neil Gaiman in terms of the weirdness -- and I mean this in the best and most adoring way possible! Roughly following the plot of “A Study in Scarlet”, the novel is narrated by a British soldier newly returned home after being injured in a war in Afghanistan. Through a mutual acquaintance, he becomes flatmates with a brilliant if unorthodox consulting detective. One day they are called by Inspector Lestrade to assist with the investigation of the gruesome murder of a member of the Royal Family. A member who is both far more and far less than human... Readers familiar with the Sherlock Holmes canon will be lulled into a sense of security by the standard opening, before realizing that this is not the same story. (view spoiler)[In this alternate retelling, the old gods have returned and they have quite the say in people's lives. The mystery revolves around what happened to one of these Cthulu-type monsters, (hide spoiler)] but to say anymore would completely spoil the ingenious way that Gaiman plays with the original Study in Scarlet --the role reversals he uses, and how he incorporates Lovecraftian elements. The illustrations pay tribute to the styles of both Conan Doyle and Lovecraft, being practical in the paneling, but with a sense of underlying unease in the atmosphere. The writing also captures the elegance expected from both of these masters. A huge twist is hidden right in plain sight too, though I suspect the most hardcore Holmes fans might have guessed it from the beginning. If you're a fan of Holmes, or Gaiman, or both -- you will probably quite enjoy “A Study in Emerald”!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    I didn't know anything about this before reading it. It's a good way to read this one as the surprises are enjoyable. This seems loosely based on the Sherlock Holmes story 'a Study in Scarlet'. It is then blended with H P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu, which I still need to read. It turns into something of it's own. I don't know that Neil uses Watson or Holmes. They are called the Major and the Detective, I believe. It is at Baker's street. There is a mystery and there is surprise. Neil has such a gift f I didn't know anything about this before reading it. It's a good way to read this one as the surprises are enjoyable. This seems loosely based on the Sherlock Holmes story 'a Study in Scarlet'. It is then blended with H P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu, which I still need to read. It turns into something of it's own. I don't know that Neil uses Watson or Holmes. They are called the Major and the Detective, I believe. It is at Baker's street. There is a mystery and there is surprise. Neil has such a gift for words in my opinion. It is such a gift. He can make anything interesting. I thought the artwork was wonderful. It is great for Victorian England. The characters are sharp and the story is too short. It's my big complaint, the story needed to have more of it. I will say, this does not really answer questions, it simply leaves you with more questions.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    3.5 stars rounded up to 4 stars I'm curious to see if they will turn this into a series since the book ends on a cliffhanger. I had to check this one out because... 1. It's written by Neil Gaiman and 2. It's a Sherlock Holmes retelling. A Study in Emerald was an unique retelling of the famous Sherlock Holmes solving a murder that had H.P. Lovecraft themes. All hail the Cthulhu! I thought the art work by Rafael Albuquerque was really well done for all the well loved characters from Holmes, Watson to 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 stars I'm curious to see if they will turn this into a series since the book ends on a cliffhanger. I had to check this one out because... 1. It's written by Neil Gaiman and 2. It's a Sherlock Holmes retelling. A Study in Emerald was an unique retelling of the famous Sherlock Holmes solving a murder that had H.P. Lovecraft themes. All hail the Cthulhu! I thought the art work by Rafael Albuquerque was really well done for all the well loved characters from Holmes, Watson to Lestrade. I'm glad I took the time to check this out from the library. It was definitely different but fun!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    An adaptation of Neil Gaiman's short story from a Sherlock Holmes anthology. It mashs up Doyle's and Lovecraft's most popular creations. The art is wonderfully moody, giving London a spooky, foggy vibe. I didn't see the twist coming at all, although I would say it could have been delivered a bit clearer. Even when I saw there would be a twist, the art didn't make it clear that it had happened, leaving too much to be inferred.

