counter create hit Amazing Decisions: The Illustrated Guide to Improving Business Deals and Family Meals - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Amazing Decisions: The Illustrated Guide to Improving Business Deals and Family Meals

Availability: Ready to download

Dan Ariely, the New York Times bestselling author of Predictably Irrational, and illustrator Matt R. Trower present a playful graphic novel guide to better decision-making, based on the author's groundbreaking research in behavioral economics, neuroscience, and psychology. The internationally renowned author Dan Ariely is known for his incisive investigations into the mess Dan Ariely, the New York Times bestselling author of Predictably Irrational, and illustrator Matt R. Trower present a playful graphic novel guide to better decision-making, based on the author's groundbreaking research in behavioral economics, neuroscience, and psychology. The internationally renowned author Dan Ariely is known for his incisive investigations into the messy business of decision-making. Now, in Amazing Decisions, his unique perspective--informed by behavioral economics, neuroscience, and psychology--comes alive in the graphic form. The illustrator Matt R. Trower's playful and expressive artwork captures the lessons of Ariely's groundbreaking research as they explore the essential question: How can we make better decisions? Amazing Decisions follows the narrator, Adam, as he faces the daily barrage of choices and deliberations. He juggles two overlapping--and often contradictory--sets of norms: social norms and market norms. These norms inform our thinking in ways we often don't notice, just as Adam is shadowed by the "market fairy" and the "social fairy," each compelling him to act in certain ways. Good decision-making, Ariely argues, requires us to identify and evaluate the forces at play under different circumstances, leading to an optimal outcome. Amazing Decisions is a fascinating and entertaining guide to developing skills that will prove invaluable in personal and professional life.


Compare
Ads Banner

Dan Ariely, the New York Times bestselling author of Predictably Irrational, and illustrator Matt R. Trower present a playful graphic novel guide to better decision-making, based on the author's groundbreaking research in behavioral economics, neuroscience, and psychology. The internationally renowned author Dan Ariely is known for his incisive investigations into the mess Dan Ariely, the New York Times bestselling author of Predictably Irrational, and illustrator Matt R. Trower present a playful graphic novel guide to better decision-making, based on the author's groundbreaking research in behavioral economics, neuroscience, and psychology. The internationally renowned author Dan Ariely is known for his incisive investigations into the messy business of decision-making. Now, in Amazing Decisions, his unique perspective--informed by behavioral economics, neuroscience, and psychology--comes alive in the graphic form. The illustrator Matt R. Trower's playful and expressive artwork captures the lessons of Ariely's groundbreaking research as they explore the essential question: How can we make better decisions? Amazing Decisions follows the narrator, Adam, as he faces the daily barrage of choices and deliberations. He juggles two overlapping--and often contradictory--sets of norms: social norms and market norms. These norms inform our thinking in ways we often don't notice, just as Adam is shadowed by the "market fairy" and the "social fairy," each compelling him to act in certain ways. Good decision-making, Ariely argues, requires us to identify and evaluate the forces at play under different circumstances, leading to an optimal outcome. Amazing Decisions is a fascinating and entertaining guide to developing skills that will prove invaluable in personal and professional life.

30 review for Amazing Decisions: The Illustrated Guide to Improving Business Deals and Family Meals

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    This is just a bad, unfunny episode of Adam Ruins Everything complete with a really dumb person to whom the book's host has to explain really basic things, such as don't try to tip grandma with cash for cooking Thanksgiving dinner. I was a little confused as to who the intended audience may be, younger readers or aliterate adults perhaps? This book also has the misfortune of being the one I read immediately after Animal Farm: The Graphic Novel, so all the bits about managers manipulating their em This is just a bad, unfunny episode of Adam Ruins Everything complete with a really dumb person to whom the book's host has to explain really basic things, such as don't try to tip grandma with cash for cooking Thanksgiving dinner. I was a little confused as to who the intended audience may be, younger readers or aliterate adults perhaps? This book also has the misfortune of being the one I read immediately after Animal Farm: The Graphic Novel, so all the bits about managers manipulating their employees' productivity through the use of social norms came off as dark, cynical and oppressive. Mostly this book reminds me I should finally get around to reading Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carin