  7. 4 out of 5

    ¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪SomeBunny Reads (Phoenix)•*¨*•♫♪

    The more I read Neil Gaiman, the more I think that I can only truly appreciate his graphic works. I do believe that his style and narrative are perfect for this kind of art, and when he finds the right illustrators, who are able to capture the atmosphere of his creations (like in this case), the result is stunning. This short book is one of the most original and interesting retakes of the character of Sherlock Holmes I ever read. Perfectly timed, beautifully illustrated, lovecraftian, weird and s The more I read Neil Gaiman, the more I think that I can only truly appreciate his graphic works. I do believe that his style and narrative are perfect for this kind of art, and when he finds the right illustrators, who are able to capture the atmosphere of his creations (like in this case), the result is stunning. This short book is one of the most original and interesting retakes of the character of Sherlock Holmes I ever read. Perfectly timed, beautifully illustrated, lovecraftian, weird and surprisingly creepy, I enjoyed every minute of this brief story. A great Halloween read!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    This is the graphic novel version of Neil Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald," which won the Hugo Award for short stories in 2004. It's a brilliant mash-up of the Sherlock Holmes universe and H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu mythos, a weird but wonderful fantasy variation on a Sherlock Holmes mystery. So I'm normally not a graphic novel kind of person - I like my reading straight-up, the traditional way, not in audio or graphic novel version - but when I saw this book sitting on the library shelf staring at m This is the graphic novel version of Neil Gaiman's "A Study in Emerald," which won the Hugo Award for short stories in 2004. It's a brilliant mash-up of the Sherlock Holmes universe and H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu mythos, a weird but wonderful fantasy variation on a Sherlock Holmes mystery. So I'm normally not a graphic novel kind of person - I like my reading straight-up, the traditional way, not in audio or graphic novel version - but when I saw this book sitting on the library shelf staring at me I couldn't resist picking it up, since the original "Study in Emerald" is one of my favorite Gaiman short stories. (Really, it is brilliant.) It's Victorian days in England Albion, and a doctor, wounded in the Afghanistan war (in this case, by a monstrous being), moves in with a new roommate. Names are never mentioned, but the new roommate is a consulting detective with a deep knowledge of obscure facts. Oh, and he lives on Baker Street. Inspector Lestrade of Scotland Yard comes to beg the detective's help in solving a mystery: an alien noble from Germany has been murdered, emerald blood scattered everywhere. All the nobility and leaders of nations in this world are Lovecraftian aliens, owing to their conquest of the world 700 years earlier. But the thing is, most people heartily approve of government-by-alien-monsters, despite some ... drawbacks. So the detective and the good doctor set off to hunt down the murderers. I still like the original written version of this story better, but this graphic novel does have about 80-90% of the original version's text (I was doing a side-by-side comparison for most of the novel). The illustrations are appropriately creepy, especially Queen Victoria and her magic tentacles and human mask. :) (view spoiler)[Prince Albert is human, and I just don't even want to think about the human/monster interbreeding going on in this world. (hide spoiler)] Once you read this, I highly recommend Wikipedia's spoiler-filled page about this book, which includes discussion of the many hints and Easter eggs that Gaiman slipped into this story. Here's a link to the Wikipedia article. The "advertisements" are to die for.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Victorian England and a royal is found murdered in a cheap Shoreditch rooming house - but who could commit such a treasonous act? Perplexed, the police turn to the greatest detective in the world and his companion, based in Baker Street. The game is atentacled in this brilliant cross between Conan Doyle and Lovecraft! I read A Study in Emerald when it was published in Neil Gaiman’s short story collection Fragile Things but that was so long ago that I’d forgotten the absolutely inspired twist endi Victorian England and a royal is found murdered in a cheap Shoreditch rooming house - but who could commit such a treasonous act? Perplexed, the police turn to the greatest detective in the world and his companion, based in Baker Street. The game is atentacled in this brilliant cross between Conan Doyle and Lovecraft! I read A Study in Emerald when it was published in Neil Gaiman’s short story collection Fragile Things but that was so long ago that I’d forgotten the absolutely inspired twist ending when I came to read this comic adaptation so I was blown away all over again. It’s no less great a story in graphic form. The mystery is compelling, the world-building is terrific and it’s the perfect meeting of two writers’ worlds with Lovecraftian elements so beautifully incorporated into Conan Doyle’s Holmes stories you’d think they were made for each other. And that twist is totally unpredictable and ingenious. I love the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen-esque interstitials - fake ads nodding to Victorian literature - and the design of Queen Victoria is genuinely creepy with “her” human mask. It’s not a huge critique but the only thing that stops me from giving this one a perfect score is Rafael Albuquerque’s art. I’m just not a fan and, while I appreciate the colour choices suit the time and setting, the pages look very drab and dull to look at. Otherwise, A Study in Emerald is a superb and imaginative blend of Victorian detective fiction and Lovecraftian horror, executed masterfully - a fantastic read!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Sherlock Holmes (and someone else...) meets the Cthulhu Mythos in an excellent comic book adaption of one of Neil Gaiman's best short tales ever, available in anthologies like Shadows Over Baker Street and Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders, but you can downoad and read it for free on the author's website too: http://www.neilgaiman.com/mediafiles/... I've read the original tale something like three times already, so the final twist was not unknown to me, but it was still great as the firs Sherlock Holmes (and someone else...) meets the Cthulhu Mythos in an excellent comic book adaption of one of Neil Gaiman's best short tales ever, available in anthologies like Shadows Over Baker Street and Fragile Things: Short Fictions and Wonders, but you can downoad and read it for free on the author's website too: http://www.neilgaiman.com/mediafiles/... I've read the original tale something like three times already, so the final twist was not unknown to me, but it was still great as the first time and Albuquerque's dark and gritty artworks added a lot of atmosphere to this wonderful horrorific pastiche. A really have to look for and play the tabletop board game inspired by it sooner or later.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    The place that leechlike mouth had touched me was tattooed forever, frog white, into the skin of my now withered shoulder. I had once been a crack shot. Now I had nothing, save a fear of the world-beneath-world akin to panic. pg. 7 A graphic novel adaptation of A Study in Emerald. Basically Gaiman is bringing together Sherlock Holmes and the works of Lovecraft. The story is good: creepy and creative. I like the lurking evil and the undertones of world domination by The Old Ones and the creeping ho The place that leechlike mouth had touched me was tattooed forever, frog white, into the skin of my now withered shoulder. I had once been a crack shot. Now I had nothing, save a fear of the world-beneath-world akin to panic. pg. 7 A graphic novel adaptation of A Study in Emerald. Basically Gaiman is bringing together Sherlock Holmes and the works of Lovecraft. The story is good: creepy and creative. I like the lurking evil and the undertones of world domination by The Old Ones and the creeping horror. It also has a few twists that are interesting. The art is kind of dark, it's not my favorite style, although it does fit in with the narrative and it is easy to follow. The writing is good, Gaiman has a way with words. His renowned creativity is a bit stifled, seeing as he is cribbing from two very famous worlds here: Sherlock Holmes and Cthulhu. It's enjoyable and fun, and the mashup is creative, but overall the concept is giving Gaiman less room to shine because he is constrained by the worlds already in place. Probably the funniest twists are the little newspaper advertisements Gaiman puts in here while winking at the reader. For example, "V. Tepes, exsanguinator" or Henry Jekyll selling "Jekyll's Powders" for people who suffer "constipation of the soul." Might be better as a prose story, but I haven't picked up the prose-story, only this version. RELATED MATERIALS: A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft The King in Yellow by Robert W. Chambers Captive State - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5968394/ - Strong similarities here Crooked by Austin Grossman