    So, I am the daughter of an economist, so I'm not your typical lay reader of books like this. Plus I have read three of his previous books (and own a fourth) so I am well-versed in his theories and ways of thinking. In fact, I was a little worried about possibly finding this book redundant or too basic. But not at all! In a nutshell, the book covers the two basic types of motivation: financial and social. I make some decisions for financial considerations, but a lot of others, including some you So, I am the daughter of an economist, so I'm not your typical lay reader of books like this. Plus I have read three of his previous books (and own a fourth) so I am well-versed in his theories and ways of thinking. In fact, I was a little worried about possibly finding this book redundant or too basic. But not at all! In a nutshell, the book covers the two basic types of motivation: financial and social. I make some decisions for financial considerations, but a lot of others, including some you might think of as financial like how hard I work at my job, turns out to have more of a social motivation. I am friends with most of my accounts, and most of my colleagues. One colleague, Ben, and I work jointly every season on a huge project we have to do before we can go on the road. No one told us or even suggested that we join up and do it as a team--it happened organically, and I really like how we help each other on it. All this is fairly self-evident when you pay attention, but the book gave me a huge insight. My SO had a previous job that was baffling to me. It was not great with a not great boss, but somehow the job was so much worse than that. I've had plenty of those myself in the past, but none of them seemed as soul-sucking as this one. And he kept reporting things that I found really confusing, like how he couldn't get anyone, no matter how much he begged and pleaded, to cover shifts for him when we would go on vacation, despite having covered shifts for all of them in the past. I just found that so weird. Weirder still: this was a job in the helping community at a non-profit, where people supposedly do the job for the love of it, not for the really low pay. So why were all of his colleagues so difficult and uncooperative? Well it turns out, the way his boss had injected finances into their everyday workplace was the problem! She was daily nickel and diming them on everything. Every minute of every day it seems she was pressuring them to keep costs unreasonably low. And she was miserly with giving them any time to do mandated reporting, for example, as that was a minute they weren't seeing a billable client. By bringing the finances of the company into the day to day workplace, no one was motivated by social factors any longer. As Dan Ariely explained about one study done: when workers were paid more to make more widgets on Monday and Tuesday, while their productivity went up those two days, it went down so hard on Wednesday through Friday, that overall the employees made fewer widgets than previously. When the only reward you ever get is money, and never a "well done" or "great job" or "I so appreciate that," you learn that your employer only thinks of you as a revenue generator, not a human, and eventually you learn to turn that attitude back around on them as well. It's particularly toxic, and was especially bizarre in that environment. But it was nice to suddenly have it all make sense, even if it's bad sense. This book is a good primer of some real basics of decision-making and the underpinnings of a lot of behavioral economics. It tries hard to not be dry (well, it's economics so you've got to be prepared for a bit of that going in) and I found it overall fun and like an extended, older version of a Schoolhouse Rocks.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Hmmm … This was actually kind of boring. I picked it up out of curiosity, without really having a clear handle on what it was about. All I knew was that it seemed to be some sort of business or psych text in comics form. And I’m always fascinated by comics that are so far removed from what most people would consider “normal” subject matter--not superheroes, not funny animals, not alt autobiography, etc. The sticker my library affixed to the book’s spine bears the number 153.83. Although I’ve been Hmmm … This was actually kind of boring. I picked it up out of curiosity, without really having a clear handle on what it was about. All I knew was that it seemed to be some sort of business or psych text in comics form. And I’m always fascinated by comics that are so far removed from what most people would consider “normal” subject matter--not superheroes, not funny animals, not alt autobiography, etc. The sticker my library affixed to the book’s spine bears the number 153.83. Although I’ve been a library rat pretty much my entire life, I’m not familiar with that area of the Dewey Decimal System. They're certainly not shelves that I normally browse. While I do read a fair amount of nonfiction, I usually don't go any lower than the sciences. Although the really low numbers can be interesting too: books about book collecting and the paranormal and so on. Anyway, my point is that, aside from the comics aspect, I was venturing far outside my comfort zone with this one. So this is a book about decision making. Its goal seems to be to help people better approach decision making by understanding whether a social or a market approach would work best. We start with a protagonist, Adam, who makes bad decisions. Like, spectacularly bad decisions. He decides to treat everything like a business transaction. Which leads to him standing up at Thanksgiving dinner at his Mother-In-Law’s, telling her how delicious it was, and offering to pay her $400 to cover his share of it. Honestly, I have trouble believing in the existence of such a clueless character, even if he is fictional. Anyway, through the magic of comics, he is quickly schooled on the differences between social and market norms and what the positive and negative aspects are to each approach. Parts of this were kind of interesting, but mostly I found myself wondering just who this book is for. Are there really people out there who are as spectacularly bad at relating to other human beings as Adam (initially, anyway)? Exaggerating to make a point is all well and good, but I think, in this instance, it's a little too extreme. I am, I think, not in the target audience for this book. I’m not sure I’m even in the same zip code as they are. I approached this as a comics fan, and the art, by Matt R. Trower, is quite fun, nice and cartoony. As to the actual content, all I can say is, if you are a comics fan, I can almost guarantee that it's like nothing you’ve ever read. Whether that's good or bad is entirely up to you ...

  4. 4 out of 5

    M Aghazarian

    This was very interesting! A little redundant but it's like a professor hammering home those concepts until you're like I KNOW, I KNOW and you're able to explain them back and apply them and your professor is just so proud of you. I find it incredible that the illustrator is a resident artist a center at Duke University -- I wish EVERY institution had a resident comics artist. The artist is also terribly (wonderfully), distractingly attractive, so if you pick this up make sure to check out the b This was very interesting! A little redundant but it's like a professor hammering home those concepts until you're like I KNOW, I KNOW and you're able to explain them back and apply them and your professor is just so proud of you. I find it incredible that the illustrator is a resident artist a center at Duke University -- I wish EVERY institution had a resident comics artist. The artist is also terribly (wonderfully), distractingly attractive, so if you pick this up make sure to check out the back cover for that photo!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Hilchie

    This was awful. The premise sounded amazing and I was let down. Adam is an idiot - how he has gotten this far in life without being beaten to a pulp is surprising. If you’re this dense and need common sense tips to get by day to day... I just feel bad for you. This might be useful reading for kids aged 12-14. 💩👎

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nopadol Rompho

    I love this book a lot. If you like to learn about how people make decision and how irrational we are, I would strongly recommend you to read this book. It is the easiest book to read as it is a cartoon. I learned lot from this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    P V

    Social norms. Market norms. How to strike a balance. From the master himself. Loved this book and the illustrations.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Extremely dry dissertation on why offering employees social benefits (gold stars, paid vacation, etc.) is proven to be more worthwhile than monetary benefits, at least in terms of getting the employees to work harder and appreciate their jobs more. There's also quite a bit about how social norms and market norms don't play nice. Pretty obvious stuff, overall. The forced framing story is awkward and unnecessary.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joseph R.