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I had kind of stopped reading these comics adaptations of Gaiman short stories, had reached Gaiman saturation, but I knew the story, the cover looked intriguing, I saw that Gaiman was able to attract (as he among very few can do) the very best team (Dave Stewart, one of the most celebrated colorists ever, and the most celebrated letterer ever Todd Klein) and I just sighed and walked this little dog home. The story is Gaiman's clever 2004 Hugo-award-winning adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's I had kind of stopped reading these comics adaptations of Gaiman short stories, had reached Gaiman saturation, but I knew the story, the cover looked intriguing, I saw that Gaiman was able to attract (as he among very few can do) the very best team (Dave Stewart, one of the most celebrated colorists ever, and the most celebrated letterer ever Todd Klein) and I just sighed and walked this little dog home. The story is Gaiman's clever 2004 Hugo-award-winning adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's A Study in Scarlet. Why emerald? Well, in part because the spilled blood here is not red, but green, because Gaiman is making a little Victorian mash-up drawing from the worlds of Doyle and Lovecraft, featuring appearances of Cthulhu. The art by Rafael Albuquerque is moody, terrific. I like the little Victorian fun adverts, throughout, and the surprise ending. Clever, entertaining, all around.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    "A Study In Emerald" is Neil Gaiman's take on mashing together the worlds of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft. He does a great job with it. Imagine a Sherlock Holmes story set in a Lovecraftian Cthulhu world. Gaiman nails the setting and the story perfectly, blending it well into the "Victorian Age" timeline where the mankind had lost to the Old Ones and the reigning monarchs of Europe and the world are all Old Ones. So we see our characters go through and solve a case in the typical Hol "A Study In Emerald" is Neil Gaiman's take on mashing together the worlds of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft. He does a great job with it. Imagine a Sherlock Holmes story set in a Lovecraftian Cthulhu world. Gaiman nails the setting and the story perfectly, blending it well into the "Victorian Age" timeline where the mankind had lost to the Old Ones and the reigning monarchs of Europe and the world are all Old Ones. So we see our characters go through and solve a case in the typical Holmes/Watson style, well "typical" if one includes Old Gods. However I noticed that the characters are never named and Gaiman drops STRONG hints about the identity, though it is never confirmed or denied. So if you don't want to spoil it and figure it out yourself..do so and read no further. However the rest of you guys: I, IMHO, think in this messed up Cthulhu world it's actually James Moriarty we are seeing as Holmes. The Watson character is hinted at by the end with the story being signed off by an S.M., Major (Retd.) I can only think of Moriarity's side-kick Sebastian Moran. In fact the limping doctor and the whole "Rache" incident is actually done by Holmes. Just my thought. Either way very cool. Great story, great artwork and an awesome mix of two similar but disparate worlds joined by the Victorian Age. Neil Gaiman weaves another very cool fantasy tale. Highly Recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alina