    Adam has a lot of tricky problems. He wants to make other people happy but doesn't always make the best decisions to improve his relationships. He gives a friend a ride to work and tries to charge him for the mileage. He gets his mom a ten dollar gift card for Starbucks when she'd rather he come visit. He has a birthday party and doesn't know what to do with the random gifts he gets. He has a lot of struggles. Luckily, he has Dan Ariely to help him out. The author is a character in his own book! Adam has a lot of tricky problems. He wants to make other people happy but doesn't always make the best decisions to improve his relationships. He gives a friend a ride to work and tries to charge him for the mileage. He gets his mom a ten dollar gift card for Starbucks when she'd rather he come visit. He has a birthday party and doesn't know what to do with the random gifts he gets. He has a lot of struggles. Luckily, he has Dan Ariely to help him out. The author is a character in his own book! The story quickly switches into a discussion of two sets of norms--market norms and social norms. The two sets overlap because people deal with both. But the norms don't work together well without a lot of thought and careful application. Giving a neighbor a ride to work or a basket of tomatoes from their garden is great. But charging for the ride or showing appreciation by giving money for the tomatoes backfires for Adam (as they probably would for everyone else). The expectations of social interactions usually has nothing to do with cash value. Gratitude, trust, and loyalty are what people need. Social norms don't expect one-to-one exchanges. They are more ambiguous and longer-term. Market norms are typically monetary and business-like. Money is exchanged for goods or labor. The people you deal with are more like commodity conduits than people. Ariely argues that applying social norms to work situations can make jobs and exchanges more rewarding. Cash bonuses at work are nice, but more loyalty and enthusiasm can be gained through gifts and praise, even when those have the same monetary value as the cash that would have been offered. Ariely persuasively backs up his arguments with studies he's conducted through the years. The book is entertainingly written and explains the ideas through the example of the fictional Adam's life. The advice is valuable though Ariely clearly favors social norms over market norms for guiding almost all one's actions. That's probably the best way to go, since that makes you treat people like people, a result definitely needed in human society. Recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    This was like a 3.5, honestly, but I'm rounding it down because it kind of suffers from the same issue that Dollars and Sense did, in that if you read Ariely's Predictably Irrational, you already kind of learned most of this, only better. It goes more in-depth about market forces versus social forces than previous works, but I'm just not sure it was any more useful. The art in this is cute and impressively diverse, and this might be a nice intro to behavioral economics if you're new to the subjec This was like a 3.5, honestly, but I'm rounding it down because it kind of suffers from the same issue that Dollars and Sense did, in that if you read Ariely's Predictably Irrational, you already kind of learned most of this, only better. It goes more in-depth about market forces versus social forces than previous works, but I'm just not sure it was any more useful. The art in this is cute and impressively diverse, and this might be a nice intro to behavioral economics if you're new to the subject, but if you've read a book or two on the subject before-- particularly one by Ariely-- you probably already kind of know what to expect. I'm also not totally convinced the graphic novel format made it more accessible. It felt very cutesy, almost like it should be for children, although the subject matter is definitely aimed at adults. It wasn't bad, and if you haven't read anything by Ariely before, it would probably be interesting. But whereas authors like Malcolm Gladwell like to focus on a wide range of subjects, Ariely keeps a tight focus, and it makes reading multiple books by him feel kind of repetitive.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Martinez

    This short graphic book starts verrry slow... the protagonist is almost unbelievably dense about interpersonal relationships, but over the course of the book, is convinced by psychology research evidence that social forces and market forces are always in tension and should not lightly be combined when trying to persuade people or build lasting relationships. I bet there could be a whole sequel to this just on child-rearing and just on education and just on human resources, but the parts I will t This short graphic book starts verrry slow... the protagonist is almost unbelievably dense about interpersonal relationships, but over the course of the book, is convinced by psychology research evidence that social forces and market forces are always in tension and should not lightly be combined when trying to persuade people or build lasting relationships. I bet there could be a whole sequel to this just on child-rearing and just on education and just on human resources, but the parts I will take away are the categories of gifts that people appreciate most (since I consider myself a good gift giver but still suffer fear of giving a bad, unwanted gift).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Case

    I was familiar with Dan before I picked this up and have been fascinated by his research for a number of years so was thoroughly entertained by reading about his work in this illustrated format. I highly recommend this to anyone who might be interested in aspects of behavioral economics, but aren't excited by the idea of picking up a research paper. I can only hope that other academics follow Dan's lead and publish their work in a way that's as approachable and entertaining as Amazing Decisions I was familiar with Dan before I picked this up and have been fascinated by his research for a number of years so was thoroughly entertained by reading about his work in this illustrated format. I highly recommend this to anyone who might be interested in aspects of behavioral economics, but aren't excited by the idea of picking up a research paper. I can only hope that other academics follow Dan's lead and publish their work in a way that's as approachable and entertaining as Amazing Decisions is.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Travis Meserve

    Really liked the graphic novel format. Certainly made me think. My complaint is that the book revolves around a "big idea" (the effects of economic vs. personal rewards) that, at times, seemed a stretch for being book length. Felt the idea could have come across adequately in a well written blog article. Nonetheless, I would recommend the book to business managers thinking about how to motivate employees.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jcon4307justin