    Went into this knowing almost nothing about it (though, in hindsight, I should have figured something from the title), and I was in for a nice surprise: a Sherlock Holmes mystery set in Lovecraft Country. And the implications towards the end are simply delicious!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shadowdenizen

    4.5 stars. An excellent adaptation of the seminal Neil Gaiman story that fuses Sherlock Holmes and the Cthulhu Mythos.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trang Tran (Bookidote)

    Full review here I always loved reading graphic novels and I noticed that one of the challenges in this medium is to convey an original story while having a clear storyline in just a few pages. Neil Gaiman, Rafael Alburerque and company did just that. They manage to set up the world building in a Lovecraftian way but keep all the Sherlock Holmes references at the same time. The perfect pastiche. A Study in Emerald is foreshadowing The Study In Scarlet by Conan Doyle. The dialogue is funny, enter Full review here I always loved reading graphic novels and I noticed that one of the challenges in this medium is to convey an original story while having a clear storyline in just a few pages. Neil Gaiman, Rafael Alburerque and company did just that. They manage to set up the world building in a Lovecraftian way but keep all the Sherlock Holmes references at the same time. The perfect pastiche. A Study in Emerald is foreshadowing The Study In Scarlet by Conan Doyle. The dialogue is funny, entertaining and as thought provoking as the original works from Doyle. The story follows the simple murder mystery plot until the last page ends WITH A FRKN TWIST! A magnificent twist, dare I say, for I am a fan of big reveals. The kind of reveal that makes you want to re-read the story and find the clues that you missed the first time. As for the length, It is short I must warn you, I wish they will continue this a series because I’m sure they have plenty of ideas to explore 😀

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sara *~The Loquacious Lassie~*

    Holmes, and aliens, and bears- oh my! Oh...wait. Scratch that last- there were no bears. But there WERE aliens and there definitely was a Sherlock Holmes. Holmes (in all of his neurotic brilliance) and his sidekick work tirelessly to track down a murderer. Sound familiar? Think again. The victim is alien royalty! The story was beautifully written and artfully illustrated. Expect all the moody, dark, and mysterious goodness of 1800's London as well! This was brilliant! But I mean, I'm quite sure Holmes, and aliens, and bears- oh my! Oh...wait. Scratch that last- there were no bears. But there WERE aliens and there definitely was a Sherlock Holmes. Holmes (in all of his neurotic brilliance) and his sidekick work tirelessly to track down a murderer. Sound familiar? Think again. The victim is alien royalty! The story was beautifully written and artfully illustrated. Expect all the moody, dark, and mysterious goodness of 1800's London as well! This was brilliant! But I mean, I'm quite sure that Gaiman doesn't know how to write something that is dull or boring. The man is positively allergic to writing anything that even halfway resembles cow dung...or any other kind of dung for that matter. 5 stars!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Katie (Lost in Pages)

    I want to start by saying that I know nothing when it comes to Lovecraft. I'm aware that there's a green, octopus-looking creature called the "cthulhu" that lives in the ocean, and that's literally the extent of my knowledge. I've always been intrigued by his stories, but I've never read any of them. Sherlock Holmes, on the other hand, I know quite a lot about. Without having read any of the actual books, I know a good deal because of adaptations I've seen — Benedict Cumberbatch and the BBC adapt I want to start by saying that I know nothing when it comes to Lovecraft. I'm aware that there's a green, octopus-looking creature called the "cthulhu" that lives in the ocean, and that's literally the extent of my knowledge. I've always been intrigued by his stories, but I've never read any of them. Sherlock Holmes, on the other hand, I know quite a lot about. Without having read any of the actual books, I know a good deal because of adaptations I've seen — Benedict Cumberbatch and the BBC adaptation will always be my favorite!  So with a minimum amount of background knowledge, I went into this graphic novel hoping for the best because it's Neil Gaiman, and Neil Gaiman can do no wrong. I didn't know that the plot line was going to follow A Study in Scarlet so accurately, so that was a nice surprise. For some, I can see why that would be a negative, but for me, I liked the fact that I knew the base story because sometimes the Lovecraft references were over my head. I'm sure there are a bunch that I've missed or didn't recognize. That being said, I did like the Lovecraftian influences. They made the story unique! To avoid spoilers, I won't say much about the ending minus the fact that it threw me for a curve ball, for sure. It makes a lot of sense after the fact, but I definitely enjoyed that twist of sorts. Another thing I enjoyed was the art style, it matched the writing style very well. I hope this graphic novel will become a series because I'd love to see more in this interesting world. 

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ilana

    A quite satisfying Sherlock Holmes Cthulhu inspired mashup from the madly creative Neil Gaiman. Gorgeous artwork too.