    This is a hard topic to illustrate and the graphic novel format definitely helped drive things home. It did feel like the panels were just filler at times, but I don't blame the artist. Ariely probably hasn't done this before and I'm sure it's hard to go from writing scientific papers and pop-psych non-fiction to graphic novels. That said, I slammed through it in a day and really enjoyed it and learned some good bullet points about these decision-making arenas and how to navigate them.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Accessible look at how market and social norms work and how mixing the two can undercut all sorts of things from decisions to friendships to policy making. If you don’t have the time or energy to read a longer book this will introduce ideas and get the basic points across. Great for younger readers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I wish I could gift this to my younger self for a fun and easy way of making sense of the world and my decisions easie, and probably, better. I'd strongly recommend this for anyone who'd benefit from learning the basics of human decision making factors with illustrated imagery, common examples, and featured studies.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    I think a lot more non-fiction titles would be read if they came in graphic novel form! This served as a pleasant introduction and thought-provoker for the world of market and social norms. For a book that is all about how to make the biggest impact, it’s nice to see the author and illustrator walk the walk.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Suman Srivastava

    Disappointing. I'm a big fan of Dan Ariely and have read several of his books. Maybe that's the problem. This book is probably aimed at a novice in behavioural science, and is not meant to have new insights. Just that I expected more from Prof Ariely. Oh well. The good news is that you can breeze through it very quickly since it's a comic book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ben Ostrowsky

    I shelved this as ‘autism’ even though the author doesn’t address it because I suspect a lot of my fellow autistic people would enjoy learning explicitly about how social motivations and financial motivations can interfere with each other. The protagonist starts off with a kind of ineffective hyper-rationality that I recognized.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrienne

    Read this book because I’m a Dan Ariely fan. Rating is more like 3.5 stars actually. The comic is in black and white, illustrations were okay. This is a really basic guide that can be grasped by younger readers. The subtitle is eye-catching, but the concept is basically about motivation fueled by social and market forces.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I actually set this down after halfway, but not because it isn't good, just because I'm having trouble focusing. I believe Dan Ariely has a chapter or more about this exact content in one of his prose books, so it felt familiar, but was easy to read in a graphic novel format. p. 106, about kids losing the joy of drawing once it has rewards, hit home for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    S

    Social norms vs market norms. Interesting premise. Execution? It's a comic teaching you to assume the best in people, which I believe is a great way to lose a lawsuit and get screwed over taken advantage of. It highlights the dangers of mixing the two, but the solution seems very Pollyanna & unrealistic. 2* (gift) Social norms vs market norms. Interesting premise. Execution? It's a comic teaching you to assume the best in people, which I believe is a great way to lose a lawsuit and get screwed over taken advantage of. It highlights the dangers of mixing the two, but the solution seems very Pollyanna & unrealistic. 2* (gift)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Some interesting concepts, but a little elementary in execution. There were a few times I was double checking that I wasn't reading a kids book. Still, it was interesting to understand people's motivations better.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Faulkner

    Graphic “novel” (what do you call a graphic non-fiction book?) that serves as a behavioral economics primer. It’s a dramatically simplified version of BeSci principles, but a good intro book for those just wanting to understand and apply the basics without wading through an academic tome.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kbeckermann

    I've read Ariely's books so wasn't expecting new information. This is the book format of a whiteboard video of his work. It is a good introduction for anyone who isn't familiar with his work or just doesn't enjoy reading non-fiction.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Buchanan

    3.5 stars Love the graphic novel way of presenting this information. Honestly would have rounded up to 4 stars if it didn't say that people at work would rather have experiences than extra cash. Forget a trip to the Bahamas! I have student loans to pay off.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    An interesting look at money and social norms! The illustrations are good and the text is engaging enough. The book got a little dry at times and is definitely not a mindless, feel-good graphic novel--you may just learn something from it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adyasha

    Fun book, scientifically valid and very appropriate for the larger audience for a glimpse into behavioural science. Its just the top of the iceberg! Looking forward to more such cool stuff from Dan Ariely.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Morris

    An interesting and quick little read about a spread of topics, including gift-giving and motivating kids to study. Starts a little heavy-handed, to the point of being a little condescending, but don't worry too much about it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    It is really more about extrinsic motivation and intrinsic motivation, the social economy and the market economy. Sure, it will change how you think about interactions with other people, but not about all decisions in general.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.