  20. 5 out of 5

    The Story Girl

    Recently while listening to a podcast, I discovered that Neil Gaiman had written a re-telling, or pastiche, of one of the Sherlock Holmes’ stories, “A Study in Scarlet.” It can be found online for free here, and this version is actually printed like an actual newspaper with ads and all. However, there are other versions as well: a graphic novel, an audiobook, the version found in Shadows Over Baker Street where it was first found, and Amazon has it as an ebook that’s listed as 80 pages long? And Recently while listening to a podcast, I discovered that Neil Gaiman had written a re-telling, or pastiche, of one of the Sherlock Holmes’ stories, “A Study in Scarlet.” It can be found online for free here, and this version is actually printed like an actual newspaper with ads and all. However, there are other versions as well: a graphic novel, an audiobook, the version found in Shadows Over Baker Street where it was first found, and Amazon has it as an ebook that’s listed as 80 pages long? And costs $10? I’m not sure what that’s about because the pdf I linked is only 9 pages long. Anyway, Gaiman does a great job of imitating Doyle’s style, but I didn’t realize the point was basically to use all the same plot points and almost the same details as the original story? While the narrator goes unnamed, his back story is exactly like Watson’s and is introduced in the same way, some of the major plot points are exactly the same: the “rache,” the cab driver, etc. which I found confusing. What’s the point of a re-telling if you’re telling the exact same story in very similar words? And why is it a study in emerald, of all colors? Also, it’s a re-telling that takes place in H. P. Lovecraft’s world, so if you’re not familiar with that (like I wasn’t), then you’ll be even more confused. But the plot twist at the end I really liked and made this story worthwhile. I did not see it coming at all: (view spoiler)[The whole time you’ll think that Holmes and Watson are the main characters of the story, but no, it turns out the detective is actually Moriarty and his veteran friend Sebastian Moran, one of Holmes’ enemies; and Holmes and Watson are actually the “villains” of the book. They killed the German noble who was an alien because they’re against the rule of the Great Old Ones who are unjustly ruling amongst humans. (And I never would have been able to figure that out without reading the Wikipedia article, not sure if it’s because Gaiman’s writing is confusing or because I’m not familiar with Lovecraft, or what.) (hide spoiler)] I was excited to read this story because I’ve heard so many good things about Neil Gaiman and love Sherlock Holmes, so I thought it would be a great place to start, but I was wrong. Another site besides wikipedia that helped me understand this story: Tor, especially knowing this following part before reading the story would have really helped me out: “ The story begins long after the worst terrors embedded in the Mythos have come true—and become commonplace. The cultists have taken over, answering to their unholy overlords. Royalty exudes both fear and fascination, and leaders who give prosperity with one hand (limb) can carry out dreadful deeds behind closed doors. The world isn’t entirely like ours, though; the moon is a different color.” And the “rulers demand the price of minds (souls) for their general benevolence.” In conclusion, if you’re a fan of Gaiman’s and/or Lovecraft’s, you’ll probably enjoy (and understand) this story more than I did. It even won the Hugo Award in 2004.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    To be very honest I bought this comic for my daughter as a Christmas gift as ever since Sherlock she is a fan of things Sherlock Holmes, only she does have trouble with reading the originals which she finds tedious sometimes. Hence a modern update. Sherlock Holmes & Watson the the an Lovecraft generated time, only the names SH & Watson are never mentioned, they are the detective and the Major. They are called into the murder of a member of the Royal family who are of course not of human nature and To be very honest I bought this comic for my daughter as a Christmas gift as ever since Sherlock she is a fan of things Sherlock Holmes, only she does have trouble with reading the originals which she finds tedious sometimes. Hence a modern update. Sherlock Holmes & Watson the the an Lovecraft generated time, only the names SH & Watson are never mentioned, they are the detective and the Major. They are called into the murder of a member of the Royal family who are of course not of human nature and rule Britannia. An interesting take on the genre and an alternative tale of Sherlock. Great art and well written. I do not give it a higher rating as it leaves to early and some questions feel unanswered.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    The great old ones from H. P. Lovecraft the green Gods of Cthula this another Holmes book with Lovecraft undertones their lot of them about. This based on early novel by Gaiman famed for The Sandman graphic novels, so idea of adapteding this into graphic design is nothing new as its just a reverse of what use to do.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    This is a splendidly superb adaptation of one of Gaiman’s finest stories. The elevator pitch is: Sherlock Holmes meets Cthulhu. It's not the first time such a concept has been put forward, and it very likely won't be the last. The background of the story is that Lovecraft’s Great Old Ones have awakened and now rule the world. The setting is roughly Victorian England, though the Queen herself is decidedly not human. Inspector Lestrade brings in the only consulting detective in London. The case cle This is a splendidly superb adaptation of one of Gaiman’s finest stories. The elevator pitch is: Sherlock Holmes meets Cthulhu. It's not the first time such a concept has been put forward, and it very likely won't be the last. The background of the story is that Lovecraft’s Great Old Ones have awakened and now rule the world. The setting is roughly Victorian England, though the Queen herself is decidedly not human. Inspector Lestrade brings in the only consulting detective in London. The case clearly is intended to evoke Conan Doyle’s classic, A Study In Scarlet--”Rache” scrawled on the wall and everything. But the blood is green, and the victim royalty, Prince Franz Drago of Bohemia. It soon becomes apparent that the crime was committed by members of a faction bent on ridding the world of the Old Ones and restoring humanity to power. And the main perpetrator would appear possessed of an intellect and resourcefulness worthy of Holmes himself … Honestly, I’m not sure how this could have been done any better. The artwork is lovely, the adaptation thorough and respectful. Highly recommended!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This is a very good adaptation of Gaiman's Doyle/Lovecraft crossover story. It does a very good job of presenting a complex plot in a short graphic format, and presenting an alternate world without too much explanation. I didn't love the art, but it presented the story serviceably. It's well worth seeking out, especially for those who've not read the prose version. Surprises abound, because things aren't what they seem.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    Really good. But wait..is this the only volume or is there going to be more stories set in this world. The whole thing was really good but I wish it had gone on longer. 5 stars.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I was about to give up on these Dark Horse adaptations of Neil Gaiman short stories, but the pretty good mash-up of Sherlock Holmes and H.P. Lovecraft in this volume means I'll have to keep checking them out. The little twist at the end actually caught me off guard and elevated the story considerably.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Great take on Holmes and Watson. I especially liked the "advertisements" in between each of the chapters.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    I was so excited to see that they turned my favorite Neil Gaiman short story into a graphic novel! And let me just say, they did a wonderful job! It had honestly been long enough since I had read the original short story that the twisty twists got me again. Well played, Gaiman. A must read if you are fans of: - Neil Gaiman - Sherlock Holmes - H.P. Lovecraft And if I know you nerds, there's going to be a lot of overlap in those categories.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    A Study in Emerald is a love story to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft. It’s a beautiful collision of styles that creates an incredibly atmospheric and engaging mystery. It combines the best aspects of Doyle’s mysteries and Lovecraft’s horror making A Study in Emerald one graphic novel not to be missed. The dialogue and narration throughout are funny and informative. There isn’t a moment of useless dialogue throughout, which makes reading quick and unforgettable. The dialogue is so well A Study in Emerald is a love story to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft. It’s a beautiful collision of styles that creates an incredibly atmospheric and engaging mystery. It combines the best aspects of Doyle’s mysteries and Lovecraft’s horror making A Study in Emerald one graphic novel not to be missed. The dialogue and narration throughout are funny and informative. There isn’t a moment of useless dialogue throughout, which makes reading quick and unforgettable. The dialogue is so well crafted that if reads as if it has been plucked from Doyle’s original work. I’m a fan of clean and simple illustrations in my comic books and graphic novels. Though the illustrations are not simple, they are clean with a sort of grittiness to them that lends itself well to the story. The only criticism I have is that it’s very short. Just as I was getting into the story, it’s wrapping up with a killer twist. I wish it could have been a few pages longer. Overall, A Study in Emerald is a quick read that should be on everyone’s TBR. The quick-witted dialogue, engaging mystery, and gorgeous illustrations make A Study in Emerald worthy of its predecessors.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Issuing a pricy hardcover for what amounts to a 64 page special after you remove the sketches, faux Victorian ads, and multiple blank pages used as chapter breaks is a blatant cash-in on Gaiman's name, and a shoddy one at that. Many panels uses watercolor washes in place of background art, so characters appear to be floating in space. Worst of all, the twist from the original story is handled so poorly only part of it lands. (view spoiler)[We discover that our narrator isn't Dr. Watson at all bu Issuing a pricy hardcover for what amounts to a 64 page special after you remove the sketches, faux Victorian ads, and multiple blank pages used as chapter breaks is a blatant cash-in on Gaiman's name, and a shoddy one at that. Many panels uses watercolor washes in place of background art, so characters appear to be floating in space. Worst of all, the twist from the original story is handled so poorly only part of it lands. (view spoiler)[We discover that our narrator isn't Dr. Watson at all but bungles the reveal that it's Moriarty's henchman and therefore the detective was Moriarty, not Holmes, all along (hide spoiler)] As a longtime Holmes reader, this went completely over my head, and considering that as many people will be picking this up based on the Lovecraft connection as the Conan Doyle one, it should have been made much clearer. As the first issue of an ongoing series it it's an intriguing setup; as a standalone tale it is sorely lacking.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.